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JA N UA RY/ F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 6 W E D D I N G S | H E A LT H | C A M P G U I D E

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CHICAGO AND NORTH SHORE

CHICAGO AND NORTH SHORE V O L U M E 7, I S S U E 1

BRIDAL BLISS: FASHION, VENUES, GUESTS GUIDE TO HEALTH & WELLNESS THE SECRET TO WORK/LIFE BALANCE CHRONICLES OF A STAY-AT-HOME DAD 2016 CAMP GUIDE

2 0 1 6 D I G I TA L G U I D E


FEATURES J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 6 • V O L U M E 7, I S S U E 1

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GERAGHTY

WHERE TO WED Turn to page 38

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2016 Wedding Guide

36 All That Glitters: Stunning Rings 38 Where to Wed 40 Should Kids Be Invited to Weddings? 70 Wedding Fashion: Bridal Bliss By Jessica Suss and Lisa Zimbler

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How Hard Can It Be? Stay-atHome Dad on Full-Time Parenting By Ross Ritchell

45

2016 Health & Wellness Guide

46 6 Calorie-Burning Winter Workouts

48 Food For Life: How to Heal Your Body With Andrew Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Diet 50 The Most Common Chromosome Disorder You’ve Never Heard Of 53 Could You Be a Superager? By Christy Coughlin, Cortney Fries, Karen Malkin, and Jessica Suss

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2016 Camp Guide

62 9 Great Sports and Music Camps By Katie Jenko

68

DayTripper: Michigan Avenue By Heather Leszczewicz

80

Making the Most of Midlife By Marjie Killeen

84

7 South Side Restaurants That Are Worth the Drive By Julie Chernoff

Cover Photo by Jennifer Avello Gown by Yumi Katsura Style: Belinda, lace top with pleated tulle bottom in buttercream, Call for price and information. Mira Couture, 1 E Delaware Pl., Chicago, 312-2551699, miracouture.com


DEPARTMENTS 18

FAMILY & TRAVEL Great Escape: Amelia Island

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Housewarming: 5 Beautiful Accessories for a Cozy Winter Home

By Cortney Fries

By Meghan Streit

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Industrial Revolution: Wilmette Bungalow By Tate Gunnerson

A BETTER YOU

66

The Secret to Work/Life Balance

78

Lasting Beauty: 6 Steps to Makeup That Stays Put All Day

By Pamela Rothbard

By Jenny Muslin

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

82 50

86

My New Secret Vice: La Principal in Evanston

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editor’s letter you said it community celebrations from the web real estate news fresh recommended events event listing give time, give things, give support closing thoughts

98

Warm Up Your Kitchen With 10 Great Cookbooks

MAKE BETTERS

Frosty Footlights: Winter Theater By Robert Loerzel

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

92 96

IN EVERY ISSUE

By Julie Chernoff

By Julie Chernoff

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Better Makers and Their Impact Glenview’s Patron Saint By Susan B. Noyes

n our November/December issue we made two errors and would like to correct the record. We deeply regret these errors: -In “Day to Night,” Fashion with Beverly Johnson, on p. 72, Cy Fredrics Jewelers was misspelled. - In the Philanthropy Awards preview piece on p. 8 of the Guide to Giving, we misspelled the name of the Social Justice Award sponsors. The correct spelling is Dennis and Ann FitzSimons.

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF JEWELL EVENTS CATERING; 2ND PHOTO COURTESY OF LINCOLN PARK ZOO; LUCAS HAND PHOTO COURTESY OF CALLIE BARROW; RESORT PHOTO COURTESY OF OMNI AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION

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Happy 2016! I hope that you all had a joyful holiday season and are looking forward to the year ahead. There was much joy around my home in December, as we celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah (we are a Chrismukkah family) through the eyes of our 4-year-old and 4-month-old daughters. I also returned to work from maternity leave last month. Reuniting with the fabulous Make It Better team and the work that we do was a wonderful salve for the transition of leaving my little one (it’s a challenging one, as you working mothers out there well know!). And now here it is January, and our focus has turned to the potential that a new year holds. What better way to kick off 2016 than with a focus on weddings? Whether you’re in the midst of planning one or simply love perusing the latest trends in dresses and rings like I do, check out our first-ever wedding guide on page 35.

START THE YEAR

RIGHT

BY GENEVIEVE LILL

These cold winter months are a great time to shift our attention back to the things that help keep us sane and happy: staying fit, eating well and making our health a priority. For ways to stay fit while having fun this winter, check out our Winter Workout Tips on page 46 and learn about the benefits of following an anti-inflammatory diet on page 48. Given the link between chronic inflammation and the development of everything from cancer to depression, we’d all be wise to heed this advice! As you prepare for the year ahead, be sure to check out our Camp Guide on page 61 for a rundown of local summer music and sports camps. Many great options for kids of all ages, and stay tuned for part two of our Camp Guide in our March/ April issue. Finally, if you do nothing else this month, flip to page 96 to read about Sister Paulanne of Glenview and the Needy Family Fund that she’s established to help local families with just about anything they need to thrive—from groceries to gas money. She’s the definition of a Make It Better woman. May we all learn from her example and take action on the things we care about the most. Check out Give Time, Things, Support on page 90 to learn about local organizations that need our help. Happy Reading,

MONEY RAISED FOR NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: $4,392,734

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Our Mission is: To be the most trusted, easiest-to-use community resource that helps you make your life and the lives of others better, by connecting you to the businesses and nonprofits we support—online, in print and in person.

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Thanks for all the emails, letters, tweets and Facebook messages this month! Here’s what you had to say: In response to “Why (and How) to Hire a Wedding Planner” (makeitbetter.net/planner) I recently read your “How (and Why) to Hire a Wedding Planner.” It was very helpful as we are in the process of interviewing planners for our daughter’s July wedding. Thanks again for a helpful article. —Maura Crisham

I attended Make It Better’s Re:Work event and found it immensely practical and useful. In fact, it completely flipped my job search strategy. I stepped away from my career to raise our children. After six years out of the workforce, I’m dipping my toe back in the water. It’s quite intimidating, and so I appreciated the balance of kick-in-the-pants candor and cheerleading evident at Re:Work. —Kate Jackson PHOTO COURTESY OF RM CHAMPAGNE SALON

MINDY FAUNTLEROY, PRESIDENT OF WINTRUST BANKS CATHY PRATT AND SUSAN NOYES AT RE:WORK 2015

In response to “Chicago’s Coolest Venues for Private Parties” (makeitbetter.net/venues) Having played at several of these beautiful venues with Maxwell Street Klezmer Band, I’d advise your clients to check out the room for its acoustic qualities, if they plan to have musicians or a DJ. If the walls and ceilings are all hard surfaces (stone, metal, etc.), the echo chamber effect can make the auditory experience less than perfect. With carpeting, acoustic paneling, drapes or wood, sound is absorbed instead of bounced back. —Lori Lippitz This is great! I never knew these places existed. —Randey Foss Grossman We had our wedding at Prairie Production … another place to add to the list. —Lauren Nichols Very cool! I loved reading — since I have never been to any of those places. —Lisa Schulkin

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588 Lincoln Ave. Winnetka, IL, 60093 | 847-256-4642 Publisher & CEO Susan B. Noyes Associate Publisher Michelle Morris Chief Operating Officer Sandy Tsuchida Editor In Chief Genevieve Lill Managing Editor Brooke McDonald Digital Editor Anna Carlson Art Director Lesley Simon Designer January Thomas Social Media Director Heather Leszczewicz Shop For Good Manager Gabrielle Tasiopoulos Beauty Editor Dining Editor Finance Editor Fitness Editor Sex & the Suburbs Editor

Jenny Muslin Julie Chernoff Meghan Streit Christy Coughlin Marjie Killeen

Contributing Writers Cortney Fries Tate Gunnerson Robert Loerzel Karen Malkin Ross Ritchell Pamela Rothbard Lisa Zimbler Photographer Jennifer Avello Editorial Interns Katie Jenko Karly Sacco Jessica Suss

Senior Account Executive Julie Carter Account Executive Denise Borkowski Executive Sales Planner Haley Hughes GOT FEEDBACK? Email susan@makeitbetter.net TO ADVERTISE: Contact michellemorris@makeitbetter.net HAVE AN EVENT? Email anna@makeitbetter.net

Make It Better North Shore (ISSN No. 2151-0431) is published 6 times per year by Make It Better LLC, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Phone: 847.256.4642. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved. Application to Mail at Periodicals Rates is pending at Wilmette, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Make It Better, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Make It Better is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved.


W H AT ’ S N E W

BY JULIE CHERNOFF AND JESSICA SUSS

Gigi’s Cupcakes, a Wilmette newcomer, offers a rotating menu of more than 300 cupcake flavors. While the piledhigh-with-icing cupcakes are the signature offering at this Nashville-based chain, don’t miss out on the other delicious options, including muffins, pies, breads, cinnamon rolls and more — all baked in-house. Got a special event? Gigi’s does orders upon request, including wedding cakes. GIGI’S CUPCAKES: 3217 Lake Ave. (in Westlake Plaza), Wilmette, 847-728-0848—JS

Get Funky in Evanston

Mongolian food … who knew? Believe me, you don’t realize what you’ve been missing. The Funky Monk has the perfect comfort fare for the colder months: steaming bowls of lamb broth with toothsome homemade noodles; deeply flavorful Russian borscht, served hot and available with or without beef; and traditional Mongolian milk tea broth loaded with perfect, tender lamb dumplings submerged below the surface. Don’t miss the Samsy, an oven-baked hand pie with impossibly flaky crust surrounding either hand chopped and seasoned beef or diced winter squash and onions (delicious with either the sweet and sour plum sauce or the sriracha mayo). Vegetarians will also love the pirojki, Russian buns filled with mashed potatoes that resemble large empanadas. THE FUNKY MONK: 618 1/2 Church St., Evanston, 847-859-6915—JC

Simply Greek

Shake (Shack) It Up

If you haven’t been yet, it’s time to head over to Westfield Old Orchard and get in line — believe me, there is a line — for Shake Shack’s griddled all-natural, hormone- and antibioticfree beef burgers and Vienna Beef hot dogs. We’re loving the crispy retro crinkle-cut fries, but most of all the frozen custard shakes in flavors like Caramel, Black & White or the Coffee Fair Shake. In each location, the Shack partners with a nonprofit and a local “tastemaker” (at Old Orchard, it’s The Talking Farm and Bang Bang Pie Shop) to create a special concrete. The irresistible Bang Bang Pie Oh My combines vanilla custard with a full slice of seasonal pie, and 5 percent of each special concrete sold will be donated to The Talking Farm. SHAKE SHACK OLD ORCHARD: 4999 Old Orchard Center, Skokie, 847-380-1240—JC

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There’s a new fast-casual restaurant in town: The Simple Greek is open in Highland Park. Marcus Lemonis, host of CNBC’s “The Profit,” is a partner in the restaurant, a franchise out of Philadelphia. The Simple Greek emulates the much-admired Chipotle model of an open food assembly line. Start with a base of white or whole-wheat pita bread, rice or salad, and then add protein (gyro meat, grilled chicken or steak, pork souvlaki or lentils) and toppings (feta cheese, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, tzatziki sauce, etc.). Supplement with spanakopita, fresh-cut Greek fries and some baklava, and you’re on your way. SIMPLE GREEK: 478 Central Ave., Highland Park, 847-748-8285—JC

SHAKE SHACK PHOTO BY EVAN SUNG; THE FUNKY MONK PHOTO BY JULIE CHERNOFF; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH BUSINESS

Icing on the (Cup)cake


#ONLINE

OUR BETTER HALF IS ONLINE:

T H E “ B ET T E R L ET T E R ” E M A I L N E WS L ET T E R : M A K E I T B ET T E R . N ET/S U B S C R I B E MAKEITBETTER.NET

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jeanmarie brownson’s red lentil soup with lamb and fresh lemon There’s nothing better than a warm bowl of soup on a wintry day. Longtime Chicago Tribune food columnist JeanMarie Brownson shares this delicious recipe filled with Moroccan spices, lamb and citrus. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/BROWNSON

The park might not currently be an option for restless kids, but don’t let that keep you at home. Check out these cool places where kids can let loose no matter the conditions outside. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/INDOOR

what’s hot on makeitbetter.net FITNESS AND HEALTH

PARENTING

Want to Live Longer? Telomeres Could Hold the Key

The Critical Thing You Should Do Before Your Kids Turn 3

OUTINGS & TRAVEL

GET INVOLVED

Guide to Chicago’s Neighborhoods: What to Eat, See and Do in the Best Parts of the City and Suburbs

The Best Fundraisers Around Chicago and the North Shore

8 cozy winter sweaters 5 fun options for family game night Make the most of an evening indoors with family game night. Break out a few of your faves, or update your board-game collection with these fun picks. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/BOARDGAMES

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Sure, the temps outside are not ideal, but it’s still possible to stay toasty and chic at the same time thanks to these fashion-forward sweaters. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/ SWEATERS

BOTTOM 2 PHOTOS COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS; PLAY PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM; SOUP PHOTO BY BILL HOGAN

9 indoor play spaces to entertain kids this winter


COVER CREDITS Gown by Yumi Katsura Style: Belinda, lace top with pleated tulle bottom in buttercream, Call for price and information. Mira Couture, 1 E. Delaware Pl., Chicago, 312-255-1699, miracouture.com Crystal Drop Earrings Mira Couture Charm Slingback Pump $328, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-654-8853, katespade.com JA N UA RY/ F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 6 WEDDING S

J A N U A R Y/

CHICAGO

AND NORT H SHORE

FEBRUARY

2016

| H E A LT H | C AMP GUIDE CHICAGO A ND NORTH SHORE V O L U M E 7, ISSUE 1


BY JESSICA SUSS

BY THE NUMBERS $14.9M The current price of Michael Jordan’s massive estate, down from its initial price of $29 million in 2012.

29 the number of Air Jordan sneakers (not including variations) included in the sale price of the Jordan Estate.

THE WORD ON THE STREET: LOCAL BROKERS SHARE TIPS & TRENDS “Classic, simple exteriors are selling more than “Have a professional decorator come through colonials or very highly stylized architecture and and do an unemotional assessment — they can wallpaper is trending.” find little things that are easy to overlook but —Annie Flanagan, Coldwell Banker make a big difference to a buyer.” —Joe Stacy, Koenig Rubloff Berkshire Hathaway

ON THE MARKET Iconic Victorian in Highland Park: This five-bedroom Italianate Victorian dates all the way back to 1871 and has since served as a history museum for almost 50 years. Registered as a local and national historic landmark, this 12-room house fea

tures a widow’s walk with seasonal views of Lake Michigan and original oak floors. Located just three blocks from the lake, this elegant home is one of Highland Park’s oldest. Visit premierlistingshowcase.com for more details.


# C E L E B R AT E

BY ANNA CARLSON

Jewell Events Catering

JourneyCare

In 2015, Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter, a 2013 Make It Better Philanthropy Awards winner, merged with Horizon Hospice & Palliative Care of Chicago and JourneyCare of Barrington to form JourneyCare. Together, JourneyCare will serve 10 counties in and around Chicago. journeycare.org, Various locations, 847-467-7423

Dream Kitchens, Inc.

North Shore Senior Center

North Shore Senior Center will celebrate its 60th anniversary in 2016. Since it opened, North Shore Senior Center has been dedicated to providing a space where older adults can continue to volunteer and learn through weekly educational and experiential programs. nssc.org, 161 Northfield Road, Northfield, 847-784-6000

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Dream Kitchens is the proud recipient of the 2016 Better Business Bureau Torch Award for Marketplace Ethics. The award was presented at a luncheon in November. Dream Kitchens has provided award-winning kitchen remodeling for more than 24 years. dreamkitchens.com, 806 Central Ave., Suite 101, Highland Park, 847-4332400

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH BUSINESS

2016 marks Jewell Events Catering’s 49th year in business. Jewell Events Catering provides financial assessment, menu development, equipment rental, all staffing and more for weddings, fundraisers, galas and other social gatherings. georgejewell.com, 424 N. Wood St., Chicago, 312-829-3663


#EVENTS

R E C O M M E N D E D

Stay up to date on all the happenings.  MAKEITBETTER.NET/EVENTS

BY ANNA CARLSON

“Spring Awakening” Jan. 14-31 | The Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire | marriotttheatre.com In a special limited pre-season event, The Marriott Theatre presents this “daring” musical about youth and rebellion, which won eight Tony Awards including Best Musical. (“Spring Awakening” is rated R.) JAN

Randolph Street Market Jan. 30-31 | Plumbers Hall, 1340 W. Washington, Chicago | randolphstreetmarket.com Don’t miss the first Randolph Street Market of 2016. You could win a Randolph Street Market season pass, good for two people (a $100 value). Email anna@ makeitbetter.net with the subject line “Randolph Street Market” by Jan. 25 to enter. JAN

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JANUARY

Frozemont q 1 Various | MB Financial Park at Rosemont, 5501 Park Place, Rosemont | rosemont.com/mbfinancialpark/ frozemont Take advantage of the frightful weather at Frozemont. Polar Peak, a two-story tube hill, is open through Jan. 31, and you can stop by the free outdoor ice skating rink any time through Feb. 28. JAN

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Skate With the Greats Jan. 16 | MB Financial Park at Rosemont, 5501 Park Place, Rosemont | ronaldhousechicago.org/skatewiththegreats MB Financial Park at Rosemont and the Chicago Blackhawks Alumni Association are giving you a chance to skate with a current Blackhawks player and alumni, including Denis Savard. Proceeds will benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities® of Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana. JAN

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Day — Community Service Event Jan. 18 | Winnetka Community House, 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka | winnetkacommunityhouse.org Join The Volunteer Center and The Kindness Connection for a day of giving back. Take part in a variety of hands-on service projects for local nonprofits, and don’t forget to bring fleece fabric and scissors for the annual MLK Day signature no-sew blanket-making project. JAN

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FEBRUARY

Winter Chilly Fest Feb. 13-14 | Emily Oaks Nature Center, 4650 Brummel St., Skokie | skokieparks.org Go ice skating on the pond, enjoy a hay ride, take part in snow and ice games, roast marshmallows, and dine on chili by the fire at this family-friendly festival. FEB

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Chinese Golden Dragon Acrobats Feb. 17-18 | North Shore Center for the Performing Arts, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie | northshorecenter.org North Shore Center’s Youtheatre welcomes the Chinese Golden Dragon Acrobats to Skokie to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Youtheatre provides performing arts productions perfect for grades K-12. FEB

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FROZEMONT PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROL FOX & ASSOCIATES; RANDOLPH STREET MARKET PHOTO BY ERIC CLARKE

editor’s pick


#EVENTS

The Orchid Show Opens Feb. 13 | Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe | chicagobotanic.org Make wintry days bright with CBG’s annual Orchid Show, where you’ll be surrounded by more than 10,000 orchids. Learn more about special events and classes happening throughout the show’s run at chicagobotanic.org/orchid. FEB

NAZI OLYMPICS PHOTO COURTESY U.S. HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS; ORCHID SHOW PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN

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“Othello” 18 Opens Feb. 18 | Chicago Shakespeare Theater, 800 E. Grand Ave., Chicago | chicagoshakes.com This classic Shakespearean tragedy comes to life in Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s Courtyard Theater. Famed Brit Jonathan Munby directs. FEB

Sleepover With the Animals Feb. 20-21 | Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N. Clark St., Chicago | lpzoo.org This is a sleepover like none other. Have dinner, then explore the zoo after hours before enjoying snacks, games and stories as you get ready to curl up in your sleeping bag. When you wake up, a continental breakfast will be waiting. (Participants can also attend just the evening activities.) FEB

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Nazi Olympics: Berlin, 1936 u Opens Feb. 21 | Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, 9603 Woods Drive, Skokie ilholocaustmuseum.org This museum exhibit goes inside the FEB

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Olympic Games that took place in Nazi Germany and shares the stories of athletes who were barred, boycotted, and those who competed as Hitler looked on. The exhibit will also showcase one of the torches from the first torch run. “Romeo and Juliet” 22 Opens Feb. 22 | Lyric Opera of Chicago, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago | lyricopera.org Another Shakespearean classic opens in Chicago this month, this time on the Lyric Opera stage. “Romeo and Juliet” will be sung in French with English titles. FEB

“If/Then” Opens Feb. 23 | Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph St., Chicago | broadwayinchicago.com In this contemporary musical, newly divorced Elizabeth moves to New York City for a fresh start. When new friends suggest two different paths she could take, the show begins to follow both versions of her life, one in which she’s “Liz” and the other, “Beth.” FEB

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#EVENTS

JANUARY/ FEBRUARY HIGHLIGHTS BY ANNA CARLSON

Cody Fry

Enchanted Railroad Jan. 15-Feb. 21 The Morton Arboretum, 4100 Illinois Route 53, Lisle | mortonarb.org The Music Institute of Chicago Presents Kate Liu Jan. 16 Nichols Concert Hall, 1490 Chicago Ave., Evanston | musicinst.org LEGO© Architects: Design and Build Jan. 16, Feb. 20 Frederick C. Robie House, 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave., Chicago | flwright.org “Another Word for Beauty” Jan. 16-Feb. 21 Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago | goodmantheatre.org Chicago Sketch Comedy Festival Ends Jan. 17 Stage 773, 1225 W. Belmont, Chicago chicagosketchfest.com Black Creativity Family Day Jan. 18 The Museum of Science and Industry, 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago msichicago.org/blackcreativity Cody Fry With Ryan Hommel Jan. 20 SPACE, 1245 Chicago Ave., Evanston evanstonspace.com Disney On Ice Celebrates 100 Years of Magic Jan. 20-24 Allstate Arena, 6920 N. Mannheim Road, Rosemont | rosemont.com/allstate

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“Hairspray” Opens Jan. 20 Paramount Theatre, 23 E. Galena Blvd., Aurora | paramountaurora.com

“Educating Rita” Opens Feb. 12 Citadel Theatre, 300 S. Waukegan Road, Lake Forest | citadeltheatre.org

Weekend Family Class: Hot Chocolate Jan. 23, 31 Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe | chicagobotanic.org/ familyprograms

Marnie & Phil: A Circus Love Letter Opens Feb. 13 The Actors Gymnasium at the Noyes Cultural Arts Center, 927 Noyes St., Evanston actorsgymnasium.org

Lake Forest Symphony’s Beethoven 8 Jan. 23-24 The James Lumber Center for the Performing Arts, 19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake | lakeforestsymphony.org Youth Services Firefighter Chili Cook Off and Trivia Contest Jan. 30 Youth Services of Glenview/Northbrook, 3080 W. Lake Ave., Glenview | ysgn.org

FEBRUARY

70s Retro Mixed Doubles Night Feb. 6 A.C. Nielsen Tennis Center, 530 Hibbard Road, Winnetka | winpark.org More Than a Survivor: More Than a Story Opens Feb. 6 Loyola University Museum of Art, 820 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago | luc.edu/luma Bold Moves Feb. 10-21 Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Parkway, Chicago | joffrey.org/boldmoves Chicago Theatre Week Feb. 11-21 Various locations | chicagotheatreweek.com

makeitbetter.net

Brew Up a Great Date Feb. 14 Sunset Valley Golf Course, 1390 Sunset Road, Highland Park | pdjp.org Van Gogh’s Bedrooms Opens Feb. 14 The Art Institute of Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago | artic.edu Let’s Wine About Winter Feb. 20 Downtown Libertyville mainstreetlibertyville.org Red Rose Ragtime Jazz Band Feb. 21 Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Road, Lake Forest | gortoncenter.org Danceworks 2016 Begins Feb. 26 Josephine Louis Theater, 20 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston communication.northwestern.edu/wirtz “Mothers and Sons” Closes Feb. 28 Northlight Theatre, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie | northlight.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF CODY FRY

JANUARY


MAKE A DIFFERENCE

“The Wizard of Oz” at Center Stage in Lake Forest

ARTISTS UNITE!

CELEBRATING A NEW ARTS ALLIANCE IN LAKE FOREST AND LAKE BLUFF BY SUSAN B . NOYE S

• Reinvent GalleryCommunity Center • Gorton Community Center

LIBRARIES

• Lake Bluff Library • Lake Forest Library

LFLB ArtsLink should eliminate duplication of services and create substantial synergies to help each organization reach a far broader audience than it would have alone. The whole will be far greater than the sum of its parts.

MUSEUMS

“We all assume that the entities that we love in our community will go on forever, but all of them need audiences outside of LFLB to do so,” Lake Forest/Lake Bluff Chamber Director Joanna Rolek explains. “We’re finding ways to create an economy of scale and let the public know what is coming up. The collaborative promotion has been a big focus.”

• Lake Forest Civic Orchestra • Lake Forest Symphony • Midwest Young Artists • Music Institute of Chicago

“The other wonderful thing is the synergies and new relationships here,” Rolek says. “It’s all about community engagement.” This engagement is further enhanced with the help of LFLBArtsLink.com, which provides an online connection to the program where LFLB’s younger and web-driven audiences can find resources and maintain community. ArtsLink participants include:

ARTS ORGANIZATIONS & GALLERIES • Artists on the Bluff • Deer Path Art League • Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Artisan Guild • McMahon Studio/Gallery • Ragdale

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• Lake Bluff History Museum • Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society

MUSIC

THEATER

• CenterStage • Citadel Theatre Company “We want to be more involved in the community,” Michael Manson, Lake Forest BMO Harris branch manager, says. “We found that Lake Forest and Lake Bluff are very proud of their history, arts and culture and ArtsLink [is now] the driving force behind supporting this.” Make It Better proudly supports LFLB ArtsLink, too. It’s a model virtuous circle, allowing our community to find and support the best in local arts programing. For more details, visit MAKEITBETTER.NET/LFLBARTSLINK

makeitbetter.net

PHOTO COURTESY OF LFLB CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

LFLB ArtsLink is exactly the right program for the times. Seventeen outstanding Lake Forest and Lake Bluff arts programs have pooled their resources and connected online to promote their programs more effectively, thanks to the vision and leadership of the LFLB Chamber of Commerce and substantial sponsorship by BMO Harris.


SPONSORED CONTENT

ment plan for you. It may be minimally invasive surgery, but it could be medication, lifestyle changes or catheter therapy. Improving overall health and wellness can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease. Start with knowing your numbers. High cholesterol and high blood pressure can put you at risk. Your primary care physician can help you monitor your numbers — and lower them if needed. Controlling your weight, stopping smoking and engaging in moderate exercise can improve your heart health too. INNOVATIVE TREATMENT, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY With the launch of the Cardiovascular Institute this year, NorthShore has further enhanced its leading-edge services and programs. The expanded offerings include AFib, Heart Valve, Coronary Artery Disease, Advanced Heart Failure, Vascular Surgery & Medicine, Weight Management and much more.

PERSONALIZED TREATMENT

B Y N O R T H S H O R E U N I V E R S I T Y H E A LT H S Y S T E M

NorthShore Cardiovascular Institute takes a broad spectrum, collaborative approach to helping you achieve optimal health and wellness. Our team understands that no two patients are alike, so they work together — and with other specialty areas as needed — to develop care specifically tailored to you. MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE, LEADING EXPERTS NorthShore’s cardiovascular team is comprised of leading heart specialists with comprehensive expertise — from AFib and Heart Failure programs to wellness, prevention and intervention. Cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, advanced practice nurses and physician assistants work together to determine the best treat-

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NorthShore utilizes the latest minimally invasive procedures and advanced therapies to ensure optimal outcomes and quicker recovery. The improvement is often immediate. With their hearts functioning properly again, many patients feel as if they’ve gotten their lives back. The specialists at the Cardiovascular Institute also conduct a wide range of clinical trials to offer patients earlier access to leading-edge advances. On rare and highly complex cases, NorthShore’s experts collaborate with the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. The teams share knowledge and second opinions. So, if needed, you have access to two leading teams, close to home.

Cardiovascular Services If you’re facing a serious heart condition, contact NorthShore Cardiovascular Institute. Call (847) 86-HEART or visit NORTHSHORE.ORG/CARDIO today.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NORTHSHORE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM

ADVANCING HEART CARE WITH LEADING EXPERTISE AND

Under the leadership of Jorge Saucedo, M.D., Division Head of Cardiology, and Paul Pearson, M.D., Ph.D., Division Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, the NorthShore team includes internationally recognized cardiologists, cardiovascular and vascular surgeons. For instance, Ted Feldman, M.D., a leader in interventional cardiology, was the first physician in the country to perform percutaneous mitral valve repair.


PHOTO BY JENNIFER AVELLO

ONE FINE DAY

A wedding celebration marks not only the marriage of two people who’ve waited a lifetime to walk down the aisle together, but also the culmination of months or even years of preparation for the big event. Not sure where to start? Read on for help finding the perfect gown and jewelry, selecting the ideal venue to suit your unique style, and even navigating the most delicate of guest-list dilemmas. J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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#WEDDING

ALL THAT

GLITTERS BY JESSICA SUSS

Bring on the bling with these stunning rings that range from trendy to timeless.

with a center stone just shy of three carats, is a standout among more traditional shapes. The Diamond Starflower is surrounded by white pavé diamonds in a floral motif. Graff Diamonds, 103 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-604-1000

DIAMONDS are a girl’s best friend — and nobody

knows this better than Tiffany & Co. The exquisite Soleste® emerald cut ring is the epitome of ageless beauty. Ranging in weight from a quarter up to two-and-a-half carats, the stone is surrounded by bead-set diamonds in platinum. Tiffany and Co., 730 N. Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL, 312-944-7500

ELEGANCE rules with these eternity bands. Set all

around in a variety of carat weights and cuts; choose any type of gold or platinum for the setting. Cy Fredrics Jewelers, 2719 Pfingsten Road, Glenview, 847-564-8828; 600 Central Ave., Ste. 111, Highland Park, 847-433-8448

This CUSHION-CUT diamond (available between one and 3.5 carats) is offset by delicate micropavé diamonds and centered on a micropavé band set in platinum. Harry Winston, 55 E. Oak St, Chicago, 312-705-1820

This one-of-a-kind STUNNER will blind everyone within a 25-mile radius. An eight-carat center cushion is surrounded by diamond trapezoids with micro-pavé around the band set in platinum. Burdeen’s Jewelry, 1151 W. Lake Cook Road, Buffalo Grove, 847-4598980

CLASSIC but far from stodgy, the Gent’s Wedding Band collection from Lester Lampert is an exercise in simplicity. Bands are made to order in any type of gold or platinum. Lester Lampert, 57 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-944-6888

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH BUSINESS

THIS EXQUISITE RING,


PHOTOS COURTESY OF RIFE PONCE PHOTOGRAPHY

FlowersFlowers is a quaint Europeanstyle flower shop in Evanston, with emphasis on quality flowers and beautiful lush designs. We design flowers for every occasion, big and small, as well as for weddings and events, from small and simple, to elaborate and luxurious!

We invite you to call us or stop in and visit us at our shop. We would love to make your world a prettier one. 1110 Davis St., Evanston 847.328.7110 flowers-flowers.com


#WEDDING

WHERE TO WED

CHICAGO’S BEST NEW WEDDING VENUES BY LISA ZIMBLER

Looking to book a chic and unique venue for your upcoming nuptials? Setting the tone for a successful soirée starts with selecting the right venue for your big day. Check out some of Chicagoland’s newest and most notable venues. MODERN, EDGY AND INDUSTRIAL

1. THE GERAGHTY The Geraghty, a 25,000-square-foot “venue of possibilities” is the brainchild of Tom Kehoe, president of Kehoe Designs, one of the most sought-after event design firms in Chicago. An open space with a clean palate that can be transformed to match any style, the venue accommodates up to 1,000, yet is easily resized for intimate events as small as 75. With 32 unique residentialstyle powder room stalls, your guests will never have to wait in a line for the

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loo. Located just west of downtown off of I-55, The Geraghty is conveniently located for guests coming from every direction, city or suburbs. 2520 S. Hoyne Ave., Chicago, 312-967-2520 2. MORGAN MANUFACTURING A former electric company founded in 1855, Morgan Manufacturing is an exciting new event space located in the Fulton Market area featuring three levels of industrial space accommodating 100–500 seated guests. From a rooftop atrium to mezzanine with built-in bar to sunlit first-floor production/timber

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room, the venue offers many amenities for creative entertaining, including rectangular hardwood dining tables and an eclectic mix of dining chairs and lounge furniture. 401 N. Morgan St., Chicago, 312-763-3317 3. REVEL DOWNTOWN Represented by The Revel Group, a full-service event design agency with several event locations throughout the city, Revel Downtown is one of the most popular wedding spaces in the group’s portfolio. Housed in a 1920s-era building, this urban industrial event space has the

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GERAGHTY; OPPOSITE PAGE PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LANGHAM

The Geraghty


#WEDDING

ability to hold wedding ceremonies or cocktail receptions in the upstairs loft area and dinner and dancing below on the main level. With an in-house team of event planners, floral designers, and vendor partners, Revel offers a one-stopshop approach to wedding planning. 440 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 773-486-9010

ARCHITECTURAL AND ARTISTIC

4. THE LANGHAM With views overlooking the Chicago River and city skyline, the elegant Langham Chicago is a storybook grand hotel cradled within an architecturally significant skyscraper designed by Mies van der Rohe. Wedding receptions hosting 150–300 guests are held in the

Langham’s Devonshire and Cambridge ballrooms, which offer panoramic city views, British sophistication and style and a world-class culinary team that will customize exquisite gastronomic menus to fit even the most refined palate. The hotel also boasts spacious, contemporary rooms and an award-winning wellness spa. 330 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 312923-7020 5. CHEZ Glide down an elegant glass staircase before heading down the aisle in this urban yet elegant loft space. Originally designed as a bakery in 1917 by architects Marshall and Fox, best known for the Drake and Blackstone Hotel, “Chez Paree” was once a well-known speakeasy

then a classic supper club, hosting some of the biggest names in entertainment. Now know as “Chez” (and still run by its original owner), the room dazzles in brilliant white with airy draping over its 17-foot floor-to-ceiling windows, white-washed brick walls and polished concrete floors, giving it an ethereal glow for weddings of up to 200 guests. 247 E. Ontario St., Chicago, 312-255-0288 Is your style more Vintage Glamour, Boho/Rustic Chic or Classically Elegant? Check out six more recommendations for Chicago’s top venues in these diverse styles online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ VENUES

The Langham

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#WEDDING

PINT-SIZED CONTROVERSY: SHOULD KIDS BE INVITED TO WEDDINGS? BY LISA ZIMBLER

Whether or not you plan to include the littles on your invite list, wedding and etiquette experts all agree that the key to avoiding hurt feelings is stating your intentions with careful consideration and a certain amount of decorum well before the big day.

BAN KIDS, SPARE PARENTS’ FEELINGS

AGE AND MATURITY OF THE CHILD: Children over 5 are most suited to participate in the wedding party or attend the ceremony. However, each child’s maturity level is different, so consider individual personalities and each child’s ability to stay quiet or sit still during the ceremony. TIME AND FORMALITY OF THE WEDDING Be mindful of each child’s mental and physical limitations. Asking a young child to stay awake for a 7:00 p.m. candlelight ceremony may be next to impossible.

Frank Andonoplas, master bridal consultant and adjunct professor of business etiquette for the School of Hospitality at DePaul University, says he has seen a slight increase in recent years on the part of his own clients to make their nuptials a “kid-free” zone in an effort to keep their wedding more formal and dignified.

SUPERVISION Parents who are also in the wedding party will be hard-pressed to quiet their crying child if they are doing double duty at the altar as a wedding attendant.

If the consensus is to put a ban on babes at your wedding, the best way to politely convey this message to your guests is by communicating directly via phone or in-person. In addition to a word-of-mouth approach, Andrea Liss, founder and creative director of Hannah Handmade, a custom invitation boutique firm in Evanston, suggests placing careful consideration on the wording of invitations to express a couple’s wishes.

PREPARATION Prepping kids for a wedding is crucial, says Lynelle Wooley, founder of Los Angeles-based website Flower Girl World. She recommends encouraging children in the wedding party to practice in advance. She also recommends children get plenty of sleep the night before and that parents bring mess-free snacks and activities on the day of the wedding.

IF YOU INVITE CHILDREN, SET THEM UP FOR SUCCESS

Andonoplas recommends that a separate room be designated as a children’s suite during the reception so children can socialize with their peers in a comfortable environment manned by a licensed and bonded professional sitter service.

Andonoplas admits he’s seen it all when it comes to children’s behavior at weddings, and issues usually occur when children are not properly prepared or lack parental supervision during the event. If your heart is set on little ones in your bridal procession, Andonoplas suggests considering these factors first:

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What’s your take on inviting kids to weddings? Tell us! MAKEITBETTER.NET/KIDSWEDDING.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HUSAR PHOTOGRAPHY

For some families, a couple’s decision to make their nuptials an adult-only affair can not only be seen as controversial, it can be enough to start a family feud.


PHOTO <CREDIT>

MAKE A DIFFERENCE | local treasure

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# F A M I LY

HOW HARD CAN IT BE? BY ROSS RITCHELL

Stay-at-home dad Ross Ritchell sets the record straight about full-time parenting.

As a first-time father working in the city, I came home tired, unfulfilled and resentful that my pretty wife had a full day rocking yoga pants and scoring excess applesauce off the lips of my cute little cuddlebubble all day, while I sliced my fingers on my crusty Jos A. Banks. Chasing ankle-biters all day couldn’t be worse than endless strategy meetings in tight pants and collars, right? Well, after publishing a novel, I got to stay at home and find out for myself. And holy s*** was I wrong! Here’s a little reality check.

THE MORNING WAKEUP

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Dear God, I wake up at 6:30 a.m. every day. How can eight hours

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of sleep go so fast? Aw, look at my sleeping wife with her cute little sleep mask snoozing away while I rise for my shift at the workingwheel on the corporate slaveship. Does she ever wake up? What a cute little lucky freeloading duck. Half of me wants to get out quietly, be a good parent and spouse, and the other half wants to slam the door so she and Johnny Jr. know what its like to work for a living. I hope Bill brought some donuts for the train. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: How can a child scream for four hours straight, and how does Johnny Sr. never hear a peep? He sleeps like a corpse. Johnny Jr. blew guacamole out of his diaper THREE times last night. Three! And he only gets breast milk! How is that even possible? Where’d he find the avocados? I know Johnny Sr. thinks I’m sleeping right now, but he’s wrong. I don’t wake because I don’t sleep. I live in perpetual darkness. My sleep mask covers my tears.

DIAPER CHANGES

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: It’s a cloth sausage hammock with two straps, for God’s sake! How hard can it be? Ew, gross. Is that dirt under my fingernails? The train is disgusting. I’ll wash my hands after I finish watching these cat videos on YouTube. Hey, Bill! Have you seen the one where the cat bites the dude in his sugar peas?

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSS RITCHELL

Ah, the eight-hour workday. You wake before the sun and run to your train, festering in filmy sweat-stank slacks, only to arrive at work and endure pointless meetings, exposed cubicles and crowded deli counters until 5 o’clock rolls around. And, all the while, the sweat-stank slacks crystallize to such a degree that your pleated trousers form dangerous crusts capable of drawing blood. Damn, capitalism! I mean, that’s real work, right? Beautiful and horrible and the only thing that builds countries, sustains families and earns Monday a hearty how-long-until-retirement shiver, right? That’s Work. With a capital dubyah, thank you very much. But raising babies isn’t like, real work, right? I mean, let’s be honest. Raising babies isn’t Work. It’s “work.”


# F A M I LY

Ross with his wife Stephanie and their two children Ross at home with his children

STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: I was petrified of snakes before I had kids, now I’m a herpetologist. I birthed no child; I birthed a spineless boa constrictor. I have the forearms of an Olympic weightlifter after dealing with Johnny Jr.’s crocodile death rolls on the changing table. Is that dirt or doodoo under my fingernails? Whatever. I just won’t bite my nails.

LUNCH

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Holy cow, was that meeting boring! Hey Bill, what should we do for lunch? The Italian deli or sushi? Oh, really? They got a sanitation violation? Gross. Sushi it is. My treat, I’ve got the Amex. Nah, I work hard enough. The wife and kid dine on my dime every day. They’re probably eating lobster and breaking out the good Scotch. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: I breastfeed my gluten-intolerant child in a dark room. If he sees the sun at lunch, he doesn’t nap. If he doesn’t nap, I cry more than usual. I haven’t seen the sun at noon or eaten anything but almonds in 43 days. Holy crap, is that an old Dorito under the couch? I can drag it over with my foot. Score! The parenting gods are smiling on me this day.

BACK TO WORK AFTER LUNCH

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Man, Bill, that dragon roll is lodged in my intestines. No, no, no. The big one. Or maybe the small one. I don’t know. Whatever, Bill. Maybe we should go for a walk outside before our next meeting. No, yeah, I already saw that cat hit the guy in his almond pouch this morning — let’s go. Maybe I’ll call the wife and see how the day is going. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: Holy meatballs, was that Dorito delicious?! It only had two hairs on it and the half that wasn’t under the couch wasn’t too stale. Sure, Johnny Jr. flinched when I chewed, but at least the phone hasn’t rung, and I only needed to eat half anyway. Oh my God, what’s that smell? He’s asleep! Wait, is wheat a Doritos ingredient?! NO!

AFTERNOON COFFEE BREAK

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: That was a nice walk, Bill, wasn’t it? And the meeting wasn’t too bad either. Hey, that sure was a blast dancing with that flash mob in Millennium Park, wasn’t it? I think I might’ve tweaked my patella. Let’s grab some coffee so I can walk it off. No, I’ll have my secretary hold my calls. You know what, I don’t even know if she can have coffee yet. She’s still breastfeeding, and seems pretty well rested to me. I’m the one with the sore patella, Bill. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: Wake up! Wait, did I just fall asleep standing up — is that even possible? Is Johnny Jr. okay? Phew. He only napped a few minutes, but at least I could eat that chip. Aw, look, he’s just bouncing in his bouncer and laughing at me. Mocking my existence. Oh my God, what’s that smell? Is Mrs. Pleasant next door making coffee? I haven’t had a cup since I got pregnant. Would it kill me if I had a sip? Would that be a bad thing? Could Johnny Jr. laugh loud enough to hail Mrs. Pleasant for help?

CLOCKING OUT

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Bill! Closing time, amigo. Can I grab a beer? Sure, I’ve got a few minutes. If I miss my train there’s another in 45 minutes. No, she won’t mind. Does she cook dinner? Ha! I wish, Bill. She’s so zenned out from all her yoga, she won’t even know if I’m a few minutes late. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: It is exactly 5:34 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. Johnny Sr. should be three blocks from his train by now, unless a strong wind’s blowing from the northwest, in which case he’s four or five out. Either way, he’s got time for the train and once it leaves he’ll be here in 30 minutes. Then it’s a seven-minute walk to our door. If he’s not through that door by 6:17 p.m., I’m calling the police to report spousal abuse. At least, I’d call them if my fingers weren’t soaked in Johnny Jr.’s lunch. Stop moving, baby, please! Can I voice-dial the cops? A pizza?

REUNITED, AT LAST

WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Hey, honey! Little man, gimme a five! How’d the day go? I see you’re in your yoga top, looks comfortable. Is that sweat? You never had smelly sweat. Hope you got a good workout in! Bill and I just grabbed a beer, sorry I’m late. STAY-AT-HOME REALITY: He can’t give you a five without pulling out all of my hair. I wear my yoga top so whenever he wants to feed, I can just pull ‘em out. It’s not sweat. It’s leaking breast milk, Johnny Jr.’s spit-up and my tears. I haven’t burnt a single calorie that wasn’t shed crying or feeding our son since he was born. WORKING PARENT’S PERCEPTION: Honey, why the long face? And why are the cops here? Ross Ritchell is a father of two and graduate of New Trier High School. He was an Army Ranger and wrote “The Knife,” a novel about Special Operators at war in the Middle East, published by an imprint of Penguin Random House in 2015.

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HERE’S TO A HAPPY,

HEALTHY 2016 From easy and fun winter workouts to anti-inflammatory diet tips, we’ll help you you start your year on the right foot.

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# H E A LT H

6 CALORIE-BURNING

WINTER WORKOUTS BY JESSICA SUSS

Chilly temperatures have a tendency to freeze more than just car engines: They freeze our willpower too. Luckily, it’s surprisingly easy to burn calories just by getting out in the cold for some old-fashioned winter fun — and it sure beats an hour on the treadmill. 1. ICE SKATING

Hit the ice at Millennium Park — just one hour of consistent movement burns 490 calories. On top of that, you’re engaging your core to stay upright, inching you closer to that six-pack when you peel away your winter gear.

2. SNOWSHOEING

Strap on a pair of snowshoes and tromp around your local forest preserve, or even your block. An hour of steady walking burns — wait for it — 560 calories in one fell swoop. What better way to atone for

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your holiday cookie sins? Rent snowshoes, $15 per pair for two days, $10 each additional day: The Runner’s Edge (multiple locations)

3. SHOVELING

It has to get done anyway, so why not do it yourself and take care of your workout for the day? Clearing the driveway blasts about 450 calories an hour, so you might as well do the sidewalk … and your neighbor’s driveway while you’re at it. Just make sure you’re bending from the knees so you don’t put unnecessary strain on your back.


4. SLEDDING

Parents rejoice! Hitting the sledding hill burns a surprisingly high number of calories — 490 an hour. Maybe it’s not that surprising considering you spend 90 percent of the time schlepping up the hill, 8 percent of the time arranging snow pants and 2 percent of the time actually sledding down the hill. Sounds like a great way for parents and kids to get their cardio together.

5. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING

You might think cross-country skiing would be pretty low-impact in terms of calories, but exerting just moderate speed and effort knocks off 560 calories an hour. If you are really trying to push it, with some serious vigor you can torch upwards of 600 calories an hour, skiing off heavy holiday meals with just a turn or two around a beautiful nature preserve. Rent cross-country skis, $12 per pair, at Heller Nature Center, Highland Park

6. HAVING A SNOWBALL FIGHT

Depending on how determined you are, you can burn about 319 calories an hour. If the snow is extra deep — meaning extra resistance — you can count on blasting a few more. Plus, it’s actually fun to run around and dodge snowballs, so you won’t be checking your phone every five minutes like you would during a spin class. Calorie counts are approximate and vary based on weight and intensity of movement. Looking to step up your fitness game? We asked top local fitness experts to show us their favorite moves for every part of the body—from abs to arms. Watch, learn and sweat: MAKEITBETTER.NET/FITNESSGUIDE


# H E A LT H

FOOD FOR LIFE:

HOW TO HEAL YOUR BODY WITH ANDREW WEIL’S ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DIET BY KAREN MALKIN

The author of “Fast Food, Good Food,” “True Food,” “Spontaneous Happiness,” “The Healthy Kitchen” (with Rosie Daley), “Healthy Aging” and other books, Weil advocates following an anti-inflammatory diet to maintain health and promote healing. Here are some top tips for anti-inflammatory healthy eating.

FIBER

• Aim for 40 grams of fiber per day to include a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, beans and whole grains. • Vegetables rich in soluble fiber such as asparagus, berries and artichokes provide a healthy food source for the gut microbiome. • Cooking with spices such as black pepper, ginger and cumin can aid digestion of high-fiber foods.

CARBOHYDRATES

• The type and quality of carbohydrates impact their association with disease. • Fruits, vegetables, legumes and unprocessed whole grains are

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a rich source of fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. • Whole wheat bread is not a whole grain. Beans, berries, legumes and whole grains are healthy sources of carbohydrates. • Eat a plethora of cruciferous vegetables, a rich source of sulfurcontaining compounds known as glucosinolates, such as broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, kale and collard greens, daily. • Consider organic when possible. Check out the Environmental Working Group for the Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen. • Prioritize organic apples, celery, tomatoes, cucumbers, grapes, nectarines, peaches, potatoes, snap peas, spinach, strawberries, sweet bell peppers, hot peppers, kale and collard greens. • The USDA recommends eating one-half cup of green leafy vegetables a day to prevent nutrient deficiencies and serious illnesses. Leafy greens include spinach, collard greens, kale, Swiss chard, turnip greens and mustard greens. • Vinegar can cut the glycemic response by one-third. Adding vinaigrette dressing to a salad helps lower the glycemic response to food.

FATS

• Include foods rich in omega-3 such as wild salmon, sardines, herring, black cod and albacore tuna. • Plant sources of omega 3s include walnuts, flax, chia and hemp seeds. • Enjoy foods high in monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, avocados, nuts and seeds. Eliminate soy and corn oil, which are high in pro-inflammatory omega-6s.

PHOTO BY LINDA MACLENNAN

Dr. Andrew Weil, M.D., is a leader in the field of integrative medicine, a prevention-oriented, evidence-based approach to health, which takes into account the whole person, including all aspects of lifestyle. Integrative medicine combines the best practices of conventional and alternative medicine and works from the premise that the body can heal itself, if given the chance. Methods such as nutrition, herbal remedies, supplementation and stress reduction are used as natural and less invasive remedies to promote healing.


# H E A LT H

PROTEIN

• The recommended allowance is around 56 grams per day for men and 46 grams for women of lean protein sources. • Enjoy plant-based proteins such as tempeh, lentils, legumes, hemp seeds and quinoa. • Enjoy dairy from organic-grass-fed cows, which have been shown to produce a more anti-inflammatory fatty acid profile than non-organic-grain-fed cows. • Eat less protein if you have allergies, kidney, liver or autoimmune disease. • Grilling, broiling, roasting, frying and searing at high temperatures animal-derived protein that is high in fat accelerates new “AGE” (Advanced Glycation End products) formation and inflammation, which can become pathogenic when found in the tissues. • Cook with moist heat, lower cooking temperature and create a citrus or vinegar marinade for food that will be broiled or grilled to reduce AGEs.

FRUCTOSE

• Diets high in added fructose are associated with increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver and raise inflammation. • Aim for less than 25 grams of fructose per day. • Foods high in fructose include: sugar-sweetened beverages, breakfast cereals, breads, fruit-flavored yogurts, candy and

candy bars, fruit juice blends, salad dressings and condiments, energy bars and agave syrup.

ASIAN MUSHROOMS • An excellent source of protein, fiber, vitamins A, B3, B12, C and D, and bioactive compounds that have anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive effects. • Shiitake mushrooms are used medicinally for conditions such as depressed immune function, cancer, diabetes, environmental allergies, high cholesterol and infectious disease. • Add to a stir-fry, omelet, soup or create mushroom pâté.

TURMERIC

• Contains curcumin, a powerful compound used for prevention and healing. • Turmeric functions as an anti-inflammatory antioxidant shown to be anti-cancer, contains pain-relieving properties to support tendinitis and arthritis, has neuroprotective benefits that support brain health, and is shown to be effective in people with gastrointestinal diseases. • Add turmeric to any savory dish. It also tastes great in a turmeric latte. Read more about healthy living online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BETTERYOU


# H E A LT H

THE MOST COMMON

CHROMOSOME DISORDER YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF

“The ultrasound technician was being very quiet and taking longer than normal,” recalls Ryan Garcia. He and wife, Lindsey, were awaiting the results of her 20-week ultrasound for their second child. At first, the doctor thought their son had Tetralogy of Fallot, a heart defect common to certain genetic disorders. The Garcias decided to have an amniocentesis for genetic testing. After three rounds of testing, their son, to be named Cohen, was diagnosed with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

that one in 2,000 to 4,000 children each year are born with 22q, the actual number of people who are diagnosed with the syndrome is less than that because the symptoms range from mild to severe and are associated with almost 200 different health and development issues.

After Down syndrome, 22q is the second most common chromosome disorder. It is caused by a small missing portion, or deletion, of the 22nd chromosome. While it is estimated

Before the discovery of the deletion, the disorder was known by several different names. DiGeorge syndrome was associated with severe heart defects, hypoparathyroidism and severe im-

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DEMPSTER FAMILY FOUNDATION

BY CORTNEY FRIES


# H E A LT H

Ryan Dempster with a 22q family Isla and Cohen Garcia

mune deficiency. A combination of milder heart defects, feeding issues, speech problems and cleft lip/palate was identified as VCFS (velocardio facial syndrome). Now, all symptoms are realized to fall under the 22q11.2 umbrella. The number of names associated with the symptoms only compounds the issue of diagnosing and managing healthcare for 22q.

BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF DEMPSTER FAMILY FOUNDATION; TOP PHOTO BY ERICA BARRACA PHOTOGRAPHY

“There are individuals with 22q who need 24-hour care, while there’s also a woman with 22q who has the same master’s degree I do,” says Bettsy Leech, genetic counselor and 22q/VCFS coordinator at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center. “If your child has birth defects, developmental delays and learning problems that are not going away, you should consider a genetic evaluation.” An early diagnosis can save years of confusion and frustration. It provides parents and practitioners with a roadmap and warning signs, enabling symptoms to be caught while they are small. About 75 percent of 22q patients have a cardiac anomaly. Anxiety is the single most common symptom, with 98 percent reporting. Learning disabilities are also common. “Their whole lives are built on anxiety,” explains Leech. “It’s like listening to a foreign language tape for a region in India, then just getting dropped off there. You don’t know the culture. You’re bound to offend people. The anxiety builds and these children have less bandwidth to focus on learning.” Scoliosis is another possible concern as children reach puberty, but Leech says less than 5 percent of the kids with 22q whom she is familiar with have scoliosis. A bigger, and more frightening concern, she says, is the 25 percent risk for schizophrenia. When the Garcias received their son’s diagnosis in August 2013, they immediately turned to the Internet for information. The Dempster Family Foundation, founded by former Cubs’ pitcher Ryan Dempster when his daughter, Riley, was diagnosed, was a wonderful resource. Focused on building awareness and supporting 22q families, the Dempster Family Foundation (DFF) pitches in to provide a leg up in managing children’s special education needs and developing a roadmap to success. The Dempster Family Foundation is planning to close, but The International 22q11.2 Foundation, Inc. provides similar resources for families. No stranger to helping others, Ryan Garcia quickly realized he had a platform to build awareness for this seldom-discussed syndrome.

You may remember Garcia as the Chicago dad who pledged to perform 366 Acts of Kindness in 2012 after his daughter, Isla, was born. “I wanted to make the world a better place for her and set a good example,” recalls Garcia. “For the final act of kindness, we were going to adopt a baby.” Those plans were delayed when the Garcias discovered they were pregnant. When Cohen was diagnosed with 22q, instead of worrying about every possible negative outcome, Garcia decided to evolve his efforts into State of Kind — he pledged to perform an act of kindness in every state, to raise awareness for 22q. The first State of Kind endeavor was completed in October 2013, a month before Cohen was born. Garcia raised more than $1,200 in gasoline gift cards to offset the travel expenses of an Indiana single mother of three special needs children, including one in a facility two hours from her home. To date, six acts of kindness have been completed, in Indiana, Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Vermont and Texas. State of Kind gifted lawn care and spa services to a mother of two young boys who was recovering from colorectal cancer after she lost her husband, father and father-in-law to other forms of cancer. Kyle Korver of the Atlanta Hawks donated great seats to a game and Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. provided an autographed model of his NASCAR racecar to State of Kind recipients. “It’s really bonded us as a family,” says Garcia. “Our mission is now to raise awareness.” Daughter Isla has been known to host drink stands and request donations to 22q in lieu of birthday presents. 22q is a common syndrome that is rarely diagnosed. Education allows those affected to be proactive. You can help put 22q on the public radar by sharing this article. FIND IT ONLINE AT MAKEITBETTER.NET/22Q Mystery Tour Bus with 22q families

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Though discomfort is relatively minimal during these heatbased procedures, it mainly stems from the need to place a dilute local anesthetic (tumescent) solution around the entire length of the veins being treated. So, ironically, it’s the numbing medicine that doctors use to alleviate discomfort that causes patients to feel discomfort (though not too much). Newer, state-of-the-art techniques are now available to patients that are even less invasive and require much less numbing medicine — almost none at all — to achieve similar outcomes. These non-thermal, non-tumescent (NTNT), FDA-approved techniques could be called “cutting edge” except that they don’t really involve cutting. Instead, it would be more appropriate to call them “blunting-edge” technologies. One such technique is mechanical occlusion with chemical assist (MOCA or Clarivein®). Instead of heat from a laser, veins are closed by injecting a chemical through a catheter combined with a specialized, blunt wire that rotates rapidly, all under ultrasound guidance. To the patient, it feels like a gentle vibration. None of the patients I have performed the Clarivein® procedure on have complained of pain. The procedure is safe, effective (about the same as with lasers) and comfortable — a winning combination.

THE

“BLUNTING EDGE”

OF MODERN VEIN CARE

B Y DAV I D I A N R O S E N , M D FOUNDER & MEDICAL DIRECTOR , ROSEN VEIN CARE

Advancements in medicine over the past few decades relating to the care of chronic vein disease have led to less invasive means of achieving great outcomes for patients. Surgical stripping used to be the mainstay of treating superficial vein disease. The first breakthrough that led to a shift away from invasive surgery was the use of endovascular, ultrasoundguided techniques. Other than sclerotherapy injections, newer techniques employed devices that “heat-sealed” veins closed from the inside. These included radiofrequency catheters and specialized lasers. Over the course of the past decade, these techniques have proven to be safe, effective and well tolerated.

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A second recently approved method is called VenaSeal®. This revolutionary “super glue” is a special formulation for use in veins. Again, no need for tumescent anesthetic means minimal associated discomfort. This technique has demonstrated to be safe and effective to a similar degree as thermal ablation. One additional potential “plus” is that patients may not be required to wear compression stockings after VenaSeal®, making the procedure more appealing for patients in the summer and for those living in warmer climates. The cold winter months are the perfect time to discover these state-of-the-art treatment options and get your legs ready for next “shorts season”!

To discover if Clarivein® or VenaSeal® may be right for you, schedule your consultation appointment with Dr. Rosen today.

847-272-8346 | RosenVeinCare.com 1535 Lake Cook Rd., Suite 401 | Northbrook


# H E A LT H

COULD YOU BE A

SUPERAGER? BY CHRIST Y COUGHLIN

A new study is revealing interesting brain characteristics in older adults who aren’t aging like most. So-called SuperAgers have cognitive abilities like those of much younger people. SuperAger Elizabeth Lautner

Scientists at Northwestern University’s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center at the Feinberg School of Medicine are working to understand why some older adults’ brains function like those of people 20 to 30 years younger. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, “In 2050, the population aged 65 and over is projected to be 83.7 million, almost double its estimated population of 43.1 million in 2012.” As the population ages, many older adults deal with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, while others continue to lead active, productive lives. Researchers at Northwestern hope to uncover ways to improve normal aging and possibly treat dementia. “SuperAgers” are people over age 80 who have memories similar to healthy 50- to 60-year-olds. Started in 2007, the SuperAgers research team focused exclusively on memory and thinking ability, rather than physical health. Research is showing that the SuperAger brain is protected from the atrophy normally associated with aging, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

PHOTO BY RALPH NORDENHOLD

“This is the upper echelon of people over the age of 80 when it comes to memory performance,” explains Dr. Emily Rogalski, the lead investigator on the project. Participants in the study must be 80 years or older with exceptional memories and cognitive abilities. Candidates for the SuperAgers are given a baseline evaluation including a blood draw, neurological exam, MRI brain scan, detailed medical and family histories, and cognitive and memory tests. Participants are asked to consider brain donation at the time of death. Researchers use brain imaging to reveal three brain characteristics in the SuperAgers that distinguish them from others: 1. The region of anterior cingulate cortex, associated with memory and attention, was thicker in SuperAgers compared to healthy 50- to 65-year-olds. 2. SuperAgers showed a lower frequency of Alzheimer-type neurofibrillary tangles, making them less vulnerable to the disease.

3. The study also revealed a higher supply of von Economo neurons, which have been linked with intelligence. While the reasons for these brain differences are not yet known, researchers hope to discover the brain structure, genetic or lifestyle factors that may contribute to the SuperAger brain. There may be more than one way to achieve the SuperAger status. “Participants are generally very engaged … working, volunteering, teaching, taking classes and socially active,” Rogalski says. She notes that while some participants exercise, others smoke, drink, and many have had major health problems like cancer and heart disease. Not all are highly educated. Some have no children. Not all come from a line of long-living relatives. Elizabeth Lautner, 83, who lives in a retirement community outside San Antonio, came upon the SuperAgers study online. “When I hear about an opportunity, I jump in,” Lautner says. “I feel so blessed to have such a good memory and am happy to help out with the study.” Lautner is extremely active, still taking photographs, working as a cashier in the dining room at her retirement community, teaching photo editing, playing dominoes four times a week, volunteering, learning to read music and writing short stories. “My mind is still very active, even though my body is aging,” Lautner says. While more than 1,000 people have expressed interest in the SuperAgers study, fewer than 100 have qualified. These SuperAgers are truly the “brain elite” of the over-80 crowd. Are you, a parent or friend a candidate for the SuperAger study? Contact the SuperAging study coordinator at 312-503-2716 or agingresearch@northwestern.edu. Your healthy brain may help advance the science of aging, leading to a better quality of life for all.

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# T R AV E L

GREAT ESCAPE:

AMELIA ISLAND BY CORTNEY FRIES

If you’ve been craving a warm-weather getaway that’s close to home, yet feels like yesteryear, hop on a plane and be at one of the top 10 islands in America in just two hours. A golfer’s paradise, Amelia Island is home to 117 holes of awardwinning golf. Omni Amelia Island Plantation offers 54 championship golf holes, including courses designed by Pete Dye and Bobby Weed, with spectacular views of the natural terrain. If you’ve dreamed of a gentle horseback gallop along sand and surf, Amelia Island is the perfect place for a beachfront ride. Soak in the sunshine and sounds of the ocean as your feet graze warm waters and saltwater air sweeps through your hair. For nature lovers and history buffs, a visit to Fort Clinch State Park might be the ticket to a sensational vacation. Bike among Spanish moss-draped oaks or hike to the largest sand dunes in Florida.

WHERE TO STAY

The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island is a new addition to the island, combining the Ritz’s upscale ambiance with dashes of southern charm. Revel in stunning coastal views from every private balcony. Relax by the courtyard fire pit, cocktail in hand, or bury your toes in the sand of the dune-lined beaches. Young guests can snuggle up with a special tuck-in from Princess Amelia. The Omni Amelia Island Plantation recently underwent an $85 million re-imagination. This impressive 1,350-acre property is like a world unto itself, with luxurious beachfront accommodations, gorgeous pools, countless dining options and tons of 54

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family-friendly activities, including mini golf, biking and nature excursions, all seemingly effortlessly painted into the beautiful backdrop. They even offer a “Biggest Loser Resort” for people who want to take the first step toward getting fit. Elizabeth Pointe Lodge is a charming oceanfront bed-and-breakfast with wide porches perfect for reading and reclining. Not only is their breakfast exceptional, but they also serve free wine and hors d’oeuvres every evening and complimentary cookies all day.

EATING WELL ON THE ISLAND

Salt, Ritz-Carlton’s AAA Five Diamond Restaurant, serves artfully prepared dishes from land and sea, seasoned with salts from around the world. For a unique experience, try “Dine with the Chefs.” You’ll get a private seat in the kitchen with a customized menu and optional wine pairings. Joe’s 2nd Street Bistro features casual elegance in an environment similar to dining in a chef’s abode. Located in a restored 1900s home in the historic heart of Fernandina Beach, their creative pasta, seafood and steak dishes are delectable, but the desserts are to die for. Not only does Amelia Island dining include fabulous French finds, like Le Clos, and tempting tapas at España Restaurant and Tapas, but also several casual cafés that feature quality dishes. Dine at Pi Infinite Combinations for tasty pizza served in a cozy

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMELIA ISLAND TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

WHAT TO DO


Elizabeth Point Lodge Sunset horseback ride on Amelia Island

courtyard. Toppings range from spicy pepperoni to fresh local shrimp and black truffle oil. See why Timoti’s Seafood Shak was named one of America’s Best Seafood Dives by Coastal Living magazine in 2013. Their wild-caught fish, clams and shrimp are served in baskets, tacos and wraps. You’ll soon become a part of their fiercely loyal following.

TREAT YOURSELF

Luxurious spas on Amelia Island offer unique and indulgent ways to rejuvenate. The Salon & Spa at Omni Amelia Island Plantation features signature services like the “Seaside Sensory Journey,” a three-step exfoliation under restorative waters, as well as yoga classes and retreats in their Spa Treehouse.

SHOP UNDER THE SUN

HOTEL PHOTO COURTESY OF OF ELIZABETH POINT LODGE

Explore the eclectic collection of local shops and galleries in the quaint downtown shopping district. You’ll be sure to notice a line out the door of Fantastic Fudge. If the sweet aroma of fudge and freshly baked waffle cones doesn’t draw you in, you’ve got stronger willpower than most. Delight in the different fudge flavors crafted throughout the day, the old-fashioned way, on a thick marble slab table. And nothing says vacation like an ice cream cone by the beach. Next to Fantastic Fudge, you’ll find a reader’s treasure trove at The Book Loft. Immerse yourself in stacks of rare and signed books, as well as pirate and historic collections.

JOIN THE PARTY

Amelia Island loves to celebrate. Two festivals worth going for are the Shrimp Festival at the end of April and Jazz Festival in October. The Annual Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival features pirates, parades, arts and entertainment and, of course, shrimp. Hosted in historic downtown Fernandina Beach, the birthplace of the modern shrimping industry, it is one of the premier festivals in Southwest Florida. Learn more about where to stay, what to do, where to eat, shop and be pampered at MAKEITBETTER.NET/AMELIA.


#HOME

HOUSEWARMING:

5 BEAUTIFUL ACCESSORIES FOR A COZY WINTER HOME BY MEGHAN STREIT

Throw another log on the fire, pour yourself a warm (spiked!) drink and cue up a great movie. It’s winter in Chicago. For happier hibernating at home, feather your nest with these items—proudly including Maze Home and Chicago Luxury Bed from our Shop For Good e-commerce store. Shop For Good Item, available at makeitbetter.net/shop

CAROLA VAN DYKE STAG PILLOW

Give your living room a textured and lived-in look by mixing in a fun statement pillow with several simpler throw pillows. This quirky plaid pillow from Maze Home says “winter” without screaming “Christmas,” so you can leave it out after you pack up the holiday decorations. $205, Shop For Good, makeitbetter.net/shop

HOT TODDY DIAGRAM GLASSWARE

Cold weather calls for stick-to-your-ribs stews and casseroles. Cook up one of your favorite recipes and serve it in this handsome wood and silver casserole holder from Maze Home. $590, Shop For Good, makeitbetter.shop

SFERRA CELINE THROW

You can never have too many throw blankets. Stock up on these super-soft herringbone throws from Chicago Luxury Bed so you’re prepared for family movie nights, lazy Sundays on the couch, and those inevitable snow days. $89, Shop For Good, makeitbetter. net/shop

SHEEPSKIN RUG

Plush sheepskin rugs will warm up cold feet. Available in black, taupe, linen and vole, these Arhaus rugs will work in just about any room. Layer them over thinner rugs during the winter, and then pack them away in spring. $979, Arhaus, arhaus.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS

CHALTEN CASSEROLE HOLDER

Never forget how to mix up a hot toddy (even after you’ve had a couple!). These cute mugs are perfect for sipping the classic winter cocktail by the fire. $30 for two, Uncommon Goods, uncommongoods.com


#HOME

INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION WILMETTE BUNGALOW GETS SLEEK NEW LOOK WITH GLASS, STEEL AND MARBLE

lmost as soon as we walked in the door, I realized that this was the right house,” explains the owner of a nearly 8,000-square-foot brick bungalow adorned with columns and other Georgian architectural elements in Wilmette. Although the interior was dark and derelict, he was impressed with its solid construction and could envision a lighter, brighter future.

sioned and allow natural light to flow unobstructed through the interior. “The client was interested in doing something that was a little more clean-lined but still made sense with the architecture of the existing house,” Massey explains. “We gave them an interior that felt much more open but with defined spaces that still felt traditional.”

“The beauty of this house is that very little had been done to it,” the owner explains. “We could justify a major overhaul.”

To address a once-cramped kitchen, Massey created a new one in the former master bedroom, which he relocated to the second floor. And what was once an unheated back porch is now a vestibule with direct access to the laundry room, an open stairway leading to the lower level and a new deck.

Although he was living in Hong Kong with his wife and two children at the time, the owner embarked on a lengthy search to identify the right team for the project, ultimately hiring Bill Massey, who also managed the construction in his absence. The changes begin in the front foyer, where Massey incorporated a glass and steel vestibule clad in marble. “The homeowner wanted to find a way to use some sort of metalwork,” Massey explains. “It’s a nod to the fact that his family is in the manufacturing business.” The transparent walls, which also define the dining area and back stairway, create the modern aesthetic that the owner envi-

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“The house didn’t really have a relationship to the backyard, which looked over the golf course, so this amenity of a long, green vista in the city was cut off from the rest of the spaces,” Massey says. Taking his cues from the linear interior architecture, interior designer David MacKenzie selected furnishings with contemporary lines, which are set against a neutral palette of warm hues. In the formal living room, for example, a taupe rug with a modern geometric pattern has been used to unite two distinct

PHOTOS BY ERIC HAUSMAN

B Y TAT E G U N N E R S O N


Walnut custom cabinetry in the kitchen The bright bungalow dining room

seating areas. “It’s a very large-scale geometric pattern, which speaks to a more modern way of looking at things,” MacKenzie says. According to Massey, the home feels cohesive thanks to the strong working relationship between architect and interior designer. “One of the things that made the project so successful is how seamlessly David and I worked together,” Massey explains. “There’s a connection between materials, lighting, fabric and paint color. It all works together so beautifully.” The house earned a silver LEED certification and has also been awarded a historic preservation award by the Village of Wilmette. Although the owner initially had buyer’s remorse after taking on such a large job while living overseas, he is still amazed at how smooth the process was and thrilled with the final result. “The interior has a calming and peacefulness to it that is very inviting,” he says. “It’s a daily joy to live in this house.” See more images of this home online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ WILMETTEBUNGALOW


#CAMP

PHOTO COURTESY OF NIKE SOCCER CAMP

MAKE IT BETTER’S 2016 CAMP GUIDE PART 1:

ADVENTURES ABOUND

Now that the holidays are over, it’s time to start thinking about the next busy season: summer! With most camps opening their registration in the new year, make sure you start looking into their programs now. The following music and sports camps are perfect for the high-energy, fun-loving kid. J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 6

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#CAMP

9 GREAT SPORTS AND MUSIC CAMPS B Y K AT I E J E N KO

It’s hard to find the right activities for kids with ever-evolving interests. Fortunately, there are great camps nearby that appeal to a variety of passions. From rock ‘n’ roll to classical, let your kid channel their inner-musician at one of these music camps. Have an athletic thrill-seeker? Check out these sports camps that range from traditional to adventurous. 62

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PHOTO COURTESY OF INTERLOCHEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

SUMMERTIME HAPPINESS:


Interlochen Center for the Arts Instrumental Institute

MUSIC CAMPS CHICAGO CENTER FOR MUSIC EDUCATION GLEE CAMP Whether your child is hoping to star in the next “Pitch Perfect” movie or is just looking to carry a Happy Birthday tune, the Chicago Center for Music Education (ChiMe) “Glee Camp” can help. During the week-long day camp, kids will learn vocal and sight-reading techniques as well as improve performance skills such as self-confidence and self-expression. The city-based camp will close with an exciting performance by the campers. Due to popularity, ChiMe will offer two separate week-long camps during early July. Ages: 6 and up Cost: $195 Dates: Early July Location: 1148 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago For more information, visit chimemusic.org/summer-camps or call 312-738-2646 INTERLOCHEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS Nestled in the northwest Michigan woods, the Interlochen Center for the Arts has been honing young musicians’ skills for nearly 80 years. The elite conservatory offers both summer-long as well as week-long “Instrumental Institutes.” Brass, percussion, string and woodwind musicians will receive direction from exceptional faculty and participate in several performances over the summer. With no classes on Mondays, campers may enjoy off-campus field trips to the Sleeping Bear Dunes and Peterson Beach on Lake Michigan. Financial aid is available. Ages: 8-18 Cost: Starting at $1,150 Dates: Mid-June through early August Location: Interlochen, Mich. For more information, visit academy.interlochen.org or call 800-681-5912 SCHOOL OF ROCK SONGWRITING CAMP Let your kids channel their inner rock star at the School of Rock Songwriting Camp. Students will learn song form, song arrangement, groove creation and mood development during staff-led clinics. At the end of the camp, your rocker-intraining will get to lay down original tracks in a professional recording studio. School of Rock will offer two camps, one in late June at the Highwood location and one in late July at the Evanston location. Ages: 12-17 Cost: $450 Highwood: 6/20-6/24 Evanston: 7/25-7/29 For more information, visit locations.schoolofrock.com/highwood or call 847-433-7625

SPORTS CAMPS BULLS/SOX ACADEMY BASKETBALL CAMP Who better to teach basketball than the Chicago Bulls? Since 1999, the Bulls have offered exceptional camps to Chicago’s boys and girls, ages 6-12. Younger players will learn the basics


#CAMP Summer Camp at Lake Forest Sailing

CHICAGO ROWING FOUNDATION Thrilling, fast-paced and intense, rowing provides the perfect outlet for the energetic kid. Tucked up against the Chicago River, The Chicago Rowing Foundation (CRF) offers entrylevel day camps during July and August. During the twoweek camp, teens will learn the essentials of sweep rowing (one oar per person) and dynamic teamwork. Comprised of current and former collegiate athletes, CRF’s coaching staff provides excellent instruction on how to row as a crew of eight. Additionally, CRF provides an adaptive program for teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities. Ages: 11-16 Cost: $525 Dates: July 5-15, July 25-Aug. 4 Location: 3400 N. Rockwell, Chicago For more information, visit rowchicago.com or call 312-636-1239

Ages: 6-8 (Rookie Camp), 9-12 (Veteran Camp) Cost: $215 Dates: TBD Location: Lisle For more information, visit bullssoxacademy.com or call 630-324-0865 NIKE SOCCER CAMPS Learn from some of the country’s most respected and accomplished coaches when Nike Soccer Camps comes to Elmhurst College this summer. Players will receive instruction on functional training, attacking, supporting play, decision making, shooting and defending. Standing apart from other soccer camps, the Nike camp also provides specialized goalkeeping and striker training. The acclaimed camp is open to players of all levels, ages 8-18. Ages: 8-18 Cost: $340 (Day), $420 (Overnight) Dates: June 24-26 Location: Elmhurst College For more information, visit ussportscamps.com/soccer/nike or call 800-645-3226 BIG BLUE SWIM SCHOOL Watch your waterbug splash with joy at one of the North Shore’s most popular swim programs. A three-time Make It Better Best Of winner, Big Blue Swim School offers four-day camps of 30 minute lessons. The “Super Improver” camps combine quality instruction with fun activities, encouraging kids to advance their swim skills. Ages: 6 months-12 years old Cost: $88 per camp Dates: June-August For more information, visit bigblueswimschool.com or call 847-729-7665

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LAKE FOREST SAILING With Lake Michigan lapping nearly at your toes, it’s hard to pass up an opportunity to enjoy the water. As a nationally recognized and accredited training center, Lake Forest Sailing offers top-line instruction for kids ages 8 and up. Providing prams and 420 sailboats, the program separates campers based on age and experience. In addition to on-the-water coaching, sailors will receive seamanship instruction, including knot-tying and basic boat maintenance. Whether your child is learning to sail or is already an avid seafarer, the two-week-long camps are a perfect summer activity. Ages: 8-18 Dates: June 13-Aug 26 Location: Forest Park Beach, Lake Forest For more information, visit cityoflakeforest.com/parks-andrecreation/sailing or call 847-615-4592 NEW VISION ATHLETICS SUMMER SPORTS CAMP Do you have an adventurous son or daughter? Since 1999, New Vision Athletics has satisfied the elementary-aged thrillseekers of the North Shore. At the beginning of the week-long Lake Forest camp, coaches will follow a lesson-plan of athletic activities including baseball, whiffle ball, soccer, flag football and floor hockey. By mid-week, kids will get to craft their own days with the sports and activities they enjoy most. To promote good sportsmanship, kids are awarded “NVA Dollars” that can be used to buy souvenirs/treats at the “NVA Store.” For 3rd graders and up, NVA offers special elective options such as an overnight “lock-in” at Lake Forest College and one-day scuba diving classes in the pool. Ages: 8-13 Cost: $420/week Dates: Late June through July Location: Lake Forest College, Lake Forest For more information, visit newvisionathletics.com/summer-camp/ index.html or call 847-295-0682 STAY TUNED FOR PART 2 OF THE CAMP GUIDE IN OUR MARCH/APRIL ISSUE.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE FOREST SAILING

of the sport through fun games and drills while “soon-to-be serious” players refine their skills through advanced instruction. At the end of the camp, coaches will provide an evaluation report to highlight players’ progress and room for improvement.


#FINANCE

THE SECRET TO WORK/LIFE BALANCE (HINT: IT’S NOT MULTI-TASKING) BY PA M E L A R OT H B A R D

Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, former professor and dean at Princeton, and author of “Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family,” says her own childhood featured a father who encouraged her to have a career while her mother stayed home with children before starting a career later in life. We are all surrounded by mixed messages like these when it comes to creating space for work and family. Feminism, the passage of equal rights acts and increased access to higher education have made the workplace more open to women, yet Slaughter penned a popular 2012 article titled “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All.” In it, she cited research

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findings that “women are less happy today than their predecessors were in 1972, both in absolute terms and relative to men.” In trying to understand the reasons women are so unhappy — and leaving the workforce in record numbers — Slaughter discovered the following:

1. WORK/LIFE BALANCE HAS A TIPPING POINT

“It’s basic physics,” Slaughter says. “You cannot lean in too far without a strong support system or you will tip over.” And even when you have support, you can hit a tipping point. Circumstances can and do change. You might have a child with special

PHOTO BY GREG MARTON

You know an issue is complicated when one of the leading voices on the matter admits that her view is as evolving as the issue itself. The leading voice is AnneMarie Slaughter and the issue is work/life balance, which she came to the North Shore to discuss during a Family Action Network event last fall.


Author Anne-Marie Slaughter

needs or a marriage that fails or childcare that falls through — the list is endless.

2. IT’S NOT JUST A “WOMEN’S ISSUE”

Though work/life balance has been framed for many years as a “women’s problem,” Slaughter urges us to expand our thinking. She makes the point that our American workplace is still designed for a workforce from 50 years ago — one that assumes men will work and women will stay home to be the primary caregivers, despite the fact that 60 percent of women work outside of their homes. Care issues — childcare, but also elder and other family care — top the list of reasons women leave the workforce. Care-based responsibilities influence men’s careers too, with 50 percent having changed jobs or deferred a promotion for family reasons. Twenty percent of the comments on Slaughter’s 2012 article were from men saying basically, “You think I have it all? I would much rather spend more time with my children, but this is not an option for me. I have to be the breadwinner.” Like women, men have to deal with others’ perceptions that if they take a step back they’re not committed to their careers. Further, a man stepping back may have his masculinity called into question.

3. CONSIDER HOW WE ARE RAISING OUR KIDS

Slaughter says, “Women are not equal until men are equal — we can’t change women’s roles as dramatically as we have and not change men’s.” This starts with how we raise our kids. While daughters are encouraged to have a career and a family, “our sons are being raised to be breadwinners,” Slaughter says. It’s important to teach our sons that they can choose to support their spouses with care rather than cash.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP PROMOTE WORK/LIFE BALANCE • Get involved in political action committees like Moms Rising, Mocha Moms and Make It Work. • Come together as voters to demand government-mandated paid maternity and paternity leave. • Volunteer for political candidates who support these issues. • Support efforts to create an infrastructure of quality care for both children and elders. • Explore alternative options for women and men who want more flexibility like starting a business or getting involved with organizations like OpenWork, which seeks to work with organizations and employees to redefine how work gets done. • Give boys the same sense of doing something new as we gave girls with “you can break the glass ceiling.” Help break gender roles for boys with communication.

Watch a clip of Slaughter’s FAN talk at MAKEITBETTER.NET/WORKLIFE

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR

FINANCES FOR DIVORCE

BY ANNE T TE FINDLING AND LE SLIE NORTH

Going through a separation is difficult. The process can turn your world — and the world of everyone involved — upside down. Managing the financial facets of divorce can be nearly as overwhelming as coping with the emotional aspects of it. The following can help you prepare financially for divorce: • Gather financial documents including savings, investments, retirement accounts, insurance policies, pay stubs, loan documents, tax returns, property titles, etc. • Pay down any debt. • Open your own checking/savings accounts. • If you don’t already have credit established, obtain a credit card in your name to help establish credit. Maintain your credit history by paying your bills on time and staying under the credit limit. • Make sure your taxes are up to date. • Document your cash flow and develop a future budget. When determining the division of assets, consider liquid and illiquid assets, as well as the after-tax value of assets such as retirement accounts, real estate and other investments. Many parents want their children to remain in their current home to ease the divorce process, but that might not be in their — or your — best long-term interest. Two considerations: What is the cost to maintain the house, including taxes and insurance? Do you want the responsibility of maintaining a house on your own? Moving forward, reevaluate the following: your will; establishment of a trust; updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts and life insurance policies; life, disability and long-term care insurance; retirement planning. For many, managing money may be a new responsibility and this can be challenging. A financial professional can help you clarify your finances and outline your options for the future.

If you are in the early stages or contemplating divorce, attend one of our monthly workshops, Second Saturday, chicagosecondsaturday.com, held the second Saturday of each month at 980 N. Michigan Ave., 6th Floor, in Chicago. Stonebridge Wealth Advisors | 312-945-5950 stonebridgewealthadvisors.com Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through HighPoint Advisor Group, LLC, a registered investment advisor. HighPoint Advisor Group, Stonebridge Wealth Advisors and Second Saturday are separate entities from LPL Financial. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only, and strategies may not be suitable for every individual and do not assure positive outcomes. Seek tax or legal advice form a qualified professional.


DAY T R I P P E R

DAYTRIPPER:

MICHIGAN AVENUE B Y H E AT H E R L E S ZC Z E W I C Z

Michigan Avenue is best known as a shopping destination with the stretch north of the Chicago River dubbed the Magnificent Mile. Indeed, great shopping can be found on this famous street — and so much more to delight tourists, suburbanites and city dwellers alike! Right near the Chicago River, there are two newish candy shops where you can satisfy your sweet tooth: Dylan’s Candy Bar and Ghirardelli. Looking to line your pockets with candy? Dylan’s is your best bet. The shop sells all sorts of candies by weight; plus, there’s a room dedicated to nostalgia candy (Cow Tales!). Pro tip: Try the salted caramel chocolate-covered pretzels if they are available. The location has also added a café with plenty of candy-themed drinks too. 445 N. Michigan Ave., 312-702-2247 If you are looking primarily for chocolate, head straight to Ghirardelli. The store recently took up residence in the Wrigley Building. The bottom floor contains retail, while a café is upstairs. Try one of the awesome milkshakes or treat yourself to an extravagant sundae. 400 N. Michigan Ave., 311-923-0168

TRIBUNE TOWER

The home of the venerable Chicago Tribune is an architectural masterpiece. It makes a great backdrop for snapping a selfie. But, if you take a closer look at the outer walls of the building, you can see more than 140 bricks and fragments from significant sites all over the world. Most recently, bricks from Wrigley Field and the old Comiskey Park were added. 432 N. Michigan Ave.

LABRIOLA RISTORANTE & CAFÉ

For anyone who loves bread, Labriola is top notch. We also like the pizza selections here. 535 N. Michigan Ave., 312-955-3100 GHIRARDELLI

WRIGLEY BUILDING AND TRIBUNE TOWER

ALICE AND OLIVIA

This location is the brand’s only Midwest store. If you’re looking for an elegant yet sexy dress or a cute outfit for a night on the town, this shop should definitely be part of your trip. 919 N. Michigan Ave., 312-273-1254

NOMI GARDEN

If the weather’s nice, stop by NoMI Garden at the Park Hyatt. The location is one of Make It Better’s 10 Best Rooftop Bars in Chicago and it has a great brunch/breakfast menu. 800 N. Michigan Ave., 312-335-1234

THE CHICAGO SPORTS MUSEUM

A can’t-miss destination for any sports fan. There are fun interactive exhibits, including one that allows you to see how you measure up to hall-of-famers, and another that features the curses and superstitions of Chicago teams. There’s a ton of great memorabilia to check out, too. Water Tower Place, Level 7, 835 N. Michigan Ave., 312-202-0500

360 CHICAGO

At the John Hancock Building, you can get a gorgeous 360-degree view of the city — from 94 floors up! For the thrill-seeking crowd, there’s the option of being tilted 30 degrees downward over Michigan Avenue. $13 for kids, $19 for adults; 875 N. Michigan Ave., 94th floor To get more neighborhood-specific tips, head to MAKEITBETTER.NET/DAYTRIPPER.

DYLAN’S CANDY BAR

LOOKING NORTH ON MICHIGAN AVE.

BOTTOM FOUR PHOTOS BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ

DYLAN’S CANDY BAR AND GHIRARDELLI


#FA SHION

BRIDAL BLISS

Yaki Ravid Lace Gown Price upon request, Dimitra's Bridal Couture, 1009 N. Rush St., Chicago, 312-787-0920, dimitrasbridal.com Circus City Pump $1,295, Christian Louboutin, 58 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312337-8200, us.christianlouboutin.com Subtle Sparkle Statement Earrings $98, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-654-8853, katespade.com Pick a Pearl Cocktail Ring $98, Kate Spade

ON YOUR WEDDING DAY, IT’S ALL ABOUT THE DETAILS. FROM INTRICATE BEADING TO BREATHTAKING LACE AND SPARKLING JEWELS, THESE GOWNS AND ACCESSORIES WILL ENSURE YOU DAZZLE FROM HEAD-TO-TOE. HAIR BY DANA LOUDER, CO-OWNER OF PIN ME UP CHICAGO AND OWNER OF MANE SPACE SALON

PHOTOS BY JENNIFER AVELLO STYLED BY LESLEY SIMON WRITTEN BY BROOKE MCDONALD MODEL NATALIE PATRICELLI OF 10MGMT

PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL CHICAGO

MAKE UP BY GABRIELLE RAGUSO OF GLAMD CHICAGO

BOUQUET PROVIDED BY FLOWERSFLOWERS EVANSTON

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Maison Robe $1,753, La Perla, 34 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-494-0400, laperla.com Shape Allure Collection Garter $114, La Perla Sailor Knot Hinge Bracelet $78, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-654-8853, katespade.com


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#FA SHION

Stephen Yearick Satin Ball Gown Price upon request Dimitra's Bridal Couture, 1009 N. Rush St., Chicago, 312787-0920, dimitrasbridal.com Malis Henderson Headpiece style 7711 Price upon request, Mira Couture, 1 E. Delaware Pl., Chicago, 312-2551699, miracouture.com "Vincenza" by Justine M. Couture Crystal Drop Earrings Price upon request, Mira Couture

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Claire Pettibone Romantique Prairie Rose Gown Price upon request, Bella Bleu Bridal Couture, 912 Green Bay Rd., Winnetka, 847-386-7406, bellableubridal.com Enchanted Atelier by Liv Hart Madison Headband Price upon request, Bella Bleu Bridal Couture Purely Pearly Statement Necklace $298, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312654-8853, katespade.com Pearly Delight Stackable Rings $68, Kate Spade

Watch behind-the-scenes footage from the bridal fashion shoot and get expert tips on 2016's top wedding trends at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ WEDDINGTRENDS


#FA SHION

PHOTO <CREDIT>

Atelier Pronovias "Veranda" Price upon request, Mira Couture, 1 E. Delaware Pl., Chicago, 312-255-1699, miracouture.com Sala Peep Toe D'Orsay Pumps $328, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312654-8853, katespade.com Say Yes "Mrs" Studs $48, Kate Spade Dainty Sparklers Pave Bow Cuff $78, Kate Spade

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#FA SHION

Demetrios Slim, Satin Bridal Gown Price upon request, Macy's Bridal Salon, 111 N. State St., Chicago, 312-781-3545, macys.com Demetrios Cathedral Length Veil with Crystal Detail Price upon request, Macy's Bridal Salon Spade Thin Hinge Bangle $48, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-6548853, katespade.com Drop Crystal Earrings Price upon request, Mira Couture, 1 E. Delaware Pl., Chicago, 312-255-1699, miracouture.com Rose and Hydrangea Bouquet FlowersFlowers, 1110 Davis St., Evanston, 847-328-7110, flowers-flowers.com

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Make Me Blush Earrings $128, Kate Spade, 56 E. Oak St., Chicago, 312-654-8853, katespade.com Wedding Belles Perfect Match Clutch $378, Kate Spade Open Back Bow Dress $448, Kate Spade Take The Cake Ring Dish $30, Kate Spade


#BEAUTY

LASTING BEAUTY 6 STEPS TO MAKEUP THAT STAYS PUT ALL DAY BY JENNY MUSLIN

Your makeup looks flawless when you leave the house, but by the time you’re done with lunch, your dark circles have reappeared and your lipstick’s nonexistent. Sound like you? These tricks will help your makeup last throughout the day and save you from future makeup blunders. 1. REMOVE MAKEUP CORRECTLY. When you wash your face and use a toner afterward, do you collect more dirt or makeup on the pad? If you do, you probably are not getting your face clean enough, according to Chicago makeup artist Regina Sneor, owner of D’Works. “Using an oily eye makeup remover can be better for your eye area and cause less irritation toward other products used around the eye area,” Sneor says. “Most face cleansers or cleansing towels are too irritating for the eye area." Sneor suggests exfoliating the face at least twice a week to take off dead skin cells and make skin vibrant. Moisturizers will work better and makeup will stay on longer. 2. PRIME THE SKIN. Primer, a transparent cream worn on top of your moisturizer and underneath your makeup, has become more mainstream in recent years. According to Jenny Patinkin, Chicago makeup artist and owner of Lazy Perfection Beauty School, primer is a great barrier to put between your skin and your makeup for longer wear time.

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Priming the skin before applying tinted moisturizer or foundation helps you fill in larger pores, blur wrinkles, improve skin imperfections and achieve smoothness. That means you won’t need as much foundation to cover the skin. “Primer prevents oils from surfacing and causing your makeup to slip and slide,” Patinkin says. “It also keeps makeup from being absorbed into dry skin, leaving you with a faded look.” Unsure which primer to try? By Terry Hyaluronic Hydra-Primer and Laura Mercier Foundation Primer Radiance recently won raves from Harper’s Bazaar while Sneor swears by Zelens Primer. It comes in a satin finish for drier skin and a velvet finish for oily skin. 3. LAY YOUR FOUNDATION. To keep foundation in place, use a good foundation brush and “stipple” it on your face. Stippling is a technique for applying foundation with a bi-layered brush and pushing it rapidly into the skin, Sneor says. “Adding powder to a stippled face sets much better,” Sneor says. “This way, the powder isn’t soaking up the excess foundation because there isn’t any. This also avoids separation of foundation on the face during the day.” 4. PREP THE EYES. First, gently pat eye cream onto your lids, as well as underneath your eyes. Then, press a concealer onto lids and again underneath your eyes. You can also prep lids with


an eye shadow base, such as Chanel Professional Eyeshadow Base, to make eye shadow stick. Finally, liberally brush a white or ivory eye shadow on the lids and use a bit less underneath the eyes. The eye shadow layered over the concealer will keep your lids from creasing and help hold onto the product. 5. USE THE RIGHT EYELINER. Sometimes, as the day goes on, your eyeliner starts to move south and creates a thicker line under the eyes. Consider a waterproof liner like Bobbi Brown LongWear Gel Eyeliner or Kat Von D Tattoo Liner. A typical liner pencil is oilier and will slide down the skin as the day progresses, particularly during the warmer months, as opposed to a waterproof one. Mascara on the lower lashes is more prone to running, but if you don’t want to give it up, apply waterproof mascara on the bottom lashes. 6. SET YOUR LIP COLOR. Just as you should regularly exfoliate your skin, your lips need to be exfoliated and moisturized as well. Sneor suggests using sugar and a toothbrush to slough off dry skin. To keep color on your lips, both Sneor and Patinkin favor lip stains. “This will hold color without a lot of extra product on the lip,” says Sneor. “Top off the stain with an emollient such as lip balm, lipstick or gloss. It looks neater and lasts longer.” BONUS TIPS: • Patinkin suggests layering textures, particularly when it comes to blush. Applying a creamy blush underneath a powder one will help the pigments grip together and wear better. • To prevent shine throughout the day, throw a small package of oil blotters in your makeup bag for on-the-go touch-ups. • If skin is feeling dull, a few mists of rosewater spray will set makeup or wake up skin mid-day with a little extra hydration. Read more beauty tips at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BEAUTY


# R E L AT I O N S H I P S

MAKING THE MOST OF MIDLIFE BY MAR JIE KILLEEN

KarenLee Poter believes that the second half of life is an incredible opportunity for women, and the vibrant 50-something is having a rollicking good time to prove it. She’s in a committed relationship with a younger man, has a sexy web-based show that has garnered 2 million views, and has written a new book called “A Cougar’s Guide to Getting Your Ass Back Out There.” Poter’s journey to cougarhood was far from easy. After dealing with the shocking murder of her husband, Gary, in 2006, the Northbrook mother of three emerged from grief and loss determined to live her life to the fullest. “By having this happen, I realized how fragile life is and how important it is to follow your inner strength,” says Poter. “The

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tragedy became an opportunity. I transformed myself into a powerhouse. That’s the main goal of my book — to inspire women to be the best person they can. It sounds corny, but it’s true.” Poter’s book is a guide for women reentering the dating scene in middle age. When Poter first began to date, she wasn’t prepared for a serious relationship; she simply wanted affection. “When you lose a spouse suddenly, tragically, your body responds in a way that’s almost adolescent-like,” she says. “You want male companionship more than anything, not just for friendship, but for sex. You want to be held and touched again, you want to feel alive again.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF KARENLEE POTER

Self-proclaimed ‘Cougar’ KarenLee Poter tells women how to reenter the dating scene in middle age — and have the time of their lives in the process.


Self-proclaimed ‘Cougar’ KarenLee Poter

Poter found the men most often looking for the same thing were younger guys, busy with their careers and not yet ready to settle down.

Poter doesn’t accept the predatory stereotype most often associated with the term “cougar.” Her definition of a CO-U-G-A-R is a woman who is Confident, Older, Unique, Genuine, Assertive and Racy. For women just entering the dating scene, the first step, says Poter, is to “heal — inside and outside — before you do anything else.” Poter recommends a woman take a good look at the issues in her prior relationships and deal with them so she can move on to a healthier one. And, it’s important to take care of yourself and look your best physically. “Work out, walk, run, bike, watch what you’re eating — your physical aspect reflects what’s inside,” she says. “If you want someone to be attracted to you, they have to see your glow.” And then, “The second part is you’ve got to get out there!” Poter’s book is filled with dishy personal anecdotes and savvy advice about how to approach, meet, charm and communicate with men, but throughout, her emphasis is on how women should prioritize their own needs (see chapter six on the selfish orgasm). Online, her “KarenLee Poter Show” covers more explicit topics — she has a very entertaining series of interviews with porn stars — but Poter recognizes that women are more likely to seek out sexual advice in print rather than video. Poter is now enjoying a long-term relationship with her younger partner, but surprisingly, age is no longer an issue for the couple. “We thrive on our energy, and we enjoy each other’s company so much, we really have a good time together,” she says. “Obviously there’s a strong chemistry.” Even so, it’s not a relationship with a younger man that makes Poter an expert cougar. She believes that having the freedom to explore her desires and the confidence to pursue her interests is what has made her most fulfilled in midlife. “The second time around, you don’t need to look for a man to be a provider and father to your children,” she says. “The second time around, you can do whatever you want and follow whatever passions you want. It’s such an opportunity.”

To read more sex & the suburbs visit MAKEITBETTER.NET/SATS

ARE YOU WORRIED ABOUT BLADDER CONTROL DURING SPORTS OR DAILY LIFE? HAVE YOU HEARD A LOT ABOUT MESH COMPLICATIONS? DO YOU THINK SURGERY IS THE ONLY OPTION? BY PARTNER S IN PELVIC HE ALTH

One in three women age 45 and older experience some form of a pelvic floor problem. Problems can include stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, urgency and frequency, and sexual function. Fear of surgery and the discomfort of discussing symptoms often keep women from seeing a specialist to learn about solutions. Women who seek guidance early have the best chance at avoiding more severe symptoms later. 75% of women can be treated without surgery. As an experienced urogynecologist in the Chicago area, Dr. Sanjay Gandhi of Partners in Pelvic Health at North Shore Urogynecology understands that discussing one’s bladder control and sexual function with a medical professional may be embarrassing and uncomfortable. With individualized attention and clear communication, Dr. Gandhi can discreetly address women’s health concerns successfully. Contact Dr. Gandhi today to schedule a consultation and learn more about how to improve your pelvic health today.

partners inpelvichealth

.com

“It’s a great match!” says Poter, who enjoyed exploring her sexuality and gaining confidence through dating.

North Shore Urogynecology Sanjay Gandhi, MD

Lake Forest | Gurnee | Woodstock | Chicago 847-234-1100 | partnersinpelvichealth.com


#DININGREVIEW

La Principal 700 Main St. Evanston 224-307-2444 laprincipalevanston.com

MY NEW SECRET VICE:

LA PRINCIPAL IN EVANSTON BY JULIE CHERNOFF

I probably shouldn’t be telling you this, because it’s already crowded all week long. But the truth is, you need to know about La Principal, a new full-service Mexican restaurant in Evanston. Located on the site of the old Lupita’s and owned by Derek Gaspar of Wilmette and Eric Young of Evanston, La Principal may be making what it bills as “Mexican Street Food,” but the results are every bit as authentic and mouthwatering as what I’ve had at (dare I say it?) Rick Bayless’ Xoco.

BELLY UP TO THE BAR

While waiting for your table (a distinct possibility, despite two dining rooms — the front room with a hipper urban vibe, the back room more a colorful family section), you’ll want to grab a specialty cocktail ($9) at the fun and funky bar. You’ll also find a well-curated list of beers, including two proprietary draft brews from nearby Sketchbook Brewing. The wine selection is quite abbreviated — but that’s not really what you’re here for. This food is meant for beer (and margaritas).

SHORT BUT SWEET

The food menu is short, too, which enables them to concentrate on making each dish shine. Don’t miss the hot and bubbly Queso Fundido ($5), spicy green chorizo, Chihuahua and cream

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cheeses and poblano rajas all melted together and brought sizzling to the table. The Elotes ($4), another starter, make for an arresting presentation. A whole ear of corn, the husks pulled back and bundled, is grilled and served charred and “frosted” with mayo, cotija cheese, chile seasoning and lime. Eating it is like being transported to a Mexican street. Choose a few of the six tacos on offer ($3-$4 a piece) for an entrée. Our server highly recommended both the Red Mole Short Rib Taco (with pickled red chiles, cilantro and cotija cheese) and the Carnitas Taco (braised pork with corn, poblano peppers, cotija cheese and pineapple relish), and so do I. Vegetarians, don’t despair: both the Sweet Potato Taco and Spicy Tofu Taco will keep you in the game, as will the limey, well-spiced Guacamole ($6). You’ll find four Tortas ($10) on the menu, all served on bolillo rolls from Evanston's Hewn Bakery slow-burn Ahogado (achiote-seasoned pork with black beans, served in a deep pool of red chile broth for dipping); unctuous Short Rib (same prep as

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LA PRINCIPAL

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN STREET FOOD


Queso Fundido Churros and coffee

the taco above, but here with black beans, queso and salsa); spicy Pollo (chilebraised chicken, red cabbage, pepper Jack cheese and salsa de arbol) and the vegetarian Hongos (portabello mushrooms, cactus, goat cheese and huitlacoche).

HOMINY TIME

Pozole lovers — rejoice! There are both Green (pork, chile-tomatillo broth) and Red (chile-tomato broth with hominy and braised chicken) options ($12 each). Opt for a side of Tomato Cumin Rice or Black Beans ($3) to round out your meal. For dessert, don’t miss the Churros ($4) served with a dark, rich Mexican chocolate sauce. They are also available, along with specialty coffee drinks and atole (a hot, masa-based chocolate drink), at Cafecito, the genius walk-up window around the corner on Custer Street, facing the tracks, open for commuter traffic on weekday mornings. If Mexican street food is your jam, head over soon. With food this good and prices this reasonable, it won’t be a secret for long. La Principal is open Tuesday – Friday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; walk-up coffee window Cafecito is open Monday – Friday from 6:30-10 a.m. Check out more reviews online.  MAKEITBETTER.NET/DINING


#FOOD

7 SOUTH SIDE RESTAURANTS WORTH THE DRIVE Northsiders, Chicago doesn’t stop at Madison Street! There are some great new restaurants in the South Loop and beyond that you really need to know about. It’s high time to head south. Go now and thank me later. ACADIA

This is serious food, prepared beautifully by Chef Ryan McCaskey and served in a sophisticated space. You can opt for the five- or 10-course tasting menu and have the full two-Michelinstar experience, or belly up to the bar and enjoy the city’s most inventive (Gin and Tonic) Lime ($14) with a Maine Lobster Roll ($18) or a kick-ass Patty Melt ($16). 1639 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 312-360-9500, acadiachicago.com

COUNTY BBQ

A Michelin Bib Gourmand recipient once again this year (that means great food at good value), this joint is presided over by chefs Michael Kornick and Erick Williams, who share a love for all things brined, smoked and spice-rubbed. Bourbon lovers will find much to admire, with more than three-dozen labels on hand. Go for the Meat & Three ($16), a plate with your choice of ribs, rib tips, brisket or chicken and three sides (don’t miss the Blackened Cauliflower with Parmesan and the Sweet Potato Fries with Sriracha Aioli). 1352 W. Taylor St., Chicago, 312-9292528, dmkcountybarbeque.com

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DUSEK’S

In the heart of Pilsen, you’ll find this dimly lit but charming restaurant, along with the subterranean Punch House and the always swingin’ Thalia Hall. Michelin just bestowed a star on Chef Jared Wentworth and this hip resto, where you’ll find the bar food of the gods: Wood-Roasted Olives ($6), Beef Fat Frites with Harissa Ketchup ($6), Wood-Roasted Blue Crab Dip with Artichoke Relish ($16) and their famous Juicy Lucy burger ($15). There’s also a killer Choucroute ($28), a fabulous craft beer selection and a deep cocktail program. Hipster never felt so good. 1227 W. 18th St., Chicago, 312-526-3851, dusekschicago.com

A10

Über-cool and talented Chef Matthias Merges (a Trotter protégé) was the first celebrity chef to venture down to Hyde Park and set up shop. His handmade pasta is well worth the trek — the Bucatini Carbonara ($20) with a 60-minute egg is perfection. But the man is equally adept with seafood, meat and game. It’s hard to go wrong at this Bib Gourmand winner. 1462 East 53rd St., Chicago, 773-288-1010, a10hydepark.com

ACADIA PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF DUSEK’S

BY JULIE CHERNOFF


Behind the bar at Dusek

#FOOD

The Lobster Roll at Acadia

THE DUCK INN

Everyone’s talking about Chef Kevin Hickey’s latest hotspot, a gastro-pub with seriously delicious food (and another Bib Gourmand winner this year… I told you the South Side was happening!). Not surprisingly, duck features prominently on the menu: Duck Wings with Japanese BBQ Sauce ($10), Shrimp & Duck Spring Rolls ($9), and the show-stopping Rotisserie Duck ($62) meant to share. But don’t leave without an order of the Fried Cheese Curds with Bloody Mary Ketchup ($8) or the highend Gyros Plate ($26). 2701 S. Eleanor, Chicago, 312-724-8811, theduckinnchicago.com

PLEASANT HOUSE BAKERY

If you’re an Anglophile, welcome to Nirvana. Chefs/owners Art Jackson and Chelsea Kalberloh Jackson are serving up individual Royal Pies — handmade flaky wonders — filled with all good things, like deeply flavorful Steak and Ale, curried Chicken Balti and the vegetarian Mushroom and Kale (all $7.95). Potatoes come in English “chip” form (i.e. thick cut and crispy) and topped with gravy; and British desserts abound (treacle tart, trifle, sticky toffee pudding and the like). Best of all, baker Wes Ervin (late of Publican Quality Bread) is baking bread onsite daily. 964 W. 31st St., Chicago, 773-523-PIES, pleasanthousebakery.com

THE PROMONTORY

From the Dusek’s/Thalia Hall and Longman & Eagle team of Bruce Finkelman and Craig Golden comes this hearth-focused

resto. Michelin-starred chef Jared Wentworth’s menu spans the globe, ranging from decidedly American (Brunswick Stew, Sweet Corn Hush Puppies) to Asian (Grilled Phoenix Tofu, Kalbi Beef Short Ribs) and Mediterranean (Ricotta Gnudi, Mezze Spreads). Come for the food, stay for the music. 5311 S. Lake Park Ave. West, Chicago, 312-801-2100, promontorychicago.com Hungry for more? Check out eight more South Side restaurants worth the drive online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/SOUTHSIDE


#BOOKS

WARM UP YOUR KITCHEN WITH

10 GREAT COOKBOOKS BY JULIE CHERNOFF

It’s hard to get excited about going out to dinner in subzero temperatures or the middle of a snowstorm. Instead, embrace winter as the perfect opportunity to stay inside and have some fun in the kitchen with the help of these top cookbooks. Two-time James Beard Awardwinning food journalist and author Nina Barrett, and Make It Better Dining Editor Julie Chernoff teamed up to pull together this list of their favorite culinary guides. NINA’S PICKS Empanadas: The Hand-Held Pies of Latin America Sandra A. Gutierrez Sugar-Coated Pork and Raisin Turnovers! Roquefort and Walnut Mini Pies! Creamy Tuna and Roasted Red Pepper Pies! Now there’s a food truck in your kitchen.

Food52 Genius Recipes Kristen Miglore These recipes from the popular Food52 website are easy enough for any home cook to follow, yet each offers some clever twist that even experienced cooks can learn from. Fabulous Caesar salad dressing without the scary raw egg yolks? For me, that’s a game changer.

NOPI Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully His previous books have been so remarkable that just looking at the name ‘Ottolenghi’ makes my mouth water. Anything he can dish out, I want to cook.

Mark Bittman’s Kitchen Matrix Mark Bittman I’m still in withdrawal from the disappearance of Bittman’s mix-and-match recipe columns from the New York Times Sunday Magazine, which would present a dish like paella, and instead of telling us how to ‘do it right, damn it,’ would encourage us to have fun playing with the concept. This book finally enables us to throw away all the two-page recipe spreads we ripped out and stashed in our other cookbooks!

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH PUBLISHER

Martha Stewart’s Appetizers Martha Stewart Bite-size foods rock. Who wouldn’t rather eat 10 different dishes in one sitting than 10 bites of one thing? This lavishly illustrated update of the 1990s classic, ‘Martha Stewart’s Hors d’Oeuvres Handbook,’ screams: Throw party now!


JULIE’S PICKS Cookie Love Mindy Segal Segal is Chicago’s favorite rock-and-roll pastry chef, and HotChocolate, her restaurant in Wicker Park, has long been a favorite of the food cognoscenti. And let me tell you, the woman can flat-out BAKE. Her Peanut Butter Peanut Brittle Cookies will make you weep. Grandbaby Cakes Jocelyn Delk Adams This charming book grew out of Delk Adams’ popular recipe blog, Grandbaby Cakes. These are twists on the desserts she grew up baking with her grandmother, with clear, concise directions and helpful tips. This book is worth buying for the Cream Cheese Poundcake recipe alone — but you will return to it again and again. The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook Danny Bowien and Chris Ying San Francisco and New York foodies wait hours for a taste of his (sometimes crazy, often inspired) mash-ups of American and classic Chinese foods. Feel free to take down the heat a notch on incendiary specialties like Kung Pao Pastrami, Ma Po Tofu and Sour Chili Chicken — or not. You can always write it off as a hot flash. New England OpenHouse Cookbook Sarah Leah Chase Clams, cranberries, crab and corn: all the stalwarts of New England cuisine, cooked with love. The New England-born and bred Chase is a true storyteller, and Ina Garten, the cookbook queen (who wrote the book’s foreword) is a big fan. My new go-to Clam Chowder recipe. The Dead Rabbit Drinks Manual Sean Muldoon and Jack McGarry The owners of this Lower Manhattan bar have won countless awards (including World’s Best Bar) for their inventive takes on turn-of-the-20th-century cocktails and punches. They’ve forgotten more about absinthe than you’ll ever know, perhaps from drinking it in quantity. This book is the next-best thing to being there.

BE PREPARED WITH

LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE BY CHRIS L . WEBB, C . L .U., C . L . P.C .

Baby boomers across the country are faced with decisions regarding their elderly parents’ care. Many baby boomers are part of the sandwich generation; they’re raising their own children and taking care of aging parents as well. It’s often a struggle for families to decide how to handle necessary care: Will care be handled in-home or in a facility? Home health care may seem like the best option initially, but the physical, emotional, and financial toll can sometimes be too much if the caregiver is a family member. Down the line, your children will be met with these same tough choices. Webb Financial Group offers Long-Term Care (LTC) Insurance options to help fund your decisions. With a LTC Insurance package the recipient will receive funds for home or facility care if one develops or loses cognitive issues such as dementia or Alzheimer’s or loses two or more of the following activities of daily living (ADL’s): feeding yourself, toileting, grooming, dressing oneself, bathing, maintaining continence, walking and transferring. Make the decisions regarding long-term care now while you are still young and healthy. Start with the end in mind and plan ahead. Let Webb Financial Group help you explore the options that best fit your needs.

Call WFG today to learn more about our excellent coverage options. Chris L. Webb, President Webb Financial Group ChrisWebb@webbfg.com | 847-235-6001 | webbfg.com


# T H E AT E R

“Measure for Measure”

FROSTY FOOTLIGHTS BY ROBERT LOER ZEL

SHAKESPEARE 400 CHICAGO

Throughout 2016 | Chicago Shakespeare Theater, 800 E. Grand Ave., Chicago, and other venues | 312-595-5600 shakespeare400chicago.com Chicago Shakespeare Theater is spearheading this big festival honoring William Shakespeare, who died 400 years ago. Actors, dancers, musicians and other artists from Chicago and around the world will perform at hundreds of events. Early highlights include: Cheek by Jowl and Moscow Drama Pushkin Theatre’s “Measure for Measure” (Jan. 27-31); Belarus Free Theatre’s “King Lear” (Feb. 5-14); Oxford Playhouse’s “Sancho: An Act of Remembrance” (Feb. 17-21); Chicago Shakespeare’s own staging of “Othello” (Feb. 18-April 10), with British theater artist Jonathan Munby directing Stratford Festival favorite Dion Johnstone in the title role; Lyric Opera’s “Romeo and Juliet” (Feb. 22-March 19); Hamburg Ballet’s “Othello” (Feb. 23-24 at the Harris Theater); and the British company Forced Entertainment’s “(In) Complete Works: Table Top Shakespeare” (Feb. 26-27 at the MCA).

“SPRING AWAKENING”

Jan. 14 – 31 | Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire 847-634-0200 | marriotttheatre.com Before starting its subscription season, the Marriott presents a short run of a show that’s riskier than its usual fare. In this Tonywinning rock musical by Duncan Sheik and Steven Sater, teens in 19th-century Germany grapple with their awakening sexual urges. It’s recommended for adults only — but then comes Marriott’s

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regular season, starting with a family-friendly musical comedy, “Sister Act” (Feb. 10-April 3), based on the hit movie about nuns.

“2666”

Feb. 6 – March 13 | Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago 312-443-3800 | goodmantheatre.org When Roy Cockrum, a former monk in Tennessee, won $259 million in the Powerball, he decided to spend his money supporting new plays — including this five-hour epic. The Goodman’s artistic director, Robert Falls, and Seth Bockley are adapting and directing the late Chilean author Roberto Bolaño’s masterpiece, a sprawling portrait of the 20th century and the nature of evil.

“THE FLICK”

Feb. 4 – May 8 | Steppenwolf Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted St., Chicago | 312-335-1650 | steppenwolf.org Dexter Bullard directs the 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner for drama, Annie Baker’s play about three misfits working at a run-down movie theater. “This lovingly observed play will sink deep into your consciousness, and probably stay there for a while,” New York Times critic Christopher Isherwood wrote.

“MOTHERS AND SONS”

Jan. 22 – Feb. 28 | Northlight Theatre, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie 847-673-6300 | northlight.org Terrence McNally, the playwright of “Love! Valour! Compassion!” and other acclaimed dramas, looks at how society has changed since AIDS struck the gay community in the early 1980s. Nearly 20 years after her son’s death, a woman makes an unexpected visit to the New York apartment of his former partner, who is now married to another man and has a young child.

PHOTO BY JOHAN PERSSON

Expect lots and lots of Shakespeare on Chicago stages in 2016, with a yearlong festival celebrating the Bard’s works. Meanwhile, the Marriott is trying something a bit more daring than usual, and the Goodman is creating a five-hour epic about evil.


SHOP FOR GOOD

#MIBSHOPFORGOOD Shop outstanding community businesses online and 10% of your purchase will benefit carefully vetted nonprofits. You want your spending power to do as much good as possible. We make this easy. MIB SHOP FOR GOOD: THE MORE YOU SHOP, THE MORE GOOD YOU DO.

VISIT MAKEITBETTER.NET/SHOP

Interested in selling your products via Shop For Good? Contact your sales rep for more details.


#PHILANTHROPY

B Y K AT I E J E N KO

GI V E T H I NGS

GI V E SU PP ORT EMPOWER CHANGE WITH ONE SIMPLE DONATION Impact 100 Chicago 847-348-8701 | impact100chicago.org Become a voting member of an Impact 100 circle and reward deserving nonprofits with a $100,000 grant. Impact 100’s mission is to award transformational grants to local nonprofits and empower women to improve their lives through philanthropy. Involvement in the group is flexible — members can choose to just make a donation and vote or become involved on any number of committees. For more information, contact info@impact100chicago.org.

STAND UP FOR ABUSED AND NEGLECTED CHILDREN Court Appointed Special Advocates Lake County (CASA) 847-383-6260 | casalakecounty.com Volunteer as an advocate for neglected and abused children going through the juvenile court system. CASA Lake County recruits, trains and manages volunteers who ensure each child’s rights and needs are being attended to while in foster care. Volunteers will need to complete a 10-session training course, offered both during the day and evening at the Vernon Hills CASA office. Upon completion, volunteers must be able to commit 15 hours each month to the child in his or her case. If you are interested in volunteering with CASA, please contact scash@casalakecounty.com for more information.

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SUPPORT LOCAL NONPROFITS WHEN YOU SHOP FOR GOOD Make It Better Shop For Good makeitbetter.net/shop Do good when you shop. Ten percent of the proceeds from every item will be donated to the featured nonprofit of the month. Shop For Good has partnered with more than 17 local vendors to offer an array of exquisite items. Visit makeitbetter.net/shop to find great products that help good causes.

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TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF A SAFE HAVEN; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF CASA LAKE COUNTY

DONATE LIFE NECESSITIES TO CHICAGO’S HOMELESS p A Safe Haven 312-435-8386 | asafehaven.org Donate new twin bedding sets, pillows, towels, toiletries and non-perishable food items to the residents of A Safe Haven. Focusing on uniting families, stabilizing neighborhoods and creating viable communities, A Safe Haven helps individuals transform their lives from homelessness to self-sufficiency. To ensure residents are warm and comfortable as they work toward overcoming homelessness, A Safe Haven is seeking life necessity items. Donations can be sent to A Safe Haven Foundation at 2750 W. Roosevelt Road, Chicago from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. Please contact A Safe Haven’s Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@asafehaven.org or 773-435-8386.

HELP SENIORS REMAIN INDEPENDENT Housing Opportunities and Maintenance for the Elderly (H.O.M.E.) 773-921-3200 | homeseniors.org Donate to H.O.M.E. online to help improve the quality of life for Chicago’s low-income elderly. For the past 30 years, H.O.M.E. has helped seniors remain independent and active in their communities by offering intergenerational living opportunities and a variety of citywide support services. During the harsh Chicago winters, H.O.M.E.’s Upkeep and Repair program keeps seniors warm by repairing furnaces and hot water tanks. To continue these life-changing programs, H.O.M.E. is seeking monetary support. Donations can be made online at homeseniors.org/donate.html or sent to 1419 W. Carroll Ave., Floor 2, Chicago, IL, 60607.


#PHILANTHROPY

DONAT E TO YOU R LOCA L FOOD PA N T RY Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to donate non-perishable food items and life necessities to your local food pantry this winter.

PHOTO COURTESY OF A SAFE HAVEN

Greater Chicago Food Depository 4100 W. Ann Lurie Place, Chicago 773-247-3663 chicagosfoodbank.org The Harvest Food Pantry 2495 Howard St., Evanston 847-328-4544 evanstonvineyard.org/harvest Lake County Community Action Food Pantry 574 McAlister Ave., Waukegan 847-249-6050 caplakecounty.org

Niles Township Food Pantry 5255 Main St., Skokie 847-673-9300 x215 nilestownshipgov.com/food-pantry New Trier Township Food Pantry 739 Elm St., Winnetka 847-446-8202 newtriertownship.com Northfield Township Food Pantry 2550 Waukegan Road, Ste 100, Glenview 847-724-8300 x26 twp.northfield.il.us/pantry Shields Township Food Pantry 906 W. Muir Ave., Lake Bluff 847-234-0802 shieldstownship.com

FIND YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK AT FEEDINGAMERICA.ORG.

OC TOBER 2015

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#BETTERMAKERS

BETTER MAKERS AND THEIR IMPACT

30TH ANNIVER SARY GAL A | OCTOBER 17, 2015 Kohl Children’s Museum • Over $700,000 raised Museum’s Founder’s Circle honored

Co-chairs Bethany Crocker and Sarah Alshouse of Winnetka.

Members of the Founder’s Circle: Estelle Walgreen of Lake Forest, Andrew Farley of Evanston, Nancy Firfer of Glenview, Dolores Kohl Kaplan of Highland Park, and Frederick Waddell of Winnetka, with event co-chairs Erin & Brandon Beavers of Hinsdale.

The annual gala raised more than $700,000 to support the museum’s educational programming, exhibits, services for children with special needs and outreach to children in low-income communities. Dolores Kohl Kaplan with granddaughters Abigail, Elizabeth and Nina Tilton-Kohl. 4

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Mindy Turitz, Bethany Crocker, Alicia Waters and Molly Foster, all of Winnetka. 5

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PHOTOS BY ROBIN SUBAR PHOTOGRAPHY; IMPACT PHOTO BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ

KOHL CHILDREN’S MUSEUM


#BETTERMAKERS

Sunny Fischer and Karen Singer, both of Evanston.

Donations to the women’s shelter.

UNION LEAGUE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS

Joe Behles, Karl Peters, Richard Coasby and Peter Giangreco, all of Evanston.

Susan Oleari (BMO Harris) of Evanston, with leadership award winners Sunny Fischer of Evanston, Blair Brettschneider of Chicago, Delores Holmes of Evanston and YWCA Evanston/North Shore Executive Director Karen Singer of Evanston.

38TH ANNUAL GAL A | NOVEMBER 7, 2015 The Union League Club of Chicago • Raised over $300,000

Gala Chair and Union League Boys & Girls Clubs First Vice President Nancy Ross and Phil Dodson of Wilmette.

Astrid and Timo Rehbock of Kenilworth.

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PHOTOS BY EVANSTON PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIOS

Y WOMEN LE ADER SHIP AWARDS | OCTOBER 15, 2015 Hilton Orrington/Evanston • Raised nearly $150,000 Delores Holmes, Sunny Fischer and Blair Brettschneider were honored

Mike and Gail Kiss of Deerfield.

makeitbetter.net

Katie Dunlap and Chris Dunlap of Wilmette.

Union League Boys & Girls Clubs Drive Program.

PHOTOS BYMICHAEL NOTHNAGEL

Y WCA EVANSTON/ NORTH SHORE


#BETTERMAKERS

ZOOLA | NOVEMBER 12, 2015 Held at a Private Club • More than $225,000 raised

PHOTOS BY VIOLET DOMINEK OF REILLY PHOTOGRAPHY

LINCOLN PARK ZOO

Vice President of Development at Lincoln Park Zoo Christine Zrinsky; John Fornengo, auctioneer; and Lincoln Park Zoo President and CEO Kevin Bell, all of Chicago.

Lincoln Park Zoo President and CEO Kevin Bell, and Chairman of the Board John Ettelson, both of Chicago.

PILOT LIGHT

Susan Flynn and Molly Perry, both of Chicago.

3RD ANNUAL FEED YOUR MIND GAL A | OCTOBER 9, 2015 Morgan Manufacturing • $190,000 Raised

Paul Kahan of Albany Park, Jason Hammel of Logan Square, Michel Nischan, Matthias Merges of Old Irving Park and auctioneer Billy Harris of Los Angeles. PHOTOS BY GALDONES PHOTOGRAPHY

ZooLA 2015 Co-Chairs Vasiliki Weiden of Chicago and Shawn Sandor of Winnetka with Women’s Board President Kim Theiss, of Chicago.

The Gala event space at Morgan Manufacturing.

Ji Suk Yi of Asheville, North Carolina, and Mark Bazer of Oak Park.

Students from Mitchell Elementary in West Town.

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#GIVEBACK

GLENVIEW’S PATRON SAINT

SISTER PAULANNE OF OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP DEFINES WHAT IT MEANS TO SERVE THOSE IN NEED BY SUSAN B . NOYE S

Every child would have someone to provide help and stability to his family when it’s most needed. And every child would learn that giving to thenless fortunate is an important part of life. Sister Paulanne has been a beloved, iconic member of Glenview’s Our Lady Of Perpetual Help (OLPH) parish and teacher in the school for decades. Since the early 1960s at OLPH, she has been saying “yes” to every person who knocks on her door in the middle of the night because they are homeless, hungry or living with children in their car. This developed into the OLPH Needy Families Fund in 1975.

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“We can’t stand by and say that it doesn’t matter. Because it does matter!” she declares with such passion that I’m sure I hear God speaking. “1.6 million children are homeless. All of them need food, shelter, a stable family life and good education. Their parents need gas in their cars to get to work.” Community members drop off food, supplies and home furnishings at the “Sharing Room” almost every day of the year. They also donate cash and gift cards. Sister’s moral imperative has developed into an important component of the school’s curriculum, too. Students learn to give from an early age.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MIBTV VIDEO

If every child had a Sister Paulanne in her life, we would have a vastly better world.


Sister Paulanne teaching a class at OLPH

#GIVEBACK

Sister Paulanne

“When students bring me $5 from money they earned caddying or babysitting, their birthday money or gift cards, I tell them that they have made an incredible difference in other people’s lives and that they have to continue this.” She pauses, “It’s as important as what they have learned at Our Lady Of Perpetual Help in math, science, arts, literature and in their faith. They have to carry this on to better the world.” Her message clearly sticks. As we tour the “Sharing Room,” two 30-something men arrive and start unloading supplies from their car. Their expressions evolve from that of self-conscious schoolboys (which they once were in her classroom) to giant grins because Sister calls them by name and sprints over to give them hugs and blessings. “The moral code in our lives must be to help other people have a better life,” Sister declares once more. And it’s easy to see that she’s right. If you would like to support Sister Paulanne’s good works, donate to the Needy Family Fund online at olphglenview.org/good-cause/ needy-family-fund or send a check via mail to: Sister Paulanne Held OLPH Convent 1772 Glenview Road Glenview, Illinois 60025

Watch to learn more about Sister Paulanne on MIBTV at MAKEITBETTER.NET/SISTERPAULANNE


# C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies. -Aristotle

Top: Lt. James McCoskey and Kristin McCoskey September 8, 2012, Chicago | Colin Lyons Wedding Photography Bottom Left: Kate Rivard and Michael Andino September 12, 2015, Glenview | Dana Ann Photography, Stephen Ticsay 

Bottom Center: Brigid and Barry Walsh | March 14, 2015, Chicago | Peter Thompson Photography Bottom Right: Selena and Jaime Lefkowitz | July 11, 2015, Chicago | BethLaurren Photography

Share your wedding and engagement stories with us!

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FOR

Money, Values & Impact Your Piece of the Pie PRESENTED BY

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 Program and Luncheon 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Chicago Botanic Garden 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL

Guests will enjoy hearing from speakers on engaging and informative topics including: • Confidently Building a Financial Success Checklist • Impact Investing and its Bountiful Benefits • Investing for a Secure Retirement • Top Investment Tools & Trends Guests will also enjoy:

$60 per person $50 per person if you register with a friend! Registration fee: Includes lunch and parking

• Networking • Q & A with industry experts • A Financial Resource Gallery: A gathering of resources to help develop a solid financial strategy with confidence!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: makeitbetter.net/moneyvaluesimpact


2016 Make It Better January/February Wedding Issue  

Wedding Issue. Bridal Bliss: Fashion, Venues, Guests. Guide to Health & Wellness. The Secret to Work/Life Balance. Chronicles of a Stay-At-...

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