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Friday, July 21, 2017

Tillie’s Farm to host grand reopening By Melanie Higgins

T

illie’s, the beloved community farm stand at 189 Lynn St. in South Peabody, is hosting its grand reopening this Saturday, July 22 starting at 10 a.m. The farm stand reopened this spring, but is not holding its celebration until this weekend. This reopening is special because it is the first year that the city is running the farm since it purchased it 10 years ago. A few months ago, the city appointed Billy Murphy, a Peabody resident, as its farm manager. The farm stand wanted to wait until the weather improved to share the celebration activities. And there are a lot. The celebration will have hay rides, pony rides, food and drinks, its famous corn on the cob, fun

Inside the greenhouse, where the first flowers for sale this season are grown.

and games, arts and crafts and much more. Mayor Ted Bettencourt will also be on-site to help with the ribbon-cutting. “It’s a neighborhood meeting spot … People pop in to

Peabody Institute Library receives federal grant

walk around and chat. You don’t find places like this anymore,” said Shelagh Murphy, a volunteer at Tillie’s and Billy Murphy’s mom, to the Advocate back in April. Murphy also praised the presence of the farm in the neighborhood, which she called something of a “food desert” in terms of fresh produce. Some of Tillie’s most popular items are its corn on the cob and “4th of July” tomatoes, which are not much bigger than a golf ball and are difficult

Shelagh Murphy, Earl Spurr and manager Billy Murphy in April.

to find anywhere else. Shelagh described the zeal for the tomatoes as incredible. “We can’t keep them in stock,” she said. They also sell and grow pumpkins in the fall, Christmas trees in the winter, wreaths, poinsettias, eggs, apple cider, baked goods, various fruits and more. Tillie’s also sells a wide array of flowers, such as petunias, geraniums and pansies. The flowers are some of the first items available in the spring, due to weather, and vegetables begin to be avail-

able around Father’s Day. Tillie’s was started by Tillie Spurr back in 1978. She built the current storefront in 1986, in addition to both greenhouses, although the farm itself dates back to the 1800s. Today, the city owns the property. As of last April, Peabody is the first municipality in the state with two self-operated farms. Also new are credit and debit card terminals, for the less old-fashioned. Look for updates from the farm at www.tilliesfarm.org.

All-Stars Rising

Money will benefit Peabody’s toddlers By Melanie Higgins

P

eabody is on a roll. Last week, the Peabody Institute Library was named a recipient of a grant that would improve services to preschoolers at the library. The grant for Peabody will go towards “Mind in the Making,” a program aimed at learning in preschoolers. The program will help preschoolers in the areas of development and preparation for subsequent education. New collections of books and new play spaces will be added to the library. The grant comes from the Federal Library Services and Technology Act, and is funded through the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The grant itself was awarded by the Massachu-

setts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC). Forty-two other communities received the funds, totaling $468,102. Public, school, special, and academic libraries were selected for a grant, which ranged in amounts from $4,200 to $30,000. Peabody received $9,945 for the program. Assistant Library Director Jerri Guyote called the grant “a tremendous boost for the whole concept of children, literacy and play.” The Peabody Institute Library frequently receives grants from the MBLC. Library director Melissa Robinson said she is "really excited" about this grant, which will improve the way kids learn from play. "Play is an underrated element," Robin-

INSTITUTE | SEE PAGE 14

The Peabody 11-12-year-old Little League squad poses with the championship banner after capturing this year’s District 16 title in dramatic fashion over West Peabody on Sunday. See story inside on page 7. (Courtesy Photo)


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 2

~ Political Announcement ~

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ed to run for Ward 6 Councilor to make sure our neighborhoods have strong representation on the City Council. I feel that now is the time to serve to not only work hard on behalf of our Ward but all residents of Peabody.” Mark holds a degree in Business Administration from Westfield State University. He is employed by Lexington Insurance Company as an Assistant Vice President in the Transportation Department.

E

rickson Living has named Tracie Bettano as the new Executive Director at Brooksby

Village in Peabody. In her new leadership position, Bettano will oversee the overall operations of this retirement community, one of two Erickson Living developed and managed sites in the Boston area. “Tracie began her career at Brooksby Village in 2004 and has over 20 years of health care experience in the clinical, rehabilitation and management areas,” said Chris Emmett, Regional Vice President of Operations for Erickson Living. “Tracie’s outstanding operational experience and leadership skills will allow Brooksby Village to remain one of the premier places to live and work.”

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BETTANO | SEE PAGE 10

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Peabody-based nonprofits Citizens Inn and Haven from Hunger announce merger

T

wo Peabody-based nonprofits, Citizens Inn, Inc. and Haven from Hunger, Inc., are merging into one organization to better help local families and individuals leave hunger and homelessness behind. The merged organization will be known as Citizens Inn. The merger will go into effect this month. Citizens Inn currently operates 34 emergency shelter units at Citizens Inn Between and Citizens Inn Transition, and 15 units of affordable housing and social service programs for families at Citizens Inn Homes. Haven from Hunger currently runs a food pantry and community meals program at 71 Wallis St. Through the merger, Citizens Inn will continue its homelessness prevention and social service programs, while incorporating the hunger-prevention programs and the 71 Wallis St. building into its operation. The hunger-prevention programs will remain branded as Haven from Hunger. “When Haven from Hunger’s board approached Citizens Inn with the opportunity to merge,

we became very excited about the possibility of supporting an even greater population of families and individuals in need,” said Citizens Inn Executive Director Corey Jackson. “Citizens Inn believes strongly in the important services that Haven from Hunger provides to the community. Through the merger, we will ensure that these efforts evolve and expand for decades to come.” The Citizens Inn’s administrative team will apply its experience in finance, development, facility maintenance and community outreach operations to the entire spectrum of post-merger programming. It will also bring expertise in nonprofit management and capital campaign planning, having completed several multimillion dollar projects, such as renovations at Citizens Inn Between and Citizens Inn Transition. Citizens Inn has also purchased and rehabilitated many multifamily units in and around the Haven from Hunger neighborhood. “Citizens Inn has fiscal stability, a good reputation in the community and extensive so-

cial service experience; all the things that are needed to continue the mission of the Haven,” said former Haven President Robert McHugh. “We are pleased that the Haven will be a part of Citizens and continue to exist and serve the people in need in this area.” This new union furthers Citizens Inn’s mission to break the patterns of instability and strengthens the long-term success of every family and individual served. It also aligns beautifully with Citizens Inn’s strategic plan, which includes goals to develop a workforce training program in the culinary arts, create space for a family resource center and connect to an expanded supportive base of volunteers, donors and community leaders. “The merger of Haven from Hunger and Citizens Inn is good news for the City of Peabody and the entire region,” said Peabody Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt. “Together, these two wonderful organizations will have an even greater impact on the lives of so many of our friends, neighbors and family members.”

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 4

Reid’s Ride raises nearly $250K to fight youth cancers By Melanie Higgins

R

eid’s Ride was off to a great start last Sunday, as large crowds attended to bike along the North Shore and raise money to defeat Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Cancers. Over 420 enthusiastic bikers from all over sped around the parking lot at the Lynnfield High School, warming up for the 28-mile ride through the North Shore to Gloucester. Lorraine Sacco, excited and passionate as ever, wore a big smile ahead of the race when speaking to supporters and

Shown, from left, are Carol O’Neill, Kerry O’Neill and Kevin Flaherty.

riders. Lorraine and her husband, Gene, Reid’s parents, organize the ride. “This is a great day for us as always,” Sacco said. “This is what I call a celebration.” Reid Sacco was a bright Lynnfield student, athlete and musician who was diagnosed with soft-tissue cancer in 2003 and died two years later. Taking up his wish to end AYA Cancer, Reid’s parents created Reid’s Ride. The bike ride just wrapped up its 13th year.

Mark Pelletier (left) with Andrew MacDonald

Lorraine Sacco with her husband, Gene (adjusting helmet), shortly before the beginning of the race.

Reid’s Ride chooses a theme that the waves were in fact a every year. This year’s theme “tsunami”: the organization was “Making Waves for AYAs.” Reid’s Ride was proud to report

REID’S RIDE | SEE PAGE 8

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

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Be Happy! The Science of Happiness and How to Be Happier at the South Branch of the Peabody Library

D

o you ever find yourself wishing you could feel happier? Many of us do and we think we will feel happier as a result of something - such as finding a new job, finishing a project, losing 10 pounds, etc. However, psychologists and neurologists are now realizing that happiness can be more readily achieved through changing the way we think. Lizzie Linn Casanave, professor of philosophy at NECC, will explain this revolutionary concept and provide you with practical tools for achieving this new mindset. Lizzie Linn Casanave has been teaching Philosophy for over 10 years. She received her BA in Philosophy/Religion and World Perspectives and her MA in Critical and Creative Thinking. She is also the Study Abroad Short Course Coordinator at Northern Essex Community College. Her curriculum includes a workshop on the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Science of Happinessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; which looks at happiness though the lens of positive psychology. Be Happy! The Science of Happiness and How to Be Happier will take place at the

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 6

Legion baseball: M-P seniors eliminated from playoffs By Greg Phipps

A

fter suffering a tough loss in last Saturday’s Senior Legion state sectional opener, the Middleton-Peabody (M-P) Elves fell behind early on Sunday against Methuen at Masconomet Regional High School and couldn’t come all the way back. Methuen emerged with an 8-6 victory while the Elves saw their season come to an end in the double-elimination tournament. The Elves, who put together a 10-game winning streak during the season, finished 125-1 overall and placed second in the District 8 League regular-season standings after playing to a 3-3 tie against league champion Andover last week. M-P head coach John Kowalski, who was not happy with his team’s overall performance in last Saturday’s 8-7 playoff-opening loss to Newton, was more satisfied with Sunday’s effort despite the defeat. “I’m pleased with the way we played. We had a tough inning there in the fifth, but overall, I thought we hit the ball well and played good defense,” Kowalski said after Sunday’s loss. “Hats off to Methuen. They’re a good team.” The “tough” time Kowalski referred to was the top of the fifth inning when Methuen

erupted for four huge runs after the Elves had scored twice in the bottom of the fourth to climb within one at 3-2. Methuen scored twice in the second and once in the fourth to jump ahead, 3-0. Trailing 7-2 entering their half the fifth, the Elves stormed back with four tallies to, once again, draw within one at 7-6. Mike Stellato’s three-run rocket over the left field fence was the big blow. Andrew Manni, who had three hits, singled-in the other run. M-P’s two fourth-inning runs came on Kyle Hawes’s sacrifice fly and Mike Federico’s RBI single. Jack Seymour doubled twice and scored two times. Justin Juliano and Hawes also socked two-baggers, and Nick Aslanian and Trevor Lodi contributed singles. Methuen added an insurance run in the seventh on a home run, and that turned out to be enough. Two players reached base with one out for the Elves in the bottom of the frame. But the final two hitters were retired. Kowalski said the team met its objectives coming in to the campaign. “We set three goals before the season started. First, we wanted to have fun and enjoy playing the game and meeting other players. Second was to improve as baseball players, and the third was to

Bryant Dana of the Elves slides into second base after being tagged out attempting to steal in the third inning against Newton.

make the playoffs. We achieved all three,” he said. Newton rallies to steal win In last Saturday’s playoff opener at Masconomet High School, the Elves appeared to be in good shape, leading 7-3 entering the fifth inning. Newton put up two in the top of the fifth to cut the margin to 7-5. M-P lefty starter Nick Aslanian made it through the sixth without any damage. But a leadoff walk and a single put two runners on with one out for Newton in the seventh. Aslanian, who gave a gutsy effort (six and a third innings, four strikeouts, eight hits), was replaced by Jake Zeuli. A double and two singles later, Newton had three runs and was suddenly in front, 8-7. Kowalski praised Aslanian’s effort: “Nick’s a fierce competitor. Against a good hitting team, he threw strikes, worked very hard and kept us in the game. He did his job.” The Elves had runners on first and second in their half of the seventh but the final two batters were retired. Kowalski said the keys to the loss were his team’s base-running errors, inability to take advantage of scoring chances early in the game, and some miscues on defense which led to early runs for Newton. “We should have had two or three more runs, that’s what it comes down to,” Kowalski pointed out after the game. “The reality is we should have been up by three or four runs [entering the seventh] but our base-running was horrible. We had two or three guys picked off base, and I don’t think we played smart defensively. You can’t make mistakes and give up outs to good teams.” Bryant Dana’s two-run single

LEGION BASEBALL | SEE PAGE 10

M-P’s Mike Stellao (right) is congratulated by teammate Jake Irvine after smashing a three-run homer in the fifth inning of Sunday’s playoff loss to Methuen. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

Elves catcher Trevor Lodi applies the tag to a sliding Methuen base runner at home plate. The runner was safe on the play.

On Sunday M-P’s Jack Seymour gets a good lead off first base after drawing a walk in the first inning.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 7

Peabody 11-12 all-stars win Little League District baseball title By Greg Phipps

I

t was a cross-city battle as the Peabody Little League allstars faced West Peabody in a final contest to determine the 11-12-year-old District 16 championship last Saturday at Gallagher Park in Lynn. Peabody had a 3-0 lead and looked like it was well on its way until West Peabody suddenly scored three runs via the long ball with two outs in the top of the sixth to tie the game. Peabody came out on top but barely, as it needed a run in the bottom of the seventh to win in walk-off fashion, 4-3. Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nick Villano tagged a two-run homer, and Tyler Fawcett immediately followed by smashing one over the left field fence to deadlock the contest at 3-3. The game went into extra innings. To their credit, the Peabody all-stars overcame the

shock of losing their lead by bringing across the game-winning run in the seventh. Justin Powers scored on a wild pitch after reaching on an error and advancing to third base via a passed ball, a walk to Daniel Zizza and a wild pitch. Ryan Brunet was at bat when Powers raced home on the second wild pitch of the frame. Peabodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first three tallies came on Carson Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solo blast in the first inning and two more scores in the fourth, one of them off an RBI single by Matt Richards. Starting pitcher Powers had a strong outing for Peabody, going 6 1/3 innings and fanning 10 hitters. On the other side, West Peabody starter Zach Fisher performed well also, allowing just two earned runs on five hits in his four innings of work. Fisher had nine strikeouts. Giovanni Guglielmo hurled the next three frames

for West and did not allow a hit. He fanned six. It was the first District championship since 1997 for Peabody, which opened Section 4 tournament play this week at Reinfuss Field in Lynn. Softball 11-12 team falls in state ďŹ nals The Peabody 11-12-year-old Little League softball all-stars could not keep the momentum going as they ran into a powerful Jesse Burkett team and were swept in the state final round last week in Woburn. Peabody was defeated by 6-0 and 12-4 scores in the two games. Head coach Mark Bettencourtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team had been dominant in winning the District 16 title, outscoring opponents, 350, and then pulling off two exciting wins over East Bridgewater to take the Section 2 cham-

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pionship. But Burkett proved to be an even more challenging opponent. Bettencourt said Peabody should feel good about its accomplishment this summer.â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have nothing to hang our heads

about â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to finish as the second best team in Massachusetts is something to be proud of, and these memories will stay with [the players] the rest of their lives,â&#x20AC;? Bettencourt told the press after the second loss to Burkett.

Acoustic Archives Concert Series: Molly Pinto Madigan performs at the Peabody Institute Library

T

he Peabody Institute Library is pleased to announce the next concert in our Acoustic Archives Concert Series, which brings live music to the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Sutton Room. The series continues with a CD release event for singer/songwriter Molly Pinto Madigan and will be held on Monday, August 14 at 7 p.m. at the Main Library, which is located at 82 Main St. in Peabody. Winner of the Boston Folk Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Songwriter Contest and a dual Creativity Award recipient from Salem State University, Molly Pinto Madigan is a young

songwriter who has earned praise for her angelic voice. Filled with smoke and roses, heartbreak and beauty and unrelenting hope, her songs combine haunting melodies with raw, poetic lyrics to create an intimate and evocative listening experience. The Acoustic Archives Concert Series is generously sponsored by the Peabody Institute Library Foundation. For more information and to reserve your seat, please call 978-531-0100 ext. 10, or register online at http://www.peabodylibrary.org.


Page 8

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

REID’S RIDE | FROM PAGE 4 said that 420 cyclists participated in the ride, and collectively raised $220,000, both records. All proceeds of the ride support clinical research trials and improved specialized care for AYAs with cancer. “We Can't Stop” was the top fundraising team at more than $16,000 raised. Honorable mentions include Lynnfield Rotary at $14,800+, “Danvers Diehards” at $14,000+, “Oyster River” at $11,000+ and “Honeybadgers” at $8,000+. Among the individual riders who made significant contributions were Liz Joyce of Danvers, who raised $12,000+, Patrice Fogg of Madbury, N.H., who raised $10,000+, and Meredith Nash of Andover, who raised $8,500+. Many of the riders were either survivors themselves or had a close family member or friend who had died from

“The Wrecking Crew” (from left): Mike Battaglia, Rich Battaglia, Jose Valencia, Steve Swanson.

cancer or received a diagnosis. One rider we spoke with, Carol O’Neill, was riding for her nephew who had cancer and was Reid Sacco’s roommate at the hospital. Another rider, Jeff Corbett, was a family dentist for the Saccos for 25 years and treated Reid. Going towards the ride’s 14th year, Lorraine Sacco is optimistic about its future. “I am

convinced that the Alliance and Reid’s Ride will continue to ‘make waves for AYAs’ and to improve the lives of AYAs with cancer,” she said. The big smiles on the faces of the cyclists at the riders’ outset leaves little doubt. “This is the best ride in Lynnfield,” said a beaming rider Reid Lavoie, before pedaling away towards Gloucester.

“Team Honeybadger,” one of the top fundraisers


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 10

LEGION BASEBALL | FROM PAGE 6 in the first inning and Zeuli’s RBI groundout in the second gave M-P its first three runs. Newton

tallied three times in the second. Kyle Hawes then launched a long solo blast to centerfield to regain the lead for M-P in the third. Justin Juliano’s two-run

M-P’s Justin Juliano gets caught in a rundown in last Saturday’s playoff loss to Newton.

VA CULINARY ARTS Culinary arts at the VA? Well not exactly but for Veterans wanting to live a healthy lifestyle the Bedford VA on the hospital campus offers a program with an appropriately worded title, Healthy Teaching Kitchen. This program has healthy cooking demonstrations as well as nutrition education, proper cooking methods and how to develop and maintain healthy lifestyle habits. Each session is six classes long which currently run for 1 1/2 hours each. Veterans will learn how to prepare simple, low cost and nutritious meals while encouraging healthy eating habits. Educational materials and recipes are provided to promote cooking independence at home. While these classes will not prepare you to be an Emeril or Bobby Gold, they will put you on the road to a healthy lifestyle. If interested in joining the next healthy cooking session call (781)687-2685. Thank you for your service.

1. What opera does the music “Here Comes the Bride” derive from? 2. What American writer said, “Adam was the luckiest man; he had no mother-in-law”? (Hint: initials MT.) 3. The largest recorded lobster weighed eight lbs., 8 oz. True or false? 4. At the Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, General Thomas Jackson earned what nickname? 5. Who wrote, “That beautiful season the Summer! Filled was the air with a dreamy and magical light”? (Hint: initials HWL.) 6. What American wrote, “Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example”? (Hint: initials MT.) 7. What bird has the fastest flight for its body length? 8. What American actor said, “Playing polo is like trying to play golf during an earthquake”? (Hint: initials SS.) 9. What Tennessee Williams play concerns Blanche DuBois and the Kowalskis? 10. The “Mersey Beat” was named after a river in what English city?

11. What is the smallest dog? 12. On July 24, 1847, Brigham Young declared “This is the place” after arriving where? 13. What is the oldest ballroom dance? 14. In what scary shark movie is the line, “You’re gonna need a bigger boat”? 15. On July 26, 1775, Benjamin Franklin became head of what government office? 16. Which of these is not a real museum: the Burlesque Hall of Fame, the Spam Museum or the Musical Works Museum? 17. What Irishman said, “Work is a refuge of people who have nothing to do”? (Hint: initials OW.) 18. In 1975 who had the hit “Rhinestone Cowboy”? 19. What U.S. president said, “The nightmare is over” after being swornin? (Hint: initials GF.) 20. What union boss said, “I may have faults, but being wrong ain’t one of them”?

ANSWERS ON PAGE 15

double and David Hunter’s RBI base hit in the fourth brought in three more to put the Elves ahead, 7-3. The Elves did produce some

Elves lefty starter Nick Aslanian battled through six and a third innings last Saturday and held the lead before Newton rallied to go on top in the seventh.

BETTANO | FROM PAGE 2 roles have included serving as the Associate Executive Director, Director of Continuing Care and the Rehabilitation and Wellness Manager at Brooksby Village. She also served in a Director of Clinical Operations role within Erickson Living. Bettano holds a Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology. Prior to joining Brooksby Village, she worked as a speech-language pathologist in acute care teaching hospitals on the East Coast before moving her focus to senior care and leadership roles. In addition to her clinical degree, she is a licensed nursing home administrator. Bettano replaces Helen Lanagan, who retired after serving the past four years as the community’s Executive Director. Brooksby Village is a vibrant Continuing Care Retirement Community developed and managed by Erickson Living. The scenic 90-acre campus is located in Peabodyand is home to more than 1,700 residents.

defensive highlights over the weekend. In the Newton game, Zeuli made an excellent running catch up against the fence in centerfield, and Jake Irvine made a diving catch in right. On Sunday, Jack Seymour made a couple of tough running catches in centerfield.

Junior Legion team The Middleton-Peabody Junior Legion team lost twice in playoff action over the weekend. M-P lost, 7-4, to North Andover last Saturday and 3-2 to Andover on Sunday in Methuen. The Juniors finished their season at 6-10-1 overall.

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 11

Three Chelsea Jewish Residences Win National Quality Awards

T

hree Chelsea Jewish Lifecare skilled nursing facilities have received national recognition for the outstanding quality care they provide to residents. The Jeffrey and Susan Brudnick Center for Living in Peabody and the Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home in Chelsea are two of just nine facilities in Massachusetts that received the Silver National Quality Award from the American Health Care Association. The achievement quality awards spotlight providers across the nation that have a commitment to providing quality care for residents and patients in long-term and post-acute care centers and communities. Ad-

ditionally, the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea received the Bronze level award, which is the first step in the awards process. “We are so honored to receive these prestigious awards,” said Adam Berman, President of Chelsea Jewish Lifecare. “Our dedicated staffs were instrumental in obtaining this national recognition. They truly make a difference – every single day – in the lives of our residents.” These Quality Awards recognize organizations that develop and demonstrate effective approaches to help improve performance and health care outcomes.

Members of the Brudnick Center for Living staff

Treatment Plant Fire Results in Voluntary Water Restrictions

D

ue to the fire at the Coolidge Avenue Water Treatment Plant, and based on a recommendation by the Department of Environmental Protection, Mayor Bettencourt has declared a water emergency for the City of Peabody effective Wednesday, July 5, 2017. Since the fire rendered the treatment plant inopera-

ble, the City has had to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to purchase water from the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority, the MWRA. Water purchased from the MWRA is priced at a significantly higher rate than locally treated water. Mayor Bettencourt said he hopes to have the plant back online by this fall. However,

he noted that the fire damage was extensive and that the fall timeframe could prove optimistic. The initial water emergency measure consists of a Phase 1 – Voluntary Water Restriction Request – which went effect on Wednesday, July 5th. Residents are asked to conserve water by only watering their lawns every other day as fol-

lows: • Via sprinklers or by hose (both in-ground and aboveground systems). • Odd # houses – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday ONLY 6 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. and 6 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. • Even # houses Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday ONLY 6 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. • Cars should only be washed during scheduled watering

times • Please no Sunday watering Residential water billing is based on usage. By helping to conserve water during the city’s water emergency, residents can also help lower their costs. For more information on the water emergency and voluntary water restrictions, please visit the city’s official website, www.peabody-ma.gov.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 12

THE NUTRITIONIST CORNER By Anna Tourkakis NUTRITIONIST

Have More Get-Upand - Go energy ANNA TOURKAKIS

I

t seems that not matter the time we set the alarm clock the day is over before the todo list is all checked off. We, as a society, are busy, stressed, need more physical activity and sometimes have poor eating habits — all contributing to low energy levels. One way to fix our energy deficit is to eat better. The right combinations of food can give you that get-up – and- go energy. Follow these five strategies to maximize your energy. Plan Your Eating Eating every three to four hours can help to fuel a healthy metabolism, maintain muscle mass and prevent between-meal hunger that can lead to unwise snacking. If you only are eating one to two meals a day, this will be an adjustment. As you learn how to eat more frequently throughout the day, remind yourself that you will feel better and be more focused when you have fuel in your system on a regular basis. Honor Your Hunger and Fullness Cues Eating just enough, but not too much, helps to curb cravings and reduces chances of overeating. Keep in mind that portions often are too large. If your meal carries you five to six hours without hunger pangs, it’s likely that you’re eating too much. On a scale of 0 to 10 (where 0 is starving and 10 is painfully full), try eating to about a 5 or 6 level, where you are comfortably full

but not stuffed. Be mindful of your feeling of fullness and not what’s on your plate. As you realize you have had enough to eat – save the rest for later.

cup of Greek yogurt and ½ cup of fresh berries. Keep in mind that snacks are not intended to fill you up, but to bridge you from one meal to the next.

Central IT Alliance/iStock/Thinkstock Eat Healthy Ingredients A healthy meal includes whole grains, lean meats, poultry or fish, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, fat-free or low-fat dairy and a small amount of healthy fats. Balance out your meals throughout the day with all the food groups for sustained energy. Snacks Are a Bridge Don’t skip this important eating event. Snacks should have protein and fiber-rich carbohydrates to provide lasting energy. Grab a small apple and a few nuts; carrots and one stick of string cheese; or ½

Skip Sugary Drinks Skip the soda, sugary coffee and energy drinks. These foods may leave you buzzing for an hour, without satisfying your hunger or energy level. Plus they are usually high in calories. Instead, quench your thirst with water; add a splash of fruit juice if desired. fat-free or low-fat milk, or unsweetened ice tea. Make your eating habits healthier. Balance out your meals throughout the day to get the energy required for all the items on your to-do list. Keep hunger at bay as you maximize your energy.

Anna Tourkakis is a nutritionist, author and founder of Eating From Within Nutrition. She provides nutrition advisory services and healthy eating programs to companies and individuals to help clients manage health conditions and maintain healthy eating lifestyles. Anna can be reached at anna@eatingfromwithin.com T. 781 334-8752; www.eatingfromwithin.com

How to Find and Claim Your Family’s Unclaimed Money Dear Savvy Senior, I’ve heard that there are free online search tools that can help people look for lost or forgotten money left behind by deceased relatives. Can you refer me? When my father passed away his financial affairs were in such a mess, I’m wondering if there was anything he left behind. Wondering Daughter Dear Wondering, Forgotten or lost money is actually quite common in the United States. According to the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, there is around $42 billion in unclaimed funds sitting in state treasuries and other agencies just waiting to be found. These unclaimed funds are from accounts that are inactive or whose owners, or their heirs, cannot be located. Unclaimed funds can include things lost or forgotten saving or checking accounts, stocks, utility security deposits, tax refunds, life insurance proceeds, un-cashed dividend checks, contents of safe-deposit boxes and more. This typically happens because of a change of address (the owner moved), a name change (the owner got married or divorced), or the owner dies and the estate was unaware of the money or the heirs could not be located. By law, companies and financial institutions that can’t find the owner or their next of kin within two to five years must turn the property over to the state where it’s held indefinitely. Where to Search It’s very possible that your father, or you, have some unclaimed money out there and you don’t even know it. To start your quest go to Unclaimed.org, which has links to all state programs that will let you to do a state benefits search online for free. Or, you can do a multi-state search in 40 states at MissingMoney.com. Check every state in which your father or you have lived, worked or conducted business. Also, if you’re married, make sure to check under your maiden name as well. Using a first initial and your last name is also encouraged to make sure everything comes up. Every state can tell you immediately if you or your dad have some unclaimed money, as well as how to go about collecting it.

Look Here Too In addition to state treasuries, here are some other agencies that can help you find unclaimed money. IRS: Each year thousands of refund checks totaling millions of dollars are returned to the IRS by the post office. To look for lost Federal tax refund checks go to IRS.gov/refunds, or call 800-8291954. U.S. Treasury: To find out if there are any savings bonds your dad didn’t claim dating back to 1974, go to TreasuryHunt.gov. For older bonds or those still drawing interest use form 1048, which you can download at TreasuryHunt.gov/forms/sav1048.pdf, or call 844-284-2676 to request a form by mail. Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation: If your dad worked for a company that went out of business or ended its defined benefit pension plan, you may be entitled to some of his benefits. To look for lost pensions, use the pension-search tool at PBGC.gov/ search/unclaimed-pensions, or you can call 800-400-7242 and get help over the phone. National Association of Insurance Commissioners: To track down a lost or forgotten life insurance policy, the NAIC, an insurance regulatory support organization, offers a national policy locator service at Locator.NAIC.org. PenChecks Inc. and Millennium Trust Co.: To search for lost or forgotten retirement benefits or 401(k) funds left behind with an old employer, go to UnclaimedRetirementBenefits.com and MTrustCompany.com/unclaimed-retirement-funds. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation: To search for unclaimed bank accounts at firms that were shut down between January 1, 1989 and June 28, 1993 go to ClosedBanks.FDIC.gov/funds. State treasuries hold assets from shutdowns after 1993. Social Security: To find lost Social Security benefits, including the $255 death benefit, call 800772-1213.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 13

O B ITUAR I E S Alvin R. Levy Of Boynton Beach, FL, formerly of Danvers and Peabody, entered into rest on July 11, 2017 at the age of 83. Beloved husband of the late Maxine (Baker) Levy. Devoted father of Alan Levy and his wife Janet of Scarsdale, NY, Bill Levy and his late husband Paul Delery of East Boston, and the late Lisa Langsam. Loving brother of David Levy and his late wife Marilyn, the late Eunice Freedman and the late Thelma Zane. Cherished grandfather of Emily Langsam, Amy Langsam, Alexander Levy and Lauren Levy. Great-grandfather of Lily. Funeral services were held on Thursday, July 13 at Stanetsky-Hymanson Memorial Chapel, Salem. Interment held at Temple Beth Shalom Cemetery, Danvers. In lieu of flowers, donations in his name may be made to Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Dr. Allan Ropper’s Discretionary Fund), 75 Francis St., BB204, Boston, MA 02115 or to Temple Tiferet Shalom, 489 Lowell St., Peabody, MA 01960. Stanetsky-Hymanson Memorial Chapel 781581-2300 stanetskyhymansonsalem.com

Mary E. (Lattanzio) Deavilla Of Peabody formerly of Malden & Cape Cod, July 15, 2017 at age 94. Beloved wife of the late William F. DeAvilla. Loving sister of Alice Spadafora & her late husband Anthony & the late Adeline Frisiello & Frank, Anthony & Alfred Lattanzio. She is also survived by many loving nieces & nephews. Relatives & friends are respectfully invited to attend a Mass of Chris-

tian Burial celebrating Mary’s life in Sacred Hearts Church, 297 Main St., Malden on Thursday July 20th at 11:00am. There are no visiting hours. Private interment will be in the Mass National Cemetery in Bourne. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Mary’s memory may be made to The City of St. Jude, 2048 W. Fairview Ave. Montgomery, AL 36177-9821. For directions & guestbook visit spadaforafuneral.com Spadafora Funeral Home 781-324-8680

Stephen D. “Steve” Barry Of Peabody, MA and formerly of Winchester, MA passed away at the Kaplan Fa m i l y H o s p i c e House in Danvers, MA on July 16, 2017, surrounded by his loving family. Steve is survived by his wife of 55 years Marie (Helmick) Barry, his son Raymond and his wife Keri (DeVito) of Tewksbury, MA, his daughter Anne Marie of Lake Charles, LA, and eight grandchildren; Alex Barry, Tiffany Barry, Zachary Barry, Michael Thompson, Stephanie Ryan, U.S. Army Private William Ryan, Alicia Gill and Robyn Gill. Steve is survived by his two sisters; Kay Hooley of Las Cruces, NM, and Marguerite Sullivan and her husband Roger of Hingham, MA. He is the brother-in-law of Monsignor William M. Helmick and the late Father Raymond Helmick, S.J. Steve was a United States Marine, a Veteran of the Korean War, an alumnus of Boston College and the Secretary of the Boston College Class of 1956. A Funeral Mass was held at St.

Theresa of Avila Church, West Roxbury on Thursday, July 20. Interment to follow at St. Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury, MA. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Heart Association: Founders Affiliate of American Heart Association, P.O. Box 417005, Boston, MA 02241-7005 or, by calling 1-800-242-8721 or by visiting their online site at: https://donatenow.heart.org/. On Saturday, July 29, a Memorial Mass will be celebrated in the Chapel of Brooksby Village in Peabody at 11:00 A.M. William J. Gormley Funeral Service 617-323-8600

William A. “Red” Krol Of Peabody, July 11, William A. “Red”, age 82. Retired civil engineer for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Husband of Sarah J. (Bartlett) Krol. Father of Ann-Marie Jordan and her husband Richard of Marblehead, William F. Krol and his wife Martha of Beverly, and Catherine V. Krol of Denver, CO. Grandfather of Sarah Jordan, Zachary Jordan, and William G. Krol. Brother of John Krol of Peabody and the late Charles and James Krol. The family would like to extend their gratitude to the staff at the Kaplan Estates as well as All Care Hospice for their kindness and compassion. Funeral on was held on Saturday, July 15 in the Solimine Funeral Home, Lynn. Burial private at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverly Oaks Road, Waltham, MA 02452. Directions and guestbook at www.solimine.com

P E A B O D Y P O L I C E D E P T. I N C I D E N T S SATURDAY, JULY 8 These are the people in the neighborhood A call about a suspicious motor vehicle on Orchard Terrace prompted the police to make an appearance – some neighbors were reportedly doing drugs on their front porch, according to the report. After the police arrived, the partiers

moved inside their domicile, refusing to come out on the request of the officers. A warning was issued should any similar further action happen. Don’t get all fired up on liquor Firefighters at Peabody FD Headquarters on Lowell Street were surprised to find a motor vehicle had struck a pole and “no parking” sign right out-

side the fire station. According to the report, Claiton A. Mejia-Tejeda, 29, of Cambridge, was taken into custody for allegedly operating under the influence of liquor and leaving the scene of proper damage.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 12 Seeking quieter mornings A Linden Road resident

ARRESTS FRIDAY, JULY 7 Christine T. Zak, 33, of 18 Cashman Rd., Peabody, was charged with two arrest warrants.

was charged with an arrest warrant.

TUESDAY, JULY 11

Matthew Greenlaw, 19, of 9 ½ Northend St., Peabody, was charged with disorderly conduct. Jonathan J. Roy, 31, of Swampscott, was charged with armed robbery and two arrest warrants.

Lucio Martinez, 20, of Medford, was charged with breaking & entering in the nighttime for felony – motor vehicle; with possession of burglarious instrument; with possession of a Class B drug; and with possession to distribute a Class D drug. Felicia M. Solimine, 27, of 1100 Salem St., Peabody, was charged with an arrest warrant.

SUNDAY, JULY 9

THURSDAY, JULY 13

Brian Michael French, 32, of 500 North Shore Rd., Peabody, was charged with an arrest warrant. Carlene Malo, 36, of Danvers,

Anthony Landry, 26, of 53 Lynn St., Peabody, was charged with resisting arrest; with assault & battery on a police officer; with operating a motor vehicle with

SATURDAY, JULY 8

suspended license, subsequent offense; with failure to stop for police; with assault with dangerous weapon; and with an arrest warrant. Andrew F. Gaff, 25, of 61 Pierpont St., Peabody, was charged with an arrest warrant. Eduardo S. Figueiredo, 47, of Norwood, was charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

FRIDAY, JULY 14 Desdale Shakes, 37, of Medford, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor, with operating under the influence of drugs, with leaving the scene of property damage and with negligent operation of a motor vehicle.

called Peabody Animal Control to complain about neighbors’ dogs on his street and on Longview Way. According to the report, the caller stated that they bark in the early

morning hours. The man was advised to call Peabody Police if there was another disturbance and that the police would then send out notices to the dog owners.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 14

INSTITUTE | FROM PAGE 1 son said. "In reality it’s a great way to learn at that age. I think it’s really going to allow us to become a destination and for parents to see us as a

resource." “Such early literacy activities build essential life skills that are key to young children’s development and make a crucial difference in their kindergarten readiness and

long-term school success,” said a press release from MBLC. “These grants are competitive and require serious planning, great idea development, and a strong commitment to

meeting well-defined local needs … The federal grants go a long way to opening new avenues for innovation and targeted services in Massachusetts libraries and the results are impressive and man-

ifold,” it continued. The grant for the library comes on the heels of another grant awarded to the Peabody Council on Aging for six new transportation vehicles, just last week.

65

Copyrighted material previously published in Banker & Tradesman/The Commercial Record, a weekly trade newspaper. It is reprinted with permission from the publisher, The Warren Group. For a searchable database of real estate transactions and property information visit: www.thewarrengroup.com.

R E A L E S TAT E T R A N S AC T I O N S BUYER1

BUYER2

Volpe, Peter

SELLER1

SELLER2

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

DATE

PRICE

Jodice, Elizabeth A

Jodice, Paul A

794 Lowell St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

26.06.2017

$642 500,00

Tishler, Brian

Tishler, James A

Alaka, Ghassan J

Alaka, Elaine M

1 Friendship Ln

Lynnfield

MA

1940

27.06.2017

$925 000,00

Lombardo, Guy V

Lombardo, Tanya P

Tishler, Brian M

Tishler, James A

16 Tophet Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

27.06.2017

$810 000,00

Thomson, Laura A

Thomson, William D

44 Grey Ln

Lynnfield

MA

1940

29.06.2017

$1 100 000,00

Sloan, Keith H Lambert, Brian P

Lambert, Jessica L

Altieri, Richard M

Altieri, Linda M

7 Huntingdon Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

28.06.2017

$1 150 000,00

Doherty, Mark T

Doherty, Kayla A

Ji, Dongxiao

Tian, Wen

15 Hutchins Cir

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.06.2017

$430 000,00

Tammaro, Marco

Tammaro, Julie

Kochocki, Joseph A

Kochocki, Hazel

9 Pine St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

27.06.2017

$710 000,00

Helena P Gorham T

Gorham, John J

557 Summer St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

27.06.2017

$450 000,00

Cole, Colleen E

Harris, James N

Harris, Jill C

3 Temple Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.06.2017

$530 000,00

Heath-Neenan, John

Hunt, Jenna R

Mooradian, Julia R

Hiscock, James S

8 Thomas Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

27.06.2017

$523 500,00

Lane, Kimberly

Magliocchetti, Jan M

Paul R Lyon RET

Lyon, Paul R

16 Longbow Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.06.2017

$542 000,00

34 Brook Dr

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.06.2017

$750 000,00

55 Locust St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

28.06.2017

$705 000,00

Sidiropoulos, Haralampos Cole, Michael

Le, Ken Obrien, Timothy P

Raso, Charles F Obrien, Margaret

Ciambelli, Steven

Ciambelli, Cynthia

Stitt, Betty

Lebaron, Gary J

Lebaron, Deborah

Donovan, Daniel

Wells Fargo Bank NA Tr

3 Hopkins Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$427 000,00

10 Maryvale Ln

Peabody

MA

1960

26.06.2017

$337 250,00

7 Peterson Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$667 000,00

38 Russell St

Peabody

MA

1960

29.06.2017

$465 900,00

113 Goodale St

Peabody

MA

1960

27.06.2017

$412 000,00

11 Southwick Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$632 500,00

717 Lowell St

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$610 000,00

27 Jordan Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$408 800,00

Goncalves, Gabriella

38 Murray St

Peabody

MA

1960

26.06.2017

$575 000,00

Black Roof Properties LLC

34 Perley Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$400 000,00

Scott FT

Sudak, Diane C

23 Mount Pleasant Dr

Peabody

MA

1960

29.06.2017

$329 000,00

6 Margin Street Ct

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$559 500,00

Falzarano, Joseph J

Hirtle, Angela

Conway, Francis L

Weaver, Kimberly

Maselan, James P

Farinato, Sandra L

Hickey, Michael T

Marino, Robert L

Girolamo, Fred

Girolamo, Gary A

Merchant, Janice M

Bell, Michael J

Bell, Jennifer M

Fix, William F

Lewis, Lynn

Reagan, David J

Mccarthy, James M

Higgins, Patrick S

White, Erica A

Goncalves, Cleudo C

Pasquale, John J Geddes, Eric

Geddes, Kathleen

Barry, Ryan R

Conway, Carol A

Peterson, Jane E

Fix, Deborah A

Carpenter, George E

Salvatore, Anthony J

Salvatore, Gabrielle

Sikora, Kristen R

Sikora, Catherine L

7 Mulberry Dr

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$250 000,00

Bueno, Jaris

Bueno, Jose L

Hunt, Kathryn A

Hunt, Margaret M

19 Winona St

Peabody

MA

1960

27.06.2017

$436 000,00

Kelly, James M

Kelly, Nancy A

17 Paul Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$560 000,00

Doyle, Cory R

Doyle, Jodi A

Shepard, Debra

Shepard, Gordon

15 Wahtera Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$360 000,00

Scanlon, Ross A

Scanlon, Alicia

Scanlon, Peter J

Scanlon, Lois A

22 Jennifer Ln

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$440 000,00

Cook, Earl W

Cook, Sheila M

Daniel&Rose Mahoney IRT

Fletcher, Linda

17 Englewood Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

29.06.2017

$355 000,00

Rodrigues-DeMelo, Divino

Araujo, Marly A

Fleming, James T

Casey, Jane E

276 Lowell St

Peabody

MA

1960

26.06.2017

$339 900,00

Elliott, James E

Elliott, Elizabeth T

Scialdoni, Edward C

Scialdoni, Patricia C

Portugal, Marco A

Portugal, Flavyana

Witt, Maria E

Cummings, Cynthia L

22 Collins St

Peabody

MA

1960

26.06.2017

$479 000,00

7 Winthrop St

Peabody

MA

1960

27.06.2017

$360 000,00

Vezga, Jacob

Tricomi, Robert B

Tricomi, Lisa A

15 Swampscott Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$405 000,00

Couceiro, Fernando A

J Irving RT

Irving, Jason

55 Aborn St

Peabody

MA

1960

28.06.2017

$470 000,00

Stefanom, Sirlene C

Lurie, Joseph M

Lurie, Amy L

260 Lynnfield St

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$375 000,00

Piotrowski, Mary J

Lima, Renata S

Green, Kevin M

Green, Amy

8 Boulder Way #8

Peabody

MA

1960

29.06.2017

$335 000,00

Greer, Kenneth R

Lazarou, Leah

126 Lynnfield St

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$525 000,00

Roy, Jeffrey M

Roy, Karyn E

Rabin, Daniel J

Rabin, Julia

222 Bartholomew St

Peabody

MA

1960

27.06.2017

$580 000,00

Louf, Michael E

Busteed, Jennifer B

Thomas, Edward J

Thomas, Cynthia A

35 Oak Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$352 500,00

Hossain, Khondaker S

Islam, Kohdaker A

5 Coolidge Avenue T 1

Coughlin, Paul T

5 Coolidge Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

26.06.2017

$351 000,00

Brace, Morgan T

Gomes, Sebastian

Gomes, Sebastiao

75 Walnut St #112

Peabody

MA

1960

30.06.2017

$196 000,00

Hadsall, William S

75 Walnut Street RT

Botta, Vincenzo

75 Walnut St #112

Peabody

MA

1960

29.06.2017

$202 500,00

Carnevale, Linda

Windsor Court LLC

527 Salem St #41

Lynnfield

MA

1940

30.06.2017

$1 235 000,00

DUC Residential LLC

20 Pearl St

Peabody

MA

1970

28.06.2017

$651 200,00

Difonzo, Michael A

Difonzo, Heather L


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

FROM PAGE 12

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017

Page 16

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 21, 2017