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Friday, September 22, 2017

Healthy Pet brings ‘‘family vibe’’ to Peabody By Christopher Roberson

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iting a recent shift in consumer shopping trends, Robert Mellace, along with his brother John and sister Lucia, decided to open Healthy Pet, a store with a comprehensive approach to pet care. Located at 637 Lowell St., the store’s soft opening was on July 9 with the ribbon-cutting and grand opening on Sept. 15-16. “Healthy Pet is a new concept store for us,” said Mellace, adding that he and his siblings have also owned Pet Express since 1995. “We try to provide consumers with healthy alternatives; we don’t want consumers going to the Internet to buy things for their pets.” Mellace said customers can quickly determine the quality of pet food by looking at the first five ingredients. “The proof is in the label,” he said. Some of the brand names customers will find at Healthy Pet are Blue Buffalo, Merrick, Taste of the Wild and Fruitables. M ellace also said that Healthy Pet is designed to be a neighborhood store, rath-

Shown celebrating the Healthy Pet store’s ribbon-cutting on September 15 are, from left to right, Mayor Edward Bettencourt, the Peabody Area Chamber of Commerce President Deanne Healey, Healthy Pet Co-Owner John Mellace, Healthy Pet Co-Owner Lucia Mellace-Castle, State Rep. Thomas Walsh, State Rep. Theodore Speliotis and Healthy Pet Co-Owner Robert Mellace. See photo highlights from the event on page 11. (Photo Courtesy of Maria Terris)

er than a big box conglomerate. “We have that family vibe here,” he said. The store itself features a 400-gallon fish tank; a rabbit-petting area, which Mel-

lace said has been very popular with the children, as well as fish from across the globe, lizards, ferrets and hedgehogs. Mellace said Healthy Pet is equipped with LED lighting.

“We’re a green store,” he said. In addition, Mellace spoke in favor of House Bill 3212. Sponsored by State Rep. Mark Cusack, the bill would prohibit the sale of puppies and kit-

tens that are less than eight weeks old, require puppy microchips to improve consumer protection and prohibit the roadside sale of puppies. “This is a bill we’re standing behind,” said Mellace. Although Boston City Councillor Matthew O’Malley sponsored and passed a similar city ordinance in March 2016, Mellace said, it did nothing more than create a black market for puppy mills. “What they did in Boston was so counter-productive, it does absolutely nothing,” he said. State Rep. Theodore Speliotis said he would like to see tighter regulations for service dogs. Right now, anyone can go online and obtain a document stating that they have a service dog, when in fact, that is not the case at all. “I’d like to do that bill,” said Speliotis. “It has wide support in the State House.” Healthy Pet’s hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The store can be reached at 978-535-7387.

Tanners soccer net home opener win Medical marijuana still a

hot topic for City Council By Christopher Roberson

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Austin Silva attempts to regain control of the ball during a rush to the net against Swampscott during the Tanners 4-2 home opener victory against their Northeastern Conference foe. See story and photo highlights inside on page 6. (Advocate photo by Greg Phipps)

he City Council continued to tread lightly on the matter regarding medical marijuana companies who will be applying to set up shop in Peabody. “We don’t want to be in court, we want to protect ourselves,” said President Joel Saslaw during the council’s Sept. 14 meeting. He also said he expects all approved companies to be active and positive contributors to the city. “These entities are going to put their best foot forward,” he said. But the real issue has been about determining when a letter of non-opposition would be warranted. “That’s the elephant in the room,” said Saslaw. “There is no guide.” Therefore, he suggested a list of criteria for the council to use when it comes time to start making those kinds of decisions. Saslaw recommend-

ed inquiring about a company’s board of directors, its level of security and its years of industry experience and location. “Those are the things that I thought about,” he said. Saslaw also said the council would review a host agreement before sending it to Mayor Edward Bettencourt for his signature. Councillor-at-Large David Gravel suggested implementing additional zoning restrictions for medical marijuana companies. “We should go back into the Zoning Ordinance, open it up and put in the restrictions,” he said. In other news, the council voted unanimously to grant a live and non-live entertainment license to Metro Bowl. Resident Jose Pinto of Chestnut Street said he and his neighbors were initially apprehensive about car alarms

MEDICAL | SEE PAGE 10


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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Arnotis makes second run for School Committee By Christopher Roberson

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wo years after making an unsuccessful bid for School Committee, Andrew Arnotis has decided to try it again.“I am running for the School Committee to bring a new voice and fresh ideas to the board,” he said. “When you want to have an impact and better your community, you need to step up and get involved. My goal, if elected, is to make our school system the strongest it can be for the future of our city.” Arnotis said his campaign has been going “incredibly well so far” and “The reception to someone bringing new blood to the committee has been entirely positive.” He also said the campaign has allowed him to hear and understand how residents truly feel.“I can’t tell you how many substantive genuine conversations I’ve had with folks about our schools simply by knocking on their door, saying hello and asking to hear their thoughts and opinions,” said Arnotis. Arnotis outlined some of his objectives should he get elected. “Class sizes and the potential for redistricting is becoming

Andrew Arnotis

a larger and larger issue in our city. Keeping class sizes small is key to a successful learning environment,” he said. “I am hopeful and supportive of the proposal sent to the state to update and restore the Kiley School to help alleviate overcrowding in classrooms.” In addition, Arnotis shared his view about the upcoming search for a new superintendent of schools. “I see this as one of the biggest decisions a School Committee has to make,” he said. “It is important to choose someone who is willing to make tough decisions, has a long-term plan on where our district should be in the next five, 10 and 15 years

and is open to shaking things up if necessary.” Arnotis said workforce development would be another priority. “While I chose the fouryear college track, it is not always the right fit for many current students,” he said. “Making sure our students are aware of all their options rather than have them fall behind is something I will work tirelessly towards.” Arnotis also said he is very much aware of the financial challenges facing Peabody’s schools. “I know the School Committee had to make some difficult decisions when determining the FY18 budget,” he said. “Making sure our bills get paid while protecting and expanding valuable and necessary school services will always be a tough balance, especially when money is tight. The board worked hard to strike that balance and protect many important services vital to our students.” A 2012 graduate of Peabody Veterans Memorial High School and a 2016 graduate of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Arnotis is currently the legislative aide to State Rep. Thomas Walsh and was appointed to the Zoning Board of Appeals in January of this year. “I am the only person running who is a product of the current day Peabody Public School System. I not only know, but have experienced the strengths and weaknesses our schools have,” he said. “That first-hand knowledge, matched with my background serving our city in various capacities and current experience on the state level, collectively presents a perspective the School Committee doesn’t have and could benefit from.”

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 3

This Sunday, September 24 beginning at 1 p.m. Breakaway hosts Band’N Together for Texas All proceeds benefit victims of Hurricane Harvey

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ANVERS – Breakaway on Newbury Street in Danvers has announced an amazing musical event on Sunday, September 24, to aid victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas. The night will feature 10 bands – top regional musical giants Fortune with Barry Goudreau, formerly of the band Boston, Aerochix, Brian Maes, 43 Church Street, the Slush Puppies, and the Lee Hawkins Band, to name a few. Also featured is legendary guitarist and songwriter Charlie Farren. Breakaway owner Joe Crowley will be donating his music hall along with an incredible buffet for an incredible night of music to raise money for the victims of the catastrophic flooding that has hit Texas. “My heart goes out to those people who need so much help, so I think a night of musical camaraderie among our great musical talent can help those who’ve lost so much,” said Crowley. On that same day (Sept. 24), the New England Patriots are scheduled to play the Houston Texans, so Crowley figures a night of old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll in the spirit of Live Aid is just the remedy to aid our neighbors in the Southwest. All proceeds will go to the Topsfield/Middleton/Boxford Rotary Club, which will send the money to the Houston Rotary Club to distribute the funds to those directly in need. Tickets will cost $20 per person and will include a free buffet from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m.; the outdoor Patio will also be open, weather permitting. The music will begin at 1:00 p.m.

On Sunday, to benefit the victims of Hurricane Harvey, local legendary rockers Fortune (pictured above) and Barry Goudreau, formerly of the band Boston, will perform together as well as Charlie Farren (bottom right) of Farrenheit and the Joe Perry Project.

and end at 9:00 p.m. Along with the abovenamed bands, also included in the lineup will be the Jimmy Hawkins Band and, Mary Beth Maes Band, as well as the opening acts, CIA and Back to the 80’s. Crowley is also expecting some surprise guests from some famous rockers. The North Shore area is known for its tight-knit musical community and spirit of giving back, and Crowley said all the

bands, including at least 20 more, have offered to play for gratis. “Since I started booking local talent at Breakaway, the bands have been incredible, and I truly appreciate how hard they work at their music and their incredible fan base,” he said. “It’s moving to see the kind of people that are willing to step-up with me to help people on the other side of the country. God bless America.”

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Tierney endorses O’Neill to represent Ward 6 By Christopher Roberson

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hile she did not receive enough votes in the Sept. 12 primary to advance to the November general election, Margaret Tierney has no hard feelings. She has now pledged to stand behind Mark O’Neill, who she said is “the next best candidate” for Ward 6 City Councillor. “I commend him and his wife on running an honest, respectable, fair, highly successful campaign and I wish Mark the best in November,” she said. However, Tierney said she has urged her supporters to “keep an eye” on O’Neill and his opponent Michael Geomelos and to choose the right candidate for Ward 6 going into November. “This means,

in my opinion, one who can think successfully on his own, is approachable and has the understanding and ability to stand for good choices for his constituents and the citizens of Peabody, regardless of popularity,” she said. In the months leading up to the primary, Tierney said, she

knew there would be substantial obstacles.“As a single female running a grassroots campaign, I realized I was running as the underdog,” she said. “Both my opponents have wives working in the schools, which gives them PTO [parent teacher orga-

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 4

Aylward and Melvin face off in Light Commission race By Christopher Roberson

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n this year’s election, there are four candidates running for seats on the Peabody Light Commission, two of them are challengers and two of them are incumbents. Vice Chairman William Aylward said he decided to run for a second term so that he could continue helping the city’s residents. “I do not look at it as a job, but more like an extracurricular activity that benefits the residential and commercial ratepayers of Peabody and South Lynnfield,” he said. “I don’t feel that I am a ‘politician,’ nor do I feel that I am ‘entitled’ to this posi-

tion. I wish all of my opponents the best of luck.” During his six years on the commission, Aylward was a proponent for investing an additional $1 million to fund projects such as the dredging at Crystal Lake and putting in a new turf field at the high school. In addition to serving as the commission’s chairman in 2013, Aylward said he was also the chairman of the commission’s Policy Committee in 2012. “That year we raised the Education Assistance policy for our employees from $750 per year to $5,250,” he said. Aylward also said the city has

started using renewable energy, which “allowed us to diversify our power supply portfolio” and that the improvements to the Johnson Street substation have been completed. In addition to his service on the commission, Aylward said he also has 28 years of experience in executive management where he has been responsible for budgeting, facilitating contract negotiations, quality control and customer service. While out campaigning, Aylward said residents have lauded the commission for reducing the rates twice in the past six months, implementing an early payment discount and responding swiftly during power

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outages. “All of this is due to the great management and staff that we have at PMLP (Peabody Municipal Light Plant),” he said. Looking ahead, Aylward said this will be a very exciting time with numerous projects currently underway. He said the new citywide automated meter reading system is 75 percent complete, a $12 million state-of-the-art substation is under construction in Ward 6, LED street lights are being installed and work is

also being done to improve cell phone service. However, Aylward has been challenged by Raymond Melvin, an employee of Eversource Energy for the past 36 years. “I knew someday I would run for this position,” he said. Melvin also said residents deserve to have more than one choice for a cable and Internet provider. “I want to bring some competition into the city, we’ve had Comcast for who knows how long,” he said, adding that the cost of Internet service has skyrocketed. “Even the mayor is concerned with that.” Going forward, Melvin said the commission’s budgetary issues are not something that will go away anytime soon. “That’s an issue that will cross their desk,” he said. Incumbent commissioner Thomas D’Amato and challenger Laurence Olcott were not available for comment.

Historical Society to present “Saving Brooksby Farm”

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he Peabody Historical Society will present a lecture, “Saving Brooksby Farm,” by Michael Schulze – Historian, Social Activist and Chair of the Community Preservation Committee – on Wednesday, October 11 at 1 p.m. at the Smith Barn, which is located at 38 Felton St. in Peabody. Don’t miss a chance

to learn firsthand from Schulze, one of the grassroots organizers of this successful effort, about how our own Brooksby Farm was saved from developers in the 1970s. Members free; non-members $5.00. The Barn is wheelchair accessible. For information: 978-531-0805.

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 5

Veronica Greenan celebrates 100th year By Christopher Roberson

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ut of the 326 million people living in the United States, only 72,000 have reached their 100th birthday – Veronica Greenan is one of those people. When Greenan was born, a car could be purchased for $400, gasoline was four cents a gallon, the United States had entered World War I and President Woodrow Wilson had just begun his second term. During the 10 decades that followed, Greenan watched 16 more presidents come and go from the Oval Office. She remembered being 12 years old when the Stock Market crashed in 1929, triggering the Great Depression that followed for 10 years. “Things were pretty bad, you did well just to have food,” she said during her birth-

day celebration on Sept. 18 at Sunrise at Gardner Park. Greenan was one of the billions around the world who watched as Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made their historic moonwalk through the Sea of Tranquility. She has experienced other technological marvels, such as the advent of the Information Age. “I must admit that I enjoyed the computer,” said Greenan. She said she attributes her longevity to her Polish background and living off the land during her years in New Hampshire. “In the good old days, we had a garden and we had chickens,” she said. Greenan’s daughter, Ann Davidson, said her mother was born in Clare-

mont, N.H., and lived in Hanover, N.H., for most of her life working in the Bursar’s Office at Dartmouth College. Greenan has four children, seven grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Mayor Edward Bettencourt was on hand to present Greenan with a Centenarian Certificate. “Actually, the City of Peabody turned 100,” he said. “I can only imagine the stories that Veronica can tell.” Angela Federico, program coordinator at Sunrise, said Greenan has been a resident there for the past three months. “She’s added a nice little spar-

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

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Late Danvers TD sinks Tanners By Greg Phipps

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s is characteristic of the Peabody High School football team under head coach Mark Bettencourt, the Tanners rebounded from a disappointing defeat a week earlier and played the always-tough Danvers Falcons to a virtual standstill last Friday night in the Northeastern Conference (NEC) opener for both squads at Peabody’s Veterans Memorial Stadium. In the end, however, it was Danvers which emerged on the winning end, 7-0, when running back Matt McCarthy broke through the Peabody defense and raced 50 yards for the game’s lone touchdown and subsequent PAT kick with just 2:36 left to play. The Tanners made it interesting on their ensuing possession and came close to scoring when, on two occasions, Peabody receivers got behind the Falcons’ defense. Both times quarterback Jonell Espinal’s passes were broken up at the last second. His final last-gasp attempt on fourth down was picked off, and the visitors ran out the remaining 19 seconds.

Tanners RB Noah Freedman attacks an open spot in the Danvers defense on Friday. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

fore, mustered just 125 total yards (60 on the ground), with 50 of those coming via McCarthy’s scoring run. Coming off the previous week’s 24-7 upset loss at Somerville, Bettencourt had his team ready to compete. “We made some adjustments and it paid dividends. The defense deserves to win this game. We need to find ways to win games when

failed to take advantage. Peabody did have one strong drive in the second quarter when it put together a 14-play march that took over nine minutes. The Tanners reached the Danvers 10-yard line before being stopped on downs. “We need to build on this game. We have a young lineup out there, so we’re going to make some mistakes,” said Bettencourt. “As far as the penalty calls, we just live with it. The

Peabody RB Declan Russell gets stood up by a Danvers defender in last Friday’s home-opening loss to Danvers.

calls were made. We don’t make excuses.” Defensively, the Tanners were led by front-liners Cam Powers, who harassed Danvers QB Justin Mullaney throughout, Eric DeMayo and Dariel Canela. Marcus Barker had a third-quarter interception. On offense, DeMayo gained 51 yards on 13 carries while Cole Cuzzi caught four passes and QB Colby Therrien completed 4 of 5 passes. When asked about using two

quarterbacks (Therrien and Espinal) so far this season, Bettencourt said, “The two-headed quarterback situation can pay dividends. We’ve just got to find a way to make it work to our advantage.” It doesn’t get any easier for the Tanners this week, as they host powerhouse Marblehead (2-0) in an NEC battle on Saturday evening at Veterans Memorial Stadium (scheduled 6 p.m. kickoff ).

Tanner boys’ soccer team beats Swampscott in home opener By Greg Phipps

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Danvers RB Matt McCarthy breaks free on his way to a 50yard TD run late in last Friday’s game at Peabody High School’s Veterans Memorial Stadium.

Defense ruled the roost in this one, as Peabody, which dropped to 0-2, struggled for the second week in a row to get much going offensively. The Tanners, who have been held scoreless over the last seven quarters, managed just 115 total yards on offense. The same held true for the Falcons, as the Tanner defense stymied them for nearly four full quarters before McCarthy’s late heroics bailed them out. The 2-0 Falcons, who blanked Winthrop, 31-0, the week be-

our defense plays that well,” he said after the loss. “Penalties killed us tonight and the offense needs to get better. You’re not going to win many times when you score one touchdown in eight quarters.” Misconduct penalties on both sides stifled potential scoring chances, One example for Peabody took place in the second quarter when Ramon Franco intercepted a pass in Danvers territory. But an unsportsmanlike infraction brought the ball back to the Peabody 40, and the Tanners

he Peabody Tanners may have been kicking themselves for owning just a one-goal lead after a first half in which they dominated territorially last Wednesday in their home opener against Northeastern Conference foe Swampscott. The inability to cash in on numerous quality first-period scoring chances nearly came back to bite Peabody, as the visitors stepped up and played much better in the second half. Still, three second-half goals helped the Tanners pull out a 4-2 victory. Mike Tansey’s score off an assist from Josh Atemkeng late in the first half gave Peabody a 1-0 lead, but head coach Stan McKeen was not pleased with his team’s inability to finish. “It wasn’t a well-played game. We had multiple opportunities but couldn’t put the ball in the net,” he said afterwards. “We only had eight [official] shots on goal, but we had a lot more chances than that. We just couldn’t finish in front of the net. It was very frustrating.” The Tanners, who lost their season opener two days earlier at Medford, were missing the services of key offensive player Kevin Aroke, and Noah Surman hit the ground hard after being knocked down on a rush. He had to leave the game late in the first half. After Jonathan Alves gave the Tanners a 2-0 lead six minutes into the second stanza, Swamp-

Peabody midfielder Lucas Pimenta races a Swampscott player for the ball in the Tanners 4-2 win at home last week. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

scott scored to make it a one-goal deficit. Alves tallied again off an assist from Trevor Lodi with 15:44 left to give Peabody a seemingly comfortable 3-1 advantage. To their credit, the visitors

TANNER BOYS’ | SEE PAGE 11


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 7

PHS volleyball team o to 3-2 start By Greg Phipps

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espite losing two close matches against two of the better teams in the area, Peabody head volleyball coach Lisa Keene is optimistic about the season. “We have two losses right now, but it was nice to get those types of competitive games in the beginning of the season,� said Keene after a com-

fortable 3-0 win over Saugus last Friday at the PHS Gym. “It gives us a feel for where we are as a team and where we need to go from here. It was a learning experience for the kids and me.� Both defeats have been hard-fought 3-2 losses against Northeastern Conference rival Danvers and North Reading. Entering this week the Tanners

had grabbed wins over Salem, Swampscott and Saugus. In last Friday’s 25-4, 25-14

and 25-9 sweep over the Sachems, Bianca Chouinard scored five aces, and captain

Serena Laro drilled five kills and had two blocks to lead the way.

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Peabody’s Serena Laro goes for a spike attempt in last Friday’s win over Saugus.

Peabody’s Ava Lavalle tries to lift her shot over the outstretched arms of a Saugus defender last Friday at the PHS Gym. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

Girls’ soccer team plays to 0-0 tie

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he Peabody girls’ soccer team battled to its second tie of the early season, as the Tanners ended their contest on Tuesday in a 0-0 deadlock against Marblehead in Northeastern Conference action. The tie brought Peabody to 1-0-2 as the team got strong performances defensively from Catherine Manning, Aja Alimonte, Jordyn Collins and Colleen Crotty. Head coach Dennis Desroches also credited senior Emily Nelson, who went over the 100-career-points mark last week, Amber Kiricoples and Bridget O’Connell. Jordan Muse played her first varsity game in goal and made seven saves.

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 8

~ Bishop Fenwick Sports Roundup ~

Girls’ soccer team earns two shutout victories By Greg Phipps

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oming off a 2-0 win over Essex Tech last Friday, the Bishop Fenwick girls’soccer team repeated the feat against Cardinal Spellman at home on Monday. After a scoreless first half, the Crusaders tallied twice during the second 40 minutes. Marissa Orlando scored a goal and added an assist while Madison Csogi notched the other tally. Sam Tache and Jenna Durkin were credited with strong games on defense. Boys’ soccer team grabs tie against Cardinal Spellman Having earned a 1-0 win over Georgetown last Friday, the Bish-

BF captain Grace Foley charges to the ball against Cardinal Spellman on Monday.

op Fenwick boys’ soccer squad came out of Monday’s game at Cardinal Spellman with a 2-2 tie. Brian Harrington and Anthony Capo scored for the Crusaders, and John Mahoney assisted on both scores. Capo was also credited with a strong defensive outing. Solid effort falls short for BF football team Down 14-0 after one half, the Bishop Fenwick Crusaders kept battling and made a game of it before falling short to Dedham by a 20-12 count last Friday night at Donaldson Stadium. The loss dropped the Crusaders to 0-2 on the early season, but head coach David Woods was encouraged by the effort and grit his young team showed. “ We played with hear t, much better than our opening game [a shutout loss at Hamil-

Bishop Fenwick’s Finola Corcoran tries to settle the ball in front of the Cardinal Spellman goal during first-half action of Monday’s 2-0 Crusader victory. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

ton-Wenham]. There was certainly no lack of effort,” Woods told the press after the contest. “I saw a lot of positives. If we stick together and believe in ourselves the wins will come.” A 25-yard TD pass from quarterback Derek DelVecchio to Stefano Fabiano brought Fenwick to within eight points midway through the third quar-

ter. It was the first score of the season for the Crusaders. Dedham scored on a muffed punt by BF later in the third to make it 20-6. DelVecchio and Fabiano hooked up again for a TD in the final seconds to account for the end result. The Crusaders travel for a game at Pentucket Regional on Saturday afternoon.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 9

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 10

Beacon Hill Roll Call By Bob Katzen

THE HOUSE AND SENATE: Beacon Hill Roll Call records local representatives’ votes on several of the roll calls overriding Gov. Charlie Baker’s cuts of $320 million in spending. A two-thirds vote in both branches is needed in order for a veto to be overridden. The Senate has not yet taken up the vetoes. The House restored an estimated $275 million. House Democratic leaders said the budget was balanced and that Baker’s cuts were unnecessary and would have hurt many people including the sick, seniors, children and minorities. “We’re going to start with vetoes that have a statewide impact and consider regional items in the upcoming weeks, and we’re continuing to monitor our fiscal trends and weigh our options as well,” said House Ways and Means Chairman Jeffrey Sánchez (D-Boston) during the debate. “The current fiscal environment, specifically soft revenue collection reports to date, indicates there is no basis to support the decision to increase spending by $275 million,” said Baker spokesman Brendan Moss. House GOP Minority Leader Brad Jones (R-North Reading) said he was disappointed the House chose to move ahead with overturning a significant number of Baker’s spending vetoes. “State tax revenues are currently running behind projections and there are still many uncertainties about where those revenues will be trending in the months ahead,” said Jones. “Because of this, I decided to vote to sustain all

MEDICAL | FROM PAGE 1 going off and other loud noises coming from the establishment late at night. “We’re not here to oppose anything, we’re just here to voice some con-

of Gov. Baker’s vetoes, even though it meant voting against restoring funding for many worthwhile programs I otherwise would have supported. In my opinion, it would have been more prudent to wait and see what revenues look like in September and perhaps even October before moving forward with overrides.” CUT $2.5 MILLION FOR HIV AND AIDS (H 3800) House 126-25, overrode a reduction of $2.5 million (from $30,834,416 to $28,334,416) for HIV, AIDS, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted infections and tuberculosis programs. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $2.5 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT $1.25 MILLION FOR KIDS’ MENTAL HEALTH (H 3800) House 131-21, overrode a reduction of $1.25 million (from $2.5 million to $1.25 million) for early childhood mental health consultation services in early education and care programs. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $1.25 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT $800,000 FOR PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE (H 3800) House 139-13, overrode a reduction of $800,000 (from $2,606,334 to 1,806,334) for pediatric palliative care. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $800,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT $275,000 FOR PROSTATE CAN-

cerns,” he said. Pinto said he and other residents recently had the opportunity to share their concerns with Metro Bowl owner Robert Leo, Ward 4 Councillor Edward Charest and Ward 2 Councillor Peter

CER (H 3800) House 133-19, overrode a reduction of $275,000 (from $550,000 to $275,000) for prostate cancer awareness, education and research programs focusing on men with African-American, Hispanic or Latino heritage, family history of the disease and other men at high risk. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $275,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT ENTIRE $200,000 FOR STROKE PROGRAMS (H 3800) House 119-33, overrode a cut of the entire $200,000 for stroke treatment and prevention programs. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $200,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT ENTIRE $100,000 FOR DOWN SYNDROME PROGRAMS (H 3800) House 143-9, overrode a cut of the entire $100,000 for a Down Syndrome Program at the Children’s Medical Center at the University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center in Worcester. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $100,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

CUT $200,000 FOR SAMARITANS (H 3800) House 129-23, overrode a reduction of $200,000 (from $400,000 to $200,000) for the Samaritans for suicide prevention services. (A “Yes” vote is for funding the $200,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.) Rep. Theodore Speliotis Rep. Thomas Walsh

Yes Yes

HOW LONG WAS LAST WEEK’S SESSION? Beacon Hill Roll Call tracks the length of time that the House and Senate were in session each week. Many legislators say that legislative sessions are only one aspect of the Legislature’s job and that a lot of important work is done outside of the House and Senate chambers. They note that their jobs also involve committee work, research, constituent work and other matters that are important to their districts. Critics say that the Legislature does not meet regularly or long enough to debate and vote in public view on the thousands of pieces of legislation that have been filed. They note that the infrequency and brief length of sessions are misguided and lead to irresponsible late-night sessions and a mad rush to act on dozens of bills in the days immediately preceding the end of an annual session. During the week of September 1115, the House met for a total of five hours and three minutes while the Senate met for a total of two hours and 30 minutes.

Mon. Sept. 11 House 12:01 p.m. to 12:38 p.m. Senate 11:10 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. Tues. Sept. 12 No House session No Senate session Wed. Sept. 13 House 1:02 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. No Senate session Thurs. Sept. 14 House 11:03 a.m. to 11:31 a.m. Senate 11:15 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. Fri. Sept. 15 No House session No Senate session Bob Katzen welcomes feedback at bob@beaconhillrollcall.com

McGinn. Speaking about parking, McGinn said 48 new spaces have been added and employees have been instructed to park on Chestnut Street Extension. He said the addition-

al spaces will prevent patrons from having to park on Chestnut Street, Coolidge Road and Franklin Street. In addition, a manager will walk through the parking lot every night to ensure that patrons do not become disruptive. McGinn also said there will be a regular police presence. Councillor-at-Large Anne Manning-Martin questioned the need for the police. “I’ve never seen any police reports; I’ve never heard of any complaints down there,” she said.

Gravel said he has fond memories of Metro Bowl going back many years. “I grew up in Ward 2 and was a regular patron of Metro Bowl; as kids that’s where we went every Saturday,” he said, adding that he fully backed the request for an entertainment license – “I’m 100 percent in support.” The council voted unanimously to ask Bettencourt about developing an Economic Vitality Fund, which would be subsidized by the city’s Unrestricted Reserve.

TIERNEY | FROM PAGE 3

and Richard Jarvis of Peabody Access Television. In addition to backing O’Neill’s campaign, Tierney said she is excited to continue her work on the library’s Board of Trustees. “I look forward to returning to my responsibilities and commitment as a library trustee and assisting with our upcoming Annual Gala in October,” she said.

nization] support and children giving them the support from the youth activities in Peabody.” Although Tierney came up shy in vote count, she still wished to recognize the efforts of City Clerk Timothy Spanos and Assistant City Clerk Colleen Kolodziej as well as Natalie Maga, Russell Donovan


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 11

Healthy Pet opens on Lowell Street

Mayor Edward Bettencourt (center) as well as state officials and residents were on hand to help Healthy Pet Co-Owners John Mellace, Lucia MellaceCastle and Robert Mellace cut the ribbon to their new Lowell Street store on Sept. 15. (Photos Courtesy of Maria Terris)

Left to Right: Healthy Pet Co-Owners Robert Mellace, Lucia Mellace-Castle and John Mellace during the Sept. 15 ribboncutting of their new store on Lowell Street.

TANNER BOYS’ | FROM PAGE 6 kept battling and pulled within 3-2 in the final two minutes. Atemkeng sealed the win when he headed the ball in off a corner kick by Andrew Prousalis in

the final minute. “We got two goals off corner kicks and that was good,” said McKeen, who cited the efforts of substitutes Fabio and Jacob Martins. “Our bench did a good job. We moved the ball

well, but we don’t spread as wide as we should to create more space [on offense].” Peabody goalie Troy Cappos was largely untested in the first half but made a couple of stellar saves in the second pe-

Mayor Edward Bettencourt (left) and State Rep. Theodore Speliotis (right) take turns holding one of the many lizards at Healthy Pet on Lowell Street during the store’s ribboncutting on Sept. 15.

riod. Overall, he stopped seven shots during the game. Last Friday the Tanners played to a hard-fought 1-1 tie against Revere at home. Entering this week’s play, Peabody stood at 1-1-1. Against

Revere, Cappos stepped up big, making 11 saves. Alves had the team’s lone score off an assist from Giovani Lumaj. Aroke was back in the lineup and had a strong game at the midfield position.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 12

SOUNDS OF PEABODY

OBITUAR I E S Eleanor F. (Curran) Dembowski

At 92, of Peabody, devoted wife of the late Mitchell B Dembowski, daughter of the late John and Frances (Donahue) Curran, loving mother of Michael J. Dembowski and his wife Hiroko Kunitake of Lincoln, mother-in-law of, Susan Dembowski-Skolnick of Dracut, and loving grandmother of Devon, Brandon, and Ceara Dembowski, all of Dracut. She was predeceased by her son Mitchell Dembowski and her

sister Phyllis Davidson. She was employed for over 35 years by the city of Peabody School Department as a personal and confidential secretary to many superintendents of schools. Her funeral was held on Monday, September 18 at the Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home, Peabody, followed by her Mass of Christian Burial at St. Ann’s Church, Peabody. Burial in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Lynn. For online obituary, visit www.ccbfuneral.com

Muriel D. (Cohen) Briggs

In Peabody, formerly of Saugus, September 13, age 86. Wife of the late Richard H. Bilodeau. Loving mother of Patricia O’Connor, Janice Fuller & her husband Michael, Michelle Chrisos & her husband Mark. Cherished grandmother of Jeffrey, William, Jennifer, Christopher, Alexa & Richard. In lieu of flowers, donations in Muriel’s name may be made to All Care Hospice, 210 Market St., Lynn, MA 01901. A funeral service was held in the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home on Tuesday. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For directions & condolences, www.BisbeePorcella.com.

During its Sept. 14 meeting, the City Council voted to appoint School Committee Member Beverly Griffin-Dunne as the city’s representative to the Essex North Shore Agricultural and Technical School District. The Torigian Family YMCA, which is located at 259 Lynnfield St., will be hosting a fundraiser on Sept. 23 for families who lack the financial resources to participate in YMCA programming. The event will be held from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. North Sea Gas, a Scottish folk band, will perform at 7 p.m. on Sept. 25 at the Peabody Institute Library, which is located at 82 Main St. Free influenza vaccines will be available at the following places and times: From 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sept. 28 in the Lower Level Conference Room of City Hall, which is located at 24 Lowell St. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 11 in the Wiggin Auditorium of City Hall, which is located at 24 Lowell St. From 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Nov. 2 at the Peabody Municipal Light Plant, which is located at 201 Warren Street Ext. St. Clare of Assisi will host its First Annual Pet Blessing at 10 a.m. on Sept. 30 at Emerson Park, which is located at 34 Perkins St. The Peabody Institute Library, which is located at 82 Main St., will be hosting the following events: Family Books and Bingo on Oct. 2 at 10:30 a.m. “Starry, Starry Night XIV” Cocktail Fundraiser at Brooksby Farm, which is located at 54 Felton St. The event is scheduled for Oct. 4 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Admission is $25 and can be paid in advance or at the door. Tickets can be purchased at all Peabody Institute Library locations. For additional information, contact Melissa Robinson at mrobinson@noblenet.org or 978-531-0100 ext. 16. Preschool Stories and Crafts for children ages two to five on Oct. 4, Oct. 11, Nov. 1, Nov. 8 and Nov. 15. There is no charge for this program. For additional information, call 978-531-3380. Family Books and Bingo on Oct. 16 at 10:30 a.m. Cook Me a Story on Oct. 17 at 4 p.m. Registration is required. Anyone interested should contact the library at 978-531-0100. Tai Chi for Healthy Aging at 11 a.m. on Oct. 14. The program will continue for seven weeks thereafter. To register, residents are asked to contact the library at 978-531-0100 ext. 10 or online at http://www.peabodylibrary.org. Peabody Main Streets will be hosting the Fourth Annual Antique Car Show and Craft Fair at 11 a.m. on Oct. 7. There is no charge for admission; the event will be held on Main Street between Foster and Washington Streets. The Peabody Historical Society & Museum will be hosting a lecture at 1 p.m. on Oct. 11 about saving Brooksby Farm. The Historical Society is located at 35 Washington St. Music at Eden’s Edge will be performing at 7 p.m. on Oct. 16 at the Peabody Institute Library. Featured musicians include Daniel Stepner and Maria Benotti playing the violin, Joan Ellersick playing the viola and Lynn Nowels playing the cello.

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1. What TV character said, “The first thing I remember liking that liked me back was food”? (Hint: initials RM.) 2. When did a report by the U.S. Surgeon General first link cigarette smoking to cancer: 1953, 1960 or 1969? 3. Apollonia was Prince’s love in what song and film? 4. On Sept. 22, 1784, trappers from what country settled on Kodiak Island, Alaska? 5. In which Shakespeare play does Feste the Clown sing “Journeys end in lovers meeting, every wise man’s son doth know”? 6. Native Americans used quahogs for what two purposes? 7. What four insects have a worker class? 8. The music term forte means what? 9. On Sept. 23, 1846, what planet was discovered? (Hint: also a sea god’s name.) 10. What Bay Stater was the first U.S. pres-

ident with a middle name? 11. What sport uses a creel? 12. What is the country’s oldest operating inn? 13. On Sept. 25, 1690, the Americas’ first multi-page newspaper, “Publick Occurrences Both Foreign and Domestick,” began where? 14. What film director said, “Always make the audience suffer as much as possible”? 15. What was King Arthur’s kingdom called? 16. What is the name of compost made mostly of leaves? 17. In 1992 the over-$650-million Mall of America opened in what state? 18. What plant has the largest seeds? 19. What is the longest running (consecutively) TV sci-fi series? 20. In the 1600’s Harvard University had an on-campus brewery. True or false?

ANSWERS ON PAGE 15


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 13

65

Copyrighted material previously published in Banker & Tradesman/The Commercial Record, a weekly trade newspaper. It is reprinted with permission from the publisher, The Warren Group. For a searchable database of real estate transactions and property information visit: www.thewarrengroup.com.

R E A L E S TAT E T R A N S AC T I O N S BUYER1

BUYER2

Lopez, Aldo

SELLER1

SELLER2

Lynnfield Holdings LLC

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

DATE

PRICE

928 Main St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.08.2017

$500 000,00

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$690 000,00

Bornstein, Dana P

Bornstein, Josephine

Carson, David J

Carson, Gia M

17 Benevento Cir

Fuccillo, Ronald P

Fuccillo, Audrey J

Schulman, Irving

Schulman, Frances

5 Ledgewood Way #15

Peabody

MA

1960

30.08.2017

$327 500,00

Coburn, Patrick

Coburn, Mary

FNMA

3 Mount Pleasant Dr

Peabody

MA

1960

30.08.2017

$295 000,00

Witkus, Hanora E

15 Dublin Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$465 000,00

Serino, Beth A

Serino, Theresa A

Deprizio, Maxine

5 Oran Cir

Peabody

MA

1960

01.09.2017

$559 900,00

Patel, Hiteshkumar B

Patel, Yanika A

Thompson, Barbara A

110 Margin St

Peabody

MA

1960

28.08.2017

$423 000,00

Cuilla, Gregory

Graff, Vern D

5 Nichols Ln

Peabody

MA

1960

01.09.2017

$490 000,00

Picardo, Paul

Bruce, Matthew S

14 Grant St

Peabody

MA

1960

29.08.2017

$445 000,00

Sturtevant, Lester A

4 Lincoln Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

29.08.2017

$410 000,00

Sturtevant, Brigette D

Mankodi, Vishwakant G

Tonzillo, Ciro P

Mankodi, Sandhya V

Soto, Patricia

Leonard RT

1301 Foxwood Cir #1301

Peabody

MA

1960

28.08.2017

$399 950,00

Mcnemar, James

Ciulla, Gregory

3004 Postgate Ln #3004

Peabody

MA

1960

01.09.2017

$386 100,00

12 Winthrop St

Peabody

MA

1960

29.08.2017

$520 000,00

Prezioso, Antonina

Prezioso, Angelo

Bettencourt, Manuel S

Patel, Jigar S

Patel, Tejaskumar S

Becker-Potter Investments

Stucchi, Angela M Viola, Daniel

Viola, Joanne

Branquinho, Maria C

13 Oakland St

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$517 000,00

Franzosa, Steven D

Franzosa, Patricia A

47 Raymond Cir

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$410 000,00

Difranco, Joseph

Difranco, Miranda C

46 King St

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$575 400,00

Branquinho, Maria F

34 Mount Vernon St

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

$295 000,00

Francis, Melissa J

57 Pierpont St

Peabody

MA

1960

28.08.2017

$379 800,00 $460 000,00

Hancock, John D

Hancock, Heide E

Boccuzzi, William J

Boccuzzi, Kristin M

Yaffe, Scott R

Phung, Kiet T

Nguyen, Phoung T

Banks, Kimberley D

Tavares, Andrea

Leonard, Jan-Louise

Yaffe, Rachel M

6 Diane Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

31.08.2017

23 Johnson Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

29.08.2017

$421 000,00

Churchill, Daniel W

Churchill, Jannette

15 Elmwood Cir

Peabody

MA

1960

28.08.2017

$395 876,00

Corbett, Jason W

Corbett, Melynda T

Faleyev, Taras

Faleyev, Svetlana

19 Ravenwood Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

30.08.2017

$460 000,00

Martinez, Francisco J

Armata, Josephine M

Kerr, Eric P

Kerr, Kelly A

5 Tappan Ct

Lynnfield

MA

1940

28.08.2017

$1 074 000,00

Maranda, Kelly

75 Walnut St #203

Peabody

MA

1960

29.08.2017

$260 000,00

Pringle, Adam J

Simonelli, Kristen A

8 Crowninshield St #414

Peabody

MA

1960

28.08.2017

$328 900,00

Ogrady, Matthew J Giterman, Natela


Page 14

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

PEABODY PD LOG TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 Better start selling more cookies A caller reported to police that a fellow Girl Scout mother had overdrawn the account by $1,700 and is now receiving collection notices. The officer took the report for investigation.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 Must be a Fast Pass member A caller reported that a silver motor vehicle traveling towards Centennial Drive still had a gas pump nozzle at-

tached. A dispatched officer reported checking the area but failing to locate the vehicle. Give it a rest, Butch! A caller on Sutton Street reported that a Chihuahua mix pooch named Butch was barking excessively. The animal control officer issued a complaint and a copy of the Barking Ordinance to the dog’s owner. According to the report, Butch had no prior complaints against him. Good boy. Well, gas prices have risen sharply According to a police report,

ARRESTS a Methuen woman and her boyfriend drove to the corner of Sylvan and Andover Streets in his 2001 Mercedes Benz to beg for money. The couple was advised to discontinue the practice.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 Ramon Alberto Medrano, Jr., 39, of 3 Lincoln St., Peabody, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor, with marked lanes violation and with assault & battery with a dangerous weapon.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 Time from some driver’s ed Police were sent to Murray Street over an ongoing issue of a driver who speeds past the school bus every day, according to the caller. The officer reported speaking to the driver regarding his “driving habits” and that the male speed racer will take another route home in the future.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 No one goes to the malt shop anymore? Police were called to James Street Park due to a report of a large number of teens gathering for a fight. According to the report, a police sergeant observed a fight in progress, and when the dust cleared, approximately 50 juveniles fled the scene. It was reported that two females were the ones fighting. It was not the voice of God A security company was video-monitoring two men in a black pick-up truck who appeared to be peering into vehicles on the Acura of Peabody lot on Andover Street when a voice suddenly spoke on the PA system, advising the men to leave. The two men were not impressed by the unknown voice and remained on the property. A dispatched officer discovered the two men were employees of the nearby Century House restaurant who occasionally park on the dealership’s lot.

VERONICA GREENAN | FROM PAGE 5 kle, she’s a wonderful person,” said Federico. She also said it no easy feat for someone to make it into the triple digits. “It’s a big deal for someone to be 100,” said Federico, adding that even the healthiest residents generally live into their late-90s – “No one else is 100.” Executive Director Katie Palamara said 86 is the average age of the residents at Sunrise.

Follow us on Twitter advocatenewspaperma

Tom Michael Hancock, 48, of 30.5 Newhall St., Saugus, was charged with possession of a Class A drug, with possession of a Class B drug, with operating a motor vehicle with suspended license (subsequent offense), with attaching plates, with uninsured motor vehicle, with possession/use/false/stolen RMV document and with an arrest warrant. Everett W. May, 46, of 266 Newbury St., Peabody, was charged with possession of a Class A drug and with two arrest warrants. Joseph V. Passanise, 45, of Hampstead, N.H., was charged with operating a motor vehicle with license suspended (subsequent offense) and with failure to stop/yield.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 Vanessa Caruso, 24, of 6 Sanborn St., Peabody, was charged with two counts of possession of a Class B drug, with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and with an arrest warrant. A 17-year-old juvenile was charged with disorderly conduct. Kevin Anthony Bovell, 39, of 286 Newbury St., Peabody, was charged with malicious destruction of property over $250.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 Michael F. Castiello, 30, of 34 Keys Dr., Peabody, was charged with operating a motor vehicle with license suspended.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 Jon Paul Guitard, 48, of 116 Lafayette St., Salem, was charged with larceny over $250. Michael Patrick McDade, 28, of 90 Aborn St., Peabody, was charged with larceny over $250.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 Connor May, 24, of Arlington, Texas, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor. Evelyn French, 65, of 6 Devons Rd., North Reading, was charged with shoplifting $100+ by concealing merchandise.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

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Page 15

FROM PAGE 12

1. Rhoda Morgenstern 2. 1969 3. “Purple Rain” 4. Russia 5. ‘Twelfth Night” 6. For food and to make wampum 7. Ants, bees, wasps and termites 8. Loudly 9. Neptune 10. John Quincy Adams 11. Fishing 12. Longfellow’s Wayside Inn in Sudbury, Mass. 13. Boston (The colonial government closed it after four days.) 14. Alfred Hitchcock 15. Camelot 16. Leaf mold 17. Minnesota 18. The coconut 19. “Dr. Who” 20. True


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017

Page 16

SOUTH PEABODY - $379,900

LYNNFIELD - $479,900

WEST PEABODY - $529,900

JUST LISTED!

THIS DESIRABLE CAPE FEATURES 3/4 BEDROOMS AND 1.5 BATHS. Bright and sunny three season room to enjoy right off of the Kitchen, formal dining room and a lower level Family Room. Nice yard with and above ground pool.

CHARMING 3 BEDROOM CAPE ON CUL DE SAC. Fireplace living room, formal dining room, 1st floor cathedral ceiling family room, 1.5 baths, replacement windows, newer roof and 2 car garage. Convenient location to Market Street.

EVENINGS: 617-285-2057

MELROSE - $359,000

LYNNFIELD - $1,129,000

NEW PAINT AND CARPET MAKE THIS 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH CONDO AT MELROSE TOWERS SHINE. Updated kitchen with new appliances. Walk to train, restaurants and shops. Open floor plan, elevator building and garage.

EVENINGS: 617-650-2487

APPLE HILL NEIGHBORHOOD! This Meticulous Home Must Be Seen to Appreciate the Living Space, Attention to Detail, Fine Craftsmanship, and UpGraded Materials. Large Master Suite. 4 1/2 Impressive Baths. Beautiful Acre Lot with Pool. Better than New! EVENINGS: 617-538-9396

EVENINGS: 781-956-0241

LYNNFIELD - $769,000

EXCEPTIONAL 4 BEDROOM COLONIAL IN GREAT LOCATION. Spacious first floor family room has pellet stove and slider to screened porch overlooking private yard. Fabulous master bedroom with walk in closet, newer full bath with steam shower and Balcony/Deck. Lower level has in law potential with separate entrance and full bath. Garage has heated room above and storage. Many updates.

EVENINGS: 978-590-1628

EVENINGS: 617-797-2222

LYNNFIELD - $539,900

WELCOME TO PYBURN MEWS! This 3 bed 2.5 bath pristine townhome is open concept and is move in ready! 2 car attached garage. Too many features to list! Minutes from highways and shopping!

EXCEPTIONALLY WELL MAINTAINED 3 BEDROOM GARRISON boasts a large family room with vaulted ceilings and loads of natural lighting, sliding glass doors leads to the deck that looks out to private backyard.

LYNNFIELD - $1,772,900

LYNNFIELD - $799,900

COMPLETELY RENOVATED WITH EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY AND DESIGN. Open floor plan for this 10 room Colonial with 4 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. Stunning kitchen with fireplace ,island,granite,and open to generous family room .New heat and air conditioning, Great in law potential with second kitchen.

THE ULTIMATE OF LUXURY LIVING in this Scholz Design brick front colonial. 15 rooms, 4 bedrooms, first floor master suite, 5 full, 2 half baths and a 3 car garage. Elegance throughout with architectural designed woodwork, 2 story ceilings and walls of glass and palladium windows. This home is beautifully sited at the end of a cul-de-sac with a heated pool on a beautifully landscaped acre lot.

EVENINGS: 617-797-2222

EVENINGS: 617-797-2222

EVENINGS: 978-317-4362

MIDDLETON - $379,900

LYNNFIELD - $799,900

MIDDLETON - $739,900

JUST LISTED!

BEAUTIFUL 55+ COMMUNITY OF 30 CONDOS ON 30+ ACRES. 2nd floor end unit, 2 bedroom 2 bath. Open concept Kitchen, dining & living area, 4 season room, and bonus office/storage room.

SUN FILLED 4 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH, BRICK FRONT COLONIAL. Front to back Living room, spacious Dining room, 30 x 15 Eat in Kitchen. Walkout basement with 9 foot ceilings. Private yard.

EVENINGS: 617-240-0266

SPRAWLING RANCH IN SHERWOOD FOREST. Ideal for extended Family. 12 room, 4 bedroom, 3 full bath & 2 car oversized garage. Newer heat & updated bathrooms. Beautiful walk out lower level.

EVENINGS: 978-590-1628

EVENINGS: 617-285-2057

Bernie Starr - Broker/Owner • Richard Tisei - Broker/Owner Donna Aloisi Bert Beaulieu Cheryl Bogart Helen Bolino

Julie Daigle Kim Burtman Christine Carpenter Alex DeRosa Marshall D'Avanzo Kerry Connelly Eric Doherty

Elena Drislane Lori Kramich Corrie Luongo Maria N. Miara

Catherine Owen Gale Rawding Ron Supino Debra Roberts Patrice Slater Marilyn Phillips Carolyn Palermo Maureen Rossi Donna S nyder - DiMella Marcia Poretsky

Northruprealtors.com • 26 Main Street, Lynnfield • (781) 334-3137

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(781) 246-2100

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, September 22, 2017