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M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 D I N I N G | S U M M E R G O G U I D E | L A N D S C A P I N G

THE DINING ISSUE M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6

CHICAGO AND NORTH SHORE

CHICAGO AND NORTH SHORE POWERFUL . POSITIVE . CONNECTORS.

GARDEN-TO-TABLE RESTAURANTS SUMMER GO GUIDE BEST BRUNCHES

V O L U M E 7, I S S U E 3

CUBA TRAVEL MUST-HAVE SUMMER FASHION FOOD-FOCUSED PHILANTHROPIES


Experience our contemporary American menu influenced by French and Asian cuisine.

MAKE RESERVATIONS TODAY! CATERING ALSO AVAILABLE.

Monday - Thursday 11:30am-10pm Friday 1130am-11pm Saturday 4pm-11pm Sunday 4pm-9pm

westwoodbistro.com 950 N Western Ave | Lake Forest, IL | 847.295.2500


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Banking products provided by Wintrust Financial Corp. Banks. 1. The bank does not charge its customers a monthly card usage fee. No transaction charge at any ATM in the Allpoint, MoneyPass, or Sum surcharge-free networks. Other banks outside the network may impose ATM surcharges at their machines. Surcharge fees assessed by owners of other ATMs outside the network will be reimbursed. Reimbursement does not include the 1.10% International Service fee charged for certain foreign transactions conducted outside the continental United States. 2. Employees of Wintrust Financial Corp. and its subsidiaries are ineligible. $100 deposit bonus is IRS 1099-INT reportable. $100 deposit bonus applies only to new Total Access Checking customers. $100 deposit bonus will be deposited into Total Access Checking account by 9/01/16.


FEATURES M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 • V O L U M E 7, I S S U E 3

GARDEN-TO-TABLE RESTAURANTS Turn to page 43

35

99 Days of Summer: The Summer Go Guide By Anna Carlson

43

Dining Guide: Where to Eat & Drink Now

By Eileen Baer, Julie Chernoff, Cortney Fries, Amber Gibson, and Amanda Hanley

70

Landscaping & Gardening Guide By Heather Blackmore

74

Cuba Within Reach By Andrea Guthman

78

This Home’s a Dream: Inside the 12th Annual Dream Home By Heather Leszczewicz

86

Can You Afford to Get Divorced? By Meghan Streit

90

Flower Child: ‘70s Inspired Summer Fashion By Brooke McDonald

102

Time to Disonnect: How to Limit Tech Use and Build Empathy By Pamela Rothbard

Cover Photo by Rachel Brown Kulp. Pictured: Strawberry Shortcake with Candied Fennel from Floriole Cafe and Bakery Above photo by Erica Barraca. Thank you to Mrs. Green’s Winnetka for providing produce and location. See more images from this shoot at makeitbetter.net/foodasmedicine


DEPARTMENTS FAMILY & TRAVEL

66

76

Must-Read Tips for Traveling with Kids

By Amber Gibson

85  What Kids Bring Home

from Sleep-Away Camp

By Pamela Rothbard

97  Gear Up for Father’s Day

By Anna Carlson

A BETTER YOU

98  5 Common Makeup Mistakes

By Rachel Brown Kulp

100  Bringing Sexy Back:

Moves for a Strong Back

By Christy Coughlin

100

31

Home Renovations That Add the Most Value

By Meghan Streit

97

83  9 High-Tech and Eco-Friendly Upgrades to Try at Home

By Rachel Brown Kulp

 Eat These Words: 8 Books for 104

Food Lovers

By Julie Chernoff

 Summer Stage 106

108

By Robert Loerzel

1 0 Local Art Galleries Worth Exploring By Liz Logan

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

108 116

28 Pro Sports Teams Make it Better 66  Food for Your Stomach and Your Soul

14 publisher’s letter 16 you said it 18 from the web 22 fresh 26 community celebrations 32 may event listing give time, give things, 110

give support closing thoughts 118

By Gabrielle Tasiopoulos

112 Better Makers and

Their Impact 116 Hecky Powell: Working Hard to Give Back

IN EVERY ISSUE

By Susan B. Noyes

MAKE BETTERS Please note the following corrections from our March/April publication: - the founder of the Academy for Global Citizenship, Sarah Elizabeth Ippel, is a graduate of Cambridge University - AGC’s External Initiatives Manager’s name is Katherine Elmer-DeWitt - the James B. Moran Center for Youth Advocacy serves 1000 people each year We regret these errors.

FIRST COLUMN: TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF BLESSINGS IN A BACKPACK; SECOND PHOTO BY JULIE KAPLAN; THIRD PHOTO BY JAMES PRINZ; FOURTH PHOTO COURTESY OF HECKY’S BARBECUE; SECOND COLUMN: PHOTO COURTESY OF MANTRY

HOME & ENTERTAINMENT


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Food is universal. Who doesn’t crave dining experiences that satisfy emotionally, as well as physically? Our goal with this magazine issue is to help you find or create more of those experiences. This insures that we fulfill our mission to be the most-trusted, easiest-to-use community resource that helps make your life and the lives of others better. Please enjoy learning about the restaurants leading the garden-to-table movement in our area (p. 43), our favorite brunch spots (p. 58) and rooftop bars (p. 64), where to eat on Randolph St. (p. 54) and the legacy of Hecky Powell, owner of Hecky’s Barbecue, in Evanston (p. 116). And don’t forget to visit our more comprehensive Dining Guide online at makeitbetter.net/WhereToEat. It’s an ideal reference whenever you are looking for something new to explore.

EAT YOUR

HEART

OUT

BY SUSAN B . NOYE S

What a great time it is to explore the culinary landscape in Chicago! We’ve earned our reputation as the leading foodie capital in the country. We’ve also earned our reputation as the most philanthropic city in America too. Therefore, we are also delighted to recommend outstanding food nonprofits for your support on page 66. As always, we think you will enjoy and be moved by our fashion, family, fitness, home and other content, too. If so, please let us know. Your thoughts help make us better. And speaking of thoughts, please be sure to vote for your favorite resources in our Best of 2016 Audience Choice Awards. Voting is open from May 1-15. Your vote is important! Earning our “Best of 2016 distinction” is powerful proof of strong community support. Last year we received over 105,000+ online votes. That’s an engaged community. Thanks for reading. Your time and attention are valuable to us and to this community. With gratitude,

Susan@makeitbetter.net

MAKEITBETTER.NET @MAKEITBETTERNS

@MAKEITBETTERNS

MAKEITBETTERMAG

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MAKEITBETTER2009

The Mission of Make It Better is to be the most trusted, easiest-to-use community resource that helps you make your life and the lives of others better—online, in print and in person. We accomplish this by providing the highest quality lifestyle content for our audience and connecting them to the businesses and nonprofits they support. 14

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WE LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU, SO PLEASE KEEP SENDING US YOUR STORIES, COMMENTS, OPINIONS, IDEAS AND REVIEWS!

susan@makeitbetter.net

Thanks for all the emails, letters, tweets and Facebook messages this month! Here’s what you had to say:

In response to “Trying to Sell Your Home? Avoid These 5 Deal Breakers” (makeitbetter.net/dealbreakers) If you have a retro home, keep its original details or remodel honoring the time period. A certain segment of buyers is interested in mid-century homes (and mid-mod is hot) and those original details like wall murals, pink bathrooms and retro laminate! Beige and grey will be a turnoff for these buyers.

In response to “The 6 Most Luxurious Caribbean Escapes” (makeitbetter.net/caribbean) I want to go to all of these places! I’m hanging on to this list. –Jamie Sotonoff Bartosch

Another thing: If you are living in a home and not sure when you will resell, model to your taste, and not to a prospective buyer. Repaint, sure, fix broken or overly worn things that may deter a buyer, but think twice about major remodels done just for the sake of a buyer. They may rip out the vanilla thing you installed, and that’s a waste. Instead spend the money on fixing structural issues. Who cares how pretty a home is if it isn’t sound. I’m surprised that was not addressed. –Sabrina Savra

Ocean Club — my favorite for getting away with the family and teenage grandkids — perfect! –Cheryl Andrews Powder sand and warm turquoise water, what else does a person wish for! –Susan Johnson

Read more “You Said It” online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ YOUSAIDIT

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In response to “Brunch Time! Our New Favorites for 2016” (page 58) Any choices that are less carni-centric? –Lori Lippitz

PHOTO BY ANJALI PINTO

In response to “Could You Be a SuperAger?” (makeitbetter.net/superager) I am writing to follow up with you regarding your article on the SuperAging study that was published in Make It Better Magazine. We read your article and were thrilled to publicize it on our website. We have gotten a large number of phone calls from individuals who are interested in joining the program as a result of your article. This is great for study recruitment and we are excited to screen these potential participants! –Emmaleigh Loyer, SuperAging Research Coordinator, Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Northwestern University

Writer Response: Thank you, Sabrina. As the article states, this was intended to focus on design details that could deter buyers. Structural issues should definitely be checked, but those are beyond the scope of this article. Your input is appreciated. –Cortney Fries

Writer Response: A valid concern. Actually, all of these places have great vegetarian options. I am just addicted to bacon! –Julie Chernoff You should try Epicure Bistro on Route 14 in Barrington. The shrimp and crab cakes benedict are so far beyond incredible that they defy description. With the Suzette crepe for dessert. OH MY GOD!!! –Dottie Broznowski


588 Lincoln Ave. Winnetka, IL, 60093 | 847-256-4642

Publisher & CEO Susan B. Noyes President & Chief Francia Harrington Strategy Officer Associate Publisher Michelle O’ Rourke Morris

Chief Operating Officer Sandy Tsuchida Manager of Sales Lynne Madorsky perations & Client Relations O Editor In Chief Genevieve Lill Managing Editor Brooke McDonald Digital Editor Anna Carlson Art Director Erica Barraca Designer January Thomas

Social Media Director Heather Leszczewicz

Philanthropy Manager Gabrielle Tasiopoulos

Beauty Editor Jenny Muslin Dining Editor Julie Chernoff Finance Editor Meghan Streit Fitness Editor Christy Coughlin Sex & the Suburbs Editor Marjie Killeen Contributing Writers Eileen Baer Heather Blackmore Cortney Fries Amber Gibson Andrea Guthmann Amanda Hanley Rachel Brown Kulp Robert Loerzel Liz Logan Pamela Rothbard Meghan Streit Fashion Contributor Skatie Noyes Photographer Jennifer Avello Editorial Interns Brooke Markley Antea Gatalica Senior Account Executives Denise Borkowski Julie Carter Barbara Baisley Murray Andrew Vogel Sales Interns Adrian Adamiec John Snider GOT FEEDBACK? Email susan@makeitbetter.net TO ADVERTISE: Contact michellemorris@makeitbetter.net HAVE AN EVENT? Email anna@makeitbetter.net

Make It Better North Shore (ISSN No. 2151-0431) is published 6 times per year by Make It Better LLC, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Phone: 847.256.4642. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved. Application to Mail at Periodicals Rates is pending at Wilmette, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Make It Better, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Make It Better is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved.


#MAKEITBETTER

OUR BETTER HALF IS ONLINE:

T H E “ B ET T E R L ET T E R ” E M A I L N E WS L ET T E R : M A K E I T B ET T E R . N ET/S U B S C R I B E MAKEITBETTER.NET

@MAKEITBETTERNS

@MAKEITBETTERNS

MAKEITBETTERMAG

MAKEITBETTER.NET

MAKEITBETTER2009

Vote for Best of 2016

2016

Let your voice be heard in our annual Best of survey. We want to know the best businesses for shopping, dining, entertainment and more, both on the North Shore and in Chicago. You can vote starting May 1 at MAKEITBETTER.NET/VOTE.

Can’t get enough of our dining issue? Find even more fab foodie content online:

13 Margaritas You Should Be Sipping Right Now

Just in time for Cinco de Mayo (and the rest of summer), our list of the best margaritas around Chicagoland includes something for everyone. From the Spicy Mango Habañero Margarita at De Cero to the Blood Orange Margarita at Nick’s Wilmette, there are multiple ways to step up your margarita game.  MAKEITBETTER.NET/MARGARITAS

what’s hot on makeitbetter.net FITNESS

RECIPES

8-Minute Fitness Guide: Workouts for Your Whole Body

Chrissy Teigen’s Cobb Salad With Honey-Mustard Ranch Dressing From “Cravings”

FASHION

‘O, the Oprah Magazine’ Launches New Clothing Line YOUR MONEY

9 Reasons You’re Not Rich Yet

18

PARENTING

The Trauma of Privilege: How Overprotective Parenting Hinders HEALTH

An Experience With Floating

M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

makeitbetter.net

Airport Food You’ll Want to Eat: The Best Restaurants at O’Hare and Midway

Have a couple summer vacations planned? Don’t fret about terrible airport food. Both O’Hare and Midway have tasty and even healthy options waiting for you on the other side of the security line.  MAKEITBETTER.NET/AIRPORT

Chicago’s Think Jerky is Leading an Artisanal Jerky Movement On the hunt for a delicious and healthy afternoon snack? Try Chicago’s own Think Jerky, which comes in flavors like SrirachaHoney Turkey and Ginger-Orange Beef. This lean protein has no added antibiotics or hormones and is gluten-free. Learn more about the local company and its work with chefs Gale Gand, Laurent Gras and Matt Troost at  MAKEITBETTER.NET/JERKY


SPONSORED CONTENT

Thomas A. Hensing, M.D., Medical Director, NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center, Evanston (left); Bruce E. Brockstein, M.D., Medical Director, NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center

LEADING-EDGE RESEARCH AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

Devoted exclusively to cancer prevention, patient care, research and education, NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center provides academic-level care and access to the latest and most advanced clinical trials. NorthShore University HealthSystem is a teaching affiliate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

NORTHSHORE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM KELLOGG CANCER CENTER:

PERSONALIZED CARE FOR CANCER PATIENTS “There is no one-size-fits-all protocol if you’re diagnosed with cancer. Each patient’s cancer is different,” says Bruce E. Brockstein, M.D., Medical Director, NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center.

“Advanced technologies are being used to identify the molecular changes causing a patient’s cancer and to determine the right drugs to treat it,” notes Thomas A. Hensing, M.D., Medical Director at NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center in Evanston. “These studies help us develop targeted therapies to treat specific cancers. On-site molecular and surgical pathologists are using next generation DNA sequencers to analyze tumors on a genetic level for complex cases. This means a much shorter time from diagnosis to treatment.” “Our patients are our number-one priority,” adds Brockstein. “We offer the finest cancer care to produce the best outcomes, while providing a comfortable and soothing environment to make sure patients’ emotional and social needs are always addressed.” To learn more or schedule an appointment, call 847-570-2112, or visit the website at northshore.org/cancer.

“In complex cases, we can analyze the genetic makeup of your tumor and work with your team of specialists to design therapy that’s unique to you and your cancer,” he says. "The Center has teams of physicians who have expertise in a wide range of cancers —including breast, lung, colon and prostate — as well as rare and uncommon cancers." The Center offers comprehensive, compassionate cancer care close to home, with conveniently located sites at their Evanston, Glenbrook and Highland Park hospitals. Physician appointments are also available in Skokie and Gurnee. Teamwork is key to the Cancer Center’s approach. “We’re leaders in bringing integrated cancer care to the region,” says Brockstein. “Patients are supported by a multidisciplinary team, including surgical oncologists, medical and radiation oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, oncology nurses, clinical oncology pharmacists, social workers, clinical nutritionists and psychologists.”

Dr. Brockstein screens a patient for possible oral cancer.

Kellogg Cancer Center (847) 570-2112 | northshore.org/cancer


DNA holds the key to fighting your cancer. Cancer care for what’s next. At NorthShore Kellogg Cancer Center, we know everyone’s cancer is unique. So we’re using DNA to unlock the secrets to fighting yours. We have leading experts in a wide range of cancers—including breast, lung, colon and prostate, as well as rare and uncommon cancers. Our molecular and surgical pathologists analyze the genetic makeup of your tumor and work with our team of specialists to design therapy that’s unique to you and your cancer. At NorthShore, we’re pushing the boundaries of cancer care to help you fight back.

(847) 570-2112 northshore.org/cancer

Kellogg Cancer Center


#NEWINTOWN

BY ANNA CARLSON AND JULIE CHERNOFF

Epic Evanston

Good Enough to Eat

Andrea Metcalf understands good health. Perhaps you’ve seen her share fitness and healthy living tips on Chicago’s Fox 32, the “Today” show or “Good Morning America” and marveled at her flawless skin. At her newest venture, Tasty Facial Bar, Metcalf combines superfoods with powerful antioxidants and the stimulating combination of massage and steam to create rejuvenating 30-minute express aromatherapy facials. Oatmeal, Orange, Chocolate and Pumpkin facials are offered year-round; seasonal “flavors” such as spring’s Margarita & Lime Salt or summer’s Watermelon — loaded with vitamin A — are also available. “I want to help Chicagoans put their best face forward and be inspired to live healthier,” says Metcalf. Time to pamper yourself! TASTY FACIAL BAR: 2203 N. Halsted, Chicago, 312-898-6212, tastyfacialbar.com—JC

In a bold move, local mini-chain Epic Burger has opened in downtown Evanston, just a block north of homegrown Edzo’s and a block east of national burger chain Five Guys. They’re betting that locals and Northwestern students will be enticed by their message of sustainability and mindful eating. The menu is pretty basic — choose a burger (beef, turkey), grilled chicken or Portobello mushroom; white, wheat or lettuce; and condiments. Premium toppings (horseradish Havarti, aged Cheddar or blue cheese, bacon, avocado and fried egg) will run a buck or two, but the humanely raised meat and poultry have never been frozen and are hormone- and antibiotic-free. Opt for hand-cut crispy fries or a simple side salad, but don’t miss the premium shakes made with organic whole milk and all-natural ice creams (hint: go for a chocolate/ peanut butter combo). They even have skinny shakes with 35 percent fewer calories. The turkey burger, made from Michigan birds, is particularly delicious. Who knew eating mindfully could taste so good? EPIC BURGER: 1622 Sherman Ave., Evanston, 847-868-8968, epicburger.com—JC

Named for the famed Sichuan spice sprinkled liberally through its extensive menu, Peppercorns Kitchen is a modern, chefdriven Chinese restaurant located in the heart of Evanston’s bustling downtown. Yes, you’ll find many standard favorites, like Orange Chicken and Mongolian Beef, but you’ll also discover inventive regional delights such as Xinjiang-Style Sautéed Lamb, Dungeness Crab with Salted Yolk & Crispy Rice, and Leaf Mustard & Millet Soup served in a stone pot. The setting is contemporary and has already gathered a following of NU students and faculty, giving nearby Joy Yee’s a run for its money. Yet another Evanston restaurant to add to the mix! PEPPERCORNS KITCHEN: 620 Davis St., Evanston, 847-563-8461, peppercornskitchen.com—JC CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH BUSINESS

Modern Chinese


#NEWINTOWN

Do You Want That Stacked or Folded?

To-Die-For Dumplings

There is some drop-dead gorgeousness happening at the chic Imperial Lamian in Chicago’s River North. This Indonesian import is sure to take the neighborhood by storm; it is the first American outpost for the brand. Named for China’s famed, hand-pulled lamian noodles (made on-site here in the open kitchen by Wang Hong Jun), the eatery also specializes in Chinese BBQ, soup dumplings, dim sum and creative wok dishes. Grab a tea-infused cocktail, an Asian beer or one of the two dozen well-chosen wines by the glass, and marvel at the stunning interior, designed by Metaphor Interior Architecture, an Indonesian firm, in their U.S. debut. IMPERIAL LAMIAN: 6 W. Hubbard St., Chicago, 312-595-9440, imperial-lamian.com—JC

Down Home Food and Fun

There are large indoor music venues throughout Chicagoland, but the scope of the new Joe’s Live in Rosemont’s MB Financial Park is still impressive. The creative team behind Bub City, Joe’s Bar on Weed Street and the BBQ and country festival Windy City Smokeout have joined forces to take over a 35,000-square-foot space that is literally made to party. In addition to Joe’s Live, which will feature both nationally known and up-and-coming country music acts, a second location of Lettuce Entertain You’s popular River North bourbon and BBQ favorite, Bub City, will be serving up dinner daily and Southern-style brunch on weekends. Lunch will soon follow, and as a fan of Chef Doug Psaltis (the culinary brains behind the RPM restaurants and others), I look forward to his Giddy Up Fries, 18-Hour Smoked Beef Brisket and other down-home treats. Having a big party? Not a problem here, where they can accommodate groups ranging from eight to 1,500. Time to saddle up and ride to Rosemont. JOE’S LIVE/BUB CITY: MB Financial Park, 5441 Park Place, Rosemont, joesliverosemont.com—JC Read more Fresh online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/NEWINTOWN

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TOP PHOTO BY JEFF SCHEAR PHOTOGRAPHY; MIDDLE PHOTO BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE’S LIVE/BUB CITY

Winnetka’s Stacked & Folded is the new go-to spot for sandwiches (Stacked) and tacos (Folded). On the Stacked side of the menu, you’ll find options like Pork Belly and Eggs, Duck Bacon BLT and Turkey and Brie. Want tacos? The Folded menu includes Cajun Salmon, Ahi Tuna Poke and Panko Crusted Avocado. Kids can dine on Grilled Cheese on Brioche Bun, Broccoli Cheese Quesadilla, Chicken Strips or a Turkey Burger Slider. And if you’re in a hurry, grab a salad and drink from the cooler. STACKED & FOLDED: 551 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, 847-386-9100, stackedandfolded.com—AC


# C E L E B R AT E

BY ANNA CARLSON

First Bank of Highland Park Award

The Northbrook Chamber of Commerce awarded the 2016 Corporate Citizen of the Year Award to First Bank of Highland Park. For 60 years, First Bank of Highland Park has stood by their tagline: “Where Community is First.” In 2015, the bank supported 38 nonprofits and employees volunteered more than 2,500 hours. First Bank of Highland Park: 1835 First St., Highland Park, 847-432-7800; 633 Skokie Blvd., Northbrook, 847-272-1300, firstbankhp.com

Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria’s 45th Anniversary

Wilmette Tailors & Cleaners’ 85th Anniversary

Wilmette Tailors & Cleaners, owned by Kurt and Rita Raggi, will celebrate 85 years in business this June. Throughout the month, the business will give a free cleaning to any customer with an invoice ending in “85” or “16.” Rita believes the company stands out because an owner is always available to assist customers, and they do all of their cleaning, pressing and tailoring on-site. Rita adds that they are the only cleaner in the area to sanitize sports equipment with the Sani Sport process. “I also love what I do and appreciate the loyalty and friendships that have been made over the years,” Rita says. Wilmette Tailors & Cleaners: 819 Ridge Road, Wilmette, 847-251-2433, wilmettecleaners.com

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Goodman Theatre Artistic Director’s 30th Anniversary

Robert Falls will celebrate 30 years as artistic director at Goodman during the theater’s 2016/2017 season. Falls will direct “Uncle Vanya,” a Chicago premiere adaptation, and “Ah, Wilderness!” Other season highlights include world premieres “The Magic Play,” “King of the Yees,” “Objects in the Mirror” and “Lady in Denmark,” and Chicago premieres “Gloria” and “Destiny of Desire.” You can also support Goodman Theatre at their “Daring…Dazzling…Dynamic” Gala on May 21. Tickets and tables are available online. Goodman Theatre: 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, 312-443-3800, goodmantheatre.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH BUSINESS; GOODMAN THEATRE PHOTO BY JEFF GOLDBERG

Chicagoans love their deep dish, and Lou Malnati’s has been serving its cheesy goodness for 45 years. The first Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria opened in Lincolnwood on March 17, 1971, and as its website says, “Lou always thought it was funny that an Italian should open a pizzeria in a Jewish neighborhood on an Irish holiday, but that was just Lou’s style.” And believe it or not, a car crashed through the pizzeria’s walls on opening day. Read more about the company’s past 45 years at loumalnatis.com/ the-history-of-lous. Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria: Various locations, loumalnatis.com


#MAKEADIFFERENCE

PRO SPORTS TEAMS MAKE IT BETTER CHICAGO’S TOP SPORTS TEAMS ARE MAKING AN IMPACT

TEAM/NONPROFIT

MISSION

BY THE NUMBERS

CHARITABLE PLAYERS INCLUDE: Players, Coaches and their families u

CHICAGO CUBS CHARITIES

To support targeted programs in education, youth athletics and health awareness focused on breast and ovarian cancer research and treatment.

CHICAGO BEARS BEARS CARES

CHICAGO BULLS CHARITIES

CHICAGO FIRE FOUNDATION

SKY CARES FOUNDATION

To give back to the community by contributing time, materials, resources and financial donations to organizations that share the team’s commitment to education, health and wellness, violence prevention and military support. To improve the quality of life throughout Chicagoland by leveraging its resources and expertise in the area of soccer to provide sports-based youth development and direct-service programs to underserved communities.

To actively empower youth and family initiatives, inspiring women’s programs, veteran’s support, health and wellness programs and diversity and inclusion.

More than

$3.4 MILLION

in grants and donations in 2015.

Nearly

$2 MILLION

Jay Cutler u

in grants and in-kind donations in 2015.

t Joakim Noah

Pau Gasol u

Distributed

$2.5 MILLION in cash and in-kind donations last season.

Almost

70,000 HOURS

of soccer played through P.L.A.Y.S. (Participate, Learn, Achieve, Youth, Soccer) program since 2013.

The annual Fitness Festival engages

t Eric Gehrig

Tamera Young u

400-500 YOUTH

every year to promote healthy and active lifestyles. Jonathan Toews q

To support programs and institutions that work towards creating a better tomorrow throughout Illinois.

Elena Delle Donne u

Granted

Duncan Keith u

$2.2 MILLION in 2015.

CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS CHARITIES

CHICAGO WHITE SOX CHARITIES

To provide in-kind support as well as financial and emotional support to hundreds of Chicago-based organizations fighting cancer, improving the lives of youth and those offering support to children and families in crisis.

The team is celebrating

25 YEARS

David Robertson u t Jose Abreu

of grant-giving for Chicago White Sox Charities with more than

$25 MILLION in grants since 1991.

t Pat Cannone

CHICAGO WOLVES CHARITIES

To form ongoing relationships with corporations and organizations with a commitment to improving the quality of life for families, individuals, and animals throughout the Chicago area.

More than

1,300 DOGS

given forever homes through monthly Adopt-A-Dog Nights.

Read the full guide and learn more about individual player contributions at MAKEITBETTER.NET/SPORTSCHARITIES 28

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LOGOS AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH TEAM; CUBS PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CHICAGO CUBS; WHITE SOX PHOTOS COURTESY OF 2016 CHICAGO WHITE SOX ; JAY CUTLER PHOTO BY BILL SMITH/CHICAGO BEARS. PAU GASOL PHOTO BY OREN AMZALEG . JOAKIM NOAH PHOTO BY GRACE WILEY. PAT CANNONE PHOTO BY ROSS DETTMAN/CHICAGO WOLVES

To provide increased access to sports opportunities and target improvements in health, fitness and education for those at risk.


HIS LIFE WASN’T JUST IN OUR HANDS. HIS LIVELIHOOD WAS, TOO. After Jason was diagnosed with throat cancer, a friend recommended Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University for treatment. Treatment that, if not done properly, would have affected his ability to swallow, eat and speak. As someone who’s spent a lifetime in the service industry, for once, Jason learned what it meant to have someone take care of him. Read Jason’s story and see our impact at ImpactEveryDayNM.org

#ImpactEveryDay © 2016 Northwestern Medicine


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# R E A L E S TAT E

Laura Fitzpatrick of @properties says buyers are attracted to large kitchen islands, as seen in this recently remodeled Lake Forest home. (Design and architecture by Lake Forest-based Melichar Architects; construction, cabinetry and built-ins by Lynch Construction, of Lake Bluff.)

HOME RENOVATIONS THAT ADD THE MOST VALUE BY MEGHAN STREIT

If you had to guess the home renovation projects that add the most value to a house, you’d probably say “kitchen remodel” or “new bathroom,” right? In all likelihood, “fiberglass attic insulation” wouldn’t be at the top of your list. But, as it turns out, that is the project with the greatest return on investment (ROI), according to Remodeling magazine’s 2016 Cost vs. Value Report. The estimated cost to install attic insulation is $1,268; meanwhile, that improvement adds an average of $1,482 to a home’s value, for a whopping 117 percent return.

PHOTO BY JON CANCELINO PHOTOGRAPHY

If you’re planning to do work on your house with an eye toward selling, consider each project’s ROI. Other high-yield improvements include replacing the bottom third of siding with stone veneer (93 percent return), garage door replacement (92 percent return) and steel entry door replacement (91 percent return). And, if you answered “kitchen remodel” to the question above, you were in the ballpark. Minor kitchen remodels have the fifth-highest cost versus value ratio (83 percent), according to the survey. In spite of what Remodeling magazine’s data shows, North Shore realtor Kati Spaniak ranks kitchen and bathroom updates at the top of her list of value-adding projects. “You don’t need to renovate them expensively,” she adds. “A lot of times, just painting the cabinets, if they are good quality, is almost like remodeling the kitchen.” Spaniak cautions homeowners to be very strategic about how they spend money to update kitchens and bathrooms. To make sure your planned remodel has solid resale value, she recommends consulting with a trusted realtor. You’ll have a hard time recouping your renovation dollars if you don’t choose styles and colors (think grays and neutrals) that appeal to younger buyers.

Spaniak agrees that a quick-hit project like a new front door is a smart choice to add resale value because it is relatively low-cost but makes a big first visual impression on buyers. Winnetka @properties realtor Laura Fitzpatrick says that in her experience, many buyers are attracted to huge kitchen islands, mudrooms, second-floor laundry, and master bathrooms with double sinks and roomy showers. If you’re doing work on your house in preparation to sell, Winnetka realtor Carrie Nadler Healy, with Jean Wright Real Estate, reminds homeowners to take care of eyesores that might distract potential buyers. “If one is making improvements for the purpose of selling, a good neutral coat of paint is always nice to freshen things up,” she says. “Replacing of old, worn carpeting helps to eliminate any red flags.” As much as many homebuyers say they’d like more space, few seem willing to pay a premium for it, according to the Remodeling data. The average cost of a master suite addition is $115,810, but the resale value is just $74,224 (64 percent return). Similarly, sellers only recoup an average of 68 percent of the cost of a family room addition and 56 percent of what they spend to add a bathroom. “Don’t put tens of thousands of dollars into the home for additions unless you know exactly what the outcome is going to be,” Spaniak says. “If you are creating an addition because YOU want to use it, then it is worth it for you. But don’t build an addition for resale purposes only.” Get more real estate news online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ REALESTATE M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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#EVENTS

MAY HIGHLIGHTS BY ANNA CARLSON

“Cinderella”

ONGOING

“Nazi Olympics: Berlin, 1936” Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, 9603 Woods Drive, Skokie ilholocaustmuseum.org “China’s First Emperor and His Terracotta Warriors” The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago | fieldmuseum.org

MAY 1-3

“Anna in the Tropics” May 13-22 Josephine Louis Theater, 20 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston communication.northwestern.edu Vintage Market at The Grove May 14 The Grove, 1421 Milwaukee Ave., Glenview | glenviewparks.org

Kohl Children’s Museum’s Touch a Truck May 1 Ravinia Festival, 418 Sheridan Road, Highland Park | kohlchildrensmuseum.org

Gorton’s Dog Day Parade 2016 May 14 Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Road, Lake Forest | gortoncenter.org

2016 James Beard Awards Gala May 2 Lyric Opera of Chicago, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago | jamesbeard.org/awards

Lake Forest Civic Orchestra’s Symphonic Drama May 15 Gorton Community Center Theater, 400 E. Illinois Road, Lake Forest lakeforestcivicorchestra.org

MAY 4-10

18th Chicago Kids and Kites Festival May 7 Cricket Hill, W. Montrose Drive, Chicago choosechicago.com Model Railroad Garden Opens May 7 Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe | chicagobotanic.org Asian Pop Up Cinema: “I Am a Monk” (ボクは坊さん) May 8 The Wilmette Theatre, 1122 Central Ave., Wilmette | wilmettetheatre.com

MAY 11-17

“Cinderella” May 11-22 Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Parkway, Chicago | joffrey.org/cinderella 32

Anixter Center’s 5th Annual Benefit for Ability May 13 Winter Garden, Harold Washington Library, 400 S. State St., Chicago anixter.org/benefitforability

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Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation Chicago Awards Dinner May 16 Four Seasons Hotel Chicago, 120 E. Delaware Place, Chicago themmrf.org/events/signature-events/ chicago-awards-dinner/

MAY 18-24

4th Annual Chefs’ Playground (A Benefit for the Academy for Global Citizenship) May 19 Teresa Piano at the Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago, 159 E. Monroe St., Chicago | agcchicago.org/chefsplayground 7th Annual Chicago Craft Beer Week May 19-29 Various | chibeerweek.com

Long Grove Chocolate Fest 2016 May 20-22 Historic Downtown Long Grove visitlonggrove.com Ferris Fest May 20-22 Various locations | ferrisfest.com Friends of the Lake Bluff Library Book Drive May 21 Lake Bluff Public Library, 123 E. Scranton Ave., Lake Bluff | lakeblufflibrary.org

MAY 25-31

Mole de Mayo May 27-29 18th Street at Ashland Avenue, Pilsen, Chicago starevents.com/festivals/mole-de-mayo Bike the Drive May 29 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago bikethedrive.org Butterflies & Blooms Opens May 28 Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe chicagobotanic.org/butterflies

TOP PHOTO BY CHERYL MANN; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation’s 9th Lincoln Leadership Prize Dinner May 13 Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago | alplm.org


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Free onsite parking


#CHICAGOSUMMER

BY ANNA CARLSON

Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer, that wonderful time in Chicago filled with festivals, concerts, new museum exhibits and more. Before you dive into summer fun, read our 99 Days of Summer guide to find at least one thing to do every day through Labor Day and let the good times roll all summer long!

PHOTO BY HOSSEIN FATIMI

Find the complete list of events at ď ľ MAKEITBETTER.NET/99DAYS

t Chicago Folklore Ensemble for Pivot Arts Festival

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Mudderrella

Tal Gamlieli 1 1 June SPACE, 1245 Chicago Ave., Evanston | evanstonspace.com Jerusalem-born musician Tal Gamieli has performed around the world and is now coming to Evanston for the Israeli Jazz Festival. JUNE

4th Annual Pivot Arts Festival June 2-12 Edgewater and Uptown, Chicago | pivotarts.org This festival celebrates artistic innovators with live music, theater, dance, kids events, workshops, wine tastings and more. Don’t miss the Celebrate Community! parade on June 4. JUNE

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A Conversation on Justice 3 3 June The Chicago Theatre, 175 N. State St., Chicago thechicagotheatre.com If you binge-watched Netflix’s “Making JUNE

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a Murderer” and still can’t get enough, Steven Avery’s defense attorneys Dean Strang and Jerry Buting will host a discussion on the case and the U.S. criminal justice system. The evening will end with a Q&A session. Mudderella June 4 Lake County Fair, 1060 E. Peterson Road, Grayslake | mudderella.com Form your team for this non-competitive obstacle course challenge that is designed for women by women to promote teamwork. Mudderella has also partnered with Futures Without Violence, which educates and provides resources on domestic violence awareness. JUNE

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“America After the Fall: Painting the 1930s” 5 in Opens June 5 Art Institute of Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago | artic.edu This exhibit takes a look at art and the redefinition of modernism during the JUNE

Great Depression. Featured artists include Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe and Grant Wood. “My Fair Lady” June 10 Light Opera Works, 516 4th St., Wilmette | lightoperaworks.org Get to the church, err, theater on time for this classic musical at Light Opera Works. The show opens June 4. JUNE

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Pilsen Food Truck Social 11-12 11 June 18th Street at Allport, Pilsen, Chicago | pilsenfoodtrucksocial.com Spend your day exploring Pilsen and munching on offerings from more than 30 food trucks. Event proceeds (there’s a $5 suggested donation) will benefit the Illinois Food Truck Owners Association, St. Procopius Catholic Church’s soup kitchen and food bank, and a Pilsenbased after school program. JUNE

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUDDERELLA

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Hot Summer Nights Begins June 9 Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe chicagobotanic.org Chicago Botanic Garden’s Hot Summer Nights concert series kicks off with Morry Sochat & The Special 20s, a blues band celebrating 10 years together. Visit the Garden for Hot Summer Nights concerts Thursdays through Sept. 1. JUNE

Hot Summer Nights at Chicago Botanic Garden

Haley Reinhart 14 14 June Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave., Chicago | lh-st.com Wheeling native Haley Reinhart, whom you may know from “American Idol” or appearances with Postmodern Jukebox, is bringing her Better Tour to Chicago this June. JUNE

Highwood Evening Markets Begins June 15 Everts Park, 111 North Ave., Highwood | celebratehighwood.com Enjoy a beautiful summer evening shopping for artisan bread, cheese, pasta, sweets and more goodies, as well as jewelry, fashion and art, on Wednesdays through Aug. 31. Dine on food from local restaurants and food trucks, sip on cocktails and dance to live music. Pets are welcome! JUNE

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Lincoln’s Undying Words at Chicago History Museum

The Art Institute of Chicago

See Jane Sing June 17-18 Lyric Opera of Chicago, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago | lyricopera.org Jane Lynch, a Second City alum, returns to the city for a musical-comedy cabaret show with Kate Flannery of “The Office” and Tim Davis, vocal coordinator for “Glee.” JUNE

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35th Annual Polish Fest June 17-19 Milwaukee, Wisconsin polishfest.org Enjoy a day trip (or entire weekend) at the country’s largest Polish festival. Stop by the Non-Stop Polka Stage, Cultural Stage, Folk Stage and Children’s Stage for entertainment, meet Polish Sheepdogs, get crafty with the kids, learn how to cook Polish delicacies, watch folk artists demonstrate traditional crafts, and more. JUNE

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TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN; MIDDLE PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. MICHIGAN AVENUE ENTRANCE. EDWARD KEMEYS, LIONS. BRONZE WITH GREEN PATINA. GIFT OF MRS. HENRY FIELD, 1898.1A-B. THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. THE LIONS ARE THE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO.

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Millennium Park Summer Film Series q Begins June 21 Millennium Park, 201 E. Randolph St., Chicago | cityofchicago.org Every Tuesday, grab a blanket, pack a picnic basket and head out to Millennium Park for films like “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” (June 21), “A League of Their Own” (July 5) and “West Side Story” (Aug. 2). You can even vote for the last film showing on Aug. 30. JUNE

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t Lincoln’s Undying Words 22 22 June Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark St., Chicago | lincolnsundyingwords.com The Chicago History Museum opened this exhibit on Lincoln’s most memorable written moments in April. Stop by to hear Lincoln’s words portrayed by actor Michael Krebs and see artifacts like the Lincoln family carriage and Lincoln’s deathbed. JUNE

“Between Riverside and Crazy” Opens June 23 Steppenwolf Theatre Company, 1650 N. Halsted St., Chicago | steppenwolf.org Steppenwolf brings the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Drama-winner to Chicago this summer. “Pops” is an ex-cop waiting for JUNE

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word on his lawsuit against the police department and his son has recently been released from jail. Their rentcontrolled apartment is often filled with “sketchy houseguests” in this “celebration of the glorious contradictions that make up human nature …” 15th Annual Cheese Curd 24 Festival June 24-25 East End Park, Ellsworth, Wisconsin ellsworthchamber.com If you need a quick getaway, consider heading north to Wisconsin for one of the state’s best offerings: cheese curds. This festival includes food vendors, a parade and events like the Cheese Curd Run (so you can feel OK about all the cheese curds you eat). JUNE

Summer Fest 25 25 June Lehigh Avenue and Jackson Park, Glenview | glenviewchamber.com This annual family-friendly event features live music, the Glenview Fire Department’s fire pole, kids activities, food from local restaurants, shopping sales, craft beer, puppies (!) and more. JUNE

Fountain Square Art Festival 25-26 25 June Church and Sherman, Evanston chicagoevents.com This favorite festival celebrates 37 years, making it the oldest (and largest) fine arts fair on the North Shore. More than 150 juried artists will show their work. Kids can stop by the children’s art tent, and don’t forget about the food and live jazz. JUNE

“War Paint” Opens June 28 Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago | goodmantheatre.org/warpaint Patti LuPone and Christine Ebersole, both two-time Tony Award winners, star in this world-premiere musical about entrepreneurs and rivals Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden. JUNE

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Chicago Sky vs. Indiana Fever 29 29 June Allstate Arena, 6920 N. Mannheim Road, Rosemont | sky.wnba.com The Sky tip off against the Fever in this Eastern Conference matchup. Find a complete schedule and promotional events online. JUNE

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Millenium Park Summer FIlm Series

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American Spanish Dance & Festival 8 Music June 8-25 Various locations | ensembleespanol.org Ensemble Español Spanish Dance Theater, in residence at Northeastern Illinois University, celebrates 40 years with this annual festival featuring 40 dancers, singers and musicians from Spain. JUNE

Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund 2016 Golf Classic June 6 | various locations dmsf.org

Fresh Start Caring for Kids Golf Classic Hosted 19 Celebrity by Jermaine Dye June 19-20 | The Hilton Chicago — Indian Lakes Resort, 250 W. Schick Road, Bloomingdale | freshstartkids.org/events

Forefront’s 2016 Luncheon 8 Annual June 8 | Hyatt Regency Chicago, 151 E. Upper Wacker Drive, Chicago myforefront.org

Rainbows 28th Annual Golf 20 Classic June 20 | Royal Melbourne Country Club, 4700 Royal Melbourne Drive, Long Grove | rainbows.org/events

Shedd Aquarium Gala 2016: Waters 11 Dark June 11 | Shedd Aquarium, 1200 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago sheddaquarium.org/gala

More ways to give back in June:

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Bears Cares Gala 4 | United Club at Soldier 4 June Field, 1410 S. Museum Campus Drive, Chicago | chicagobears.com JUNE

Making History Awards June 8 | Four Seasons Hotel Chicago, 120 E. Delaware Place, Chicago | pjhchicago.com/event/ chicagohistory; chicagohistory.org JUNE

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Father of the Year Awards June 16 | Ritz-Carlton Hotel, 160 E. Pearson St., Chicago | diabetes.org

Summer Dinner Dance June 18 | Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe chicagobotanic.org JUNE

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PHOTO BY JOEL MAISONET

Make It Better is a proud media sponsor of these events:


garden table

#DINING

TO

BY AMANDA HANLEY

Rick Bayless' XOCO rooftop garden

Nothing beats eating a just-plucked tomato still warm from the sun. These innovative restaurants are serving up farm-fresh produce grown on rooftops and patios in the city and on the North Shore.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FRONTERA

ARBOR

Savor a full sensory experience at this concept café in Logan Square. Starting with a dinnertime stroll through the garden, sample a Midwestern omakase (chef’s tasting menu) that’s crafted around produce that inspires you. Owner Chad Little and chef/owner Leonard Hollander explain that their approachable, sustainable, artful cuisine is different each time. Maybe you’ll end up with rooftop-honey-glazed salmon with fried green tomatoes and a dragon tongue bean salad and, to sip, a handcrafted cocktail garnished with pickled nasturtium buds. A morning and midday menu is also available. Altogether, 60 different varieties of extraordinary vegetables, fruits and herbs are cultivated in the alley garden and massive rooftop farm, which are also home to seven beehives. The Green Exchange, 2545 W. Diversey Ave., Chicago, 312-866-0795

BANG BANG PIE AND BISCUITS

Logan Square’s sublime pie café uses the freshest seasonal fruits it can get. The charming back patio, with an orchard feel, includes plum, apricot, nectarine and peach trees and a vegetable plot. Owner Michael Ciapciak says their backyard garden appeals to the inner farmer in us all. Fruit, herbs and veggies from the restaurant’s harvests and from local farms are used to create sweet and savory offerings. 2051 N. California Ave., Chicago, 773-276-8888

BIG DELICIOUS PLANET CANTEEN

The home of the “Greenest Caterer in America” is a hidden West Town treasure. A front house cafe serves up breakfast and lunch, with rotating daily specials. Just steps out the door, owner Heidi Moorman Coudal transformed an adjoining

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Suckling Pig Falafel from Homestead on the Roof

FLORIOLE CAFÉ AND BAKERY

French pastries from this beloved Lincoln Park destination sure hit the sweet spot. Ever notice the pretty bachelor button and johnny jump-up petals on the fruit tarts and panna cotta? These edible flowers, along with herbs and greens, are grown in 16 EarthBoxes on the roof and sidewalk planters. Committed to sourcing from local sustainable farms, pastry chef and owner Sandra Holl says having access to a rooftop garden makes it that much easier. Seating on the second floor overlooks the blooming garden. 1220 W. Webster Ave., Chicago, 773-883-1313

FRONTERA GRILL, TOPOLOBAMPO AND XOCO

With his authentic Mexican cuisine, chef and owner Rick Bayless has been a pioneer in the local food movement in Chicago since the late ‘80s. Started as a salsa garden, the XOCO rooftop now grows Chinese long beans and herbs in addition to tomatoes. Offsite at the Bayless’ Bucktown home, a beautiful production garden spread over three city lots grows crops every which way. Bountiful chili peppers, lettuces, microgreens, edible flowers and specialty herbs (such as hoja santa) supply the restaurants. Television shows, parties and limited tours also take place in this stunning edible backyard. 445 – 449 N. Clark St., Chicago, 312-661-1434

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HOMESTEAD ON THE ROOF

If you’re looking for a cozy dining spot right in the middle of a rooftop farm, here’s the place. Perched above Roots Handmade Pizza in West Town, Homestead’s 80-seat rooftop patio adjoins a spacious organic garden bed, vertical hanging gardens and planter boxes filled with vegetables, fruits and herbs. Utilizing the harvest, executive chef Chris Davies serves up rustic yet refined cuisine. Friendly waitstaff wearing flannel shirts deliver sophisticated, seasonal delights like the summer panzanella that features homegrown marinated tomatoes and preserved kale, with housemade sourdough, burrata and a burnt-leek vinaigrette. 1924 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, 773-332-2354

INOVASI

Relish the finest local ingredients prepared with an innovative twist at this upscale North Shore hotspot. Chef and owner John des Rosiers says it all comes down to amazing flavor. Up on the rooftop, 28 Smart Pots brim with heirloom tomatoes, peppers, greens, herbs and novel crops. The produce is sprinkled throughout the ever-changing menu, which has included, for example, bruschetta with homegrown ground cherries and tomatillos paired with smoked ancho peppers, marinated feta and spicy romesco. For the chocolate and wild mulberry dessert, ripe berries were shaken down from neighborhood trees (dedication!). Also heat up with des Rosiers’ limited versions of salsas using rooftop peppers at his adjoining taqueira, The Other Door. 28 E. Center Ave., Lake Bluff, 847-295-1000

LULA CAFÉ

This popular Logan Square boheme-bistro is celebrated for its inventive menu inspired by seasonal, local ingredients. Chef and owner Jason Hammel, who’s worked with Midwest farmers for the past 16 years, says they like to grow strange things such

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOMESTEAD ON THE ROOF

vacant lot into a sprawling urban farm. Around 90 varieties of vegetables, herbs, fruits and edible flowers are organically grown in 50 raised beds, alongside three beehives. While the bulk of staple and specialty crops are used to supply weddings and high-end events, a majority of the canteen’s leafy salads are homegrown. Meals can be enjoyed outside on a long farm table centered within the lush garden. 412 N. Wolcott Ave., Chicago, 312-455-1019


#DINING

BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY AMANDA HANLEY; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY ANNA ZAJAC

as lovage, shiso leaves, green coriander seeds and bronze fennel crowns to add a special touch to dishes. While a lovely planterbox of herbs and edible flowers surrounds sidewalk seating, you might not realize another 18 containers sit up on the roof. Italian dandelion and mustard greens prosper under grow lights in the basement, too. 2537 N. Kedzie Ave., Chicago,773-489-9554

O’HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT URBAN GARDEN

O’Hare’s indoor array of 26 verdant towers is more than a thing of beauty under bright lights. It’s the first and only airport aeroponic garden in the world. Produce is grown without soil, chemicals or fertilizers through root misting. The resulting herbs, greens, peppers, beans and edible flowers can be enjoyed year-round at airport restaurants. Escape travel stress with a tranquil green moment at the Urban Garden located in the Terminal 3 Rotunda, which also includes a yoga room and mother’s room. The garden is part of widespread sustainability initiatives by Chicago’s Department of Aviation. 10000 W. O’Hare Ave., Chicago

SKOKIE COUNTRY CLUB

Surprise! Skokie Country Club is way on top of the local food trend, too. Over the past two years, its introduced three culinary gardens, nine beehives and even a flock of egg-laying hens. Executive chef Richard Stanton designs the menu around the extensive, often unique vegetables and herbs. A special last summer featured garden beets and honey-goat cheese topped with hazelnut “soil” and garden sorrel. Since this is a private club, it’s time to dine with friends who happen to be members. 500 Washington Ave., Glencoe, 847-835-0600

Big Delicious Planet Canteen's urban farm; Strawberry Rhubarb Pie from Bang Bang Pie and Biscuits

UNCOMMON GROUND

For over 20 years, owners Helen and Mike Cameron have been leading the sustainable restaurant scene in Chicago. In 2008, the Edgewater hangout broke ground with the first certified organic rooftop farm in the U.S. Now it grows more than 50 crops with 120 varieties and hosts two beehives. Diners can visit the rooftop farm at special events, including the annual Vegetarian Harvest Dinner. In 2014, the Camerons opened Greenstar Brewery, Illinois’ first organic brewery, located next to the Lakeview location of Uncommon Ground. 1401 W. Devon Ave., Chicago, 773-465-9801; 3800 N. Clark St., 773-929-3680 Read our complete Dining Guide online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/WHERETOEAT M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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Front Bar, Steppenwolf’s new cafe and bar, is a collaboration with Boka Restaurant Group, known for restaurants such as Girl & the Goat and Balena.

STEPPENWOLF DEBUTS NEW CAFE AND THEATER BY JULIE CHERNOFF

Long known for their inventive, groundbreaking shows, Steppenwolf Theatre will soon stage a different type of opening.

According to David Schmitz, managing director of Steppenwolf, a series of audience surveys helped point the way to this new configuration. “We were trying to figure out how to elevate the theater-going experience,” he says. “We want to create a cultural hub in the community, and be the kind of place where there is always something happening.” “Steppenwolf is a familial environment, “Artistic Director, Anna Shapiro says. “For a long time, we have craved a comfortable setting where our audiences, artists, staff and friends can interact — the [Front Bar] is the perfect solution.” Theater is all about collaboration, so it’s no surprise that Steppenwolf turned to the award-winning Boka Restaurant Group (BRG) to help build Front Bar. BRG co-founders Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz are responsible for creating Girl & the Goat, Momotaro, Swift & Sons 46

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and Balena, among other über-popular restaurants, and are no strangers to pulling together productive, creative projects. Halsted Street neighbors and friends for the last 13 years (their first restaurant, Boka, is down the block, and Balena is across the street from the theater), Boehm and Katz were thrilled to work on the project, bringing in their own dream team — Chef Chris Pandel (Swift & Sons, Cold Storage, Balena) to curate the menu, Karen Herold of Studio K to design the space and Kevin McConkey of Grip to brand and market the project — to help. “What we liked about what they were telling us was that they were looking to do something not just as an extension of the theater, but something that was cool enough that could have its own independent draw,” Boehm says. The original idea behind the new café and bar, according to Boehm, was “a longing for O’Rourke’s,” the long-demolished bar where Steppenwolf ensemble members and audience alike once congregated after a play. It was the kind of bar where you might’ve seen Studs Terkel and Roger Ebert conversing with Gary Sinise and John Malkovich after a particularly intense performance. “All theaters need great bars,” Schmitz says. “The performers want to transition out of that intense emotional experience in

PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPPENWOLF

This month, the curtain rises on Steppenwolf’s newest productions: Front Bar and The 1700 Theatre, both contained in the old Ethan Allen furniture store space directly north of the Steppenwolf Theatre building. Steppenwolf bought the space in 2012, moving their offices to its second floor and connecting the buildings on both levels. A new, flexible black-box theater will take up the back half of the first floor, while the all-day café and bar will have pride of place in front, facing the street.


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Front Bar will operate as a coffee shop serving Chris Pandel’s menu of bakery and breakfast items, soups and sandwiches. Boehm feels that it’s a needed extension for both Steppenwolf and the surrounding neighborhood. The 1700 Theatre, a multi-genre, flexible performance space, will be a vital part of this creative community hub, taking over that function from the existing Steppenwolf Garage, which will be maintained as a rehearsal space. Upcoming performances include a podcast festival curated by WBEZ’s Tyler Green; a vaudeville comedy piece with long-time Steppenwolf Ensemble member Laurie Metcalf; live music acts; and partnerships with both visiting and local companies. If Front Bar goes the way of other BRG restaurants — and Steppenwolf plays, for that matter — it will be a smash hit from the get-go. Boehm, who knows a thing or two about the subject, finds that immediate success is nice, but it’s sustainability that really matters.

the same way that the audience does, and now they will be able to do it together.”

What creates sustainability in terms of a restaurant’s allure? “It’s the alchemy of food and beverage, hospitality and design,” shares Boehm. “We live in this kind of A.D.D. society where it’s difficult to constantly stimulate people. So we aren’t just trying to create spaces with great food and hospitality, but spaces that keep continuing to feel interesting to people when they are inside of them.”

With only 50 seats, many of them located around the large four-sided bar that dominates the center of the space, Front Bar is still somewhat intimate. There will be standing room, of course, as well as casual couches and furniture to lounge upon. During the day, even when the theater itself is closed,

Shapiro feels that the improved and expanded Steppenwolf complex promises to become a cultural destination that everyone can enjoy. “We have the best team in Chicago assembled,” she says. “We can’t wait to open our doors to the community.” Come mid-May, they will do just that.

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COMING UP NEXT BY AMBER GIBSON

One-on-one with Chicago’s James Beard Rising Star Chef of the Year Nominee Jenner Tomaska

Resume: Tomaska has worked at Next for four and a half years, having served as chef de cuisine for two. He was previously at MK. “Dave [Beran, executive chef at Next] started cooking there [mk] as well so through a mutual relationship with Erick Williams [executive chef at mk] I got the job [at Next],” says Tomaska. Reaction to Being Nominated: “I was kind of shocked. MICAH [MELTON] from THE AVIARY texted me with ‘Congratulations’ and I had no idea what he was talking about. I hadn’t yet read anything, so it was a surprise. Dave was nominated for it several years ago, so it’s cool to follow in his footsteps. It’s an honor to be part of the whole thing. It’s the first thing I’ve ever been nominated for.”

How He Got Started: “I started working in the culinary industry because I wanted money to go to the movies when I was 15 years old, and my parents said I should get a job. I haven’t ever had another job.” What Drives Him: “I get more joy out of hosting than the physical part of eating food. Being able to create something for someone and giving it to them. I love going out to eat and trying everything, but I get more joy out of saying ‘I made this for you.’ At Next, every four months we do basically a whole new cuisine. I get a lot of joy from learning the history and culture behind cuisine. It’s interesting to find out why people cook a certain way with certain ingredients.” Favorite Next Menu: “I started at the end of ‘Thailand,’ so ‘Childhood’ was my first official menu. Probably that one is my favorite. We worked 5:30 a.m. until 10 p.m. and after about a month and a half of that, Chef [Grant] Achatz sat us down and had dinner with us in the dining room. That instilled that menu being my favorite.” Read about the other Chicago Rising Star semifinalists at MAKEITBETTER.NET/JAMESBEARD

PHOTO BY NICK MURWAY

The James Beard Awards are coming back to LYRIC OPERA OF CHICAGO on May 2. We were able to catch up with Rising Star Chef of the Year contender Jenner Tomaska from NEXT shortly after he learned that he was in the running for the award. The 29-year-old Chicago-area native shared with us what motivates him, and how it feels to be recognized on the restaurant industry’s biggest stage.


#DINING

THE DISH ON

STEPHANIE IZARD BY CORTNEY FRIES

Crispy Frog Legs at Duck Duck Goat

Stephanie Izard is having a big year. Duck Duck Goat — her third restaurant, a casual Chinese-American spot (complete with a takeout window) in the West Loop — opened to acclaim in March, as she was expecting her first baby, a boy. Izard is the talented chef at the helm of West Loop hot spots Girl & the Goat and Little Goat Diner. You may also remember her as the delightful “Top Chef” season 4 winner, graced with a friendly smile and a halo of brunette curls. Make It Better: What was the inspiration behind Duck Duck Goat? Stephanie: We host Sunday Suppers at Little Goat. A couple years ago, we had a Chinese one that was very popular.

syrup and Shao Shsing rice wine, is an awesome, masculine drink. There are also a couple of lighter ones, with beet-apple shrub and carrot/ginger/turmeric syrup.

You traveled to China to research the cuisine, didn’t you? We visited various regions in China and Taiwan, but also Chinatown in Chicago. This restaurant is about how Chinese food came to the United States. It’s a hodgepodge of different parts that I really like.

The pick-up window is a great idea. What will you serve there? It will be a completely separate menu celebrating street food. You can walk up and order breakfast, lunch, dinner or even late-night [food]. There will be a sandwich called Rou Jia Mo, which is a bun filled with the Pig Face that we serve at Girl & the Goat and topped with hoisin and pickled cucumber. We’ll also serve a Jianbing breakfast crepe, with egg and sausage, and Chinese donuts.

PHOTO BY HUGE GALDONES

You’ve also been developing your own variation of dishes, such as a “slap noodle.” Yes, we are making all our own noodles — seven different kinds. We roll the dough, let it relax, plop it down and pull it into long, chewy noodles. Sounds great, but time-consuming. Yes, making all the noodles and dumplings by hand takes a lot of time. Most people would probably just buy wonton skins and call it a day. But I taught myself and now I’m training my sous chefs how to do it. Every dumpling has its own kind of dough. What are some of your favorite dishes? There’s Cheung Fun, rice noodles rolled up and served with sausage, grilled cuttlefish and XO broth, and Crispy Frog Legs & Potato in oyster sauce. I’m a huge fan of fried rice. We’ll have five different kinds. How about the cocktails? There will be some really fun ones. The Shao Shsing Redemption, with savory Agrocybe mushroom-infused

You and your husband [Gary Valentine, married three years] must be so excited [for the birth of your son]. You work together, don’t you? Yes, he is the beer director for all three Goat restaurants. He’s been a huge help, with the beer and other parts of opening. We’re not side-by-side, but we see each other throughout the day. What are your plans for after the baby arrives? I’ll have to take a couple weeks off, but I’m not one for sitting around. I plan to bring the baby to work. Duck Duck Goat | 857 W. Fulton Market, 312-902-DUCK duckduckgoatchicago.com Feast your eyes on more dining content online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/DINING


#DINING

IS FREEKEH THE NEW QUINOA? UP-AND-COMING INGREDIENTS WE BET WILL BE HITTING YOUR PALATE IN 2016 BY AMBER GIBSON

When an ingredient explodes in popularity, even a casual diner picks up on the trend. We’re looking at you avocado toast and massaged kale. The culinary world can be a difficult one to forecast, but we are making a studied guess about some items you may soon be seeing more of at a restaurant near you. GOAT’S MILK

Goat’s milk can be a great alternative to cow’s milk for people who have allergies or sensitivity to dairy. Although it contains lactose, goat’s milk is more easily digestible and doesn’t contain the alpha S1-casein protein that some are allergic to. Chef Andrew Pingul added a crumb cake on the brunch menu at Cantina 1910 and, to make this pastry stand out, he fills it with housemade cajeta, a Mexican caramel sauce. Pingul uses goat’s milk from LaClare Farms in Wisconsin, to add a rich, earthy note to the caramel syrup. “Its flavor is distinct and slightly more aggressive [than cow’s milk],” Pingul explains. At newly opened Oriole in the West Loop, Pastry Chef Genie Kwon makes yogurt from goat’s milk, then blends it with cajeta for a tangy, caramel-y accompaniment to her Gianduja Palette with banana and lemon.

TRIPE

The gelatinous honeycomb texture and the thought of eating cow’s stomach might put some diners off from this cut of meat, but it’s truly delectable. Many traditional Mexican restaurants serve menudo, a spicy soup made with cow’s stomach, but now some of our favorite Italian restaurants are serving it as well. At Osteria Langhe, Chef Cameron Grant’s braised tripe with mirepoix, topped with chili flakes and served with grilled bread, is one of the cozy Italian restaurant’s bestsellers. “All the undesirable characteristics melt away when loaded with aromatics and a long cook time,” Grant says. Another Italian-inspired tripe preparation is available at Nico Osteria. Chef Erling Wu-Bower braises tripe in a spicy tomato sauce with chickpeas, kale and fried egg. “It’s one of my favorite dishes on our breakfast menu,” he says. Crumb cake at Cantina 1910 5 2 M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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PHOTO COURTESY OF EACH RESTAURANT; JACKFRUIT PHOTO BY MONICA KASS ROGERS; FREEKEH PHOTO BY HUGE GALDONES

Braised tripe at Osteria Langhe


#DINING

JACKFRUIT

Chef Edward Kim first tried jackfruit while traveling in Thailand last year and was impressed with the tropical fruit’s versatility. It tastes a little like bubble gum when it’s ripe, and unripe jackfruit is used in India to make spicy curries. Kim braises the unripe green fruit at Ruxbin in red wine seasoned with cumin and Mexican spices for Jackfruit Carnitas, served with stone-ground grits, smoked tomato and escabeche. “It has a fibrous heartiness that can be used as a meat substitute,” Kim says. “I also overheard they are learning how to grow it in the U.S., so it will be easier to source in the future.” Pastry Chef Jesse Divine works with ripe fruit in desserts at Roka Akor. He recently served the fruit fresh and as a sorbet with tempura-fried raspberry mochi skin, caramelized red bean miso and banana.

FIG & OLIVE’S seared scallop dish featuring chermoula

CHERMOULA

This light herb sauce is the North African equivalent of chimichurri, made with cilantro, parsley, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice. A new seared scallop dish on FIG & OLIVE’s spring menu features house-made chermoula with their famous extra virgin olive oil. At Salero in the West Loop, chermoula is served on grilled Atlantic swordfish accompanied by fennel and potatoes cooked with oil-cured black olives, capers and preserved lemon. If trying at home, Chef Ashlee Aubin recommends heavily toasting the spices. “Let the edges of the cumin get a little dark,” he says. “Grind them with a mortar and pestle to really make the flavor pop.”

Ruxbin’s Jackfruit Carnitas

Charred Cauliflower with Freekeh at Boka

PHOTO BY HOSSEIN FATIMI

FREEKEH

While you can now find this ancient Middle Eastern grain at a grocery store near you, a couple years ago it was only available in specialty food markets. A couple months ago, Chef Lee Wolen at Boka switched from quinoa to freekeh to accompany his charred cauliflower steak, garnished with prunes and goat gouda. “I like the texture of freekeh better,” he says. “It is a bit crunchier and has more flavor. I love that freekeh is so versatile. You can cook it in so many different ways, for instance in a risotto, or puffed, or boiled, which each give it a different texture.” At White Oak Tavern in Lincoln Park, Chef Tom Van Lente is experimenting with freekeh too, with grilled asparagus, freekeh, egg and pecorino. “It’s practically breakfast but in a pretty original way that most people have never experienced,” he says.

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City Winery, CH Distillery

20 DELECTABLE RANDOLPH STREET RESTAURANTS YOU NEED TO KNOW BY JULIE CHERNOFF

Running east to west across what was once the semi-skeezy Fulton Market District, Chicago’s Randolph Street is the major artery through the heart of the vibrant West Loop dining scene. Close to the offices of the Loop and Union Station and directly on the access path to the United Center, Randolph Street is uniquely placed and highly accessible. Perhaps that’s one reason it’s proved a magnet for top Chicago chefs and restaurateurs like Paul Kahan, Stephanie Izard and Brendan Sodikoff, who saw the potential early on — nothing succeeds like success.

CH DISTILLERY

AVEC

Chicago’s original shared-plates resto. Current chef Perry Hendrix incorporates Midwestern and Mediterranean ingredients to great effect. Don’t worry; their classic ChorizoStuffed Dates and Focaccia with Taleggio remain. 615 W. Randolph St., 312-377-2002, avecrestaurant.com

It’s a distillery, so you know the adult beverages are going to be killer, but you might not expect the food to be this good. Chef Bobby Mayo has his finger on the pulse of what you want to eat with your Lapsang Suchong-infused CH London Dry Gin. More fun: Distillery tours offered Tuesdays and Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. 564 W. Randolph St., 312-707-8780, chdistillery.com

BLACKBIRD

EMBEYA

SALERO

This self-styled “progressive Asian” restaurant produces plates that are every bit as gorgeous as the surroundings. Chef Michael Sheerin (Cicchetti, Trencherman, Blackbird) combines his impeccable French-influenced technique with Asian ingredients and the results are stunning. 564 W. Randolph St., 312-612-5640, embeya.com 54

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The first restaurant of Chef Paul Kahan’s One Off Hospitality empire, Blackbird opened in 1997 to rapturous reviews, and they haven’t lost a step in nearly 20 years. Make no mistake, this is fine dining. 619 W. Randolph St., 312-715-0708, blackbirdrestaurant.com Chef Ashlee Aubin is killing it with everything from Pintxos (Uni Toast, Jamon Croquetas) to Platos Fuertes (Duck Breast a la Plancha, Poached Halibut with Green Garlic Dumplings). And the Spanish-style Gin Tonics are altogether on point. 621 W. Randolph St., 312-466-1000, salerochicago.com

LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN ZOMO; RIGHT PHOTO BY ARNOLD KLEIN

Here are some of our favorite places in the city, all conveniently located on a two-mile stretch of Randolph Street. And keep in mind that there are more treasures to explore on nearby Fulton Market (The Publican, PQ Meats, Swift & Sons) and Lake streets (Momotaro, Bar Takito, Saigon Sisters).


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RANDOLPH STREET DINING

W Randolph St

17 13 11

19 18

16

1. CH Distillery 2. Embeya 3. Avec 4. Blackbird 5. Salero

6. Grace 7. Au Cheval 8. Girl & The Goat 9. De Cero 10. Little Goat Diner

11. Bar Siena 12. Soho House 13. Maude’s Liquor Bar 14. Nellcôte 15. Green St. Meats

GRACE

10

7

9

2

6 4

8

14

15

KEY

20

5

12

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16. Graham Elliot Bistro 17. Grange Hall Burger Bar 18. Formento's 19. City Winery 20. Belly Q

BAR SIENA

Remember when you were cool? This is where you ate. “Top Chef Curtis Duffy’s three Michelin stars bear dramatic Chef” Fan Favorite Fabio Viviani knows what the people want: testimony to the elegance and beauty of both hisMAKEITBETTER.NET food and his thin-crust pizza, fresh from the wood-burning oven, and fresh restaurant. Grace is, in a word, exquisite. 652 W. Randolph St., bombolini (Italian donuts). Or is that just me? 832 W. Randolph St., 312-234-9494, grace-restaurant.com 312-492-7775, barsiena.com

AU CHEVAL

Everything you’ve heard about their burger is true — it kicks the tushy of practically every burger in town. But the matzo ball soup! The fried chicken! The foie gras terrine with orange marmalade (whaaaaaaa?)… I mean, yum. 800 W. Randolph St., 312-929-4580, auchevalchicago.com

GIRL & THE GOAT

SOHO HOUSE

You don’t need to be a member of the exclusive Soho House to partake of The Allis (the funky-cool lobby bar, filled with super comfy seating), Chicken Shop (spit-roasted chicken and homey sides) or the tiny Fox Bar. And you will feel so very, very in-crowd when you do. 113 N. Green St., 312-521-8000, sohohousechicago.com/food-and-drink

Top Chef winner Stephanie Izard’s flagship (see Little Goat Diner below; read about her newest, Duck Duck Goat on page 51 ) has been packed from the get-go and has yet to slow down. The Wood Oven-Roasted Pig Face is as remarkable as it sounds, but Izard has a deft hand with veggies, too. 809 W. Randolph St., 312-492-6262, girlandthegoat.com

GREEN STREET SMOKED MEATS

DE CERO/HELLO TACOS

MAUDE’S LIQUOR BAR

I tend to come here for the tacos (the Duck Confit, Al Pastor and Spicy Chorizo in particular), tamales and made-from-scratch margaritas (Ginger-Cucumber-Lemon or Passion Fruit are faves), but no matter how full I get, I must have their coffeeand coconut-scented flan. 816 W. Randolph St., 312-455-9100, hellotacos.com

LITTLE GOAT DINER

Breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner, late night … Little Goat does it all. And there’s not an item on this menu that I would willingly pass up. So go ahead. Have your burger done banh mì style; grab a Fat Elvis waffle with bananas, peanut butter and bacon-maple syrup. It’s — literally — all good. 820 W. Randolph St., 312-888-3455, littlegoatchicago.com

Step inside this cavernous BBQ honky tonk and you are immediately transported to Austin, Texas — at least in spirit. Grab a tray of chopped brisket, hot links, baked beans and pickled veggies, order up a brew, plop down at a picnic table and enjoy. 112 N. Green St., 312-754-0431, greenstreetmeats.com Well-executed bistro classics dominate the menu here, from a classic Lyonnaise salad to herby steamed mussels and golden roast chicken. But it ain’t called a liquor bar for nothing. The sparkling cocktails and the Whiskey Smashes are particularly magnifique. 840 W. Randolph St., 312-243-9712, maudesliquorbar.com

NELLCÔTE

There’s a distinct rock-and-roll vibe here, appropriate as the restaurant is named for the famed villa in the south of France where the Rolling Stones recorded “Exile on Main Street.” Chef Jared Van Camp is milling the flour for the house-made pasta and breads himself in the basement from heritage grains. No, seriously. 833 W. Randolph St., 312-432-0500, nellcoterestaurant.com M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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GRAHAM ELLIOT BISTRO

Celebrity chef Graham Elliot may have discovered the joys of good health and exercise in the last few years, but his menu is still filled with calorie-laden deliciousness, and truth be told, we like it that way. Don’t miss the Cheddar Risotto, topped with bacon bits and PBR onions. 841 W. Randolph St., 312-888-2258, gebistro.com

GRANGE HALL BURGER BAR

Grass-fed cows and free-range poultry sacrifice themselves for a better burger. Surprisingly, even your vegetarian and vegan friends have real options here. And did I mention fried pickles? 844 W. Randolph St., 312-491-0844, grangehallburgerbar.com

FORMENTO’S

At Formento’s, all of your Italian favorites are made new, including the Quail “Saltimbocca.” Try the Canestri with Sunday Gravy and Shrimp Dejonghe. If Tony Soprano weren’t fictional, he’d be eating here with his friends. 925 W. Randolph St., 312-690-7295, formentos.com 56

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CITY WINERY

Known for their eclectic mix of live music acts, City Winery Chicago location has hit its stride. Yes, they make their own wine here, but it’s performers like comedian Kevin Nealon and musical legend Graham Nash that bring in the crowds. 1200 W. Randolph St., 312-733-9463, citywinery.com/chicago/

BELLYQ

Chef Bill Kim has his way with Asian BBQ, and we will follow wherever he leads, because it’s all crazy good. Standouts include the Tea-Smoked Duck Breast with pillowy buns; Marinated Korean Short Ribs and the PB&J Soft Serve Parfait. Sooooooo tasty. 1400 W. Randolph St., 312-563-1010, bellyqchicago.com Read the latest dining news online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/DEEPDISHFOODNEWS

TOP PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO BY DEREK RICHMOND ; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY CHLOE LIST

Clockwise from top left: Girl and the Goat, Formento’s, Avec


#BRUNCH

Shakshouka at Beatrix

BRUNCH TIME! OUR NEW FAVORITES FOR 2016 BY JULIE CHERNOFF

Who doesn’t love brunch, that genius mash-up of breakfast and lunch, eaten on weekends when late-night shenanigans make early-morning breakfast an impossible dream? So roll out of bed, take some Advil and head out to one of our new favorite brunch spots. BALENA

BELLYQ

BRUNCH SERVED SUNDAYS FROM 11 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

BRUNCH SERVED SUNDAYS FROM 11 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Let the trumpets sound … Balena is now serving brunch. And like everything that the über-talented Chef Chris Pandel does, the food is magic. Enjoy Italian-influenced delights like Crispy Polenta Hash with Pork Ragu and Fried Egg, La Colombe coffee, Balena’s housemade Panettone and smoky wood-fired pizzas. Hallelujah! 1633 N. Halsted St., Chicago, 312-867-3888

Think outside the standard brunch box at Bill Kim’s bellyQ,where you will fall in love with his Sticky Rice, loaded with pork sausage and braised beef cheek, or the Quinoa Bibimbap, featuring shrimp, lemongrass chicken and scrambled eggs. Wash it all down with a mescal-spiked Mango Lassi; just don’t miss the cinnamon-scented Vietnamese donuts. 1400 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 312-563-1010

BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Whether you start the meal with a breakfast cocktail (perhaps a citrus-forward Tequila Sunrise or an oh-my Spicy Bloody Mary) or a fresh-squeezed juice (I love the Carrot, Orange & Ginger Snap), you’re on your way to something tasty. The food can spin either healthy or impossibly decadent. P.S.: the Raspberry-Ricotta Toast is to die for. 671 N. St. Clair, Chicago, 312-642-0001

BOHEMIAN HOUSE BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

Light eating? Not in Eastern Europe. At Chef Jimmy Papadopoulos’ table, you’ll find rib-sticking and inventive takes on Hungarian, German and Mittel-Europe cuisines. Order a big old Potato Pancake — topped with sour cream and apple preserves, natch — for the table, as well as an Apricot Kolacky or three. 11 W. Illinois St., Chicago, 312-955-0439

PHOTO BY ANJALI PINTO

BEATRIX STREETERVILLE


#BRUNCH

BOLTWOOD BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

Hello, Stone Ground Oats with cashews, dried cherries and brown sugar. You make me happy to be alive. I’ll start with you for funsies, and then switch to the Smoked Door County Whitefish Toast. And I’ve never been to Boltwood without a genuflection at the altar of Chef Brian Huston’s Crispy Potatoes fried in garlic schmaltz … so decadent! 804 Davis St., Evanston, 847-859-2880

CANTINA 1910 BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

This menu is long on both flavor and invention. Start with the Cajeta Crumb Cake, then proceed to the Huevo en Cazuela, a sunny-side up egg cooked in lava rock salsa with wild greens. If you’re ravenously hungry, the Fried Chicken and Churros with hoja santa whipped butter and fruit salsa will make you forget all the substandard chicken and waffles you’ve encountered. 5025 N. Clark St., Chicago, 773-506-1910

CHERRY CIRCLE ROOM BRUNCH IS SERVED EVERYDAY (!) FROM 7 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

Chef Pete Coenen found his way to the new and improved Cherry Circle Room after stints at Boka and The Gage; here he is making what I think of as updated club food to reflect the history of the Chicago Athletic Club. The Sticky Bun is an ooeygooey stunner, especially when enjoyed with a Gin Fizz flavored with Earl Grey tea. Need a break? Grab a cue and play a game of billiards in the Game Room. 12 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 312-792-3515

THE DUCK INN BRUNCH SERVED ON SUNDAYS FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

Clearly, you are required to order SOMETHING with duck, and Chef Kevin Hickey’s Duck Confit Hash happily fits the bill, the tender duck morsels combined with Brussels sprouts, cheddar cheese, toasty breadcrumbs and softly scrambled farm eggs. Don’t forget the must-have sweet: the moist and rich Carrot Cake topped with cream cheese frosting and crystallized ginger. Yummity yum yum. 2701 S. Eleanor St., Chicago, 312-724-8811

FIREFLY KITCHEN

PHOTOS COURTESY OF APPELLATION WINE BAR

BRUNCH SERVED SUNDAYS 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

If you’re a Benedict fan, you’ll be a happy camper. Firefly’s “Bennys” give you the option of crab cakes, filet, house-smoked pork or spinach Florentine, perched on a toasty English muffin with a poached egg and just-right Béarnaise sauce. A Passion Fruit Bellini will cut right through the richness and soothe your soul. 111 Green Bay Road, Wilmette, 224-408-2464

THE HAMPTON SOCIAL BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 10 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Come early to avoid the boisterous River North crowd. Tuck in to the Banana Bread French Toast, and you will buzz the rest of the day, no caffeine required. As for potables, go with the Southampton Smash, made with Pimm’s #1, Ford’s gin, lime and muddled cucumber, and finished with ginger beer. It’s a Mule on steroids. 353 W. Hubbard St., Chicago, 312-464-0500

Eggs in Squash Cream and Steak and Eggs at Pastoral’s Appellation Wine Bar

HEARTH BRUNCH SERVED SUNDAYS FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

An oasis of calm in our busy, busy world, Hearth is a place where you can have brunch AND hold actual discussions with everyone at your table. It’s the unicorn of brunch restaurants, people. The juice is fresh, everything is made in-house, and Sundays are happy time. 1625 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 847-570-8400

PASTORAL’S APPELLATION WINE BAR BRUNCH SERVED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Visit the palace of all things cheese, and be amazed. I’m talking Ricotta Fritters with smooth and tangy grapefruit curd; Baked French Toast with goat cheese, cherry preserves and ginger crème anglaise; or perhaps the sage-bèchamel-covered Croque Monsieur with poached pear, prosciutto and Gruyère. I mean, COME ON. There is truly no rest for the wicked. 5212 N. Clark St., Chicago, 773-358-7181 Read all about our brunch favorites online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BRUNCH


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#DRINK

Soho House

10 ROOFTOP BARS TO TRY THIS SUMMER BY EILEEN BAER AND JULIE CHERNOFF

We wait eight cold, sad months, and one day, the sun finally shines, the earth warms and our hearts open up to summertime in Chicago. And for four glorious months, we dine outside like Parisians, gazing out at our sapphire lake. In recent years, Chicago has added some fabulous rooftop bars to its arsenal of summer fun. It’s rooftop season, y’all! Fabulous views of Lincoln Park, Lake Michigan and the downtown skyline are strong selling points of this 13th floor topper at the Hotel Lincoln. Chef Paul Virant devised the appetizer menu and a retractable roof allows year-round use. 1816 N. Lincoln Ave., jparkerchicago.com

THE DEC ROOFTOP LOUNGE + BAR

Open the doors of the Ritz-Carlton Chicago’s 12th-floor bistro, Deca, and head out to a chic but casual terrace featuring a fire pit, craft beers and cocktails, and delicious small plates. 160 E. Pearson St., ritzcarlton.com

ROOF ON THE WIT

Of course, the lounge is stylish, the cocktails creative and the made-to-share cuisine delectable, but it’s the Monday outdoor movie nights and live music on Tuesdays that make it truly special. 201 N. State St., roofonthewit.com

IO URBAN ROOFSCAPE

Not just for night owls! This rooftop perch at the Godfrey Hotel serves breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as providing a swinging cocktail scene. 127 W. Huron St., iogodfrey.com

DRUMBAR

Lush plants and cozy fire pits populate the 18th-floor roof of Streeterville’s Raffaello Hotel. Gaze over sparkling Lake Michigan, or peer into the apartments of the John Hancock Building. 201 E. Delaware Place, drumbar.com

VERTIGO SKY LOUNGE

The 26th floor of the Dana Hotel sports an ultra-modern, indoor/outdoor lounge that’s open year round with live DJs spinning nightly. 2 W. Erie St., vertigoskylounge.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF SOHO HOUSE

THE J. PARKER


#DRINK

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DEC ROOFTOP BAR + LOUNGE; TOP RIGHT PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO BY MATTHEW REEVES; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY JORGE GERA

Clockwise from top left: The Dec Rooftop Lounge + Bar, drumBAR, Roof on theWit, IO Urban Roofscape

GREENRIVER

CERISE AT THE VIRGIN HOTEL

NOMI GARDEN

SOHO HOUSE

The 18th floor of a medical building is an unlikely candidate for the coolest rooftop bar in the city, with the most original cocktail program to boot, but there you have it. Bonus: The food is crazy good. 259 E. Erie St., greenriverchi.com Spectacular city views are on tap from the Park Hyatt’s 7th-floor terrace, and since NoMi is one of the top-rated restaurants in the city, you will eat well in this urban sanctuary. 800 N. Michigan Ave., parkchicago.hyatt.com

It’s a rooftop cocktail bar and nightclub rolled into one. This British import (thanks, Sir Richard Branson!) is always rocking, with dazzling lighting, pounding music and a gorgeous view. 203 N. Wabash, virginhotels.com/dine-and-drink/cerise Lose yourself in the spectacular view of the city skyline from under a canopy of lights at this über-exclusive enclave, complete with rooftop pool. Rooftop access is limited to Soho House members and hotel guests, so … get a room! 113 N. Green St., sohohousechicago.com Bookmark this article for rooftop adventures all summer long MAKEITBETTER.NET/ROOFTOPBARS


#PHILANTHROPY

FOOD FOR YOUR STOMACH AND YOUR SOUL B Y G A B R I E L L E TA S I O P O U LO S

At Make It Better, there are few things we’re as passionate about as social enterprise, but food is definitely up there. That’s why we love these three organizations using the power of food to make a difference. Read on to find out how you can warm your stomach and your soul by supporting these great causes.

BLESSINGS IN A BACKPACK

Hungry children struggle to maintain focus, retain information and stay positive. Blessings in a Backpack’s all-volunteer network sends children home with a backpack of food on Fridays that should last them through the weekend. By providing nourishing food to children in need, the organization feeds bodies and minds. Of the children who have received backpacks, 59 percent say it is easier to learn at school, 60 percent do not get in trouble as often and 78 percent feel their community is caring for them. A $100 donation feeds one child on the weekends for an entire school year. 800-872-4366 | blessingsinabackpack.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH ORGANIZATION

Blessings in a Backpack CEO Brooke Wiseman believes “no child should have to go hungry.” She leads the organization in helping to fight hunger during weekends, a time when many underprivileged children struggle with having enough to eat. Far too many children don’t know where or when their next meal will be, especially on the weekends when they are away from school where lunch is provided.


#PHILANTHROPY

Born out of founder Emily Boling’s passion for baking that began in her grandmother’s kitchen, The Floured Apron trains and mentors women from underserved communities who have an interest in baking. The program is centered around a 10-week training program in food preparation and service, covering best practices in customer service, sanitation, recipe development and decorating techniques. As graduation approaches, The Floured Apron volunteers and mentors also help students with job placement.

THE FLOURED APRON

The Floured Apron’s baked goods are now for sale at The Grand Food Centers in Winnetka and Glencoe. Proceeds from the sale of these goods, as well as orders made online, benefit The Floured Apron’s programming. To donate or order from The Floured Apron, go to theflouredapron.org | 847-868 2253.

Misericordia is well-known for its top-quality support and programming for adults and children with developmental disabilities. One of their most popular programs, the Hearts & Flour Bakery, which is staffed by residents, has grown substantially over the past 25 years. It received a significant boost 13 years ago, when Misericordia Executive Director Sister Rosemary Connelly suggested expanding the bakery’s offering to sell baked goods to people across Chicagoland and, eventually, nationally via their website. The bakery serves not only as a fundraising avenue for Misericordia, but also as a place for its residents to learn new skills and receive job training. An important byproduct is that residents gain a “sense of belonging, responsibility and importance,” says Kali Kordewick, one of Misericordia’s Hearts & Flour Bakery managers. This in turn “boosts their self-esteem and gives them confidence to try new things.” A major part of the bakery’s mission is to train and equip the residents who work there with skills and knowledge to help them find a job outside of Misericordia. With this goal in mind, the bakery is set up so that any interested resident can participate regardless of abilities.

HEARTS & FLOUR BAKERY MISERICORDIA

“No matter who you are, having a purpose in life is an integral part of your well being. That is no exception here at Misericordia,” says Kordewick, who shared that four of the bakery’s workers have recently moved on to other jobs at Mariano’s, Wal-Mart and the Radisson Blu, a sure sign that the model is proving very successful. To purchase baked goods online, visit misericordia.com/bakery.aspx.

Hungry for more? Read about seven more food-centric nonprofits doing good works at MAKEITBETTER.NET/SOULFOOD


SPONSORED CONTENT

DO YOU KNOW CPR?

IT'S A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

The chance for survival for a person in cardiac arrest is reduced by about 10 percent for each minute that automated external defibrillation (AED) is delayed, so CPR and AEDs can literally be a matter of life and death.

Participants learn how to recognize and respond to cardiac, breathing and first aid emergencies including performing CPR, using an AED, helping someone who is choking, controlling bleeding, treating heat- and cold-related emergencies and more. People can find training offerings in their area and options to take online simulation courses at redcross.org/ takeaclass. Additionally, the FREE Red Cross First Aid App includes step-by-step instructions, videos and animations on how to handle a variety of first aid situations including performing CPR and using and AED.

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Do you already know CPR? Really know it? And yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changed since you took it in high school. Are there people at your office who are trained? What about the people who work at your favorite restaurant or golf club? The caregivers who look after or coach your child? Do they know what to do in a cardiac or choking emergency?

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE AMERICAN RED CROSS

BY AMERICAN RED CROSS OF CHIC AGO & N O RT H ER N IL LIN OIS


#GARDENING BET TER YOU | finance

HOW TO CHOOSE A LANDSCAPER B Y H E AT H E R B L A C K M O R E

Whether you’re going for a refresh of an existing landscape, a total tear-out of an eyesore left by a previous owner, or you don’t even know where to begin (only that you definitely need help!), we’ve got tips from three seasoned landscape and garden design professionals to inform your process. Steve Kooyenga, senior landscape architect at Chalet Landscaping in Wilmette, encourages people to scout their neighborhoods for designs that catch their eye and follow up with the homeowner. Find out what your neighbor’s experience was with the design company. Were they easy to work with? Considerate of their needs and ideas? Candid opinions are an invaluable tool for discovering the right person for the job. “Referrals are a huge part of our business,” Kooyenga says. “I’ve designed for Chalet for 27 years and most of my clients are repeat or referral clients.” Don’t hesitate to ask a prospective designer for a portfolio. If you have a certain design aesthetic in mind, now’s the time to verify that the designer is capable of pulling it off. “You want to make sure the designer has an appreciation for all design styles,” says Tony Butterworth, landscape designer 7 0 M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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for Christy Webber Landscapes, adding: “You want to be able to have an open communication to help get your ideas across.” That first phone call or face-to-face meeting can be pretty revealing. Does the designer show an interest in what you’re saying? Is he or she telling you what you want instead of asking? Did you come away feeling you were understood? Confirm the designer’s experience and credentials too. How long have they designed? To what professional associations do they belong? Tracy DiSabato-Aust, an internationally recognized garden designer, says when creating a plan, it is as important to consider the views looking out from inside your home as those from the outside. Hopefully your designer’s plan has taken those views into account, saving you from staring into your neighbor’s living room while washing dishes every evening.

PHOTO BY HEATHER BLACKMORE

DON’T BE SHY


#GARDENING

After falling into disrepair, this Winnetka yard was revived with thoughtful plantings that not only provide an enclosed, intimate feeling around the outdoor living space but offer pleasing views from inside the home.

THE QUOTE

Once you’ve settled on a designer and had a discussion about budget and vision, he or she will return to you to share a plan of attack. Project costs are determined based on the amount of labor and materials needed to complete the work. Plant material, mulch, soil, brick, stone and debris removal will be included in the final cost. If a plan requires carpentry, irrigation, lighting or a water feature, a design/build company will factor in the costs of those contractors to come up with a comprehensive quote. As for negotiating final cost, it’s not a bad idea. “Some companies will offer discounts based on the scope of the project,” says Kooyenga. “It never hurts to ask.”

HOW INVOLVED WILL YOU BE?

Perhaps you’ll want the company to install the big stuff like trees, shrubs and hardscaping, while you’ll plant the annuals and perennials. If you’re a hands-on gardener with a desire to do some of the work yourself, be sure that’s discussed before work begins, as it could change the terms of the warranty the designer offers.

The owners of this historic country home in Thornton, Ill., wanted a unique, welcoming façade. Roasting marshmallows by the campfire is a favorite among the couple’s many grandchildren.

DiSabato-Aust says the majority of her clients rely on her to choose the best plants for the job but she welcomes the engaged client. “There are some clients who are genuinely very interested and want to accompany me [to a garden center],” says DiSabato-Aust. “I’m ok with that ... I like to have a lot of interaction with my clients.”

PHOTO BY HEATHER BLACKMORE; PHOTO BY SUSAN VARICK

IT’S A WRAP, ALMOST

Good soil is the foundation of success. Without it, a design, no matter how beautiful, will fail. DiSabato-Aust encourages clients to ask the designer if the soil will be addressed before planting begins. DiSabato-Aust also encourages homeowners to always request a care plan before a plant is placed. Butterworth adds that while some clients are given a maintenance protocol, most defer to the design company for lawn care, pruning and fertilization schedules. Be honest with the designer so that he or she can create an accurate quote for care and maintenance. The amount of labor required to keep that landscape looking its best will determine cost.

A pond was high on the wish list for the owners of this Naperville home. Aquascape, Inc. designed a plan that offered a sustainable water feature within a backyard retreat.

Get more landscaping ideas online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/LANDSCAPING

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#GARDENING

Last summer, the Chicago Botanic Garden combined zinnias and Swiss chard to beautiful effect.

HOW TO GROW YOUR OWN FOOD GARDEN B Y H E AT H E R B L A C K M O R E

“The garden is a love song, a duet between a human being and Mother Nature.” — Jeff Cox

“Work into gardening gradually,” says Shawna Coronado, a wellness and organic lifestyle expert. “Take one small step each year in the garden and build on it.” Arm yourself with these essential tips from food gardening pros, and you’ll be eating the homegrown goodness you’ve been envisioning in no time.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

Just as you might look for that ideal spot to build a home, the same holds true for a food garden.

“The amount of sunlight is the most important thing that will determine if it’s possible to grow a food garden,” says Jeanne Nolan, president and founder of The Organic Gardener. Six hours of sun is ideal, and eight is even better. According to Nolan, an inexpensive device like a SunCalc can measure sun exposure throughout the course of the day or you can eyeball it. Should you find that the area receives less than the ideal six hours, fear not. Crops like leafy greens, beans, peas, cucumbers, beets and most herbs, with the exception of the Mediterraneans like rosemary and lavender, will thrive. Nolan also says the smaller-fruited cherry tomatoes do well in lower-light situations.

PHOTOS BY HEATHER BLACKMORE

Have you always wanted to start your own garden but been afraid of failure? Like most things in life, gardening is trial and error. Talk to any gardener and they’ll happily admit to killing plenty of plants. It’s part of the learning process and the key to gardening success.


#GARDENING

SOIL IS THE LIFEBLOOD OF THE GARDEN

“There’s an old rule of thumb,” says Coronado. “No roots, no fruit.” If you’ll be planting directly in the ground, a soil test is paramount as it will identify dangerous contaminants like lead, and also help determine what amendments your soil might require. For a list of labs, visit extension. illinois.edu/soiltest. The Midwest is notorious for clay soil, making it vital that amendments like compost and aged manure are introduced to loosen it and provide a fertile planting bed. The more compost the better. This becomes less of an issue if you’ll be planting in containers or raised beds, which allow the gardener more control over the soil. According to Nolan, a planting depth of 12 to 18 inches is ideal for most crops. Gardener’s Supply Company has a nifty little soil calculator that will determine just how much you’ll need to fill the dimensions of a raised bed. Keep in mind container gardens tend to dry out faster and will require consistent watering to keep seeds evenly hydrated.

A cobalt blue tuteur rises above a bed of peppery nasturtiums. Vertical gardening creates an opportunity to grow climbing plants like beans and cucumbers.

GARDEN WITH THE KIDS

Kids have an innate interest in nature — and a seemingly preprogrammed disdain for veggies. Get kids to grow their veggies from seeds or seedlings though, and they’re much more likely to try and ultimately like what they’re eating. With names like rainbow carrots, Easter egg radishes and blue potatoes, what kid wouldn’t want to get their hands dirty and plant a garden? “If you can expose them to something they love like a favorite vegetable they’ve grown themselves, it helps plant that seed in them,” says Linda Ly, creative force behind the popular blog Garden Betty. Ly says starting seeds indoors is a perfect opportunity for children to witness the process from seed to germination. A bright, south-facing window, containers and seed-starting mix will provide the base for your experiment. Planting time depends on the recommendation that appears on the back of all seed packets. Carrots, beets, radishes, beans, cucumbers and leafy greens are some great beginner plants offering a lot of bang for your buck. It’s not a bad idea to keep a journal to track the progress of the garden from planting to harvesting. In time, and as your knowledge grows, garden tasks will become second nature. For crops started indoors, be sure to “harden off” seedlings. Accustomed to predictable indoor conditions, seedlings require a period of time to adjust to temperature fluctuations. Place them in a protected location outside for an hour the first day, and repeat the process for a week. For each day, add another hour. At the end of the week, the seedlings will be ready to transplant into the garden.

Cherry tomatoes are great for small gardens and containers as they tend to be more compact and thrive in lower light conditions.

While fertilizing is optional, all plants thrive on a little extra TLC. After all, it takes a lot of energy to produce delicious food. Nolan uses a liquid fish emulsion and seaweed spray every other week. A side dressing of granulated organic fertilizer is applied once a month at the height of the growing season. There will always be factors that work against the gardener. Too much rain, too little rain, insect infestations, not enough sun. Why fret over what we can’t control? After all, there’s always next year. Get more gardening advice at MAKEITBETTER.NET/GARDENING


# T R AV E L

Cuba’s stuck-in-time feeling is illustrated by the old-school vehicles Cubans drive everyday, as pictured here.

CUBA WITHIN REACH BY ANDREA GUTHMANN

Restrictions on travel to Cuba have continued to loosen since President Obama first announced, in December 2014, that the U.S. would be restoring diplomatic relations with the country. In March, it became legal for Americans to travel to Cuba as individuals rather than being required to travel as part of a group. But don’t pack your bags just yet — you still can’t quickly hop on a flight to Havana. If visiting Cuba fills your travel bucket dreams, here are some ideas on how to start planning.

AUTHORIZED TRAVEL CATEGORIES

You need a license from the Treasury Department to travel to Cuba. To receive one, the reason for your visit must fall under one of 12 categories, which range from “attending a public performance, clinic, workshop, exhibition or athletic competition,” to humanitarian projects, family visits or educational activities.

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Given the wide range of categories, just about anyone can find a justifiable reason to visit Cuba. But there are other obstacles. Direct flights are currently available only through charter companies, though major airlines could start offering direct flights as early as this summer. Maybe you’ve heard the buzz about Airbnb’s arrival in Cuba and are wondering if you could just book your own bed and breakfast? Technically the answer is yes, though travel agents advise the safest and easiest way to visit Cuba is still via a “people-to-people” tour. People-to-people trips can only be booked through licensed tour operators. People-to-people travel, whether with a group or as an individual, generally falls under the “educational activities” travel category and — to be clear — actually requires meeting up with Cuban citizens, say artists or scholars, not just relaxing poolside at your resort.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF INSIGHT CUBA AND ROBIN THOM

What’s been the forbidden fruit of travel for Americans for more than 50 years is now a viable destination.


# T R AV E L

Church Rooftop in Trinidad Cuba has more than 3,500 miles of coastline

REPUTABLE PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE TOURS

Since 2000, more than 10,000 guests have toured Cuba with New York-based InsightCuba, which offers more than 150 departures annually, including tours geared towards specific hobbies and interests. National Geographic Expeditions has also offered a Cuba trip for several years. Norie Quintos, editor at large of National Geographic Traveler magazine, explains the benefits: “Number one, you’re connecting with real Cubans — musicians, historians, entrepreneurs. Secondly, you’re guided by NG experts such as geographer Juan Valdez, a Cuban refugee. Finally, you’re going with a group with established relationships to the island, which really means you’re staying in the best accommodations and visiting the most interesting places.” Here are Quintos’ tips for choosing a good people-to-people tour group to Cuba:

Kendra Thornton, president and owner of Royal Travel and Tours, based in Winnetka, says Cuba is one of her agency’s most sought-after destinations this year. Here are a few of her must-see and -do recommendations in Havana:

WHAT TO DO Visit La Habana Vieja (old Havana), a UNESCO World Heritage Site, particularly the Cathedral Square, Plaza de Armas, and the San Francisco Square. The two top museums in the city, per Thornton, are Palacio de los Capitanes Generales, the former home of the governor of Cuba during colonial times, and the Museum of Fine Arts (note that there are two separate buildings — the one you want to see is the museum dedicated to Cuban art collections, which have never been seen outside of Cuba).

WHERE TO EAT

1. There will likely be many new operators that pop up, hoping to cash in on Cuba’s popularity. Go with an operator that has established relationships.

The Floridita bar and restaurant, located near Finca Vigia, Ernest Hemingway’s former residence, was one of his popular haunts.

2. Don’t just compare the listed tour price; find out what’s included and what’s extra. For example, some companies won’t cover all meals.

Tropicana and Bodeguita are two other popular restaurants that provide colorful entertainment and authentic Cuban culture.

3. The right guide makes all the difference. Who is leading the trip and how much do they know about the island? Ask beforehand.

WHERE TO STAY

For now, a call to your local travel agent is a good place to start. They can help you decipher the regulations and restrictions about traveling to Cuba. Fuel your wanderlust online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/TRAVEL

Hotel Saratoga, which Thornton says has the “best service, best room product, and a wonderful rooftop pool with great views of the city.” Thornton also recommends the Parque Central Hotel in Havana, but cautions against staying at the Hotel Nacional, Havana’s most famous hotel. “The rooms are very tired and in dire need of renovation,” she says. Ready to say hola to Cuba? Buena suerte (good luck!) and start planning now.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH STOPEK HIRSCH

# T R AV E L

MUST-READ TIPS FOR TRAVELING WITH KIDS BY AMBER GIBSON

Summer is just about here, and chances are you have a family vacation on the horizon. Highland Park mom and entrepreneur Sarah Stopek Hirsch, founder of WellTraveledKids.com, shares some of her tips for making traveling with kids a positive experience for the whole family. 1. Visualize every step of the way — from leaving your house to coming home. Make a list of everything you’ll need. 2. Likewise, rehearse ahead of time with the kids. Walk through the entire experience a week ahead. Surprising kids sounds exciting, but it has the potential to backfire if kids are caught off-guard. 3. Don’t overschedule. Sightseeing trips are great, but leave parts of the day open to see through your kids’ eyes. Make a list of what adults prefer and another of what kids want to do. Do the adult activity first, then the kid one as a reward. 4. Always call ahead and ask your hotel if they do anything special for kids. 5. When flying with a baby, you can check all of your baby gear for free — stroller, car seat — and it won’t count against your checked bags on United, American and most other major airlines. 6. Lots of people wait until kids are older to take them to Disney, but kids under 3 are free! 7. Never underestimate the value of an “off” day. Stopek-Hirsch says kids are more likely to bounce back if you don’t plan two major sightseeing days in a row. 8. Kids love having their own suitcase to help carry items such as healthy snacks, activities, toys, cards and art supplies. 9. Come prepared with enough diapers, extra clothes, snacks, bottles and emergency medication to prepare for any unexpected flight delays. 10. Splurge for help to make it feel more like vacation. Hire a porter at the airport to help drag your bags, consider hiring a babysitter for a night or two of adults-only time, and if it’s an option, rent a spacious suite so you can spread out. 11. Ask yourself why you’re going — is it for relaxation, adventure, sightseeing? Set goals and understand your limitations. Make sure everyone understands the goals so they’re enthusiastic about the plans. Read more tips for traveling with kids and learn more about Stopek-Hirsch at MAKEITBETTER.NET/WELLTRAVELED 7 6 M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6 makeitbetter.net


#HOME

THIS HOME’S A DREAM B Y H E AT H E R L E S ZC Z E W I C Z

Find your home decor inspiration, or aspiration, at the 12th Annual DreamHome, which will be on display at the Merchandise Mart through Dec. 4. Here’s a taste of four of the six rooms created by Chicago interior design firms.

BEDROOM p

Don’t be afraid to mix luxurious items with more rustic or rough textures, as designer Michael Del Piero of Michael Del Piero Good Design does in this bedroom. A supersoft throw can work well in a space that also features a natural fiber, sisal rug. The artwork also came first for this room, with a large painting acting as a headboard and the room’s focal point.

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SUNROOM

Inspired by a vintage 1970s photograph, the sunroom designed by Tom Riker and James Dolenc of JamesThomas Interiors features a base of black and white with pops of pink, raspberry and blue. When you’re designing a room, Dolenc says, don’t strive to be on trend. Keep classic proportions, make sure there’s a balance of contemporary and time-honored styles, and don’t forget to have some fun.

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t LIBRARY

Make a room look rich, warm and inviting by including a mix of textures and using jewel tones, as shown in the library designed by Kadlec Architecture + Design. The leather paneling above the fireplace is unexpected and refined. Imagine curling up with a book on the large ottoman in the center of the room.

FOYER

PHOTOS BY HEDRICH BLESSING

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t invest in things that are trendy when it comes to home design, advises Lynn Boutross of Blutter Shiff Design Associates, the firm responsible for this bright and calming foyer. If you want to be sure you will still love the design years down the road, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt to be classic. One great feature of this room is the Maya Romanoff vinyl wall covering. Super-stylish with a sparkle and you can wipe it down with a sponge when needed. Form meets function.


PHOTO <CREDIT>

PHOTO <CREDIT>


#HOME

HOW SMART IS YOUR HOME?

9 HIGH-TECH AND ECO-FRIENDLY UPGRADES TO TRY AT HOME BY R ACHEL BROWN KULP

A house is more than four walls and roof. From the electricity to the plumbing to all the creature comforts — a home is a complex piece of machinery worthy of intelligent design. Here are some of our favorite upgrades and gadgets for a home that works smarter, not harder. DURABLE QUARTZ

1

Cambria’s Torquay Quartz combines old-world charm with modern durability for a quartz surface that looks like marble, but wears like iron — and what could be smarter than that? Pricing varies, Cambria

HANDS-FREE FAUCET

3

It’s 2016 — at the very least, your home should have the same modern conveniences as a public restroom. A touch-less kitchen faucet keeps your chicken fingers from germinating salmonella and makes cleaning up a snap. $689, Kohler

4

APP-CONTROLLED WINDOW TREATMENTS

The future is looking bright with automated window treatments controlled by the Platinum App. Open and close your shades with a swipe of your mobile device, or set them to raise and lower automatically when the clock strikes midnight (or anytime you choose). Prices vary by product and specifications, Hunter Douglas

5

WATER-CONSERVING SHOWER HEAD

The Evolve Water Lily showerhead takes low-flow a step further with a twopronged approach to conserving water, and a three-pronged approach to luxuriating in it. Three spray patterns, including a rain setting, and a mechanism that inhibits spray until the water reaches a comfortable temperature, mean you and your conscience can stay squeaky clean. $70, Evolve Showerheads

HUMIDITY MONITOR

Give your home X-ray vision with Wally. The system uses special sensors hidden throughout your house to monitor humidity and temperature levels, and immediately alerts you to any leaks or mold issues. $300, Wally


6 AUTOMATED LIGHTING

No need to clap on and off — GE’s Link bulbs let you light up your home in peace. The bulbs work in tandem with the Wink app, allowing for custom settings, remote commands and automated illumination. Link bulbs, $15-25 each, Home Depot; Wink Hub, $50

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7 SELF-ADJUSTING SPRINKLERS

A sprinkler system with a mind of its own means never having to say you’re soggy (couldn’t resist). The Skydrop sprinkler controller is like a brain for your existing sprinkler system. It keeps tabs on the weather and adjusts the watering schedule accordingly. $300, Skydrop

The Nest Thermostat is part stalker (all the best appliances are), part gracious hostess. It learns your routine, and then programs itself according to your temperature preferences; you can also control it remotely with your phone. $250, Nest

No like Find more home advice online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/HOME

BLUETOOTH LOCKING SYSTEM

more jangling a janitor! Now you can unlock your door with the touch of a finger, like a magician. Kevo is a Bluetooth locking system that allows you to control your deadbolt with an encrypted e-key that lives on your phone or key fob.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH MANUFACTURER

REMOTE TEMPERATURE CONTROL


# F A M I LY

WHAT KIDS BRING HOME

FROM SLEEP-AWAY CAMP BY PA M E L A R OT H B A R D

A humorous look at the (often) wide gap between the objects kids bring to camp and those they take home. When my son first went to overnight camp, I was obsessed with making sure he was okay. My phone displayed his local weather, and I ran to the mailbox daily. I eagerly scoured the camp photos posted each night. I was Sherlock Holmes, determined to find clues to his happiness. Is that a smile on his blurry face in the background? I worried. Did he have enough sunscreen? Was he warm enough? Why is he wearing the same shorts three days in a row — didn’t I pack enough? I thought his entire experience hinged on my preparation. What I discovered in those photos is that it doesn’t matter so much what you pack; once kids are at camp, it’s a free-for-all.

In those pictures, I saw some boys in sweatshirts while others were bare-chested. There were shorts and pants, boots and flip-flops, and one kid decked in fishing gear — all on the same day. My son was laughing with his arm around a boy I didn’t know, wearing a shirt that wasn’t his. Youths at camp are mother-free children running around in whatever strikes their fancy; they’re kids being managed by other, older, kids. I wondered about the little savage that would be returned to me at summer’s end. Unlike that first year when I said goodbye at the bus then sat in my car and cried, now I know exactly what to expect. I’ve learned a few things.

WHAT KIDS TAKE TO SLEEP-AWAY CAMP

WHAT THEY BRING HOME

A brand-new toothbrush

Bad breath and a minty duffel bag

20 stamped and pre-addressed envelopes

20 stamped and pre-addressed envelopes

Stories of fun with their neighborhood friends

Stories of rowdy antics with a cast of characters you’ve never heard of

14 T-shirts

The ability to stretch their T-shirts around their heads like ninjas

Nail clippers

“Guinness Book of World Records”-length toenails with dirt underneath

2 cans of mosquito repellant

2 still-full-yet-dented cans of repellant and 32 mosquito bites

Their own carefully-labeled underwear

Alex from Miami’s underwear

Shiny new haircut

Lice

Table manners

New habits like pounding on the table to show they’re seated or yelling “freeze” just when you get a spoonful of soup to your mouth — then laughing maniacally

Things to do: books, journal, comic books, Uno, a deck of cards

Three water-logged Uno cards

Nerves

Confidence

A longing to be back home with family

A longing to be back at camp with friends


#FINANCES

CAN YOU AFFORD TO GET DIVORCED?

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE COSTS OF SPLITTING UP BY MEGHAN STREIT

When you make the painful decision to divorce, you know there will be some expenses, namely legal fees. But, the end of a marriage can trigger all sorts of costs, many of which soon-to-beex spouses don’t anticipate because they are (understandably) mired in the emotional aspects of splitting up. One big increased expense after divorce is taxes. For starters, you can no longer file joint returns, which is the most advantageous status for many couples. Chicago divorce attorney, mediator and coach Karen Covy, who is also a member of the Collaborative Law Institute of Illinois, says divorce settlements can trigger taxable events — for instance, when you sell off a portion of an IRA. And remember that while child support is not counted as taxable income, you will be taxed on alimony that you receive. “Another hidden cost is health insurance. In a family, all of the people are on one policy. When you split up, it’s every person for themselves, and health insurance is expensive,” Covy says. “It’s not only the

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cost of the premium, but a lot of divorced people have a huge deductible in order to have a premium they can afford, and they are responsible for the whole deductible because it’s no longer a family deductible.” Both spouses should also plan to spend money on therapy. While working out your emotional issues may seem like a luxury, Covy says not dealing with anger and resentment can end up costing you real money. She recalls a case in which the exes racked up significant legal fees battling over every last asset — down to a run-of-the-mill vacuum cleaner. Clearly, their negative emotions were clouding their financial prudence. “Divorce is about 20 percent legal and financial and 80 percent emotional,” Covy says. “If you don’t deal with your emotions … you spend hours, days, years fighting in court over stuff you really don’t even care about.”


For most couples, their most significant asset is the family home. Emotionally, it often makes sense for women, particularly those with young children, to keep the house. But Danielle Schultz, a certified divorce financial analyst in Evanston, says that financially, it could be a bum deal. You have to take into account all of the expenses that come along with the house — from property taxes and routine maintenance to landscaping and housecleaning costs. “The woman often bargains for this as a way to keep the children rooted, but then the spouse walks away with all the investable assets, which do appreciate and do generate income,” Schultz says. “Then, the kids go off to college, and she’s stuck with an albatross she has to pay to maintain.” Bottom line: If there’s any doubt you can afford the house, sell it before the divorce is finalized. Schultz also reminds people to be realistic when creating the budget statement that will help determine your settlement. “Often people are very proud of how little they spend on themselves or how very frugal they have been,” Schultz says. “This is a big mistake, as the opposing side and the courts will conclude that very little is actually needed for support.” As difficult as it may be to collaborate with your ex during a divorce, Laurie Barry, senior VP at UBS Financial Services, says a little teamwork — and choosing your battles wisely — will leave you both in a better financial position. She recommends working with a mediator to identify hot-button issues before you start racking up hefty legal fees fighting about the division of assets. “You might become a stickler about airline points, for example, because you think you deserve them because you were at home with the kids when your husband was traveling for work and racking up all those miles, but really, you don’t even need the points and really you want something else,” she says. “If you can vet that ahead of time, I think it’s more productive. Realize that there are some things he may really want that you can easily give up.” Get more financial advice online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/RELATIONSHIPS


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#FA SHION

FLOWER CHILD What’s old is new again as summer fashions throw back to the 1970s. Rock the revival by combining the decade’s iconic trends with modern silhouettes and fabrics.

BY BROOKE MCDONALD PHOTOS BY JENNIFER AVELLO STYLING BY SKATIE NOYES AND BRIAN STANZIALE

The bells are back! Nothing says the ‘70s like flared denim paired with an eye-catching print and chunky platforms. Up the groove-factor with rounded shades and a floppy hat.

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#FA SHION

Put on these chic, yet oh-so-comfy gold-petaled sandals and take your inner flower child to the beach! This sophisticated one-piece flatters every shape. Wrap it up in a breezy sarong in a vintage-inspired floral print and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to keep skin youthful by covering up with a hat and sunglasses.

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#FA SHION

Go disco-fabulous with a flirty, flowy dress in a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s-inspired hue. Complete the look with suede sandals (leather is out; suede is in!) and a gold-chain-strap purse in a funky print. Add shades and gold jewelry and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready for boogie nights.

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No ‘70s comeback is complete without fringe. 2016’s hottest trend hangs from everything, including this light summer sweater, the perfect complement to a bohemian patterned skirt and casual sneakers. Add a little edge and keep the fringe going on a black handbag you’ll use all year long. Find more fashion online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/FASHION M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

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Fashion Credits Additional styling by Erica Barraca and Heather Leszczewicz Flowers provided by FlowersFlowers Evanston, 1110 Davis St., flowers-flowers.com page 90 J Brand Denim, $248, Mansur Gavriel Bucket Bag, $695, Barneys New York | A.L.C. floral shirt, $295, Intermix | Haley Shoes, $395, Vince, vince.com | San Diego Hat Company, $48, Dana Reed Earrings, $70, Londo Mondo, 1100 N. Dearborn, Chicago, or 558 Green Bay Road, Winnetka, londomondo.com | Rush CZ Sprinkled Bangle Bracelets, $55 each, Skändal | Sunglasses, $450, Jimmy Choo page 91 Eres Swimsuit $405, Valentino Sandals, 1,395, Rag & Bone Panama Hat, $230, Barneys New York, barneys.com | Scarf, $88, Sunglasses, $150, Kate Spade, katespade.com | Allison Fiutak Paperclip necklace, $168, ENAZ, 444 Central Ave., Highland Park, 309 Happ Road, Northfield or 111 W. Church St., Libertyville, enaz.com page 92 Mason Dress, $438, Intermix  | Tom Ford Sunglasses, $400, Spex, 910 Green Bay Road, Winnetka, spexoptical.com | Yves Saint Laurent Palm Dress Purse, $1550, Gianvito Rossi sandals, $860 Barneys New York | Be Loved, Black Spinel Bead Necklace, $154, Gold and Diamond Horn Pendant, $396, Rita Ratskoff Gold Vintage Bracelets, $98 each, ENAZ page 93 Enza Costa Black T-shirt, $148, Phillip Lim Ivory Sweater, $495, Intermix, intermixonline.com | Yves Saint Laurent Backpack, $1990, Ulla Johnson Skirt, $325, Barneys New York | Sneakers, $550, Jimmy Choo,  jimmychoo.com | Ulla-Long Necklace, $84, Skändal, 907 Green Bay Road, Winnetka,  shopskandal.com


# FAT H E R ’ S DAY

GEAR UP FOR FATHER’S DAY BY ANNA CARLSON

Spoil Dad this Father’s Day with a gift he’ll love. Whether he enjoys discovering new food, rocking out to his favorite tunes or working on projects around the house, here are a few gift ideas for the men in your life.

MLB GAME-USED BASEBALL CUFFLINKS BY TOKENS & ICONS

These game-used baseball cufflinks have been authenticated by Major League Baseball and have the team name engraved on the back. $170, Shop For Good, makeitbetter.net/ shop

BLACK+DECKER 20V DRILL/DRIVER

Just in time for Father’s Day, BLACK+DECKER has launched SMARTECH™ Technology batteries that use Bluetooth® to connect to their mobile app and is compatible with all 20V Max tools. It’s the perfect gift for the techie DIY dad. $79, blackanddecker.com

AMAZON ECHO

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS

Dad will always be connected to his favorite things thanks to Amazon Echo, which plays music, answers questions, checks scores, turns on lights and more without Dad lifting a finger. $180, amazon.com

CORKSCREW MULTI-TOOL If Dad loves beer, wine or spirits, he’ll love a gift from DropCatch, a Chicago company that builds quality products and has donated more than 10,000 trees. This Corkscrew Multi-Tool has a wine corkscrew, foil cutter and bottle opener with a beautiful rosewood handle. $20, dropandcatch.com

“YOU COULD LOOK IT UP: THE REFERENCE SHELF FROM ANCIENT BABYLON TO WIKIPEDIA” BY JACK LYNCH

Jon Grand, manager at The Book Stall, says, “Reference works, from ancient legal codes to dictionaries, encyclopedias and atlases, are ‘the memoranda of a culture to itself.’ This is a fascinating look at reference works and how they came to be from ancient to modern times.” $30, The Book Stall, 811 Elm St., Winnetka, thebookstall.com

THE FAIRWAY “PREP-FORMANCE” POLO

This classic polo offers all the benefits of a moisture-wicking shirt without the shine, so Dad will stay cool and comfortable during his next golf or family outing. Available in 10 colors. $75, johnnie-o.com

MANTRY

Dad a foodie? Give the gift that keeps on giving. Mantry, a food-of-the-month club, sends artisan food from around the country right to your doorstep, complete with cooking and entertaining tips. Past boxes have been Tailgate Tour, Pizza Party and Bourbon BBQ. Plus, Mantry donates 1 percent of sales to City Harvest. Starts at $59, mantry.com

SOUNDLINK MINI II

Dad can take his favorite tunes anywhere with this tiny (fits in your hand) yet powerful Bose speaker that connects wirelessly with a smartphone, tablet or other Bluetooth device. A built-in speakerphone even allows him to take that unexpected business call mid-song, -video or -game. $150, Fashion Outlets of Chicago, 5220 Fashion Outlets Way, Rosemont, fashionoutletsofchicago.com


#BEAUTY

5 COMMON MAKEUP MISTAKES AND HOW TO FIX THEM BY R ACHEL BROWN KULP

Soft Eyes

Clean Foundation

MISHAP #1: LIVING IN THE PAST Nika Vaughan, lead makeup artist and owner of Nika Vaughan Bridal Artists, says a frequent mistake is holding on to makeup rules long after they’ve expired. “I see this often with women who learned a few makeup tricks in college … but both their looks and lifestyles are completely different now,” Vaughan says. THE FIX: Vaughan suggests treating your makeup routine the same way you do your wardrobe: Check in and update it every couple of years with new products and techniques.

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MISHAP #2: MASKING THE OBVIOUS Nicole Rogers, a makeup artist and hairstylist, has been enhancing pretty faces for print, commercial and bridal for a decade. Rogers says using too much makeup to cover your blemishes is a major no-no. THE FIX: Rogers recommends a three-step process: First, apply an oil-free moisturizer to the blemish and let sit for one minute. Then, wipe off the excess and with your finger or a cosmetic sponge, stipple a full-coverage concealer directly on the blemish. Finally, pat on a loose powder to set.

MISHAP #3: SHAKY FOUNDATION Kristina Feyerherm, a Chicago-based makeup artist and licensed aesthetician who specializes in editorial and bridal makeup, says a lot of women don’t know how to use foundation in a clean, modern way — leaving them with a flat, heavy application that isn’t flattering. “Modern makeup is meant to be fresh and undetectable,” says Feyerherm. THE FIX: “When I want my client to look naturally flawless and radiant,” Feyerherm says, “I apply a full-coverage foundation with a dampened sponge.” The added hydration allows the product to melt into the skin.

LEFT PHOTO BY KYLE JOHN PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY OF NIKA VAUGHAN BRIDAL ARTISTS; MAKEUP BY JEN BROWN; RIGHT PHOTO BY KRIS LOU; MAKE UP BY KRISTINA FEYERHERM

We all know makeup can be magic (just ask any Kardashian), but many of us don’t realize when our makeup is working against us. We talked to three top-notch makeup artists to get the scoop on common makeup mishaps, and how to avoid them.


Bronzer

MISHAP #4: FAKE AND BAKE That J. Lo glow can be gorgeous, but the widespread misuse of bronzer “has created a lot of unnatural orange complexions,” says Rogers.

PHOTO BY BRYAN WHITELY; MAKE UP BY KRISTINA FEYERHERM

THE FIX: “First,” Rogers says, “choose a bronzer that fits your skin tone.” Check the color of the veins on your wrist. Green veins mean your skin tone is warm, blue veins indicate a cool skin tone. Warm-toned gals can feel free to use most bronzers. But if your skin tone is cool, Rogers says to skip anything labeled “bronzer,” and instead “try using a pressed powder one shade warmer than your current foundation.” MISHAP #5: RING AROUND THE EYES While rimming the eyes in black liner might seem like an obvious choice for show-stopping peepers, Feyerherm says, “There are so many more flattering and subtle ways to call attention to your eyes!” THE FIX: For a pretty daytime look (save black for night), Feyerherm recommends a dark gray or chocolate-brown liner along the upper lash line and a mid-tone gray or brown eye shadow rather than a liner for the lower lash. “Gently smudge [the shadow] into the root, just through the center of the eye,” she says. Read more beauty tips online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BEAUTY


#FITNESS

BRINGING SEXY BACK BY CHRIST Y COUGHLIN

Build a strong, fit upper back with these eight moves. Too much time spent hunched over mobile devices can weaken your back, worsen your posture and lead to aches and pains elsewhere in your body. Add some killer upper back exercises to your fitness routine and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll not only counteract the effects on your back but reap full-body rewards as well. Personal Training Manager Jason Foster of Equinox Highland Park recommends these eight exercises to whip your upper back into shape: Reps: 3 sets of 12-15 for toning | 3 sets of 8-10 for strength

SINGLE ARM BENT-OVER ROW 1. Stand in front of a bench or chair, feet hip-width apart. 2. With a light weight in left hand, step back with the left leg. 3. Keeping right leg forward, lean on the bench with right hand.

5. Inhale, slowly release down, repeat.

SEATED ROW

LAT PULLDOWN 1. Sit with feet flat, directly under knees. 2. Hands shoulder-width apart, use an underhand grip on the bar. 3. Maintain a long spine, exhale, pull the bar down toward chest.

1. Start in a low lunge, head, shoulders, and hip directly over right knee. 2. Keep right foot directly behind knee, hips level. 3. Lean forward, place right hand on floor, line fingertips up with front toe. 4. Reach up toward the ceiling with the left hand.

4. Pause with the bar just above the chest.

5. Move from upper back as left hand reaches under right arm.

5. Inhale, slowly release, and repeat.

6. Reach up with left arm and repeat. CONTINUED ON PAGE 102

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PHOTOS BY JULIE KAPLAN EXERCISES DEMONSTRATED BY JASON FOSTER AND CHRISTY O'BRIEN OF EQUINOX HIGHLAND PARK

4. Maintain long spine, exhale as the elbow and shoulder move up.


#FITNESS

FOAM ROLLING ON THE UPPER BACK 1. Lay on left side. 2. Place roller under left arm. 3. Bend right leg behind for balance and leverage. 4. Roll back-and-forth, side-to-side, finding tight spots along the upper back for several minutes

BACK EXTENSIONS SQUAT TO ROW

This is a great warm-up exercise for the back and a perfect midday computer break exercise.

1. Hold exercise band, anchored between ankle and knee height, feet shoulder-width apart.

1. Lay facedown on mat or other soft surface.

2. With an upright spine, open chest, squat, pushing your butt back and down, inhale, allow bands to pull your arms forward, control torso on the way down.

3. Place hands under shoulders.

3. In one motion, exhale, push through heels, raise up and pull hands toward hips, keeping elbows close to the body.

6. Release and repeat.

2. Extend active legs straight back. 4. Roll shoulders up then down back. 5. Raise upper body off the ground, using very little arm strength, keeping gaze forward, neck relaxed.

4. Release arms, as you repeat the next squat.

BENT-OVER ROW 1: Start with feet shoulderwidth apart, slight bend in the knees. 2: Hands slightly wider than hip-width, use an underhand grip on the bar. 3: Slowly move forward with bent knees, tailbone stretches away from the head, hips move back, spine remains long. 4: Exhale, pull the bar toward hips, keeping chest open and gaze at the horizon, pause, hold for 1 second. 5: Inhale, release the bar back down, repeat.

THORACIC SPINE MOBILITY 1. Start in a low lunge, head, shoulders, and hip directly over right knee. 2. Keep right foot directly behind knee, hips level. 3. Lean forward, place right hand on floor, line fingertips up with front toe. 4. Reach up toward the ceiling with the left hand. 5. Move from upper back as left hand reaches under right arm. 6. Reach up with left arm and repeat.

Want more training tips? Watch our 8-minute fitness videos online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/FITNESSGUIDE


# R E L AT I O N S H I P S

TIME TO DISCONNECT BY PA M E L A R OT H B A R D

Using technology mindfully can increase empathy and improve relationships

Oh, the joy of being able to place a middle-of-the-night call to AAA when your car breaks down, and seeing photos of your niece’s first steps the moment after they happen. Our devices allow us to be everywhere at once — to always be heard, to never be bored or alone, and to edit until we get it right, thus presenting ourselves exactly as we want to be seen. But technology giveth and technology taketh away. Sherry Turkle, professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and the founder and director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self, warns of some of technology’s unintended side effects. Many of us have also become unable to be tech-free, even for brief periods. One recent study found that student subjects were willing to zap themselves with electrical shocks to avoid being alone with their thoughts for more than six minutes. “If we cannot teach our children to be alone, they will only know how to be lonely,” Turkle says. “The capacity for solitude is closely linked to the capacity for a relationship.” Fittingly, in addition to loss of solitude, our devices have led to the loss of closeness with others. “Research shows that even a silent phone between two people at a lunch table causes them to share less with each other,” Turkle says, adding that it also leads people to feel a less empathic connection with each other and as if they have less invested in the relationship. This bears true even if the phone is off the table and only in the periphery. In addition, Turkle says that in the past 20 years, we’ve seen a 40 percent decline in levels of empathy among college students, with most of that decline taking place in the past decade. Researchers link the decline to the presence of digital devices. “We are experiencing a crisis in empathy and the cure is conversation,” Turkle says. “We have what we need — we have each other.”

Though she’s been called a “techno-cynic,” Turkle insists she’s pro-conversation rather than anti-technology. One benefit to upping your chatting game? Research shows that casual conversation at work has been linked to higher productivity. Here are some things we can we do in the day-to-day to foster conversation and reclaim empathy: • Device-Free Zones: Remember that just the presence of a device can change the nature of your conversations, so create spaces or times in your home that are “device-free.” For example, outlaw phones and other screens during dinner to allow for real face-time. • Uni-Task: Accept what research has made clear time and again: The brain doesn’t multi-task. Turkle says, “Uni-tasking is the next big thing.” Giving all of your attention to one task at a time is the key to productivity and creativity. • Cultivate Solitude: Practice spending time alone and without devices. You will get in touch with your real voice and see your concentration improve. Try getting up or getting in early. • Embrace “Good Enough”: Not every bit of your communication has to be a model text, email, post, etcetera. Stop obsessing over every word — others are drawn to realness and vulnerability. • Tolerate the “Boring Bits”: “Conversation, like life, has lulls and boring bits,” says Turkle. “And, it’s often when we stumble, when we hesitate and fall silent, that we reveal ourselves to each other.” The constant inflow of information from our devices runs contrary to conversation. Be patient and let interactions unfold to find new closeness with others. Turkle urges us to use technology mindfully and with intention so that we can get back some of the real closeness and empathy we’ve lost. Get more relationship advice at MAKEITBETTER.NET/RELATIONSHIPS


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MAKE IT BETTER'S ANNUAL BEST OF VOTING IS BACK! Don't miss the chance to vote for your favorite local businesses in categories such as dining, shopping, home & design, fitness, healthcare and more. TO VOTE, VISIT

MAKEITBETTER.NET/VOTE BETWEEN MAY 1-15.

LET US HELP YOU GET CONTROL BEFORE SYMPTOMS GET THE BEST OF YOUR SPRING! Partners in Pelvic Health at North Shore Urogynecology specializes in the compassionate and holistic care of women providing a wide range of effective solutions. Call our office to speak to one of our knowledgeable assistants and learn more about assessment and treatment today. If you are ready to explore your options for better bladder control and pelvic health, Partners in Pelvic Health at North Shore Urogynecology can help with both diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Sanjay Gandhi, an experienced urogynecologist, offers acupuncture, pelvic floor stimulation, and other holistic treatments. When required and desired he has the surgical expertise to help you. Partners in Pelvic Health at North Shore Urogynecology specializes in the compassionate and holistic care of women, providing a wide range of effective solutions. Call our office to speak to one of our knowledgeable assistants or visit our website to learn more about assessment and treatment before summer is here!

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Lake Forest | Gurnee | Woodstock | Chicago 847-234-1100 | partnersinpelvichealth.com


#BOOKS

EAT THESE WORDS 8 BOOKS WHERE FOOD PLAYS A STARRING ROLE BY JULIE CHERNOFF

Of course, cookbooks are all about good food, and the best ones are a thrill to read as well as cook from. And then there are the memoirs and novels where food is the protagonist — and occasionally, the antagonist. These books are so evocative, you can taste the words on every page. The best part? Very low calorie. Throw one in your beach bag and feast. Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit Jessica Tom Aspiring food journalist Tia Monroe gets the gig of a lifetime as the super-secret ghostwriter for the New York Times’ ailing food critic. He’s lost his sense of taste and relies on her amazing palate for his reviews. This will not end well for anyone.

Gourmet Rhapsody Muriel Barberry Pierre Arthens, the world’s most famous food critic, is dying in a gorgeous Paris apartment. His last wish is to once again taste his most exquisite and meaningful food memory. Chefs, lovers, even his cat have something to say about it.

Gumbo Tales: Finding My Place at the New Orleans Table Sara Roahen Roahen, a freelance writer and oral historian, moved to NOLA before Katrina. These essays beautifully detail her love and intimate knowledge of the foodie paradise that is the Crescent City.

Bitter in the Mouth Monique Troung Linda is profoundly different from everyone around her; she can actually “taste” words. As she makes her way from small-town North Carolina to life in the Big Apple, she figures out who she is and why family is everything.

Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef Gabrielle Hamilton Easily one of the best-written food memoirs around, it traces James Beard Award winner Hamilton’s eccentric journey from her rural and difficult childhood through the kitchens of Europe to her eventual place at the helm of the acclaimed Prune in New York City.

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake Aimee Bender Nine-year-old Rose Edelstein makes the shocking discovery that she can taste emotion in the food she eats. She must learn to control her magical gift in this heartbreaking and lyrical tale.

Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots Jessica Soffer Lorca, the troubled child of a famous chef, dreams of cooking a special dish for her mother. Victoria, a recently widowed Iraqi/ Jewish immigrant, is haunted by the daughter she gave up for adoption 40 years before. They bond through their love of food, but could the connection be deeper?

The Hundred Foot Journey Richard C. Morais Even if you saw the film, you’ll relish reading this tale of Hassan Haji, a young Indian immigrant who wants to share his talents — and the warm spices of India — with the people of a French town. Madame Mallory, who owns the Michelin-starred restaurant across the street, thinks otherwise. Can they bridge the gap between them? Read more book recoomendations online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BOOKS

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# T H E AT E R

SUMMER STAGE BY ROBERT LOER ZEL

As we head into summer, local theaters are staging shows both small and gigantic. Here’s what you shouldn’t miss on-stage this May and June. May 11 – June 12 | Chicago Shakespeare Theater, 800 E. Grand Ave., Chicago | 312-595-5600 | chicagoshakes.com Shakespeare’s “history plays” burrowed deep into the court intrigue and psychology of England’s royals. Now, as Chicago Shakespeare Theater commemorates the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death with a yearlong festival, the theater’s artistic director, Barbara Gaines, offers a new way of seeing those history plays. And it’s epic. This show combines “Edward III,” “Henry V” and “Henry VI, Part 1” into one six-hour marathon. (Fret not, there’s a meal break in the middle.) And that’s not all — a second six-hour trilogy of plays will continue the story this fall.

“DEATH OF A STREETCAR NAMED VIRGINIA WOOLF”

April 27 – June 12 | Writers Theatre, 325 Tudor Court, Glencoe 847-242-6000 | writerstheatre.org With this show, Writers Theatre uses the smaller performance space within its new building for the first time to try something

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new: a comedic collaboration with The Second City. Characters from the greatest American plays of the 20th century (“Death of a Salesman,” “A Streetcar Named Desire” and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”) have somehow found themselves sharing the same stage. The next big show at WT, Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s musical “Company,” directed by William Brown, runs June 15-July 17.

“THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THOMAS JEFFERSON, CHARLES DICKENS AND COUNT LEO TOLSTOY: DISCORD”

May 6 – June 12 | Northlight Theatre, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie | 847-673-6300 | northlight.org The author of this show, Scott Carter, knows more than a little about lively conversations — the Emmy winner is a longtime executive producer and writer for Bill Maher’s series “Politically Incorrect” and “Real Time.” This comedy is essentially a fantasy version of those talk shows, bringing together a Founding Father with two famous novelists for a debate about the meaning of life and the nature of God.

PHOTOS BY JEFFS CIORTINO

“TUG OF WAR: FOREIGN FIRE”


“SOUPS, STEWS, AND CASSEROLES: 1976”

May 21 – June 19 | Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago | 312-443-3800 goodmantheatre.org Local playwright Rebecca Gilman continues her years of fruitful collaboration with the Goodman’s artistic director, Robert Falls. In this Chicago premiere directed by Falls, workers in a small Wisconsin town fear for their livelihoods when a Chicago corporation acquires the town’s main employer. Another promising show runs June 25-Aug. 7 at the Goodman: star director Mary Zimmerman’s staging of Leonard Bernstein’s classic 1953 musical “Wonderful Town.”

“THE HOUSE THAT WILL NOT STAND”

June 10 – July 10 | Victory Gardens Theatre, 2433 N. Lincoln Ave., Chicago | 773-871-3000 victorygardens.org Over the past few years, Marcus Gardley has written stirring plays at Victory Gardens that grapple with issues of race, violence and American history. He follows up “An Issue of Blood” and “The Gospel of Lovingkindness” with this story about 1836 New Orleans, where free women of color were permitted to enter into commonlaw marriages with wealthy white men. Directed by Victory Garden’s artistic director, Chay Yew, it shows the potential to be provocative and fascinating. Get more theater content online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/HOME


#GALLERIES

10 LOCAL ART GALLERIES WORTH EXPLORING Chicago’s art scene is happening, and not just in the West Loop, where most of the major galleries are located. Whether you’re a collector or just someone who likes to feast your eyes, here are the galleries in the city and the suburbs that should be on your radar. 1 Anne Loucks Gallery

This airy gallery in downtown Glencoe specializes in contemporary American artists in the fields of sculpture, painting and works on paper. It represents more than 30 artists and curates a handful of shows each year. 309 Park Ave., Glencoe

2 Cultivate Urban Rainforest & Gallery A unique combination of nursery and art gallery, Evanston’s Cultivate aims to be a community hub, offering workshops, events and kids’ activities. 704 Main St., Evanston 3 The Mission

This gallery is dedicated to supporting and showcasing the work of artists throughout the Americas, and it has presented numerous national debuts of artists from

South America. Below the main gallery is The Sub-Mission, a space specifically dedicated to artists living and working in Chicago. 1431 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago

4 Gallery 2506 This woman-owned Logan Square gallery showcases art in various media, as well as ceramics, photography and jewelry. 2506 N. California Ave., Chicago 5 Perspective Gallery

This gallery is a nonprofit, communityoriented cooperative that’s dedicated to bringing fine art photography to a wide audience. In addition to exhibitions, it hosts an annual international juried show, lectures and artist talks, and a show for Chicago-area high school students. 1310-1/2B Chicago Ave., Evanston

6 Patron Gallery Opened in the fall of 2015 by Emanuel Aguilar and JULIA FISCHBACH, this gallery was founded “on the defining characteristics of a patron of the arts, that is, a person chosen, named or honored as a special guardian, protector or supporter,” says the gallery’s website. Aguilar and Fischbach feature artists from around the country as well as emerging local artists, and have called their vibe architectural and a blend of Chicago and South America. 673 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago 7 Rhona Hoffman Gallery One of the boldest names in the Chicago art scene, this gallery, founded in 1976 at Young Hoffman Gallery, launched the careers of many emerging artists and was one of the first galleries to offer exhibi-

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH GALLERY; WESTERN EXHIBITIONS PHOTO BY JAMES PRINZ

BY LIZ LOGAN


tions to women artists such as CINDY SHERMAN and BARBARA KRUGER. The West Loop gallery now exhibits art-world stars such as SPENCER FINCH and KEHINDE WILEY. 118 N. Peoria St., Chicago

8 Monique Meloche A veteran of the Chicago gallery scene, Meloche’s Wicker Park gallery has fostered some of the top artists in the global contemporary art world, such as RASHID JOHNSON. Meloche also started Gallery Week Chicago, which takes place in the fall, to promote the city’s art scene. 2154 W. Division, Chicago 9 Corbett vs. Dempsey Get your art fix and your vinyl fix in one shot when you visit Corbett vs. Dempsey, on Ashland near Division. JIM DEMPSEY and JOHN CORBETT, who both have long histories with Chicago arts organizations, founded the gallery in 2004. It’s known for discovering new talent and showcasing the work of regional artists, such as MAGALIE GUERIN, one of our favorite Chicago artists. 1120 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago 10 Western Exhibitions This gallery was originally conceived as a nomadic exhibition space that would migrate between apartments, lofts and other galleries, but eventually became so successful that it needed a permanent space. The artists represented by the West Loop gallery run the gamut when it comes to contemporary art, and the gallery has a special focus on artist books and multiples — see its sister entity,

WESTERNXEDITIONS. 845 W. Washington Blvd., 2nd Floor, Chicago

See more of the galleries at MAKEITBETTER.NET/LOCALART


#PHILANTHROPY

BY

G A B R I E L L E TA S I O P O U LO S

GIVE TIME t FIND VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES VIRTUALLY AND IN PERSON WomenOnCall 773-529-2498 | womenoncall.org Looking to volunteer but don’t know where to start? WomenOnCall.org features 1,200 nonprofits seeking volunteers. WomenOnCall was created 10 years ago as a database for women looking to volunteer their time and has grown over the years to become a matchmaking service, of sorts, that makes it easy for volunteers to connect with nonprofits and vice versa. Most opportunities require 10 hours or less of volunteer time, and many can be done virtually, making it easy for those busy with their careers or their families to give back. To learn more and create your free profile, go to womenoncall.org.

DONATE MEDICAL SUPPLIES TO SUPPORT LIFECHANGING EYE SURGERIES FOR THOSE IN NEED u Eyecare International eyecareint.org Support those providing eye care and eye surgeries to those in need around the world by donating medical supplies. EyeCare International travels around the world with volunteers and eye care professionals donating their time and expertise to those who do not have the access or the resources to receive proper eye care. For just $2, people can have a full eye exam, be fitted with glasses and receive life-changing surgeries, if necessary. Because of the large amount of people that are given care on the trips, the organization is always in need of medical supplies and eyeglasses. To learn more about how to donate, contact Tad MacDonnell at tadmacdonnell@gmail.com.

PATIENTS IN EL SALVADOR RECEIVING EYE SURGERIES

t GIVE YOUR CHILD THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET ACTIVE AND SAVE LIVES UNICEF Kid Power Program unicefkidpower.org When you give your child the UNICEF Kid Power Band, a watchsized band that tracks activity, you are encouraging them to not only get active but to support children around the world. When kids get active while wearing their band, they gain points that can be tracked on the UNICEF Kid Power app. These points unlock funding that is used by UNICEF to provide Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) for severely malnourished children around the world. So far, this incredible program has unlocked over 330,000 RUTF packets with the almost 4 million points earned by active children across the country. SCHOOL CHILDREN GET ACTIVE AT THE CHICAGO UNICEF KID POWER CELEBRATION

To find out more information and to purchase the Kid Power Band go to unicefkidpower.org

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF WOMENONCALL; SECOND PHOTO COURTESY OF BONNIE SONDHEIMER; THIRD PHOTO COURTESY OF UNICEF

GI V E T H I NGS

VOLUNTEERS CONNECTING WITH NONPROFITS AT WOMENONCALL’S ANNUAL


#PHILANTHROPY

GI V E SU PP ORT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH ORGANIZATION; MIDDLE PHOTO BY GALDONES PHOTOGRAPHY

p GIVE A MOMENT OF KINDESS AND COMPASSION TO HOSPITAL PATIENTS Random Acts of Flowers 847-430-4751 | rafchicago.org Donate to help Random Acts of Flowers boost patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Doing two great things in one action, Random Acts of Flowers recycles and repurposes flowers and then gives them to patients in hospitals, nursing homes, rehab and hospice centers. Their goal is to brighten the day of a patient who may be feeling vulnerable and alone by giving them flowers to boost their morale, making their time in a healthcare facility more positive. For more information contact info@rafchicago.org. Donate online at rafchicago.org or mail your gift to Random Acts of Flowers Chicago, 1000 Greenleaf, Suite 5, Evanston, IL 60202.

q HELP EDUCATE THE NEXT GENERATION OF GLOBAL CITIZENS Academy of Global Citizenship 773-582-1100 agcchicago.org The Academy For Global Citizenship is on a mission to develop mindful and positive leaders to be able to make an impact in their communities and the world. When you donate, your money goes toward the programs, curriculums and resources that will be available to these students. Not only do they teach the basic care subjects, they incorporate lessons in sustainability, leadership, international cultures and food to create a generation of responsible and welleducated leaders. In addition to general donations, AGC is seeking auction package sponsors and attendees for its Chefs’ Playground gala on May 19. For more information about the gala, go to agcchicago.org/ chefsplayground or contact Katherine Elmer-Dewitt at kelmerdewitt@agcchicago.org. To donate to the academy go to agcchicago.org/donate.

t SUPPORT FREE PROGRAMMING FOR CHILDREN, TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH DOWN SYNDROME GiGi’s Playhouse 224-623-0595 | gigisplayhouse.org Donate to GiGi’s Playhouse so they can continue to provide free programming, education and job training to people of all ages with Down syndrome. Now, with almost 30 locations around the country and one in Mexico, the GiGi’s Playhouse model is clearly filling a need. Donating to GiGi’s is a gift not only to its students but also their families — who count on GiGi’s as a loving and welcoming community of peers, mentors and teachers. Private donations allow GiGi’s to provide therapeutic and educational programs to families at no charge. To support this growing organization visit gigisplayhouse.org/ways-give or contact kmalek@gigisplayhouse.org.


BETTER MAKERS AND THEIR IMPACT

ILLINOIS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM

HUMANITARIAN AWARDS DINNER MARCH 17, 2016 Hyatt Regency Chicago • $3,000,000

Museum CEO, Susan Abrams, of Highland Park, and Leon Panetta

The Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center

Chicago Mayor, Rahm Emanuel

The dinner brought together over 1,700 people to support the future of the museum and its mission to honor the victims of the Holocaust, keep their stories alive and educate people on universal lessons in humanity. Holocaust Survivor and Museum Vice President, Aaron Elster; and his son, Steve Elster, both of Lincolnshire

5

PHOTOS BY RON GOULD STUDIOS

4

Grammy Award-winning violinist, UN Goodwill Ambassador, and granddaughter of a Holocaust survivor Miri Ben-Ari, of New York

Museum Women’s Leadership Committee Members: Rebekah Shalit of Chicago; Erin Estell of Chicago; Julie Lakonishok of Chicago; and Museum Assistant Director of Development, Jessica Lindholm, of Park Ridge

CME Group Executive Chairman & President and Humanitarian Award Winner Terrence A. Duffy of Chicago, Former U.S. Secretary of Defense and Keynote Speaker Leon Panetta of Monterey Bay, California, and Survivor Legacy Award Winner Harvey L. Miller, of Riverwoods


MAGIC BALL | MARCH 5, 2016 The Fairmont Chicago Millenium Park • $1,000,000

PHOTOS BY SHERI WHITKO PHOTOGRAPHY

CAMP KESEM

Elina & Niklas Hjalmarsson of Chicago

Tom and Laura Fife, Artemis Koutsogiorgas, all of Chicago

2015 Camp Kesem campers and college counselors

Jane Saccaro of Winnetka, Renee Baldwin of Lake Bluff, Niklas & Elina Hjalmarsson, Andrew & Bevin Skoglund of Winnetka

PHOTOS BY TIM HIATT/GETTY IMAGES FOR UNICEF

UNICEF

UNICEF Hope Gala Co-Chair Kim K.W. Rucker of Oak Brook and UNICEFs Hope Gala Co-Chair Mark Mitsukawa of Chicago

Committee Member, Midwest Board Member, Former Board Chair, Joe Silich, and Committee Member Susie Silich, both of Chicago

Famed auctioneer David Goodman

Host Susanna Negovan greets the crowd

UNICEF HOPE GAL A | APRIL 9, 2016 The Geraghty • $1,000,000

Money raised helps fund UNICEF’s Ready-To-Use Therapeutic Food Packets.

Former Miss America, actress, singer and fashion designer Vanessa Williams

Watch our red-carpet interview with Vanessa Williams online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/ VANESSA

Midwest Regional Board Chair and National Board member for U.S. Fund for UNICEF, Rob Brown, Sr. VP of Development, U.S. Fund for UNICEF, Barron Segar, of New York City, National Board Chair, U.S. Fund for UNICEF, Vince Hemmer, of Glencoe, Vanessa Williams and Casey Marsh, of Chicago


City Year Chicago Vice President and Executive Director Rebeca Nieves Huffman poses with Ripples of Hope Award Honorees Thomas Ricketts (on left)

Rena Hozore Reiss, Stacey Birndorf, Domonique Battle and Jamar Beyonu

MCGAW YMCA

City Year Chicago AmeriCorps members Charé Gilliam, Allen Scaife, Thaddeus Chatto and Jess Jankowski

Ed and Dorothy Wehmer of Lake Bluff

Molly Stuber, James Reynolds and Marcus Wright present Mr. Reynolds with his City Year Jacket

Jamar Beyonu of City Year Chicago helped the organization raise just over $250,000

THE MCGAW YMCA ANNUAL GAL A | JANUARY 2 3 , 2016 McGaw YMCA • $230,000

Project SOAR mentor John Wylie, Diesel and Cyndi Armstrong

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MCGAW YMCA

Dr. Paul Goren, Sen. Daniel Biss, Mark A. Dennis, Jr., Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl, Steve Haggerty, Mark Tendam, Rosa McAndrew and Seth Green

Gala Planning Committee: Mark A. Dennis, Jr., Carolyn Kuttan, Sue Patel, Lynn Ryan, Dan Israelite, Freddi Greenberg, Leslie Luning and Sarah Walsh

PHOTOS BY ANNA MIYARES PHOTOGRAPHY

RIPPLES OF HOPE AWARDS DINNER | FEBRUARY 25, 2016 Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park • $873,000

CITY YEAR CHICAGO

Before the Gala, Casey Lewis Varela and George Varela listen to Adrian Cyrus talk about his MetaMedia project to design a new athletic shoe


PHOTOS BY KIPERSHTEIN PHOTOGRAPHY

GLENVIEW WOMEN’S CLUB

LAUNCH 2016: DRIVING FASHION FORWARD | APRIL 10, 2016 The Autohaus On Edens • $18,000

Vittoria Logli, Glenview Women’s Club Co-President and LAUNCH Emcee Tamara Taylor Holmes, Autohaus On Edens President Michael Rosengarden, Dana Russo and Jen Divine

Designer and LAUNCH Judge Peach Carr and Colombia College Professor Melissa Gamble

Stay tuned to MAKEITBETTER.NET/ MIBTV to see our video from this event.

Make It Better Founder & CEO and LAUNCH Judge Susan Noyes picking a raffle winner from Tamara Taylor Holmes

R AINBOWS FOR ALL CHILDREN

The Glenview Women’s Club Action Committee with cupcakes from Bent Fork Bakery. From left to right Michelle Gessner, Andrea Johnson, Dana Russo, Tamara Taylor Holmes, Jen Divine

People’s Choice Award Winner and Columbia College Student Designer Hayley Hogan (right) and a LAUNCH Fashion Show model in one of her looks

R AINBOWS FOR ALL CHILDREN TOUR S KL AIR MONT KOLLECTIONS FEBRUARY 27, 2016 Klairmont Kollections • $5,600

Rainbows For All Children students say thank you!

City Lights Orchestra

PHOTOS BY FLOW MOTION MEDIA

Teddie, Ilviko and Sabrian Kossof, Make It Better Associate Publisher, Michelle Morris, Klairmont Kollections Vice President, Andrew Vogel, and Brenda Warkow

Gus Lykouretzos, Make It Better Associate Publisher Michelle Morris, John Koklias

Rainbows for all Children Executive Director and CEO, Bob Thomas

Klairmont Kollections

Book your next event or fundraiser at Klairmont Kollections for a truly unique and memorable experience.


#GIVEBACK

WORKING HARD TO GIVE BACK BY SUSAN B . NOYE S

For Hecky Powell, owner of Hecky’s Barbecue in Evanston, drive and a commitment to community are his legacy.

Powell owns Hecky’s Barbecue in Evanston, which was voted Best Barbecue by Make It Better readers in 2015. His latest endeavor, Juneteenth Strawberry Soda, bears his great-grandfather’s image. Juneteenth refers to June 19, 1865, the date when the last group of slaves in the country learned they were freed — two and a half years after Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. All proceeds from the soda are donated to the nonprofit Powell founded and named in memory of his father who, like his great-grandfather, was a model of determination and commitment to hard work. The Forrest E. Powell Foundation gives awards to local heroes whose work exemplifies the mission of the foundation, and scholarships to young people entering trade schools and vocational programs. 116

M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 6

makeitbetter.net

Powell’s firm conviction that the world needs more people like his forebears and fewer who rely on handouts drives all he does in life, business and our community. “My great-grandfather moved to Evanston in 1905, when he was 42,” explains Powell, describing his fascinating lineage. “He became so successful as a barber that, even though banks wouldn’t give loans or mortgages to blacks then, he was able to build his own home.” Tragedy didn’t slow the elder Powell down either. “His daughter died when her son — my father, Forrest — was 4. So my great-grandfather raised my father and his siblings too.” Forrest Powell attended Evanston Township High School (ETHS), where he yearned to play football but was denied the opportunity because he was black. So he started his own league, referred to as “Pike’s Pals.” Forrest continually carved his way through life in this manner— with drive and dignity. “Dad never went to college, but he raised nine children from two marriages, bought his own home, never took food stamps

PHOTO COURTESY OF HECKY’S BARBECUE

Restaurateur and social entrepreneur Hecky Powell proudly honors and reflects the values of his great-grandfather — a slave who learned hard work in cotton fields, escaped via the Underground Railroad, raised a large family and eventually settled and succeeded in Evanston as the town’s first black barber.


#GIVEBACK

or handouts,” says Powell. “He was quiet, but strong.” Forrest was highly regarded in his community. He served as president of the social club “North Shore 12,” which put on debutante balls as one of its fundraising functions. Hecky Powell accomplished what his father and great-grandfather couldn’t — he earned a college degree, from Northeastern Illinois University, in social services administration. For many years he worked for government programs that were intended to give a helping hand to those in need.

In 1993, Forrest died suddenly after spending the day with Powell working to clear damage in his front yard caused by a big storm. “I helped him saw a big tree branch. As I was leaving, I had a premonition, ‘This will be the last time you are going to work with him.’ The death of his father further increased Powell’s drive to give back to the community. “We’ve helped a lot of kids through the business, Little Leagues, ETHS,” Powell says. “But his death got me going on the Foundation.”

Thirty-two years ago, Powell bought the restaurant that was next door to what was then his government office, thinking it would be a good project for his parents — particularly his mother, Verna, who grew up in New Orleans and was a fantastic chef.

Annual events include a Palm Sunday jazz concert fundraiser and a Juneteenth Awards ceremony. Not only does Hecky’s donate 100 percent of the soda sales to the foundation, the restaurant donates 10 percent of the proceeds from sales of its popular sauces.

“Soon after that,” Powell explains, “I recommended that one of my clients apply to work at the restaurant. She declined though, explaining that it would cost her too much money. She would have to give up her food stamps and other handouts.”

From his father and great-grandfather before him, Hecky Powell inherited tremendous values and a powerfully positive legacy. With his entrepreneurial spirit, he amplifies this heritage to make the world a better place for local youth and unsung hardworking heroes.

He lost faith in the welfare system and, deciding he could help more people by running a good business, quit his job to join his parents at the restaurant. He also married Cheryl, his second wife, who is an adjunct faculty member of Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy.

Read more about those making a difference in our community online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/PHILANTHROPY


CHECK OUT THESE TASTYGRAMS 1. A perfect duck egg at The Duck Inn

by @juliechernoff. 2. A variety of cupcakes from Smallcakes Cupcakery by @heatherlesz. 3. The Italian Poutine at Cibo Trattoria by @heatherlesz. 4. Avocado toast topped with slaw from Little Goat by @littlepretty. 5. Salmon with peas from The White Oak Tavern by @amberyv. 6. Candies from Lolli and Pops in Make It Better orange by @makeitbetterns. 7. Churros at La Principal in Evanston by @chicagonorthshore

Follow us:

INSTAGRAM.COM/ MAKEITBETTERNS


Make It Better May June 2016 Dining Issue  

The Dining Issue: Where to Eat and Drink Now, 99 Days of Summer, Landscaping and Gardening Guide, Cuba Within Reach, Inside the 12th Annual...

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