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Friday, July 14, 2017

State funds keep Peabody seniors on the go Grant allows Senior Center to purchase six new transportation vehicles By Melanie Higgins

T

he Senior Center has six new transportation vehicles, thanks to a state grant. The city now has five new passenger vans and one new car. Last Thursday (July 6), Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito came to the Peter Torigian Senior Center (79 Central St.) to present the new transportation vehicles on behalf of the state. The vehicles, which cost $240,000 in grant money, are a win for the city and the Senior Center, which lobbied hard to get them. The city now has one of the biggest fleets of any council on aging. “[Carolyn Wynn, the director of the Council on Aging] fights for things like this all the time,” Carol McMahon, of the senior center, told The Advocate. Mike Berry, director of Legislation and Community Affairs for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), told The Advocate that the city stood out for the “depth and breadth of their application.” Wynn, in a conversation with The Advocate, thanked

One of the six new MV1 passenger vehicles that were purchased by the city with funding from a recently awarded grant.

PEABODY ON THE MOVE: Shown, from left to right, are State Rep. Tom Walsh, State Sen. Joan Lovely, Mayor Ted Bettencourt, Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito, and Ward 1 Councillor Jon Turco, Ward 3 Councillor James Moutsoulas and Ward 4 Councillor Ed Charest.

the many groups that came together to make the funding a reality. “It’s a wonderful partnership. Between working together we can provide so much more for the seniors and disabled population for

Peabody,” Wynn said. Lt. Governor Polito thanked Wynn and Mayor Ted Bettencourt and the City Council for their leadership. “It all starts with leadership.” Polito said. “With a strong may-

or, city council, you’re putting Peabody in the best position possible to take advantage of these funds.” The funds come from the competitive Community Transit Grant Program, which in its

Peabody 11-12 softball all-stars capture Section 2 title

Members of the Peabody 11-12-year-old Little League softball all-stars jubilantly display their victory banner after clinching this year’s Section 2 title last week after a dramatic 3-2 walk-off win at East Bridgewater. Since then, the team has not allowed any runs in five of their eight tournament games. See story and photos inside on page 6. (Advocate photo by Greg Phipps)

latest round of grants, doled out $10.2 million to a handful of Councils on Aging around the Commonwealth, totaling 148 new passenger vans for senior centers (including Peabody). “Peabody stands out as a community that cares for seniors,” Polito later told The Advocate. She commended the city for its “strong portfolio of policies.” Polito said that the vans would help Peabody’s seniors lead “a healthier, safer and more comfortable lifestyle” and “stay in the community.” Wynn said that the Senior Center gives approximately 50,000 rides per year, from shopping to doctors’ appointments. They visit neighboring Danvers, Beverly and Lynn. The new MV1 car will save on fuel. It also does not require a special license, like a van, to drive. It will help the one or two people who need a ride, instead of having to take a whole van. Peter Torigian’s widow, Jackie Torigian, called the event “a little emotional” in a conversation with The Advocate. “I know how proud he would be to have it reach this level,” she said. Peter Torigian was the longest serving mayor in Peabody’s history (1979-01) and invested significantly into the Senior Center that bears his name. A hub of activity The Senior Center has over 300 volunteers and offers a

STATE | SEE PAGE 2


Page 2

STATE | FROM PAGE 1 wide array of services and activities for Peabody’s elders. “There’s something for everyone,” McMahon said. The mayor told the crowd that the Senior Center “continues to be a hub of activi-

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017 ty for thousands of older residents.” Thanks in large part to the Senior Center, AARP designates Peabody as an “age-friendly community.” “This really is the envy of the North Shore,” the mayor said of the city.

Rock Guitar God Barry Goudreau appearing at Breakaway in Danvers July 15

Rock Guitar God Barry Goudreau’s new band features former RTZ bandmates, Brian Maes on vocals and keyboards, Tim Archibald on bass, Tony DiPetro on drums and background vocals, Terri O’Soro, Joanie Cicatelli and Mary Beth Maes.

A

Lt. Governor Karyn Polito addresses the crowd of seniors and guests.

Mayor Ted Bettencourt addresses the crowd and expresses thanks for the grant.

s a founding member of the multi-platinum selling band that sold out arenas worldwide, Boston, Barry Goudreau played on their first two albums, “Boston”, and “Don’t Look Back”. The album Boston was the fastest selling debut album of all time. Both albums landed on the top of the Billboard Pop Charts with Boston reaching #3 and the hit single, “Don’t Look Back”, reaching number one. Barry’s musical career continued after the band broke-up, going on to form such great rock bands as, Orion the Hunter, RTZ, and releasing two records with the late Boston lead singer, Brad Delp. Barry’s new band,“Barry Goudreau’s Engine Room, will be appearing in a special intimate

club venue at Breakaway, 221 Newbury St., Route 1 north in Danvers on Saturday, July 15 at 9:00 PM.

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 3

First summer concert of the season a great success By Melanie Higgins

P

eabody was out in full force for the first Summer Concert of the year last Sunday, featuring the group North Shore Acappella. It was a beautiful, steamy summer evening for the crooners, who are widely known up and down the North Shore and beyond for their stellar voices and easy, breezy tunes. The group, which is composed of singers Guy Chiapponi, Tommy Duarte, Jimmy Martin and Vinny Straccia, sung Sam Cooke, the Drifters, blues and bebop.

Lots of people of all ages laid out their lawn chairs on the Leather City Common (53 Lowell St.). Dogs rolled on the ground, beach balls flew in the air, kids did cartwheels and concertgoers tapped their feet and swayed to the music. Councillors Tom Gould and Ed Charest, School Committeeman Tom Rossignoll, and city employees Mary and Curt Bellavance were among those in attendance enjoying the concert. The otherwise jubilant summer concert was punctuated by a somber moment as the

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Shown, from left, are Lillian Mason, Sandra McKinney, Molly (dog) and Kathy Johnson enjoying the summer concert.

group had to announce the passing of one of its members, Paul Lopes, the night before. The group made a remarkable tribute to Lopes, holding a moment of silence and singing with extra passion in honor of their bandmate. “It’s a celebration of life,” Kathy, one of the concertgoers, said. Likewise, her friend called the performance “beautiful.” One of Peabody’s many green spaces, the Leather City Common is yet another space that Peabodyites can enjoy downtown. It is a small park located just off of Lowell Street near the downtown area. The city also hosts similar events, like the Pop-Up Pub, nearby at the Courthouse Plaza in Peabody Square.

CONCERT | SEE PAGE 4

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

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CONCERT | FROM PAGE 3 Assistant to the Mayor Mary Bellavance said that the success of the concert was in part due to her decision to have the Nex Mex Thing Restaurant and Ipswich Ale tap truck on-site. In previous years, the concert included the humble chips, soda, water and candy. Bellavance

oversees much of the community events around the city, including the International Festival held every fall.“Our goal is always to get more people downtown,” Bellavance said. The full list of concerts is available on the Peabody Cultural Collaborative website, www.peabodyculturalcollaborative.org.

Shown, from left to right, are Ward 2 Councillor Pete McGinn, Councillor-at-Large Tom Gould, School Committee Member Tom Rossignoll, concert organizer and Mayor’s Asst. Mary Bellavance, Ward 4 Councillor Ed Charest, PACC’s Deanne Healey, Northeast Arc’s Tim Brown, Realtor Marie Bishop, State Rep. Tom Walsh and Director of Community Development Curt Bellavance.

Jenny Radloff, Bill Gardynski and Andrea Evers with daughter Gia

Giant crowds attended the first summer concert of the year.

Vinny Straccia of North Shore Acappella led a song.

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A Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Village opening permanently at Big Y Plaza in West Peabody New facility will serve moms and children throughout the North Shore

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tephanie Keohan and Cindy Solomon, owners of A Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Village, announced on Monday that they have secured their permanent location at the Big Y Plaza in West Peabody. This new 6,000+ square foot facility will allow members to attend fitness classes with childcare provided, to take part in childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrichment programming and to indulge in many other amenities to make a momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life a bit easier day to day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to make this a home away from home for moms,â&#x20AC;? said Keohan and Solomon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought, our husbands have â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;man cavesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and our kids have their playrooms, so why canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t moms have the same thing? We are creating a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;mommy clubhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; so moms and their children can come and enjoy themselves.â&#x20AC;? Amenities and features of the facility will include: â&#x20AC;˘ Two fitness studios â&#x20AC;˘ A broad schedule of challenging fitness classes taught by skilled professional trainers â&#x20AC;˘ Luxurious locker and shower facilities â&#x20AC;˘ A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Village Centerâ&#x20AC;? area for coffee, relaxation and social-

izing with friends â&#x20AC;˘ A stimulating childcare room with open play capabilities â&#x20AC;˘ Enrichment class rooms

for art, sensory, music and other areas of focus, taught by professional teachers â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drop and Goâ&#x20AC;? babysitting â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mommy Conciergeâ&#x20AC;? ser-

vices, such as meal delivery â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mommy Naptimeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Childcare services â&#x20AC;&#x201C; included in the membership â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while moms are utilizing the

center for fitness, relaxing or having coffee with friends Construction is expect-

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Peabody 11-12 softball all-stars capture Section 2 title By Greg Phipps

W

ith no room left for error, having already lost once in the double-elimination tournament, the Peabody 11-12-year-old Little League softball all-stars came through big last weekend by beating a formidable East Bridgewater team twice to capture the 2017 Section 2 championship and advance to the states. After pulling off a dramatic 3-2 walk-off win First baseman Gina Terrazzano held a Woburn runner close at East Bridgewater last Satur- in last Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second-round contest. day, Peabody got another solid pitching performance from ace Abigail Bettencourt (only four hits allowed) and a clutch threerun double in the fourth inning from Isabel Bettencourt to come away with a 4-2 win and the title on Sunday. Afterwards, the team joyously trotted around the field at Lt. Ross Park displaying the Section 2 championship banner. Emma Bloomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s run-scoring hit in the second inning gave Peabody a 1-0 lead, which was Danielle Mulready smacked a single in Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final. increased to 4-0 with the three tallies in the fourth. East Bridge- if the two played each other 10 state champs as 9-10-year-olds. water battled back to close it to times, each squad would prob- They really wanted to go to the states again and now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re go4-2 the fifth frame but would get ably win five. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine there are any ing.â&#x20AC;? no closer, as key defensive plays Peabody lost 5-4 to East by outfielder Logan Lomasney teams out there better then East and shortstop Bloom helped Bridgewater. We have all the re- Bridgewater in its opening game spect in the world for their pro- of the sectional tourney. After keep more runs from scoring. Peabody head coach Mark gram,â&#x20AC;?Bettencourt said.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dropping its Section 2 openBettencourt said his team â&#x20AC;&#x153;had the only team to score on us [in er, Peabody stayed alive by deall the confidence and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tournament play]. We were for- feating Woburn, 13-0, last Thurswait to play againâ&#x20AC;? coming off tunate to win the rubber match day at Lt. Ross Park. It was Abithat walk-off victory on Satur- here. We bent but we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gail Bettencourtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fifth shutout day. He said beating East Bridge- break. When we lost that first in tourney play. She surrendered water twice in a row is a huge game, I told the girls theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got just one hit. Peabody went 4-0 in feat, given that the teams were to have a short memory. Two winning the District 16 tournaevenly matched. He added that years ago, most of them were ment, outscoring opponents by

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Joyous members of the Peabody 11-12-year-old Little League all-star team displayed the Section 2 championship banner after Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win at Lt. Ross Park.

Shortstop Emma Bloom was solid in the field throughout the tournament and had a key hit in Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win over East Bridgewater.

Pitcher Abigail Bettencourt flashed a big smile after inducing the final out of last Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 13-0 victory over Woburn.

a combined 35-0 total. Danielle Mulready, Lomasney, Gina Terrazzano, Bloom and Penelope Spack had key hits, and Isabel Bettencourt smacked three doubles to aid the cause in the win over Woburn. Defensively Lomasney made a terrif-

ic highlight catch on a low line drive to center field. Peabody is scheduled to play its first state tournament game against the Section 1 winner this Thursday (after press deadline). The tourney is taking place at Gonsalves Field in Woburn.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Playoff-bound senior team on a roll By Greg Phipps

W

inners of 10 straight after sweeping a doubleheader on Tuesday at Danvers, the Middleton-Peabody Elves have their sights set on capturing this year’s Senior Legion District 8 League title. The Elves, who have qualified for the District 8 playoffs, improved to 12-3 after Tuesday’s wins at Twi Field. They are set to face off against Andover on Wednesday (after press deadline) in a game that would determine the league championship. After starting out 2-3 this season, the Elves have used a strong offensive attack, bolstered by some excellent pitching, to go on their 10-game surge. “We started out slowly but we’ve won eight or nine in a row here. We’re playing much better baseball,” said M-P head coach John Kowalski after Tuesday’s 9-5 victory in the first game. He continued, “We’ve got a good offensive team and we’re starting to pitch a bit better, and [pitching] is the key in this league when you’re playing four or five games a week. We’ve got a lot of good arms and depth with our pitching, and that’s enabled us to get to this point.” The Elves did most of their offensive damage in the first two innings of Tuesday’s first game against Danvers. An RBI single by Mike Stellato and a sacrifice fly from Jack Seymour brought in two runs in the top of the first. Four more runs came across for

Elves pitcher Jake Zeuli turns to fire to first on this infield grounder in first inning action of game one on Tuesday in Danvers. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

a 6-0 lead in the second on Ben Mogavero’s RBI double, a tworun single by Stellato and Kyle Hawes’s run-scoring groundout. The Elves would add three more in the sixth. Jake Zeuli was the starting pitcher and was pulled after 1 1/3 innings in order to be saved for game two. Jake Irvine relieved him and hurled the next 5 2/3 frames. He allowed just two runs until Danvers scored three times in its final at-bat. Justin Juliano had a big game for M-P with four hits, including a double, and three runs scored. Stellato had three hits and four RBIs, and Mogavero had three hits, including two doubles, and an RBI. Jason Slattery was the winning pitcher in a 5-3 win over

Justin Juliano led M-P’s offensive attack with four hits and three runs scored in Tuesday’s game one win over Danvers.

Danvers in Tuesday’s second contest. Zeuli got the save in relief. Last week, Zeuli pitched six shutout innings in a 12-2 win over Marblehead-Swampscott. Stellato belted a three-run homer and Mogavero launched a two-run blast. The Elves followed that up with a twin bill sweep over Saugus, where the pitching did not allow a run in either contest. M-P rolled to 7-0 and 3-0 victories, with Irvine collecting the win in game one, and Slattery and Nick Aslanian combining for a no-hitter in the second matchup. Aslanian was the victorious pitcher in Sunday’s 3-0 blanking of Haverhill. He gave up just two hits. Mike Federico had three hits and Juliano chipped in with a run-scoring two-bagger.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 9

Junior Legion hopes to break out of slump By Greg Phipps

M

iddleton-Peabody junior legion head coach Kevin Bloom said his team can play better after M-P dropped its fourth straight game,16-7, to

On Monday second baseman Gino Cioto awaits this M-P’s Joe Zito slides safely into second base ahead of an oncoming throw, which is too late to nab a Marblehead- throw in Monday’s loss at Marblehead-Swampscott. Swampscott baserunner. (Advocate photos by Greg Phipps)

Shortstop Mike Johns uncorks this throw to first in Monday’s game against Marblehead-Swampscott.

five-inning contest on Monday at the Senior Baseball Field in Swampscott. M-P fell behind 6-0 in the top of the first inning and gave up seven more runs in the second to find itself looking up at a daunting 13-2 deficit early. They never recovered. “That’s been the case the last few games, where we’ve come out and we’re in a deep hole be-

Bloom said after Monday’s game.“Credit Swampscott. They came out and swung the bats and they made the plays when they had to.” M-P did produce decent offense, scoring seven times on 11 hits in Monday’s game. Simon Kotarski went three-for-three with two RBIs, Nick DiBlasi had two hits, including a triple, and

double. Despite that, M-P never really threatened for the lead. Since going 6-2-1 over its first nine games and challenging for first place in the District 8 League, M-P had lost five straight after Tuesday’s 6-1 defeat at Lynn Connery. M-P sat at 6-7-1 after Tuesday’s loss with two regular-season games to play.

Marblehead-Swampscott in a

fore we’ve taken our first swing,” Will Preshong clocked a two-run

Bloom said his squad is ca-

pable of turning it around. “For whatever reasons, we’ve been in a funk here the last few games,” he said. “We just have to work our way out of it and get back to playing the way we’re capable of.” M-P hopes to close out the season on a high note this week when they face Andover on back-to-back nights.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 10

Peabody Area Chamber looking for next top young Entrepreneur

T

he Peabody Area Chamber of Commerce is looking for local students who are interested in starting their own business. The opportunity to be part of the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!) is open to students aged 12-18 years of age who are located virtually anywhere on the North Shore. YEA! is a 30-week, afterschool program that guides middle and high school students through launching and running their own real businesses or social movements. Throughout the class, students develop business ideas, write business plans, conduct market research, pitch their plans to a panel of investors for startup Young entrepreneurs Brandon Heath, Mike Axiotakis, Ryan funds and launch and run their Bey, Sofia Vasconcelas, Aum Trivedi, Luke O’Leary and own fully formed companies Matt Ciampa and social movements. “This will be the third year program, and we couldn’t be said Deanne Healey, President the Chamber has offered this more pleased with the results,” & CEO of the Peabody Area

~ Political Announcement ~

Margaret Tierney announced candidacy for Ward 6 Councillor

I

LOVE the City of Peabody and I am running for WARD 6 COUNCILLOR to represent the citizens of Peabody and continue moving Peabody forward. As an EXPERIENCED Elected Official in Peabody for the past fifteen years, I am aware of the issues and resident’s concerns and will be a representative of the people to fulfill the needs of the Community in an accountable, responsible manner. Ongoing projects like the Crystal Lake Restoration which is well underway, will soon provide a beautifully landscaped area for all to enjoy. The neighbors of Aggregate Industries, many of whom I’ve had the fortunate opportunity to speak with, either at Aggregate Industries events or in their own home, have been extremely patient throughout the years and deserve the respect as homeowners and taxpayers to enjoy their time at home in a peaceful manner. The Birch Street 15-acre lot subdivision project proposing a 23-home development at the end of Birch Street could be advantageous in Ward 6. However, significant attention needs to be given to issues such as a plan for flood/drainage which is already problematic for Birch Street residents. A Construction Traffic Plan will be key as traffic currently impacts all roads, especially Birch Street in the morning and afternoon with school buses and parents transporting children from The Burke School. I will make sure our quality of life is not unfairly interfered with. I grew up in Ward 3 in the Gardner Park area of Peabody; the youngest of three girls and the daughter of parents both active in our City. My mother, an educator, was longtime School Committee woman Mary (“Lovey McNiff”) Tierney who gave her heart and soul to support the children’s needs in Peabody so that ALL children, regardless of their interests and learning capabilities could receive a fulfilling education, to lead them on a path to success. This not only empowered me as a young child, but forced me to learn first-hand about local government, work ethic, and the advantageous effect a woman has serving in the community. As Ward 6 Councilor I will bring new light to the Council with a diverse skill set and a passion for great decision-making to best benefit the in-

Chamber of Commerce. “Students not only learn the ins/ outs of starting a business, they are guided by business professionals every step of the way. The personal growth we’ve seen in students has been amazing plus, how many kids can put CEO on their college applications?!” In the first year, Ashley Hurton, 18, of Peabody, won the East Coast Regional competition and presented her business plan at the US Small Business Summit in Washington, D.C. One year later, she continues to operate her business, Happiwear, from her college dormitory. This year, Aum Trivedi, 17, of Andover, was noticed by Endicott College for his Derive Robotics Camp which introduces middle school students to the world of robotic competition.

And then there is Matt Ciampa, 12, of Lynnfield, whose idea Treasure Socks won him a place in the MassChallenge competition for new startups. “The program just continues to get better each year,” commented Maria Terris, YEA! Program Manager. “Some kids come in with an idea, others we help find inspiration to get them started. All learn important skills that will remain with them for a lifetime.” Applications are now being accepted for the fall 2017 program. For more information, email Maria Terris at events@ peabodychamber.com or call 978-531-0384. The Young Entrepreneurs Academy is sponsored annually by Community Credit Union and many other local businesses interested in developing our future workforce.

Reid’s Ride will take place this Sunday By Melanie Higgins

R

Margaret Tierney

terests of the community. I am not reluctant to voice my opinion, regardless of popularity, and will courageously do so for the City I love and the residents of Peabody. I have a pro-active approach in all of what I do and have an independent voice. I work well with others in a cost-effective manner, both professionally and personally. I will assure you as Councilor of Ward 6, making the best decisions possible for you and your family, I will stay connected with my constituents and will remain visible in the Community. I look forward to becoming a Council member and will be a strong, independent voice to the very best of my ability; in the most fair, honest and efficient way possible while I work towards improving the quality of life for Ward 6 and all residents of Peabody. Therefore, I respectfully ask for your vote for Ward 6 Councillor in the upcoming election on Tuesday, September 12, 2017. Thank you! Margaret Tierney 6 Scott Drive Peabody, MA Cell ~ 978-430-2592 Current Library Trustee Candidate for Ward 6 Councilor

eid’s Ride is back for its 13th year. The annual 28 mile bike ride helps to support clinical research and specialized care for people between the ages of 18-39 with cancer. This age group, called in oncology circles "AYAs" (Adolescents and Young Adults), are an underfunded group of cancer patients - a reality Reid’s Ride hopes to change. Starting at Lynnfield High School (275 Essex St.) at 7:30am on July 16, the ride will go around the North Shore and finishes at Stage Fort Park in Gloucester, where there will be celebrations and speakers. Reid Sacco was a promising Lynnfield High graduate who tragically received the diagnosis of cancer in 2003 and passed away is 2005. He was an avid swimmer and LHS musician, playing in the LHS orchestra and band. Soon after his death, Reid's Ride was founded. Since its inception, Reid’s Ride has gained thousands of supporters and raised millions of dollars to aid in the battle against AYA cancer. Thanks to Reid, two centers were created for treating AYA cancers: one in Massachusetts, and another in Connecticut. The Reid R. Sacco AYA Clinic for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Tufts Medical Center is located at 800 Washington St., Boston. The other is the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Reid’s family hopes that even more clinics of this nature will open up for AYA cancers. Riders arrive at LHS at 6:30 a.m. for check-in and registration. The ride officially starts at 7:30am. Riders can also pre-register at www.reidsride.org. It’s not too late to register. You can register in three different ways: 1. As a fundraiser: Minimum amount to raise is $150. 2. As a PMC (Pan-Mass Challenge) rider: just pay the registration fee ($100). You are not required to raise additional funds. 3. As a virtual rider. If you can’t attend in person, but still want to participate, pay the registration fee and commit to raising at least $150.

Check out: Advocatenews.net Facebook.com/advocate.news.ma


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 11

THE NUTRITIONIST CORNER

9 steps to be your healthiest ANNA TOURKAKIS

C

ontrary to some articles that tout a special diet practically for each body part, In general a healthy diet is beneficial for the whole body. The following basic guidelines for healthy eating hold true for most individuals at any age. The difference among individual diets depends on personal characteristics of height, physical activity, age and gender. A basic healthy diet that relies on vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, lean meats, low fat dairy and some healthy fats meets the nutritional requirements of most individuals. Making meals and snacks from a combination of these foods and eating an amount that maintains your healthy weight is key to a healthy eating pattern.

Steps to follow The following 9 steps can help you figure out your best approach for eating your healthiest way. 1. Saturated fat intake should be less than 10 percent of calories. Limit red meat to no more than 18 ounces cooked per week. Three ounces is a typical serving. 2. Total fat intake should be less than 35 percent of calories. The American Heart Association stresses that the reduction should be from saturated fats. Limit added fats to no more than two tablespoons per day. Total fat intake takes into account invisible fat found in baked goods and other foods. As well as fats such as butter, cream, sour cream etc.. 3. Cholesterol intake should not exceed 300 milligrams per day. Cholesterol is not just found in eggs and shellfish – it is found in any animal products. 4. Protein intake should be approximately 15 percent

Anna Tourkakis is a nutritionist, author and founder of Eating From Within Nutrition. She provides nutrition advisory services and healthy eating programs to companies and individuals to help clients manage health conditions and maintain healthy eating lifestyles. Anna can be reached at anna@eatingfromwithin.com T. 781 334-8752; www.eatingfromwithin.com

MOM’S VILLAGE | FROM PAGE 5 ed to commence in late summer with an estimated opening time of early 2018. While the larger facility is under construction, A Mom’s Village has secured a space within the plaza for a Pop Up Village for current and prospective members to come and see what the new space will look like and to take part in some of the amenities that will make up the permanent location. A Mom’s Village has been successfully operating for nearly a year in their current temporary location at the Dance Studio of Wakefield. To view the announcement video and details, visit www. amomsvillage.com. A Mom’s Village seeks to identify and alleviate challenges that women experience in the rewarding (but challenging) role of motherhood. Founded in September of 2016 by Stephanie Keohan and Cindy Solomon, A Mom’s Village is a healthy community in both mind and body, a mechanism of support and a place to build lifelong friendships.

CURRIED BARLEY WITH FRUIT

Curried barley with fruit of calories. In theory protein should be consumed only to provide the body with adequate amino acids needed for growth and repair of body structures and function. 5. Carbohydrate intake should make up 50-60 percent of calories. Again in theory, carbohydrates should be the source for energy or calories to keep the body metabolism working at a healthy rate. Whole grains and starchy vegetables being the main source in this group. 6. Sodium intake should be reduced to approximately one teaspoon per day. Doing more home cooking and relying less on prepared foods and eating out is a good way to decrease sodium.

7. If Alcoholic beverages are consumed, they should be limited to about one serving per day for women and two for men. 8. Total calories should be sufficient to maintain the individuals best body weight. Balance your calorie intake with your activity level. 9. A wide variety of food should be consumed. This helps ensure that nutrient needs are better met, as foods contain a mix of different nutrients and in various amounts. These simple 9 guidelines provide a realistic outline to accommodate individual nutrient needs and personal preferences. This makes eating your healthiest an achievable and sustainable goal.

Serves 4 No salt is needed -spices and dried fruits provide tremendous flavors I even like it cold the next day. 3 cups water ¼ c u p d r i e d a p r i co t s, chopped ¼ cup dried cranberries ¼ cup raisins 1 teaspoons orange zest 2-teaspoons curry powder 2-teaspoons cumin 1- cup pearl barley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley ¼ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped 1. In a medium saucepan combine water with apricots, cranberries, raisins, zest, curry and cumin. Bring to a boil. Add the pearl barley; reduce heat, cover, and cook until the barley is tender about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent barley from sticking to bottom of pan. Remove from heat. Sprinkle with parsley and walnuts before serving.

A Mom’s Village to host series of free Pop Up in the Park events across the North Shore Free music classes, bubbles and snacks for moms and their children

W

AKEFIELD, Mass. – Through August 7, A Mom’s Village will be hosting a series of free Pop Ups in the Park across the North Shore. These events will take place in celebration of their forthcoming announcement, to take place July 10, sharing the location of a new 6000+ square foot permanent facility. A Mom’s Village will provide its members with fitness classes, child enrichment classes and other amenities to make a mom’s day-to-day life a bit easier. Moms, caregivers and children are invited to enjoy music, bubbles and free snacks and learn more about A Mom’s Village. The pop-up events will feature a fun, interactive music class designed to introduce children to the world of music through classic and original children’s songs. Children will explore music

by playing a variety of instruments designed for their little hands and by participating in movement activities that will have them jumping, wiggling and grooving. Upcoming free Pop Ups in the Park will take place as follows: July 17, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Lynch Park 55 Ober St. Beverly, MA 01915 July 24, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Glen Meadow Park Trickett Road Lynnfield, MA 01940 July 31, 4:00 to 6:30 p.m. (Music class begins at 5:15 p.m.)

Endicott Park Area 1 57 Forest St. Danvers, MA 01923 August 7, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Music Class Pop Up in the Park Cy Tenney/Lt. Ross Park Johnson Street Peabody, MA 01960 A Mom’s Village seeks to identify and alleviate challenges that women experience in the rewarding (but challenging) role of motherhood. Founded in September of 2016 by Stephanie Keohan and Cindy Solomon, A Mom’s Village is a healthy community in both mind and body, a mechanism of support and a place to build lifelong friendships.

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Page 12

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

PEABODY POLICE INCIDENTS & ARRESTS SATURDAY, JULY 1

The Hidden Dangers of Heartburn Dear Savvy Senior, Is regular heartburn or indigestion anything to worry about? My 60-year-old husband eats a lot of Tums or Rolaids throughout the day to help him manage it, but it keeps him up at night too. What can you tell us? Inquiring Spouse Dear Inquiring, Almost everyone experiences heartburn or acid indigestion from time to time, but frequent episodes can signal a much more serious problem. Here’s what you should know, along with some tips and treatments to help relieve your husbands symptoms. It’s estimated that more than 60 million Americans experience heartburn at least once a month, with around 15 million people who suffer from it daily. If your husband is plagued by heartburn two or more times a week, and it’s not responding well to over-the-counter antacids, he needs to see a doctor. Frequent bouts may mean he has gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which can severely irritate and damage the lining of his esophagus, putting him at risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer if it’s not treated. Lifestyle Adjustments Depending on the frequency and severity of his heartburn, there are a number of lifestyle adjustments he can make that can help provide relief and avoid a more serious problem down the road. Consider these tips:  Avoid problem foods: Certain foods can trigger heartburn symptoms like citrus fruits, tomatoes, fatty foods, chocolate, garlic, onions, spicy foods, mints, alcohol, coffee and sodas. Your husband should keep a food diary to track which foods cause him the most problems and avoid them.  Eat smaller, slower and earlier: Smaller portions at mealtime and eating slower can help reduce heartburn symptoms. He should also wait at least three hours after eating before lying down or going to bed.  Lose weight: Having excess weight around the midsection puts pressure on the abdomen, pushing up the stomach and causing acid to back up into the esophagus.  Quit smoking: Smoking can increase stomach acid and weaken the valve that prevents

acid from entering the esophagus. If your husband smokes, the National Cancer Institute offers a number of smoking cessation resources at SmokeFree. gov or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.  Sleep elevated: To help keep the acid down while sleeping, get your husband a wedgeshaped pillow to prop him up a few inches. If that’s not enough, try elevating the head of his bed six to eight inches by placing blocks under the bedposts or insert a wedge between his mattress and box spring. Wedges are available at drugstores and medical supply stores. Sleeping on his left side may also help keep the acid down. Treatment Options If the lifestyle adjustments don’t solve the problem, or if antacids (Tums, Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta or Alka-Seltzer) aren’t doing the trick there are a variety of over-the-counter and prescription medications that can help, along with surgery. His doctor can help him determine which one is best for him. Treatment options include: H-2 Blockers: Available as both over-the-counter and prescription strength, these drugs (Pepcid, Tagamet, Axid and Zantac) reduce how much acid your stomach makes but may not be strong enough for serious symptoms. Proton-Pump Inhibitors (PPI): If you have frequent and severe heartburn symptoms, PPIs are long-acting prescription medications that block acid production and allow time for damaged esophageal tissue to heal. They include Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec, Zegerid, Protonix, Aciphex and Dexilant. Prevacid 24 HR, Prilosec and Zegerid OTC are also available over-the-counter. But be aware that long-term use of PPIs can increase your risk for osteoporosis and chronic kidney disease. Surgery: If the medications don’t do the trick, there are also surgical procedures that can tighten or strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter so gastric fluids can’t wash back up into the esophagus.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Do they still make go-carts? A concerned resident on Hancock Street was a little upset about a youth driving a gocart up and down the street, fearing the driver could be struck by a passing vehicle – so-much-so that the person called police a second time. Police arrived on the scene but the go-cart was long gone.

Better to be a champion and ride another day The good people at Champions Pub on Foster Street observed an intoxicated person attempting to ride a motorcycle as police arrived on the scene. According to the report, for safety reasons the biker was given a ride home.

MONDAY, JULY 3 Playing with fire Police were summoned

across the city due to a report of fireworks being used illegally. Thankfully, no injuries or arrests were reported that evening.

THURSDAY, JULY 6 No gypping the gypsies A caller from Allens Lane reported that a family of gypsies lied to her about their grandmother’s house burning down and took items from her yard sale.

ARRESTS FRIDAY, JUNE 30 Alan Thomas Olivole, 37, of 74 Washington St., Peabody, was charged with operating a motor vehicle with license suspended, with attaching plates, with unregistered motor vehicle, with possess/use/false/stolen Registry of Motor Vehicle signature, with possession of an open container of alcohol in motor vehicle and with receiving stolen property (under $250).

SATURDAY, JULY 1 Matthew S. French, 31, of 500 Northshore Rd., Peabody, was charged with six counts of larceny (over $250), with breaking & entering in the nighttime for felony and with breaking into depository. Eber Ramoirez, 35, of 189 Hamilton Ave., Lynn, was charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. Jose E. Gomez, 27, of 9 Beacon Hill Ave., Lynn, was charged with motor vehicle lights violation and with allowing an unlicensed person to operate a motor vehicle. Joseph E. Dick, 32, of Ipswich, was charged with operating under the influence of drugs (second offense) and with license not in possession.

hicle equipment violation, with missing inspection/sticker, with possession of a Class B drug and with possession of a Class C drug. Catharine Ackerman, 31, of Haverhill, Mass., was charged

with shoplifting $100+ by concealing merchandise. Jacqueline A. Deleskey-Talbot, 28, of 6 Blair Terr., Peabody, was charged with an arrest warrant.

DEVRY UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT DeVry University is an on-line college in which many Veterans enroll for convenience purposes and the representations it makes with respect to future outcomes. DeVry made claims concerning employment outcomes of graduates in its website, in social media, print ads, television commercials, telephone and in-person representations. It advertised that 90% of graduates landed jobs in their field of study within six months of graduating. The office of Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healy uncovered information that in certain programs job placement was as low as 52%. Pursuing the representations, the Attorney General obtained a form of restitution in the amount of $455,000 for students affected by DeVry’s misrepresentations regarding not only employment outcomes but salaries as well. Veterans that may have been affected by these misrepresentations or needing additional information should call the Attorney General’s office at (888)830-6277. Thank you for your service.

SUNDAY, JULY 2 Ricardo Matul, 24, of 98 Laighton St., Lynn, was charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and with missing inspection/sticker.

MONDAY, JULY 3 Amberleigh Taffe, 40, of 144 Forest St., Danvers, was charged with an arrest warrant.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5 Gabriel Martinez, 20, of 65 Mason St., Salem, was charged with shoplifting by asportation (second offense).

THURSDAY, JULY 6 Andre G. Brown, 29, of 63 Veterans Memorial Dr., Peabody, was charged with operating a motor vehicle with license suspended (subsequent offense), with miscellaneous motor ve-

1. What cartoon character said, “You’re slower than a herd of turtles stampeding through peanut butter”? (Hint: the initial D.) 2. In the standard U.S. version of Monopoly, what is the cheapest property? 3. What is the faster fish: sailfish or swordfish? 4. What popular American comedienne said, “Most children threaten at times to run away from home. This is the only thing that keeps some parents going”? (Hint: initials PD.) 5. What are two men’s gymnastics events beginning with a “p”? 6. On July 14, 1864, at Last Chance Gulch, gold was discovered in what city in Montana? 7. Who played head honcho Mr. Roarke on “Fantasy Island”? 8. What U.S. president said, “If you can’t convince them, confuse them”? (Hint: initials HST.) 9. In the 1979 film “10,” what hairstyle did Bo Derek inspire? 10. Traditionally, how often are ship’s bells rung? 11. “The Yeomen of the Guard; or, The Merryman and His Maid” is a comic opera by who?

12. What American actress/singer/songwriter said, “The worst part of success is to try to find someone who is happy for you”? (Hint: initials BM.) 13. On July 18, 1940, what type of aircraft first made a 15-minute test flight at Stratford, Conn.? 14. What is the only city on two continents? 15. What stand-up comedian said, “Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid enough not to quit”? (Hint: initials GC.) 16. On July 19, 1848, what organization met? (Hint: Its Declaration of Sentiments was signed by 32 men and 68 women.) 17. What U.S. president said, “He can compress the most words into the smallest idea of any man I know”? (Hint: initials AL.) 18. What American football coach said, “If you aren’t fired up with enthusiasm, you will be fired with enthusiasm”? (Hint: initials VL.) 19. On July 20, 1942, the ALCAN Highway was completed. What does ALCAN stand for? 20. What baseball right fielder/manager said, “Ability is the art of getting credit for all the home runs somebody else hits”? (Hint: initials CS.)

ANSWERS ON PAGE 15


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 13

O B I TUAR IE S George F. Kelly

obituary and memorial guest book.

Robert G. Larkin, Sr.

At 86, of Peabody, loving husband of late Joan E. "Dolly" ( Wingard) Kelly with whom he had celebrated 54 years of marriage, passed away on Saturday, July 8, 2017 at the Kaplan Family Hospice House with his family by his side. Raised in Winthrop he has been a resident of Peabody since 1961. In 1953 he enlisted in the U.S. Army and was honorably discharged in 1955. George is survived by three daughters and their spouses, Donna and Stephen Kline, Patricia and Laurence Robertie, and Joan and Daniel White all of Peabody, four grandchildren, Kelly Robertie, Richard Robertie, Daniel White and his wife Jessica, and Christopher White; a sister, Marilyn Kelly, and many nieces and nephews. He was also predeceased by his parents George and Anna (Mahoney) Kelly and his sister Marie Kelly. His Funeral was held on Wednesday, July 12 from the Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home, followed by his Celebration of Life service at the Messiah Lutheran Church, Lynnfield. The family requested that donations be made in George's memory to the Messiah Lutheran Church, 708 Lowell St., Lynnfield, MA 01940. Burial will be held at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Peabody. Please visit w w w.ccbfuneral.com for

Husband for sixty years to the late Madeline (Olsson) Larkin, passed away peacefully on July 7, 2017 at Brooksby Village in Peabody, Massachusetts at the age of 94. Born and raised in Salem he was the son of the late Edward T. Larkin and Nora (Kelleher) Larkin. He was educated in Salem schools and graduated from Boston College in 1943. A veteran of WWll, Bob enlisted in the Navy and after training at Notre Dame and Harvard he served as Lieutenant JG on the US Navy Destroyer Escort Alexander J. Luke as supply officer seeing ac-

tion in the North Atlantic and North Sea. After the war he joined NCR Corporation as a sales trainee and over his thirty-nine years as an employee in eight different states and amassing many achievement awards, he advanced through the ranks to retire as Executive AMM. In retirement he and his wife enjoyed travel to many European countries, golf and their grandchildren. He is survived by three sons Robert G. Larkin Jr. and his wife Kim, Edward T. Larkin and his wife Mary and Timothy J. Larkin and his wife Patricia; seven grandchildren Shannon (Larkin) Tetreault and her husband Matt, Christa, Jessica, Marissa, Bridget, Kyra and Matthew; two great-grandchildren Jack and Max and many nieces and nephews. He was pre-deceased by his brothers Edward and John and his sisters Catherine and Margaret (Larkin) Bonaventura. Arrangements: Visiting hours will be Friday 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM at Murphy Funeral Home, 85 Federal Street, Salem to be followed by a funeral Mass at the Immaculate Conception Church, 15 Hawthorne Blvd, Salem. Relatives and friends

are respectfully invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Care Dimension Hospice 75 Sylvan Street, Suite B-102, Dan-

vers, MA 01923. For additional information or on line guest book please call 978744-0497 or visit www.MurphyFuneralHome.com

Peabody residents earn Dean’s List Honors, graduate Phillips Exeter Academy Matt Hosman was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2017 semester at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is a Sports Management major in the Isenberg School of Management at UMass. Dean’s List recognition is for students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Sara Hosman graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy with honors on June 4, 2017.


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

Page 14

“Tai Chi for Healthy Aging” at the Peabody Institute Library

T

he Peabody Institute Library is pleased to announce “Tai Chi for Healthy Aging.” This seven-week class begins on Thursday, August 17 at 11 a.m. at the Main Library (82 Main St. in Peabody). Please note that due to popular demand, initial registration for this class is limited to firsttime participants.

Tai Chi is a graceful form of exercise that involves a series of movements, known as forms, which are performed in a slow, focused manner combined with controlled breathing. It is a low impact exercise that puts minimal stress on muscles and joints, making it suitable for many older adults. Tai Chi has been shown

Psychic Readings by Diane

to improve balance, increase leg strength, reduce fear of falling, improve mobility, increase flexibility and improve psychological health. This class will meet for seven weeks; signing up for the first class registers you for the complete seven-week series. No previous Tai Chi experience is necessary for participation in the class. For more information and to register, please call 978-531-0100 ext. 10, or register online at http://www.peabodylibrary.org.

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65

Copyrighted material previously published in Banker & Tradesman/The Commercial Record, a weekly trade newspaper. It is reprinted with permission from the publisher, The Warren Group. For a searchable database of real estate transactions and property information visit: www.thewarrengroup.com.

R E A L E S TAT E T R A N S AC T I O N S BUYER1

BUYER2

SELLER1

SELLER2

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

DATE

PRICE

Minor, Christopher R

Minor, Kimberly A

I Allyn RT

Harris, Pamela J

39 Homestead Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

22.06.2017

$585 000,00

Goldney, Ryan

Caponigro, Lisa M

Mcdonald, Andrew J

Mcdonald, Amanda J

385 Main St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

23.06.2017

$555 000,00

Mckeough, David P

Tangard Barbara A Est

Tangard, Eric R

33 Pillings Pond Rd

Lynnfield

MA

1940

20.06.2017

$610 300,00

Fialho, Carlyle

Higinbotham Donald E Est

Canuel, Donna M

16 Maple St

Lynnfield

MA

1940

20.06.2017

$420 000,00

Darosa, Jason

Fuccillo, Ronald

Fuccillo, Audrey

9 Villa Ln

Peabody

MA

1960

21.06.2017

$456 000,00

Min, Yuxing

Anapolsky, David

Anapolsky, Susan E

12 Flynn Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

21.06.2017

$600 000,00

Smith, Deborah J

Guarino, Anthony W

Guarino, Renee F

9 Wiseman Dr

Peabody

MA

1960

20.06.2017

$473 000,00

11-R N Central St

Peabody

MA

1960

22.06.2017

$329 000,00

Chamatsos, John D

6 Sprague St

Peabody

MA

1960

19.06.2017

$485 000,00

Stefanakis, Elefteria

Mavrakis, Angelos

Sinacola, Gina

Nico, Jovan

Nico, Ryvedije

Chamatsos, Dina J

Nolan, Jason K

Nolan, Laura S

Roy, Jeffrey M

Roy, Karyn

19 Augustus St

Peabody

MA

1960

22.06.2017

$450 000,00

Hushi, Ornela

Hushi, Agron

Peach, Alfred J

Peach, Stephanie R

33 Fulton St

Peabody

MA

1960

20.06.2017

$357 000,00

Hushi, Ornela

Hushi, Agron

Peach, Alfred J

Peach, Stephanie R

33 Fulton St

Peabody

MA

1960

19.06.2017

$357 000,00

Zolotas, Michael S

Zolotas, Christina J

Carney RT

Hood, Catherine

9 Will Sawyer St

Peabody

MA

1960

22.06.2017

$408 000,00

Snider, Neal L

1100 Salem St #38

Peabody

MA

1940

23.06.2017

$372 000,00

5 Joyce Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$470 000,00

Scholz, Ronald

Scholz, Janet A

Mallett, Debra

Sinacola, Gina M

Sinacola, Thomas

Gannon, Ella M

Zarella, Kristen E

Mccarthy, Kevin E

Fallon FT

Fallon, Michael

4 Sunnybrook Ln

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$378 000,00

Brown, Jill A

Brown, Lance M

319 Lynnfield St

Peabody

MA

1960

21.06.2017

$375 000,00

11 Louis Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$455 000,00

Figueiredo, Thamillias Pacheco, Steven

Pacheco, Laura B

Girolamo, Gary A

Hale, James D

Hale, Danielle L

Chute, Ryan A

154 Bartholomew St

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$369 000,00

Ribeiro, Celso P

Dossantos, Rosemeire

Boga, Nelita M

204 Lynn St

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$520 000,00

Anumele, Loveth E

Anumele, Henry J

Settlemoir LLC

207 Lynn St

Peabody

MA

1960

19.06.2017

$387 000,00

Balentine, Amy

70 Fairview Ave

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$375 000,00

14 Spring Pond Rd

Peabody

MA

1960

19.06.2017

$375 000,00

8 Walnut St #312

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$229 000,00

900 Lynnfield St #36

Lynnfield

MA

1940

20.06.2017

$530 000,00

8 Crowninshield St #214

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$310 000,00

54 Endicott St #A

Peabody

MA

1960

23.06.2017

$399 900,00

Lanzilotta, Edward Moore, David J

Brogna-Moore, Christina M

Young, Patricia L

Muldoon, Raymond P

Muldoon, Toni M

Federico, Kimberly D

Cho, Harry B

Cho, Myung J

Carlson, David L

Abodeely, Philip L

Abodeely, Mary E

Mirica, Dan M

Marchant, Nadine

Chute, Christopher D

Feld, Dennis

Carlson, Joan E

Feld, Reeda M


THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

FROM PAGE 12

1. Dilbert 2. Mediterranean Avenue 3. Sailfish 4. Phyllis Diller 5. Pommel horse and parallel bars 6. Helena 7. Ricardo Montalbán 8. Harry S. Truman 9. Cornrow braids 10. Every half hour 11. W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan 12. Bette Midler 13. A helicopter 14. Istanbul (Europe and Asia) 15. George Carlin 16. The Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, N.Y. (the first in the country) 17. Abraham Lincoln 18. Vince Lombardi 19. Alaska-Canadian Highway 20. Casey Stengel

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Page 15

Pezzella Landscaping ll Spring & Fa s p Cleanu

Mike Pezzella Business Phone: 781-334-5740 Cell Phone: 781-526-6966 pezzellalandscap@aol.com Lawn Installation • Weekly Maintenance • Bobcat Service • Snow Plowing • French Drains

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THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017

THE PEABODY ADVOCATE - Friday, July 14, 2017  
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