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CHICAGO AND NORTH SHORE

Dance? SHALL WE

GETTING TO KNOW THE STARS OF LYRIC OPERA'S "THE KING AND I"

JET-SET SPRING FASHION REAL ESTATE TIPS & TRENDS 4TH ANNUAL PHILANTHROPY AWARD WINNERS UNDER-THE-RADAR TRAVEL DESTINATIONS 2016 CAMP GUIDE – PART TWO

2 0 1 6 D I G I TA L E D I T I O N


BOOK YOUR EVENT TODAY

BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY, CORPORATE AND PRIVATE EVENTS SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Andrew Vogel VICE PRESIDENT, SALES & MARKETING

avogel@klairmontkollections.org

3117 North Knox Avenue Chicago, IL 60641

www.klairmontkollections.org

Free onsite parking


FEATURES M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 • V O L U M E 7, I S S U E 2

PHOTOS BY JENNIFER AVELLO

JET SET SPRING FASHION Turn to page 62

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Shall We Dance? Getting to Know the Stars of “The King and I” By Anna Carlson

40

Focus on Real Estate

By Cortney Fries, Genevieve Lill and Simon Murray

45

Summer Camps for Every Interest By Katie Jenko

62

Jet Set Spring Fashion By Brooke McDonald and Heather Leszczewicz

80

7 Must-Try Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurants By Carly Hurwitz

86

4th Annual Philanthropy Awards By Katie Jenko, Susan B. Noyes, Jessica Suss and Gabrielle Tasiopoulos

Cover Photo by Todd Rosenberg


LET YOURSELF IN.

Lead Corporate Sponsors:

THROUGH MAY 10

Conservation Sponsor:

Lead support has been provided by the Estate of Jacquet McConville. Major support has been generously provided by Caryn and King Harris, The Harris Family Foundation; the Gilchrist Foundation; The Morris and Dolores Kohl Kaplan Fund; and Evonne and John Yonover. Additional funding has been contributed by Constance and David Coolidge, the Mason Foundation, Charlene and Mark Novak, and the Comer Family Foundation. Annual support for Art Institute exhibitions is provided by the Exhibitions Trust: Kenneth Griffin, Robert M. and Diane v.S. Levy, Thomas and Margot Pritzker, Betsy Bergman Rosenfield and Andrew M. Rosenfield, the Earl and Brenda Shapiro Foundation, and the Woman’s Board. The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Vincent van Gogh. The Bedroom (detail), 1889. Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection.


DEPARTMENTS FAMILY & TRAVEL

48

48

DayTripper: Rosemont

50

5 Under-the-Radar Vacation Alternatives

56

How to Talk to Your Kids About Suicide

By Heather Leszczewicz

By Amber Gibson

By Shannan Younger

HOME

52

11 Mudroom Must-Haves

54

Bathing Beauty: 2016’s Most Beautiful Bathroom Trends

By Meghan Streit

By Meghan Streit

A BETTER YOU

58

By Jessica Suss

70

Freshen Up: 6 New Beauty Products and Gadgets to Try This Spring By Jenny Muslin

72

Get a Leg Up: 5 Moves for Great Legs By Christy Coughlin

76

My Husband Left His Law Firm to Sell Pot By Rachel Bertsche

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

78

Ramen on the North Shore: Table to Stix in Evanston By Julie Chernoff

52

82

Is Marie Kondo’s ‘Magic of Tidying Up’ Really Life Changing? By Pamela Rothbard

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Spring Theater By Robert Loerzel

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

37 93 96

70

84

Opera’s Next Act Better Makers and Their Impact Fashion Statement: Local Teens Launch Socially Conscious Baby Apparel Line

IN EVERY ISSUE

12 14 18 21 22 24 26 91

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editor’s letter you said it from the web community celebrations fresh recommended events event listing give time, give things, give support closing thoughts

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF MB FINANCIAL PARK; 2ND PHOTO COURTESY OF AMBER GIBSON; 3RD PHOTO COURTESY POTTERY BARN; PHOTO COURTESY OF PIPER WAI; WRITERS THEATER PHOTO BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ

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Do Charities Want Your Time, Money or Goods?


EDITOR’S LETTER

Dear Readers, Make It Better’s mission is to be the most-trusted, easiest-to-use community resource that helps improve the lives of our audience and those around them by connecting them to the businesses and nonprofits they support. This mission is based on the premise that we all inherently have the desire — and further, the capacity! — to make the world a better place.

GET

INSPIRED BY GENEVIEVE LILL

If you need a dose of inspiration on this front, look no further than our coverage of the winners of our Fourth Annual Philanthropy Awards. The six nonprofits that received awards this year — in the form of professionally made videos about their organizations — are truly improving the lives of the communities they serve, in ways both large and small. Read about them on page 86 and make sure you visit makeitbetter.net/philanthropyawards to watch the videos that tell their stories, too. Please join us at the “orange” carpet celebration on May 5 at Mesirow Financial. Learn more on the inside back cover. And if you’re still short on inspiration (but, really, after learning about our Philanthropy Award winners, how could you be?), we are also bringing you a story this month about Lyric Opera. Not only are we excited to feature the two stars of Lyric’s upcoming “The King and I” show, we are extra excited to tell the story of Lyric Unlimited and the good works that Lyric’s community engagement and educational arm performs around Chicago. This spring, we’re also offering advice on how to make smart real estate decisions (page 40), the second half of our camp guide (page 45), tips on tidying up (it is spring cleaning season, after all) (page 82), an important piece on how to talk to your kids about suicide (page 56) and much more. This issue, we hope, will help make your life easier, richer and better, as our mission so clearly states, so that you can better serve others, too. Do you have a “Make It Better” story to share with us? Is there a person or organization in your community doing great works, perhaps under the radar? Share your stories with us, and send us your feedback on how we’re doing to help you live out our mission. Tag us on social (you can find our handles below) or send us email to: editorial@makeitbetter.net. Thank you,

MAKEITBETTER.NET

@MAKEITBETTERNS

@MAKEITBETTERNS

MAKEITBETTERMAG

MAKEITBETTER.NET

MAKEITBETTER2009

Our Mission is: to be the most-trusted, easiest-to-use community resource that helps improve the lives of our audience and those around them by connecting them to the businesses and nonprofits they support

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WE LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU, SO PLEASE KEEP SENDING US YOUR STORIES, COMMENTS, OPINIONS, IDEAS AND REVIEWS!

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LONDO MONDO

Thanks for all the emails, letters, tweets and Facebook messages this month! Here’s what you had to say: In response to “8 Activewear Lines You’ll Want to Sport Outside the Gym” (makeitbetter.net/activewear) I’ve found some great active wear locally at Londo Mondo in Winnetka. —Laura Westgate

GODDESS LEGGING BY ALO, $80; ROW TOP BY ALO, $58, LONDO MONDO

We shared a teaser of our 2016 Wedding Trends video on MIBTV. Here’s what you had to say: @packojelly So gorgeous! @classickids_winnetka So pretty! @fschicago We love it! Thank you for sharing. @debdebpat Just lovely!! Watch the video at makeitbetter.net/wedding

In response to “100 Things to Do This Winter” (makeitbetter.net/100) Lots of good ideas and links. Here’s another: Serve at a local food pantry or pack boxes at Feed My Starving Children. —Jeane De Las Alas VIA EMAIL:

In response to “Glenview’s Patron Saint” in our January/ February issue Kudos to you for your story on Sister Paulanne. I will never forget her impassioned plea on behalf of the hungry people living among us during a mass a few years ago at Our Lady (“OLPH”). She clearly has played many roles in the daily life of that church community, just one small item being the leader of song at the earliest morning masses, when no one else was available. I have limitless admiration for the woman, but never expected to see her covered in the former North Shore Magazine. Your image has risen threefold in my eyes. —Scott Schada

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER AVELLO

ON INSTAGRAM:

ON TWITTER:

@makeitbetterNS We just picked up these donations from @VolCenterHelps for Warming Hearts & Hands! Thanks to all who donated! @VolCenterHelps The Volunteer Center has been proud to work with the Warming Hearts and Hands program and MIB for 10 years!

Read more “You Said It” online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/YOUSAIDIT


588 Lincoln Ave. Winnetka, IL, 60093 | 847-256-4642 Publisher & CEO Susan B. Noyes Associate Publisher Michelle Morris Chief Operating Officer Sandy Tsuchida Editor In Chief Genevieve Lill Managing Editor Brooke McDonald Digital Editor Anna Carlson Art Director Agnieszka Hansen Designer January Thomas Social Media Director Heather Leszczewicz Shop For Good Manager Gabrielle Tasiopoulos Beauty Editor Dining Editor Finance Editor Fitness Editor Sex & the Suburbs Editor

Jenny Muslin Julie Chernoff Meghan Streit Christy Coughlin Marjie Killeen

Contributing Writers Rachel Bertsche Cortney Fries Amber Gibson Carly Hurwitz Katie Jenko Robert Loerzel Simon Murray Susan Pasternak Pamela Rothbard Jessica Suss Shannan Younger Photographers Jennifer Avello Todd Rosenberg Editorial Intern Brooke Markley

Senior Account Executives Denise Borkowski Julie Carter Account Executives Haley Hughes Barbara Baisley Murray Sales Interns Adrian Adamiec John Snider GOT FEEDBACK? Email susan@makeitbetter.net TO ADVERTISE: Contact michellemorris@makeitbetter.net HAVE AN EVENT? Email anna@makeitbetter.net

Make It Better North Shore (ISSN No. 2151-0431) is published 6 times per year by Make It Better LLC, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Phone: 847.256.4642. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved. Application to Mail at Periodicals Rates is pending at Wilmette, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Make It Better, 588 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, IL 60093. Make It Better is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Copyright 2016 by Make It Better LLC. All rights reserved.


SPONSORED CONTENT

Demetrius M. Maraganore, MD, Chairman of the Department of Neurology and Medical Director of NorthShore Neurological Institute. Photo courtesy of NorthShore University HealthSystem.

Genetic risks aside, women are twice as likely as men to develop Alzheimer’s. Other risk factors include cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes, diet, high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, sleep disorders, smoking and stroke. Wherever possible, the Center is working to reduce the effects of these risks. A DEDICATED TEAM, A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH The Center’s team of leading specialists includes neurologists, neuropsychologists, genetic counselors, physical and cognitive therapists, researchers, dietitians and lifestyle coaches. Together, they assess your risks and develop a plan specifically for you to help delay—and possibly prevent—brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s.

HEALTHCARE FOR WHAT’S NEXT: PREVENTING THE ONSET OF ALZHEIMER’S

Your team might recommend blood and lab tests, brain imaging and neuropsychological testing to develop a plan to reduce your risks. Annual checkups will monitor your brain health, making sure lifestyle adjustments are working for you, reducing your risks. At NorthShore Neurological Institute, they’re always exploring what’s next to improve brain health—and lives.

B Y N O R T H S H O R E U N I V E R S I T Y H E A LT H S Y S T E M

The Center for Brain Health at NorthShore Neurological Institute is on a mission to prevent Alzheimer’s disease by improving brain health. A bold new initiative, the Center for Brain Health is taking a novel approach to Alzheimer’s and related brain disorders like Parkinson’s disease and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. Research has shown that establishing healthy habits earlier in life can improve brain health later. So Center experts are using genetic testing, advanced diagnostics and lifestyle factors to predict aging-related brain disorders. And they’re protecting patients against these disorders with mental and physical exercise, and improved diet and sleep habits. RISK FACTORS FOR ALZHEIMER’S It is critical to understand your risks for Alzheimer’s disease and related brain disorders. One of the greatest risks is a family history of the disease. Approximately 15 percent of the population carries a variation of the gene APOE, which can increase risk up to 15 times.

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SAVE THE DATE! Attend a free information session on brain health and preventing the onset of Alzheimer’s and related brain disorders. With special guest Lisa Genova, author of The New York Times bestseller Still Alice Saturday, May 7, 9:30 a.m. Chicago Botanic Garden Visit northshore.org/savethedate for more information.

Neurological Institute (877) 570-7020 | northshore.org/neuro


#ONLINE

OUR BETTER HALF IS ONLINE:

T H E “ B ET T E R L ET T E R ” E M A I L N E WS L ET T E R : M A K E I T B ET T E R . N ET/S U B S C R I B E MAKEITBETTER.NET

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MAKEITBETTERMAG

MAKEITBETTER.NET

MAKEITBETTER2009

Red Meat Renaissance: Chicago’s Best New Steakhouses

STEAK PHOTO COURTESY OF STK CHICAGO AND BY JORGE GERA. ART GALLERY PHOTO COURTESY OF WESTERN EXHIBITIONS.

Carnivores, rejoice! Chicago has always been a great destination for red meat, but these seven innovative restaurants could all be named “Best New Chicago Steakhouse.” u MAKEITBETTER.NET/STEAK

Sign Up for Our Better Letter Want up-to-the-minute tips, trends and resources for family, food, finance, philanthropy, home and entertainment delivered straight to your inbox? Subscribe to Make It Better’s bi-weekly e-newsletter, the Better Letter, today! The newsletter for powerful, positive connectors. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/ SUBSCRIBE

what’s hot on makeitbetter.net FITNESS AND HEALTH

FAMILY FUN

8 Weight Loss Hacks That Work

10 Ways to Transform Your Digital Photos Into Real-World Keepsakes

RECIPES

Sneak More Vegetables Into Your Diet With These 5 Recipes

DÉCOR & DESIGN

Decorate Your Home With Décor That Gives Back

6 Common Makeup Mistakes and How to Fix Them Not sure if you’re using the powers of makeup for good or evil? We talked to three makeup artists who shared the most common mistakes they see and how you can avoid making the same errors. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/MISTAKES

10 Local Art Galleries Worth Exploring Spring is the perfect time to get out and explore everything our community has to offer, including art galleries showcasing the work of talented artists from Chicago and beyond. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/LOCALART

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Stay tuned for three must-read online guides in March/April > GUIDE TO SELLING YOUR HOME > LANDSCAPING & GARDENING GUIDE > GUIDE TO AN ORGANIZED HOME


COVER CREDITS

Shot on location at Lyric Opera of Chicago featuring King and I actors Kate Baldwin and Paolo Montalban Photography by Todd Rosenberg M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 PHIL ANTHROP

M A R C H /A

CHICAGO

PRIL 2016

AND NORT H SHORE

Y | REAL ESTATE | ARTS & CULTURE CHICAGO A ND NORTH SHORE POWERFUL

Dance?

. POSITIVE .

SHALL WE

CONNECTO

GETTING TO KNOW LYRIC OPERA'S "THE THE STARS OF KING AND I"

RS. V O L U M E 7, ISSUE 2

JET-SET SPRING FASHION REAL ESTATE TIPS & TRENDS 4TH ANNUAL PHILAN THROPY AWARD WINNE RS UNDER-THE-RA TRAVEL DESTINDAR ATIONS 2016 CAMP GUIDE – PART TWO

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Make Better

We forgot to list The Four Seasons Hotel Chicago on our January/February cover credits page. We deeply regret the error and thank the hotel for hosting our beautiful weddings cover shoot!


# C E L E B R AT E

BY ANNA CARLSON

In our January/February 2016 issue, we introduced this new section to highlight local businesses’ anniversaries and awards. If your company is celebrating a milestone in 2016, we want to know! Email anna@makeitbetter.net and your business could appear in an upcoming issue. Razny Jewelers

Teddie Kossof SalonSpa

Teddie Kossof, a “Make It Better Best Of” winner in three categories, celebrated 40 years in 2015. This spring, the company will launch Kossof for MEN, male-focused body grooming services plus a new partnership with Virgin Hotels Chicago that will bring Kossof Spa Services with Clarins products to hotel guests include brow trimming, styling and body-hair maintenance. TEDDIE KOSSOF SALONSPA: 281 N. Waukegan Road, Northfield, 847-999-9500, teddiekossof.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH COMPANY

Convito Cafe

Convito Cafe and Market celebrated 35 years in February with special menus, wine tastings, sales in their market and more. Visit Convito, a go-to destination on the North Shore for authentic Italian food and wine, for a meal in their cafe or stop by the market to pick up dinner to enjoy at home. The cafe also recently hired chef Eric Hammond. Watch this video to learn more about Convito’s history at makeitbetter.net/convito. CONVITO CAFE AND MARKET: 1515 Sheridan Road, Wilmette, 847-251-3654,convitocafeandmarket.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KARIE ANGELL LUC.

For 65 years, Razny Jewelers has provided exquisite jewelry designs to the North Shore. Whether you’re looking for engagement and wedding rings, exclusive collections or custom designs, the Make It Better “Best Jeweler” of 2015 can help. RAZNY JEWELERS: 1700 Green Bay Road, Highland Park, 847-432-5300, razny.com

WOODLANDS AC AD E MY Summer School Studies show an all-girls’ educational environment, like that found at Woodlands Academy, empowers girls to participate more and excel. They can get a head start with summer school - now open to middle-school girls. Empower your daughter today! REGISTER ONLINE FOR SUMMER SCHOOL BY MAY 6 or call (847) 234-4300 for your personal tour of our campus.

760 East Westleigh Road Lake Forest, IL 60045 |

WOODL ANDSAC ADEMY.O RG


W H AT ’ S N E W

B Y A N N A C A R L S O N , K AT I E J E N KO , B R O O K E M A R K L E Y A N D K A R LY S A C C O

Go Green

Winnetka is now a little healthier thanks to Mrs. Green’s Natural Market, which opened in January. This neighborhood store is dedicated to providing healthy and fresh produce by supporting local farmers and buying from suppliers who practice sustainability. If you want to live a natural and delicious life, then this might just be your new favorite store. MRS. GREEN’S NATURAL MARKET: 925 Green Bay Road, Winnetka, mrsgreens.com—KS

Get ready to exhale. The aptly named well-being brand opened its second Chicagoland location in Evanston Jan. 15. Nestled in the bottom floor of the new luxury residential high-rise, E2, this exhale location will offer a wide variety of award-winning classes that transform both body and mind. Stop in for a Power, Flow or Chill yoga class depending on your mood. If you’re looking for a serious workout, exhale’s Core Fusion offerings, from muscletoning Barre to heart-pumping Barre + Cardio, are where it’s at. Your muscles may shake, but your waistline will thank you. EXHALE EVANSTON: 1890 Maple Ave., Evanston, 847-440-0600, exhalespa.com—KJ

Experience Elevele

Taco Time

There’s a new taqueria in town! Wilmette’s Taco Lago opened in February and serves gluten-free, farm-to-table Mexican food everyone can enjoy. And don’t forget about a margarita or Mexican beer! The restaurant also has an art wall — currently featuring graffiti created by a Pilsen artist — which will be updated every six months to showcase local talent. TACO LAGO: 1515 Sheridan Road, Wilmette, tacolago.com—AC

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A new medicinal cannabis dispensary will open its doors in Highland Park in March. Elevele provides a safe and supportive environment to make every interested (and qualifying) patient feel comfortable and at ease to ask questions and seek medical care. This location will offer the highest-quality products and a highly trained staff. Stop by for a consultation and discover what is right for you. ELEVELE: 1460 Old Skokie Road, Highland Park, elevele.net—BM

PHOTO COURTESY OF EXHALE. PHOTO COURTESY OF TACO LAGO. MRS. GREENS PHOTO BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ

And exhale…


#EVENTS

R E C O M M E N D E D

Stay up to date on all the happenings. u MAKEITBETTER.NET/EVENTS

editor’s pick

BY ANNA CARLSON

MARCH

“Back to the Future” March 4| Chicago Symphony Center, 220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago | cso.org To celebrate this classic movie’s 30th anniversary, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra will perform the score (including 15 minutes of new music) as you watch the film. After, head to the post-concert party for “Back to the Future” drinks and live music. There will even be a DeLorean on site. MAR

Join us for a financial seminar presented by Morgan Stanley. Reader-requested topics we’ll cover include Investing for a Secure Retirement, Top Investment Tools and Trends, and Confidently Building a Financial Success Checklist. You will also be able to network with experts and walk through a financial resource gallery.

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“The Price Is Right Live™” March 5 | Genesee Theatre, 203 N. Genesee St., Waukegan | geneseetheatre.com If you’ve always wanted to hear your name followed by “Come on down,” this is your chance. This interactive stage show gives you a chance to play classic “Price Is Right” games and win prizes. The show has given away more than $10 million in cash and prizes in almost nine years. MAR

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Breaking Barriers: Equality in Sports March 6 Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, 9603 Woods Drive, Skokie | ilholocaustmuseum.org As part of the “Nazi Olympics” exhibit, the Illinois Holocaust Museum is hosting this event on athletes and discrimination. Hear from Bob Love, former NBA All-Star with the Chicago Bulls, and Hudson Taylor, founder of Athlete Ally. MAR

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“Brick by Brick” u Opens March 10 | Museum of Science and Industry, 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago | msichicago.org MSI’s newest exhibit features giant LEGO versions of favorite landmarks, including a 60-foot-long replica of the Golden Gate Bridge. You can even try building a masterpiece yourself with hands-on challenges that teach engineering, construction and architecture. MAR

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t Chicago Flower & Garden Show March 12-20 | Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave., Chicago | chicagoflower.com This year’s show theme, “Chicago Is,” will celebrate what makes this city so great. Plus, walk through more than 20 life-sized gardens, enjoy daily seminars and workshops, and shop the marketplace. MAR

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO FLOWER & GARDEN SHOW

Money, Values & Impact: 1 Your Piece of the Pie March 1 | Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe makeitbetter.net/moneyvaluesimpact MAR


Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage 19 March 19 | The Chicago Theatre, 175 N. State St., Chicago thechicagotheatre.com Calling all Trekkies! Get your tickets today for this symphony orchestra performance of beloved “Star Trek” music complete with footage of iconic moments from film and TV. Beam us up Scotty! MAR

APR

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY

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Bryan Stevenson April 7 Two programs: Evanston Township High School, 1600 Dodge Ave., Evanston; New Trier High School, 385 Winnetka Ave., Winnetka familyactionnetwork.net Bryan Stevenson, lawyer and author of “Just Mercy,” will speak on justice and redemption during this Family Action Network event. Other scheduled FAN speakers this spring include Krista Tippett (host of “On Being”), Adam Grant (author of “Originals: How NonConformists Move the World”), Robert Putnam (author of “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis”) and Angela Lee Duckworth (her TED Talk, “The key to success? Grit,” has more than 7 million views). Lisa Beazley 7 April 7 | Lake Forest Book Store, 680 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest lakeforestbookstore.com Meet author Lisa Beazley, whose debut novel, “Keep Me Posted,” follows two sisters as they overcome challenges and reap the benefits of social media fame. APR

Northshore Baconfest 9 April 9 | Historic Wagner Farm Heritage Center, 1510 Wagner Road, Glenview | glenviewparks.org Once again, local restaurants will serve up their best bacon dishes at Wagner Farm. As you dine, enjoy live music and stop by the cash bar. APR

“Father of the Bride” Opens April 14 | Oil Lamp Theater, 1723 Glenview Road, Glenview oillamptheater.org The hilarious and heartwarming film comes to life on Oil Lamp Theater’s stage this spring. APR

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“Death of a Streetcar 27 Named Virginia Woolf: A Parody” Opens April 27 | Writers Theatre’s New Theatre Center, 325 Tudor Court, Glencoe | writerstheatre.org Writers Theatre and The Second City put the characters of some of America’s best plays (“A Streetcar Named Desire,” “Death of a Salesman,” “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Our Town”) on the same stage. APR

“The King and I” 29 Opens April 29 | Civic Opera House, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago lyricopera.org The Lyric continues its Rodgers and Hammerstein run of the past few years with “The King and I” starring Broadway’s Kate Baldwin (a Northwestern grad!) and Paolo Montalban (who starred in the “Cinderella” movie with Brandy and Whitney Houston). Make It Better is a proud media sponsor of this event. APR


#EVENTS BET TER YOU | finance

MARCH/ APRIL HIGHLIGHTS BY ANNA CARLSON

ONGOING

American Women in World War I March 10 Evanston History Center, 225 Greenwood St., Evanston evanstonhistorycenter.org

Jerry Seinfeld March 19 Genesee Theatre, 203 N. Genesee St., Waukegan geneseetheatre.com

“The Best of The Second City” Chicago Mainstage, 1616 N. Wells St., Chicago | secondcity.com

2016 Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade and River Dyeing March 12 Parade starts at Balbo and Columbus. chicagostpatsparade.com

Great Music of Great Britain March 20 Gorton Community Center Theater, 400 E. Illinois Road, Lake Forest lakeforestcivicorchestra.org

“West Side Story” March 16 to April 24 Paramount Theatre, 23 E. Galena Blvd., Aurora | paramountaurora.com

“Matilda The Musical” March 22 to April 10 Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph St., Chicago broadwayinchicago.com

“Dressing Downton™: Changing Fashion for Changing Times” Driehaus Museum, 40 E. Erie St., Chicago driehausmuseum.org

“Monster Roster: Existentialist Art in Postwar Chicago” Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Ave., Chicago | smartmuseum.uchicago.edu

MARCH

17th Chicago Irish Film Festival March 3-6 Various locations chicagoirishfilmfestival.com Wine and Beer Tasting 2016 March 4 Winnetka Community House, 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka winnetkacommunityhouse.org International Home and Housewares Show 2016 March 5-8 McCormick Place, 2301 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago housewares.org/show Short Shakespeare! “Twelfth Night” March 5 to April 9 Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s Courtyard Theater, 800 E. Grand Ave., Chicago chicagoshakes.com Nurses, “Hello Girls,” and Farmerettes: The Changing Roles of

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Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center’s 2016 Humanitarian Awards Dinner (Keynote Speaker: Michael Douglas) March 17 Hyatt Regency Chicago, 151 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago humanitarianawardsdinner.org Chicago Botanic Garden

Estampas de la Raza: Contemporary Prints from the Romo Collection Opens March 25 National Museum of Mexican Art, 1852 W. 19th St., Chicago nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF HARRIS THEATRE. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN.

Miami City Ballet


Habitat Park Egg Hunt March 26 Kohl Children’s Museum, 2100 Patriot Blvd., Glenview kohlchildrensmuseum.org Easter Egg Brunch March 27 Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe chicagobotanic.org “Hazel” World Premiere Opens March 31 Drury Lane Theatre, 100 Drury Lane, Oakbrook Terrace drurylanetheare.com

APRIL

“Evita” Opens April 13 The Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire marriotttheatre.com Antiques, Garden & Design Show April 15-17 (preview April 14) Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe chicagobotanic.org 43rd Annual Bach Week Festival Begins April 22 Nichols Concert Hall, 1490 Chicago Ave., Evanston; Anderson Chapel, North Park University, 5149 N. Spaulding Ave., Chicago bachweek.org Miami City Ballet April 29-30 Harris Theater at Millennium Park, 205 E. Randolph Drive, Chicago harristheaterchicago.org Yossif Ivanov and Marta Aznavoorian April 30 Bennett Gordon Hall, 201 St. Johns Ave., Highland Park ravinia.org

Sponsored Listing

Launch: Driving Fashion Forward April 10 This year’s fashion show will feature Ella Louvi, Ike Behar, Juniper Boutique and Peach Carr. All proceeds from the auction will support The Glenview Women’s Club. Make It Better is the proud media sponsor of this event. launchfashionshow.com


MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Skin of Steel receives a 2014 Philanthropy Award.

Susan Steel

LIVING WITH A VENGEANCE A TRIBUTE TO SKIN OF STEEL FOUNDER SUSAN STEEL BY SUSAN B . NOYE S

Steel very intentionally lived “with a vengeance” — as an alternative to just “fighting cancer.” She did so by focusing her attention on helping others — her children, friends, future melanoma patients, the world. Her impact grew with each passing month because of this. The nonprofit she founded with others to raise awareness of, education about and research opportunities for melanoma — Skin Of Steel (SOS) — will live on with a vengeance too. “Susan founded SOS to provoke revolutionary change in the treatment and prevention of melanoma, and by God that is what we are on the cusp of!” Board Chairman Steve Sullivan declares. “She strategically partnered with people all over the globe to change the landscape of melanoma … and there will be no ‘end’ to her story. She may well have the most productive afterlife of anyone the world has ever known … Our team is resolute to open the world’s first ever ‘openly collaborative melanoma tissue bank.’” These audacious, laudable plans helped SOS win a 2014 Make It Better Philanthropy Award. In 2005, Steel was a married international real estate executive and former competitive skier with two children, 11 and 13, when she was diagnosed with late-stage melanoma and given that dire prognosis. She launched into seek and destroy mode, finding every possible experimental program that could help her fight against the deadly disease. By 2008, Steel had already endured seven brain surgeries and clinical trials. A question from a Tibetan Medical Monk transformed her thinking from just “fighting” her cancer battle to “living

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with a vengeance.” This energized her life and got her focused on helping others. Steel giggled and called her determined actions “leveraging cancer.” Steel traveled with every family member to help them pursue a dream. She launched a crew program as a way to give back to her cadre of gal pals who swooped in to help her and her family during her treatments. She wanted them to focus on learning a new skill and taking better care of themselves. She surprised herself by joining them too. According to coach Hope Poor, Steel stated: “Rowing was one of my most defiant acts.” It was also a great success. The program blossomed into today’s formidable New Trier Women’s Masters, which competes across the country. Steel started SOS in Glenview to educate local youth and others about melanoma prevention. She spoke publicly, ran fundraisers and ensured that NorthShore University HealthSystem had a robust pool of blood platelet donors. As years passed and she lived on, Steel sought out fellow melanoma warriors nationally, helped rewrite medical protocol and, upon learning that researchers need more tissue to do their work, set her sights even higher. With laser focus, Steel built a coalition and a plan to fund four collaborative tissue banks across the United States, including one in Chicago and one at the University of Pittsburgh. By choosing to live with vengeance and help others rather than just focusing on the fight she was destined to lose, Steel was able to live a decade longer than anticipated, help her children pursue dreams and grow into lovely adults, found a blossoming athletic program for women, inspire others to live courageously, and eventually likely transform melanoma research and outcomes around the world. Thank you, Susan Steel. God rest.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAKE IT BETTER AND MISTY WINTER

Susan Steel, of Glenview, died in January from melanoma. Most people diagnosed with late-stage melanoma, like Steel, live for a few months. Steel lived for more than a decade. That is big news in and of itself, but what is extraordinary and inspiring – is the way Steel lived and what she accomplished as she endured brain surgery after brain surgery and drug trial after drug trial.


# E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Dance? SHALL WE

GETTING TO KNOW THE STARS OF ‘THE KING AND I’ BY ANNA CARLSON

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD ROSENBERG

Lyric Opera of Chicago is bringing another classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical to its stage this spring, “The King and I,” and has two powerhouse talents starring as Anna and the King of Siam. Kate Baldwin is a Tony Award-nominated actress for the Broadway revival of “Finian’s Rainbow” and a Northwestern grad. Paolo Montalban has also starred on Broadway (“Pacific Overtures,” “The King and I,” “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), but you may recognize him from the 1997 “Cinderella” TV movie with Brandy and Whitney Houston. We spoke with the pair about their newest roles, work/life balance and giving back. Make It Better: What are you looking forward to the most as you begin this process? Kate Baldwin: I look forward to rehearsal. It's my favorite part of

the entire process. I'm interested in finding out why Anna does the things she does. Paolo Montalban: I'm really looking forward to working with the director, Lee Blakeley, and his creative team. With a classic like this, it's always interesting to see what the director's vision will be…To be given the opportunity to collaborate on this quality of work is every actor's dream. What draws you toward your character and gets you excited to perform? KB: I'm drawn to her contradictions. She seems simultaneously fearless yet filled with fear. She claims to not be an imperialist,

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yet she imposes her ideas on another group's way of life. What excites me about the story is how two people from such disparate cultures find common ground and even deep love. PM: An actor gets to explore the full spectrum of the human behavioral landscape in the role of the King. He's so complex and mercurial; I consider him to be the Asian Hamlet of the musical theater genre. He's both an authoritative god-King and a loving father, he's absolute with his power yet has moments of self-doubt, he's a devout Buddhist and also a man of science and learning, and he's a strict traditionalist who strives to usher his country into a modern era … And dancing the polka in bare feet with your partner wearing a 20-pound, hoop-skirted, Victorian-era ball gown can get pretty exciting too! Make It Better and Lyric are two brands committed to doing good in the world. What are some causes or charities that you feel affinity toward and why? KB: I love City Harvest and the other countless programs that provide food to hungry families. No one in this nation should go hungry.

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PM: I have an affinity for two causes: one macro and one micro. The macro cause is cancer research, because both of my parents are living vibrant healthy lives today because of progress that's been made even in the past 15 years. I propose that for every war we engage in, we should allocate 10 percent of that budget toward cancer research. Realistically though, a donation of time or money to any of the various cancer nonprofits will greatly increase the survivorship of someone's loved one somewhere. The micro cause (but no less important) is the Lelt Foundation, whose goal is to create sustainable independence (through nutrition, education and small business creation) for severely impoverished families in Ethiopia … By directly purchasing handmade Ethiopian goods on the website (I'm a huge fan of their colorful scarves), you can be the catalyst for a sense of pride and empowerment. Check out leltfoundation.org Kate, as a Northwestern grad and Evanston native, you’ve lived and performed locally before. What are you looking forward to doing or seeing as you return to the area? KB: I'm looking forward to spending time with my brother who lives with his family in LaGrange and to seeing friends all over

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD ROSENBERG

# E N T E R TA I N M E N T


# E N T E R TA I N M E N T

“collaborate

opportunity

TO BE GIVEN THE TO ON THIS QUALITY OF WORK IS EVERY ACTOR’S .

Paolo Montalban

the Chicagoland area. I'm trying to plan a time to head up to NU to teach a master class for the musical theater students. I also plan to reconnect with my college voice teacher whom I adore, the remarkable and gifted Marie Michuda. Paolo, what are you looking forward to doing during your time in Chicago? PM: I don't know in what states of undress we'll be in this production of "The King & I" (Lee mentioned it will be a very sensual one), but I really hope to sample the cuisine Chicago is famous for. I take pictures of food as a kind visual travelogue for myself. Also, the last time I visited the city, it was January and very cold. It didn't matter though, because of the ubiquitous Chicagoan friendliness. I look forward to total strangers greeting me on the sidewalk again. Windy City, warm hearts. Kate, as a working mom, do you have any secrets or tips to share with other parents who juggle career and family commitments? KB: Guard your health like it's your job. No one can function happily if they are feeling terrible. Also, make sure you marry

dream

Kate Baldwin with husband, Graham Rowat, and their son, Colin.

someone who makes you laugh. And find time to joke around with your kids. Humor saves the day! Paolo, we read that you were on a pre-med track when you graduated from Rutgers with a degree in Psychology. Did you ever consider going back to med school once you started performing or were you sure you'd found your calling? PM: The thought of pursuing med school again never came up since I started acting professionally, much to the dismay of my parents. However, I did do a year-and-a-half stint of massage therapy school on the side (I'm certified). I was still really interested in anatomy, physiology, and being able to treat people in a pinch if they became injured. That was the closest I came to flirting with the medical field again. As iconic businessman and author Harvey Mackay said, "Find something you love to do, and you'll never have to work a day in your life." I've definitely found my "something" in acting for now. I may not be a doctor, but I can play one on TV. “The King and I” opens at Lyric Opera of Chicago on April 30 with a preview on April 29. For tickets and more information, visit lyricopera.org.

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Lyric Unlimited's Heather Aranyi with Volta Elementary staff and students

OPERA’S NEXT ACT Lyric Unlimited brings opera to Chicago’s diverse communities. BY S U S A N PA S T E R N A K

For Kathy Talan, a second-grade teacher at Albany Park’s Volta Elementary School, watching her students write and perform an opera was an experience in her career that will be hard to top.

PHOTO NEIL STERN PHOTOGRAPHY

For 16 weeks, her students — a diverse group including non-English speakers, dual-language students, students with special needs, and academically gifted students — worked with a performer from Lyric Opera of Chicago’s community engagement organization Lyric Unlimited (lyricopera.org/ lyricunlimited). “Celebrations” was the theme of the opera, and its debut commanded a packed auditorium of parents, fellow teachers and students.

see performances, and school residency programs, Lyric Unlimited is able to connect with a young and multicultural population in Chicago. The experience of creating and performing an opera can be “transformative” for the students, as well as the artistteachers who are working with the children, says Heather Aranyi, a Lyric Opera artist and teacher-in-residence at elementary schools. Aranyi spoke of one classroom that was almost entirely composed of students who were new to this country. Fittingly, the theme they chose for their opera was immigration. Aranyi with Volta Elementary students

“Every child shined,” Talan says. “The only complaint I heard from the parents was that the performance wasn’t long enough.” The student-opera at Volta Elementary is just one of the many examples of Lyric Unlimited’s commitment to introducing new and diverse audiences to opera through collaboration and educational partnerships. Through backstage tours, opportunities to

Opera “accesses this entirely different part of the kids, which translates to their whole academic experience,” Aranyi says. “We work the whole gamut of the children’s life experiences. It’s unbelievable what they share, write and perform when it’s them creating it.” Lyric Unlimited brings the unique performances to the many ethnic communities in Chicago. In 2013, Lyric Unlimited presented the mariachi opera “Cruzar la Cara de la Luna” in the

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predominantly Mexican communities of Pilsen, Waukegan, and at the opera house. This production kicked off a multiyear collaboration with Latino communities that included two additional mariachi operas. To enhance the presentations of these new works, Lyric Unlimited supported youth mariachi groups and programs, which highlight the singing culture of mariachi. Similarly, in conjunction with Lyric Opera’s 2015 premiere of Mieczyslaw Weinberg’s opera “The Passenger,” Lyric Unlimited commissioned a new work, “The Property.” “The Property” was presented at venues in Chicago and Skokie, engaging Chicago’s large Jewish and Polish communities with a chamber opera performance told through the musical language of Klezmer, a musical style of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe. “The success of Lyric Unlimited’s Latino initiatives and engagement with area Jewish and Polish communities has emboldened Lyric Unlimited to connect with many other ethnic and cultural communities around Chicago,” says Cayenne Harris, director of Lyric Unlimited. To be sure, there is no compromise in artistic quality in the performances not on the main stage, with many of the Lyric Opera artists also going directly to the communities to perform. “When I was brought into the organization, they wanted to make sure it was all top-level performers and teachers,” says Aranyi, who holds master’s degrees in both voice and opera, and early childhood education, and is currently completing her ordination as a cantor. One of the goals of the program, in addition to the enrichment it brings to different communities, is to expand its audience on the main stage. As part of this effort, Lyric last year introduced two new subscription options: NEXT is aimed at college-aged students and the Medley Series is directed at young professionals. Both subscriptions offer discounted rates for various operas. “We’ve definitely seen an increase in the number of young people in the audience in the past couple of years,” Harris says. Read about other local organizations doing good works around Chicago. MAKEITBETTER.NET/PHILANTHROPY


#HOME

ONTHE

MARKET 1420 Sheridan road 1C

1420 sheridan road 1C wilmet te

kathryn bader mangel

broker

847.373.5801 kathryn@atproperties.com

kelly O'cOnnell mangel

9 broker

847.910.2621 kellym@atproperties.com

A 3-bedroom lakefront unit with a 1,000-sq.-ft. private patio at 1420 Sheridan Road in Wilmette is listed for $1,085,000 via @properties’ Team Mangel (above and right), and a 4-bedroom single-family home at 1931 N. Mohawk in Lincoln Park is listed for $3,100,000 via dreamtown’s Barbara O’Connor (top left and right). 1420Sheridanroad1C.info

BY GENEVIEVE LILL

Along with more hours of sunlight and – did we just hear a bird chirping? – you know it’s spring in the Midwest when the real estate market starts to pick up after the long freeze of winter. library

According to Kristine Menas, a broker with dreamtown in Chicago, , she expects this spring and summer in the city to mirror the competitive levels of the last few years, with multiple offers and pre-market sales continuing at a healthy clip. “People who have been waiting for their value to appreciate since the downturn are selling,” she says, particularly in desirable neighborhoods like Lincoln Park, where prices have exceeded pre-2008 levels. Low inventory plus low interest rates means the city’s a seller’s market. Kathryn and Kelly Mangel, who work together as “Team Mangel” for @properties, say it’s a great time to buy or sell on the North Shore. “With the interest rates so low, the buying power is very strong,” Kathryn says. “Since it is an election year, we are not sure how

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this will impact the interest rates moving forward, so people are buying now.” Team Mangel reports that the number of @properties sold listings are already ahead of early spring 2015, noting “the local market is strong for homes that are priced right.” Given the active downtown and suburban markets, if you’re thinking about listing a property or acquiring a new one — don’t wait! Keep reading for tips on how to choose a realtor and how to keep your property resale-ready. For more tips on selling your home, read our Guide to Selling Your Home coming online in mid-March at MAKEITBETTER. NET/SELLYOURHOME

CHICAGO SINGLE FAMILY PHOTO COURTESY OF: VIS-HOME/BARBARA O'CONNOR. WILMETTE CONDO PHOTO COURTESY OF: BRAD SHADE WITH VHT

1420 sheridan rOad 1c wilmet te


HOW TO FIND AND CHOOSE A REALTOR B Y S I M O N M U R R AY

Mary Baubonis’ friend was in need of a realtor to help sell her home. Baubonis, a Wilmette resident, was the perfect person to ask for help — as a North Shore broker, she had been selling residential real estate for more than 20 years. There was, however, just one teensy problem: Her friend lived in another state, far from the hyperlocal expertise of Baubonis. While Baubonis couldn’t sell her friend’s home, she gave her a list of questions to help vet prospective agents. “Oftentimes what [homeowners] do is call a company and say, ‘who’s your top producer?’ But there’s so much more to it than that.” Asking questions is the best place to start when choosing a realtor. Buying or selling a home is a risky proposition, compounded by the unknown. Not only are you entrusting a stranger to help you maneuver through one of the biggest financial decisions you will ever make, but you will also be working closely with that person for months, sometimes even years. For Frank Capitanini, a Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

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real estate agent serving Winnetka and the North Shore, real estate is a business of relationships. It once took his team seven years to find the perfect home for a client; the one after that took five years. “You explain to them that it’s a relationship and not a transaction,” says Capitanini. “That’s what we’ve said from day one.” One of the best ways to gauge a real estate agent’s character before meeting them is to ask for references or to read about their track record online. Or ask family and friends for referrals, which is how Jean Wright, owner of her 33-year-old eponymous boutique real estate company, says she gets most of her business.


Says Wright, “You want to pick someone [who] has a good track record.” That means an agent who doesn’t cut corners. One who is going to take the time to stage your house. One who will personally give tours to prospective buyers and not just leave the keys in a lockbox. Look for someone who is deeply familiar with the location, whether you’re buying or selling. “You’re not going to pick a Hinsdale broker to represent you in Wilmette,” says Capitanini. “It’s important that you work with someone who lives in the community, knows … everything about it.” If you’re looking to purchase an apartment in Chicago, for example, the agent should be familiar with not just one or two neighborhoods but many different ones, according to Rick Sobin, managing broker and vice president of brokerage services with @properties. If a certain price point isn’t available

in a desired area, a knowledgeable agent can guide a client just a few miles away to listings in a “sister neighborhood.” For sellers, how their broker will market their home is incredibly important. “One of the first things you should ask a prospective broker is ‘What will you do for me to help maximize the exposure of my home?’” Baubonis says. Ask them for a detailed marketing plan: “What will you do once you get the listing?” In the end, communication is key. For Chris Downing, of KoenigRubloff Realty Group, the connection between the buyer (or the seller) and the agent is the most important thing. As is a solid work ethic. Jean Wright answered my call on her birthday. “A good broker is available almost 24 hours a day,” Wright says.


# R E A L E S TAT E MAKE A DIFFERENCE | local treasure

MAKE A DIFFERENCE | local treasure

5 DESIGN DEAL BREAKERS TO AVOID WHEN TRYING TO SELL YOUR HOME BY CORTNEY FRIES

1. TOO MUCH IS NOT A GOOD THING Decorative throw pillows may be a hit at your parties, but keep accents and accessories to a minimum when trying to sell your home. “Never over-decorate,” McAuley warns. “This seems to be the No. 1 mistake that sellers make.” Let “less is more” be your mantra and keep furniture, accents and other decorative pieces simple. 2. HIDE HARDWOODS WITH CARPET? NO WAY! Replacing wall-to-wall carpeting with new carpet? Not a good idea. “Today’s buyers do not want carpet,” West says. “It’s much better to have wood floors buffed or refinished.” If there has been carpet over the floors for years, the hardwoods are often in very good shape. 3. DON’T PUT WALLS BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR BUYERS Taste-specific tiles, dated murals, textured walls and bold paint colors — these are NOT buyers’ favorite things. “It’s best to stay classic and neutral,” West says. “Remove anything that appears dated or extreme.”

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“Limit paint colors on your property,” McAuley advises. Two in neutral tones will do. “Your home will seem larger to prospective buyers.” 4. WALK-IN CLOSETS ARE NOT BETTER THAN BEDROOMS “Turning a bedroom into a walk-in closet is a bad investment,” West says. Unless you will have at least four other bedrooms, don’t do it. “Very few people are willing to pay top dollar for a house with only three bedrooms.” 5. POOLS AND HOT TUBS IN CHICAGO: NO, NO, NO “Without a doubt, one of the worst things you can do to your home, in terms of resale value, is add a swimming pool,” West warns. “A pool in the Chicago area will decrease the value of your home and could make it almost impossible to sell.” This is because pools are only usable for three summer months, have high maintenance costs and create major safety liabilities. “Most families with young children will not even consider a home with a pool,” West says. Hot tubs can cause concerns about mold and bacteria. “It’s quite possible a buyer will ask you to remove it,” West says. What should you do? “Get three removal bids, so you can negotiate with the buyer,” West advises. “Buyers almost always over-estimate removal costs and will try to negotiate bigger discounts. Have the facts on-hand to help you negotiate.” In some cases, it might be best to bite the bullet and take care of the problem up front. Ask your agent for advice on your specific situation.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNE WEST

Looking to sell your home, or determining which upgrades are best for your property’s resale value? Here are five design details that can pose potential pitfalls for your sale. Two real estate brokers, Anne West with Coldwell Banker, who specializes in the lakefront communities of Chicago’s North Shore, and Terri McAuley, a city luxury expert with KoenigRubloff, share advice on how to nix dealbreakers and fix up your home for top-dollar sale.


#CAMP

SUMMER CAMPS FOR EVERY INTEREST B Y K AT I E J E N KO

Tired of run-of-the-mill summer camps? These great camps will leave your kids never wanting summer to end. Camp Miniwanca

OVERNIGHT CAMPS CAMP MINIWANCA From cherished traditional camp activities for middle schoolers to exhilarating adventures for teens, Camp Miniwanca programs make it hard for campers to leave. Managed by the American Youth Foundation, a nonprofit youth development organization, the camp challenges kids to affect the world around them in a positive way by blending community service and adventure. Camp options include one- two- three- and six-week sessions, depending on the program. Ages: 8-18 Cost: $995-5,900 Dates: June 26-Aug. 5 Location: Shelby, Mich. For more information, visit ayf.com/miniwanca/programs or call 231-861-2262.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH CAMP

JCC CAMP CHI In business for nearly a century, Camp Chi has been named the the “Best Overnight Camp” two years in a row by Make It Better readers. Camp Chi sits on 600 acres in Wisconsin. Activities include watersports, outdoor adventures, horseback riding, sports, the arts and media. Sessions last two, three, four or eight weeks, depending on your child’s age and level of comfort with overnight camp.

Campers will learn about climbing equipment, techniques and safety skills. Though a central activity for the camp, climbing is not the sole option. Teen adventurers will also have the opportunity to go kayaking, caving, hiking and four-wheeling. Vertical Horizons caps their camps at 10 climbers per program so be sure to register early. Ages: 13-18 Cost: $699 plus $50 administrative fee Dates: Weekly, June 15-Aug. 24 Location: Union Center, Wisc. For more information, visit verticaladventure.org/teen-adventure or call 708-341-3255.

TECH POWERUP TECH ACADEMY SUMMER CODING CAMPS Coding camps, such as PowerUp Tech Academy, are blending fun games with real instruction. Using the kid-friendly programming language, campers can create a galactic battleship, virtual pets or the video game of their choice. Children will also develop skills in visual design, animation, sound design and storylines. Recommended for kids entering grades 3-6, the summer coding camps cater to beginners as well as more advanced coders.

Ages: 9-16 Cost: $2,175-7,295 plus canteen fee Dates: June 19-Aug. 12 Location: Lake Delton, Wisc. For more information, visit campchi.com. VERTICAL ADVENTURES TEEN ADVENTURE CAMPS Scale 500-foot Quartzite bluffs and take in the breathtaking views of Devil’s Lake State Park in Wisconsin. At Vertical Adventures, thrill-seeking teens can take their climbing skills to new heights.

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From acting and backstage classes to field trips and guest artists, campers will enjoy a dynamic learning experience. The Performing Arts Camp wraps up with a formal production on Northlight’s own stage. Age: 7-14 Cost: $925 Dates: Jul 11-Aug. 5 (Camp performance on Aug. 4) Location: Skokie For more information, visit northlight.org or call 847-673-6300. PowerUp Tech Academy

FAMILY CAMPS

ID TECH CAMPS iD Tech offers kids ages 7-17 an alternative to traditional outdoorsy programs. Students at any of the five Chicagoland locations may choose from an array of courses in coding, game design, app development, web design, film, photography and more. With a maximum of eight students per instructor, iD Tech gives students a personalized learning experience, empowering them to build valuable STEM skills. iD Tech runs weeklong camps featuring both day and overnight programs, dependent on the location. Ages: 7-17 Cost: $799-1,249 per week Dates: Depends on location Locations: Benedictine University in Lisle, GEMS World Academy in Chicago, Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, Loyola University in Chicago, Northwestern University in Evanston For more information, visit idtech.com/locations/illinois-summercamps or call 888-709-8324.

ARTS CAMPS JOFFREY BALLET SUMMER DANCE CAMPS Let Chicago’s preeminent dance authority instruct your child this summer. The Joffrey Ballet offers weeklong camps for dancers of all skill levels. During Children’s Camp, youngsters will learn the basics of dance along with creative movement activities. Ranging from Ballet to Hip Hop, Junior, Youth and Teen Camps offer engaging instructional sessions for both beginners and intermediate dancers. Ages: 3-16 Cost: $140-320 plus a $25 registration fee Dates: June 13-17, July 11-15, Aug. 1-5 Location: Chicago For more information, visit joffrey.org/academy/programs-anddivisions/summer-camps or call 312-739-0120. NORTHLIGHT THEATRE PERFORMING ARTS CAMP Does your child have a passion for theater? The Northlight Theatre’s Performing Arts Camp offers an entertaining fourweek session where your child will enjoy both professional theater training as well as cherished summer camp traditions.

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CAMP TOHKOMEUPOG Feeling nostalgic for summer camp? Relive the carefree days during a one-of-a kind family vacation in New Hampshire on the edge of White Mountain National Forest. At Camp Tohkomeupog, families gather for a week of fun, camaraderie and adventure. Enjoy a morning paddle through sparkling Purity Lake, show off your waterskiing skills in the afternoon or simply relax along Sunset Beach. Later, why not show your kids who the real Katniss is with a little round of archery? Ages: all Cost: Rates depend on the size of your group Dates: Aug 14-21 Location: New Hampshire For more information, visit tohko.com/summer-camp-for-boys/ family-camp. SCHOOL OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO FAMILY CAMP Looking to enjoy a camp with your kids but dread the bugs of the Northwoods? The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) offers a five day, instructor-guided family camp where you and your little ones can explore your creative side. Work as a team or side-by-side using materials such as paint, collage, clay, pastels or charcoal. The SAIC family camp inspires participants, regardless of age, to learn, create, bond and have fun. Ages: 4-10 with at least one adult enrollee per family Cost: $220 Dates: Jun 13-17 & Aug 8-12, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., M-F Location: Chicago For more information, visit http://www.saic.edu/cs/children/ summercamps/familycamps/ or call 312-629-6170. Joffrey Ballet Summer Dance Camp

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH CAMP

Ages: 8-12 Cost: $299-329 Dates: Weekly camps begin June 20, July 5 & 25, Aug. 8 & 15 Location: Chicago For more information, visit powerupta.com/register.html or call 773-382-0778.


#CAMP

OTHER CAMPS TO CONSIDER THIS YEAR Actors Training Center at Wilmette Theatre Wilmette 847-251-8710 actorstrainingcenter.com

Center for Enriched Living Riverwoods 847-315-9920 centerforenrichedliving.org/ summer-camp/

Banner Day Camp Lake Forest 847-295-4900 bannerdaycamp.com

Harand Theater Camp Evanston, IL & Kenosha, Wisc. 847.864.1500 (IL) 262-551-2149 (Wisc) harandcamp.com

Camp Birchwood LaPorte, Minn. 800-451-5270 campbirchwood.com Camp Birchwood for Boys Grand Marais, Minn. 218-388-4402 campbirchwoodforboys.com Camp CBG at the Chicago Botanic Garden Glencoe 847-835-5440 chicagobotanic.org/camp/ summercamp

Mad Science of Chicago Rockin’ Robots Camp Chicago 773-227-3345 http://chicago.madscience.org/ summer2016camps.aspx McGaw YMCA Camp Echo Freemont, MI 231-924-0829 mcgawymca.org/campecho

Jewish Council for Youth Services Summer Camps Chicago, Buffalo Grove, Highland Park, Ingleside 312-726-8891 jcys.org/summer-camps

Northwestern Volleyball Camps Evanston 847-467-3893 northwesternvolleyballcamps. com/

Light Opera Works Summer Workshop Wilmette 847-920-5360 light-opera-works.org/workshop.html

Northwestern Youth Soccer Camps Evanston Girls: 847-467-5297 northwesterngirlssocceracademy.org Boys: 847-467-1312

Learn musical theater in non-threatening nurturing atmosphere Kids 8 to 13 learn acting, dancing and singing in sessions based on popular musicals. Classes begin Monday; on Saturday kids put on a mini-musical. No experience needed. Every child gets a part. Also “My Fair Lady” teen (audition required) age 13 to 18. Light Opera Works 516 4th St., Wilmette 847-920-5360

Are you ready for CEL’s summer camp? Bring it on! Summer fun awaits campers ages 13-22 with developmental disabilities! Full or half-day options available. Save big when you sign up by April 8. Session 1: June 13 - July 8. Session II: July 11 - August 5. Center for Enriched Living 280 Saunders Road, Riverwoods 847-948-7001 CenterForEnrichedLiving.org/ summer-camp

nusoccercamps.com Piven Theatre Workshop Evanston 847-866-6597 piventheatre.org Second City Summer Comedy Camp Chicago 312-664-3959 secondcity.com/classes/chicago/comedy-camps/ Tamarak Day Camp Lincolnshire 847-634-3168 tamarakdaycamp.com To read the complete Make It Better Camp Guide, including sports and music camps, visit MAKEITBETTER.NET/ CAMPGUIDE


# DAY T R I P P E R

MB FINANCIAL PARK

DAYTRIPPER:

ROSEMONT B Y H E AT H E R L E S ZC Z E W I C Z

This year, Rosemont celebrates its 60th anniversary. The village has transformed from a destination for business travelers into a true entertainment district full of restaurants, shopping and activities for all ages. Get your live music fix in Rosemont at the Allstate Arena, ranked by Pollstar magazine as the third-best concert venue in the U.S. The 18,500-seat arena is home to the Chicago Sky women’s basketball team and attracts big-name performers (Justin Bieber, Ellie Goulding and Carrie Underwood will perform there this spring). The nearby Rosemont Theatre brings the best of Broadway shows and traveling performances like Disney Live! (March 1113) and Dancing in the Streets, a Motown revue (March 18). Check out Kings for upscale bowling or billiards. Note to families: The venue is 21+ after 8 p.m. Kings Rosemont, MB Financial Park, 5505 Park Place, kingsbowlamerica.com/rosemont. Thrill seekers can get the adrenaline rush of skydiving without any of the risk at iFLY, where an indoor wind tunnel mimics the experience. No parachute needed. iFLY, MB Financial Park, 5520 Park Place, Rosemont, iflyworld.com. Rain or shine, you can catch a baseball or softball game at the indoor Dome or the outdoor Stadium at The Ballpark, home to the Chicago Bandits women’s professional softball team. The Ballpark at Rosemont, 27 Jennie Finch Way, rosemont.com/ballpark

EATS AND DRINKS

You may know the Sugar Factory’s Couture Pops — fancy lollipops on an equally fancy reusable stick — which are popular with the celebrity crowd (Kylie Jenner is a spokesperson). While candy-themed drinks and sweets are the main attractions (hello, Fluffer Nutter milkshake!), they do serve food, KELLY CLARKSON AT ALLSTATE ARENA

including some breakfast options. Sugar Factory, MB Financial Park, 5445 Park Place, Rosemont, sugarfactory.com/chicago. With 40 beers on tap and a menu full of game-day classics, Park Tavern is the perfect hangout spot for friends and family. We recommend the pulled chicken tacos and foot-long grilled cheese topped with two fried eggs. Park Tavern, MB Financial Park, 5433 Park Place, Rosemont, parktavernrosemont.com. For a more formal dining experience, the Capital Grille offers steak, seafood and side dishes large enough for sharing. Don’t miss the crème brûlée. Capital Grille, 5340 N River Road, Rosemont, thecapitalgrille.com.

SHOPPING

If you’ve ever driven through Rosemont on 294, you will have seen Fashion Outlets of Chicago with its brightly flashing LED screens enticing deal seekers to shop at the 130+ retailers. High-end designers, including Tory Burch, Coach, Prada and Gucci, make up the top floor. The lower floor has brands like The GAP, Lindt and Forever 21 as well as a food court. Get the Green Savings Card, which provides extra discounts at select stores and can be purchased at Concierge Services. Take some time to admire the mall’s artwork that is part of a partnership with The Arts Initiative too. Fashion Outlets of Chicago, 5220 Fashion Outlets Way, Rosemont, fashionoutletsofchicago.com Gabrielle Tasiopoulous contributed to this article. To learn more about Rosemont offerings, head to MAKEITBETTER.NET/ROSEMONT and read more Daytrippers online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/DAYTRIPPER. SUGAR FACTORY

FASHION OUTLETS OF CHICAGO

PHOTOS BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ AND COURTESY OF FASHION OUTLETS OF CHICAGO AND MB FINANCIAL PARK

ACTIVITY HUB


# T R AV E L

Punta Mita

Roasted kelp ice cream

5 UNDER-THE-RADAR VACATION ALTERNATIVES TO TOURIST FAVORITES BY AMBER GIBSON

When you consider your vacation plans this year, think outside the box. These alternatives to tourist favorites offer experiences that are more affordable, less crowded, more intimate or less stressful. Sometimes all of the above.

Cancun has a reputation for wild partying and can get crowded. For privacy and pristine coastline, fly to Puerto Vallarta instead and explore Riviera Nayarit’s 200 miles of Pacific coast ranging from coastal surfing towns to luxurious resorts.

The Four Seasons Resort Punta Mita is the most family-friendly resort in the area, with a fantastic kids club allowing mom and dad alone time. Strong swimmers can try catching their own lunch by spearfishing with Spearmex, then cook the fresh catch at Bahia. Sprinkle in complimentary nature walks and lectures on local culture and heritage — the xocoatl talk includes some unique chocolate tasting — in between sunning sessions.

FOR SKIING, HIT TELLURIDE INSTEAD OF VAIL

Telluride has less crowded slopes for skiers of all levels and enviable fluffy powder. Mountain Village was built around the ski resort, but downtown Telluride is just a 13-minute free gondola ride away and the old mining town’s history has more soul than any well-manicured fairytale land. Mountain dining options are more intimate and elegant in Telluride. The ski resort has its own wine director and everyone should experience the fine food and sunset glow at Allred’s. Stay at the Lumière Telluride for easy access to the mountains. Soak in the hot tub or relax in the patio deck sauna after a long day on the slopes and grab homemade snacks available in the lobby. For dining and drinking, you can’t beat There, a cocktail bar with flavorful small plates. For a more elegant meal, 221 South Oak is a

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gem. Take a break from skiing by exploring the lively arts district and popping into Telluride Truffle for a sweet treat.

FOR SOUTHERN CHARM, TRY DURHAM INSTEAD OF CHARLESTON

Enjoy the same Southern hospitality and an equally high concentration of great food as Charleston, North Carolina with a visit to Durham. This rapidly growing city seems to be in a perpetual state of construction, but now is the time to visit for a taste of small town charm before it gets any bigger. Stay at 21c Museum Hotel Durham for a contemporary art museum housed in a hotel. Tasty eats begin at Counting House within the hotel with a wicked good grilled pimento cheese sandwich. At farm-owned restaurant Piedmont, an exciting young chef serves contemporary twists on Southern flavors. Kids of all ages will enjoy exploring exhibits at the Museum of Life and Science before stopping for an afternoon ice cream treat at The Parlour. Within walking distance of 21c are a couple places for adults to have a nightcap — The Durham Hotel’s rooftop bar and Alley Twenty Six.

IF YOU LOVE PARIS, VISIT QUÉBEC CITY

Québec City has been called the “Paris of North America” for good reason. Old Québec is the only walled city within the Canada-U.S. boundary, and its cobblestone streets are reminiscent of Europe. Direct flights from Chicago to Québec City are just a touch over two hours. You’ll get the same opportunity to practice your French and dine very well.

PHOTOS BY AMBER GIBSON

FOR MEXICAN BEACHES, HEAD TO RIVIERA NAYARIT INSTEAD OF CANCUN


# T R AV E L

Québec City

This city loves a reason to throw a party. If you visit in summer, check out the New France Festival, which celebrates Québec’s days as the capital of New France. Summer is also a great time to tour the Île d’Orléans with its bounty of fresh produce and try the oldest cheese in North America. Consider staying at Le Monastère des Augustines, formerly a cloistered monastery, it now aspires to be a haven for peace and wellness.

FOR A EUROPEAN ADVENTURE, TRY COPENHAGEN INSTEAD OF AMSTERDAM

“The Fault in Our Stars” put Amsterdam on the map as a mustvisit destination, but Copenhagen is just as fun to explore. When it comes to dining, Copenhagen easily comes out on

Danish new potatoes

top. From the elaborate tasting menu at world-renowned Noma (the world’s best restaurant four of the past six years) to traditional Danish smørrebrød at Øl & Brød, there’s great food made with local Nordic ingredients around every corner. A sustainable and organic mindset prevails, with broad availability of local and organic produce and hordes of cycling commuters. Cycling is the most efficient way to get around, so rent a bike and ride like a local across the Cykelslangen, an elevated bike lane. Visit Tivoli, the oldest amusement park in the world, for nostalgic carnival games and rides plus fireworks in the summer. Learn about the latest travel hotspots at MAKEITBETTER. NET/HOTSPOTS.


#HOME

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MUDROOM

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GALVANIZED WALL ORGANIZER

Don’t let bills, permission slips and receipts pile up on the kitchen counter. Mount this stylish space-saver close to the door as a visual reminder to grab important documents on your way to the car. $30, Target

2 METROPOLITAN RAILWAY INLINE CHANDELIER

Even in the mudroom, lighting shouldn’t be an afterthought. The industrial look of this fixture makes sense in a utilitarian part of the home. $449, Restoration Hardware

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3 APPLE CRATES

Think of these shabby-chic wooden apple crates as an updated version of the ubiquitous wicker basket — perfect for collecting odds and ends (before they become clutter!). $49, West Elm

ESTIA UMBRELLA STAND

The most beautiful homes have pops of luxury in unexpected places. Give your mudroom a bit of understated glamor with this Italian ceramic umbrella stand. $990, Saks Fifth Avenue

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SHOE STORAGE CABINET

Putting away shoes is less of a chore when you have a fashionable spot to stow them. This slender cabinet keeps 20 pairs of shoes out of sight. $265, Wayfair 52

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A spot to sit down and slip off your boots, with hidden storage for winter gloves, scarves and hats (or whatever else you need to stash!) — this stylish piece does double duty in the mudroom. $599-999, Pottery Barn

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS

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#HOME

MUST-HAVES

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FOR A CLUTTER-FREE HOME

BY MEGHAN STREIT

The mudroom (or entryway, as the case may be in your house) is your first line of defense against disorganization, yet it is often one of the most overlooked when it comes to design. Here are some of the chicest — and most useful — items to turn your mudroom into the organizing workhorse of your home.

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INSPIRATIONAL DISTRESSED WOOD SIGN

OYOBOX

There’s nothing worse than finally getting loaded into the car, then realizing you forgot your sunglasses. Keep your shades on display in this sleek lacquered box with shatterproof top. Available in 10 colors. $300, Make It Better’s Shop For Good

As you bolt out the door (five minutes late, once again, and juggling coffee, a few kids’ lunches and a laptop), a little inspiration can go a long way. $68, Make It Better’s Shop For Good

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LEATHER ALL-IN-ONE CHARGING STATION

Want to keep the whole family’s electronic devices away from the dinner table and charged for the next day? Set up this handsome charging station in the mudroom, and tell everyone to leave smartphones at the door. $200, Great Useful Stuff

DAMN GOOD DOORMATS

CAST IRON LEASH HOLDER

Even your four-legged family members should have a designated spot for their things (otherwise they’ll end up cluttering the living space, just like the kids’ stuff). $30, Plow & Hearth SHOP FOR GOOD, Make It Better’s e-commerce platform features great products that help good causes. The more you shop the more good you do. 10% of each sale goes to charity.

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Lift the spirits of all who cross your threshold with a quirky doormat that makes people smile as it prevents them from tracking dirt into your house. $45, Damn Good Doormats

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#HOME

BATHING BEAUTY THE YEAR’S MOST BEAUTIFUL BATHROOM TRENDS BY MEGHAN STREIT

Are you planning a bathroom renovation this year but don’t know where to start? We asked local design experts to predict the bathroom trends that will be hot in 2016 to help turn your bathroom into a retreat that is as functional as it is gorgeous.

are all the rage. “Whether angular, monolithic… modern or traditional, the geometry of the tub can often set the tone of the room,” says Doug Reynolds, president of Northfield-based Reynolds Architecture, Design and Construction.

1. FREESTANDING TUBS The too-large tub deck trend that dominated bathroom design for the last decade is definitely over. Now, sculptural freestanding tubs

2. WET ROOMS Can’t choose between a freestanding tub or a roomy spa-like shower? Have them both when you build a swoon-worthy “wet

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ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF REYNOLDS ARCHITECTURE.

A structural freestanding tub is a must-have for a chic modern bathroom.


House your tub in an oversized “wet room” that also features a roomy shower.

room.” “Instead of compartmentalizing, creating a transparent and open, airy design allows rich stone finishes and cabinetry to be experienced throughout the space,” Reynolds says. 3. STATEMENT TILE We admit that the clean simplicity of white-on-white bathrooms is hard to resist. But Amy Mangold, lead architect for Scott Simpson Builders (a two-time MIB Best Of winner!), says the trend has become so ubiquitous that the same old products appear in every Instagram feed (we’re looking at you, subway tiles). Give your bathroom a pop of color — and a ton of personality — with statement tiles. 4. WATER-SAVING APPLIANCES Mangold says clients are increasingly ecoconscious in their design preferences. She is quick to recommend dual-flush toilets and hands-free faucets. Fortunately, these highperformance products now come priced on par with standard offerings. 5. VINYL WALLPAPER Sure, bathrooms are one of the dampest parts of the home, but that doesn’t mean you can’t decorate with wallpaper. Winnetka interior designer Jeannie Balsam (another repeat MIB Best Of winner!) says says there are now vinyl wallpaper options, from designers like Phillip Jeffries, that are stylish and durable.

1107 Greenleaf Avenue 1107Wilmette, Greenleaf IL Avenue 60091 Wilmette, IL 60091 847-379-1748

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Making the building and remodeling process simple and efficient for over 25 years. Call us and tell us about how we can make your dream come to life.

6. CUSTOM CABINETS To truly make your bathroom your own, you need custom cabinets that function exactly as you need them to. Deep drawers for fluffy towels, electrical strips to plug in your beauty tools — whatever your primping needs, custom cabinets can accommodate, and Balsam says they also cut down on wasted space. 7. RADIANT FLOORS Balsam says radiant floors have become standard in luxurious upscale bathrooms — “No longer a trend, but a staple!” 825 S. WAUKEGAN ROAD-A8 #171 LAKE FOREST, IL | 847-735-9090 PREMIERCUSTOMHOMESLTD.COM M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 makeitbetter.net

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# F A M I LY BET TER YOU | finance

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR KIDS ABOUT SUICIDE BY SHANNAN YO U NGER

Of the conversations that parents are uncomfortable having with their kids, talking about suicide is particularly challenging. The topic is an important one, though, given that suicide is the second leading cause of death among those ages 15-24, and the third leading cause of death among children ages 10-14, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here’s what several experts had to say about how and when to start this tough conversation with kids.

WHEN SHOULD YOU START TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT SUICIDE?

“If kids are under 10 years old, you don’t really need to talk about it unless there’s a specific reason, be it them raising the issue or exhibiting symptoms of depression,” says Dr. Dan Reidenberg, executive director of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE) and managing director of the National Council for Suicide Prevention. “After age 10, parents should start a conversation and … have an open dialogue throughout the adolescent years.” Dr. Deborah Gilboa, a family physician and parenting expert at Ask Doctor G, notes that the conversation should start early if there is a family history of suicide, as some of the factors that predispose one to suicide can be genetic.

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“It’s wrong for parents to not discuss their medical family history with their kids, whatever it is,” advises Gilboa. “The more you discuss this at younger age range, the more you take the stigma away and give your kid a shot at talking about it comfortably.”

TALKING ABOUT SUICIDE IS NOT DANGEROUS

Reidenberg says that many parents have the fear that by discussing suicide, they could plant a thought about it, but “research shows that doesn’t happen,” he says. However, Dr. Christine Moutier, chief medical officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, cautions parents to use the right messaging if a child is already at risk. “We created a program that educates teens on depression, and intentionally made it focused on treatable but leading causes of suicide rather than focusing on suicide itself,” she says.


YOU NEED TO DISCUSS IT, EVEN IF YOU’RE SURE IT WILL NEVER BE AN ISSUE

“Even if our kids never face this demon, the odds are high that someone they know will,” says Gilboa. “Kids cannot take responsibility for it or think they can handle it with their friend on their own. A young life may be lost that we could help our child save if we’d been willing to talk about it.”

WHAT’S NORMAL AND WHEN SHOULD I BE CONCERNED?

“As a parent, you know your kids,” says Moutier. She urges parents to trust themselves, confident that parental instincts will indicate when it’s time to seek help. She cautions that parents tend to ignore their gut feelings when it comes to their kids. “We find a way to rationalize it,” she says. “Instead, we should have that conversation, express caring, ask open-ended questions, offer to lead them to help.” “We can’t just expect that things are going to go away and get better on their own,” says Reidenberg, who also urges parental action. He advises parents to be open to conversation and to monitor their children’s mental health on a regular basis and more frequently during times of increased pressure, such as holidays, finals, graduation and during stressful family situations, so they can recognize warning signs. “It’s also really important to develop relationships with kids’ peers,” he adds. “It not only helps parents know if something is going on with their kid, it allows parents to help … spot something going on with other kids.”

HOW DO I EVEN APPROACH THE TOPIC OF SUICIDE WITH MY CHILD?

Talking about suicide in the broader context of mental health is important, and makes the topic more approachable for both kids and parents. “We should teach kids about mental health as part of wellness. Mental health and emotional health are just as important as any other health care,” says Reidenberg. “Kids need to be able to tell parents that they aren’t doing well.” “Don’t be afraid of the topic,” says Moutier. “Just because you’re not a mental health expert doesn’t mean that you should be scared. Take 10 minutes to read up on it.”


#FINANCE BET TER YOU | finance

Bernie’s Book Bank

Greater Chicago Food Depository

DO CHARITIES WANT YOUR TIME, MONEY OR GOODS? THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAYS TO DONATE

If you’re reading this issue, chances are you care about making the world a better place. But maybe you’ve wondered: How can I make the most impact? Is my $25 check to the ASPCA really doing the most good? Am I really helping by getting behind the line and serving up chili to the needy? We talked to four Chicago charities to find out the most effective ways to make a difference. WHEN IN DOUBT, MONEY IS A SAFE BET

The majority of the 57,000 individual donors who made contributions to the Greater Chicago Food Depository in the 2015 fiscal year made monetary donations, says Jim Conwell, the organization’s head of communications. But that’s not to minimize the importance of the nearly 20,000 donors who contributed more than 100,000 hours of service. This year, the Food Depository served more than 800,000 people and Conwell maintains that this would be impossible without an equal combination of time, money and physical goods donated. That being said, online monetary donations are probably the most efficient way to impact the community.

“As a homeless shelter, obviously there are many things that people need,” Williams says, referencing socks, hats, coats and other basics. “In general, the most difficult [donation] to get is monetary. I don’t know if it’s the most important, but it’s the most difficult to get.”

BUILD A RELATIONSHIP WITH THE CHARITIES

A key part of running a charity effectively and making sure nothing goes to waste is having good relationships with donors, says Brian Floriani, founder of Bernie’s Book Bank, which distributes books to at-risk children throughout Chicagoland.

“Online donations are a great way to put support wherever it’s needed most,” Conwell says. “Be it children’s programs or purchasing fresh produce or putting trucks on the road. Those donations make so much of that happen.”

“In broad strokes, we use 80 to 85 percent of [the donations] we receive,” Floriani says. “We work hard at telling people what we want and don’t want.”

GOODS AND TIME CAN BE JUST AS CRITICAL

Williams, of PADS, agrees — he says one of the biggest mistakes people make in donating to a charity is assuming whatever they donate will do the most good.

In the same vein, Joel Williams, the executive director of PADS Lake County homeless shelters, says money is very often the key to keeping a nonprofit going. However, he also acknowledges that running a homeless shelter depends heavily on all

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possible areas of donation: from time to goods to money.

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“One of the things we try and do is have that open relationship with donors and supporters so they’re providing some-

PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC DECKER PHOTOGRAPHY , THE GREATER CHICAGO FOOD DEPOSITORY, PAWS CHICAGO

BY JESSICA SUSS


BET TER YOU | beauty

PAWS Chicago

thing that can be used by the people we serve,” Williams says. “Having that conversation with the charity before is the best way to make sure giving that gift is used effectively.”

DO YOUR RESEARCH

Paula Fasseas, founder and chair of PAWS Chicago animal shelter, says that a lack of research into charitable organizations is one of the biggest issues she sees. “If you’re focusing on helping animals in your community, [make sure] the shelter you’re donating to really does help your community,” Fasseas says. “Some of these organizations are very large and they’re more communications oriented instead of performing life-saving work. Floriani agrees, citing sustainable, lasting impact as the most important key to a successful charity.

FOCUS YOUR INVESTMENT Instead of donating small sums to numerous different charities, Floriani suggests choosing just two or three that you feel passionate about and making a more significant donation to each. Getting in touch with a charity that aligns with your passions is the best way to go about making lasting change, Williams says. If you care about the cause, you’re more likely to do more than just donate money, which is exactly what charities need. Read Give Time, Things, Support on page 91 to learn about organizations that need your help now.


SPONSORED CONTENT

find designer eyewear

from London at Optique BY KRIST Y JOHNSON AND SE AN CLOWNE Y

THINK OF TAILORING A SUIT, Now think glasses. Something you wear every day. They should be as customized as a tailored suit.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANASTASIA PAGE

At Optique in Winnetka, Dr. Michael Harms is introducing his patients to Tom Davies bespoke eyewear. This bold new direction allows his expert stylists to create handmade glasses for each individual.

The bespoke experience “This is how the world sees you and how you see the world. So why compromise?” asks London-based eyewear designer Tom Davies, the founder of TD Tom Davies. “One size does not fit all.” Each patient starts the bespoke experience with a personalized consultation. It is here that comfort, style, and the individual personality of our client are established. “Our experts help you select the best style for your natural features,” says Dr. Harms. “Then we ask ourselves how can we make this better? We take precise

measurements to ensure that the frame is balanced and fits you.”

Handcrafted Once all the details have been submitted to the design team in London, each frame is handcrafted using the finest materials -hours of close, detailed work by dedicated experts. You receive weekly emails and photos showing the creative process. And our work is guaranteed to please. We emphasize follow-up consultation and adjustments to make sure you are happy with the results. One-of-a-kind “Whether it is bright red or tortoise, we can make it,” says Dr. Harms. “And the materials create striking effects -- such as Buffalo horn, which comes from natural sources and is a sustainable, farmed product. It is completely hypoallergenic and 35 percent lighter than acetate, a natural choice that’s kinder to your skin.” With bespoke, you can bring out your own creativity with a wide range of colors and

options. In essence, your glasses become a work of art with perfect styling fitted uniquely to you. And it is truly yours. As a final touch, all bespoke frames are elegantly finished with the customer’s name engraved discreetly on the inside of the temple arm. For more information, visit Optique online at: http://www.optiquenorthshore.com/

YOU'RE INVITED . . . bespoke Grand Opening With London-based Designer Tom Davies Visit with the designer and learn how we create custom eyewear suited to your needs. April 12, 2016, 4 – 7 p.m. Optique, 561 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka www.optiquenorthshore.com Email: optique@comcast.net (847) 446-3917

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#FA SHION

JET SET

BET TER YOU | finance

PACK YOUR BAG AND TAKE OFF IN THIS SPRING’S HOTTEST FASHIONS

BY HEATHER LESZCZEWICZ AND BROOKE MCDONALD

Trina Turk Top, $235, Tart Blazer, $150, Three Dots Pant, $196, Londo Mondo, Chicago, 312-751-2794, Winnetka, 224-255-6466, londomondo.com | Chloé Flat, $475, Nordstrom, nordstrom.com | Bracelets, $165 each, Skändal, Winnetka, 847-386-7900, shopskandal.com | Necklace, $343, Lodis Passport Wallet, $62, Cocktail Kit, $24, Leather Flask, $52, Maze Home, Winnetka, 847-441-1115, mazehome.com | Parodi Hand Cream, $16, Pascal Pour Elle, Glencoe 847-501-3100, pascalpourelle.com | Earrings, $20, Vibrato Boutique, Wilmette, 847-8531434, vibratoboutique.com | Lip Balm, $8, BlackSheep General Store, Glencoe, 847-242-0130, blacksheepgeneralstore.com | Bric’s Rolling Duffel, $675, Kaehler Luggage, various locations, worldtraveler.com

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#FA SHION

Veronica M Blouse, $60, San Diego Hat Company Fedora, $32, Londo Mondo | Stuart Weitzman Sandal, $455, Nordstrom | Rebecca Minkoff Tote, $275, Shop 10, Hinsdale, 630-887-7467 | Robert Marc Sunglasses, $450, Optique, Winnetka, 847-446-3917, optiquenorthshore.com | Bracelet, $30, Maze Home | Lily Dawson Designs Necklace, $35, BlackSheep General Store | Citizen Watch, $375, T.J. Cullen Jewelers, Winnetka, 847-446-6468, tjcullen.com | Nicky Jeans, $168, Earrings, $52, Juniper Boutique, Northbrook, 224-326-2412, juniperboutique.com | Olympus PEN camera, $499, Olympus, getolympus.com PHOTOS BY JENNIFER AVELLO

PHOTO <CREDIT>

STYLING BY BRIAN STANZIALE AND TRACY CLIFFORD

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#FA SHION BET TER YOU | finance

Shop the following retailers at SHOP FOR GOOD at MAKEITBETTER.NET/SHOP and 10% of your purchase will support a local nonprofit: BlackSheep General Store, Juniper Boutique, Maze Home, Optique, Pascal Pour Elle, Vibrato Boutique

Seafolly Tote, $52, Helen Jon Swimsuit, $164, Helen Jon Lounge Pant, $134, Londo Mondo | Jimmy Choo Sandals, $625, Nordstrom | Cardigan, $98, Hat, $65, Mott 50, mott50.com | Necklace, $366, Vibrato Boutique | Leisure Society Sunglasses, $850, Optique | BluBoom Bluetooth Speaker, $69, BlackSheep General Store | CeraVe Sunscreen, $17, Essie “Tart Deco” Nail Polish, $9, Walgreens, walgreens.com

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#FA SHION

PHOTO <CREDIT>

PHOTO <CREDIT>

Diane von Furstenberg Sandal, $378, Nordstrom | Trina Turk Top, $268, Londo Mondo | Trina Turk Shorts, $228, Rebecca Minkoff Saddle Bag, $295, Necklace, $88, Shop 10 | Native Union iPhone Case and Cord, $80, Maze Home | Essie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blancâ&#x20AC;? Nail Polish, $9, Walgreens | Grande Primer, $25, Grande Mascara, $65, Grande Liner, $45, Revision Intellishade Original Tinted Moisturizer, $55, Pascal Pour Elle | Black and White Bracelet, $30, Maze Home | Earrings, $88, Magenta Wrap Bracelet, $50, Vibrato Boutique

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#BEAUTY

FRESHEN UP

6 NEW BEAUTY PRODUCTS AND GADGETS TO TRY THIS SPRING BY JENNY MUSLIN

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Get your beauty routine out of its winter rut with these six products for glowing skin and fabulous hair.

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1. GHD PLATINUM STYLER This luxury tool straightens or curls hair and has been scientifically proven to reduce breakage by 50 percent. Yes, please! Ghdhair.com, $249 2. PIPERWAI DEODORANT If you watch Shark Tank, you may have seen the creators of PiperWai strike a business deal on the show for their all-natural, charcoal-based deodorant that keeps you from sweating or smelling and won’t discolor your clothing. Piperwai.com $12 3. SK-II FACIAL TREATMENT ESSENCE LIMITED EDITION If you haven’t tried SK-II’s Essence yet, you don’t know what you’re missing!

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Made up of more than 90 percent Pitera (the skincare line’s flagship ingredient that bolsters the skin’s renewal process and provides lasting hydration), this is truly magic potion for your skin. Sk-ii.com, $229

celebrities can be easily replicated at home with the Beachwaver S1. In fact, stylists used the Beachwaver to give voluminous waves to the models who recently strutted down the Victoria’s Secret catwalk. Beachwaver.com, $129

4. WILMA SCHUMANN HYDRA-GEL PROFESSIONAL TREATMENT MASQUES This brand is relatively new to the U.S., but a staple in Europe. These hydrating, single-application masks have a lovely rose water scent and leave skin feeling plump and looking brighter. Wilmaschumann.com, $39 for 4

6. DERMAFLASH Dermaplaning has become a popular technique used during facials to exfoliate the top layer of skin and eliminate peach fuzz. Dermaflash is a new tool that lets you dermaplane at home for smoother skin and a more even skin tone. Dermaflash.com, $189

5. BEACHWAVER S1 The sexy tousled hair favored by many

Read more beauty tips online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/BEAUTY

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS

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OSHA reports, with formaldehyde derivatives used under a different name. According to Dr. Andrew Scheman, a Northbrook-based dermatologist with expertise in contact allergy and occupational dermatology, and co-author of Consumer Reports Cosmetic Buying Guide, "even some Keratin (top-of-the-line) hair straighteners contain formaldehyde, which can be listed on product labels under other names. Responsible salons using these products will have proper ventilation systems to ensure client safety." Dr. Michael Heniff, a Chicago area pulmonologist, agrees with the importance of proper ventilation to mitigate any chemical effects or reactions. "Particularly for asthma sufferers or anyone with lung or general breathing deficiencies, it's important to minimize exposure to formaldehyde and like chemicals, and to only be exposed, if necessary, when proper ventilation is in use."

HAIR STRAIGHTENERS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BY PA S C A L , S A LO N OW N E R A N D B E A U T Y I N N O VAT O R

Smooth shiny hair monopolizes the runways and spills over into the pages of fashion magazines. Hair smoothing (or straightening), as you can imagine, has become hugely popular in the beauty industry. Along with the wave of new product introductions comes questions and concerns about the safety of these products – specifically exposure to formaldehyde for salon staff and clients alike.

To that end, we have recently invested in and introduced in our salons a fume extraction system to reduce the risk of harmful vapors. During a Keratin treatment, built-in ventilation chambers above the flatiron suck in the fumes – such as formaldehyde or derivative gas and odors – and put back out purified air. AS SALON OWNERS AND EMPLOYERS: • We should all agree to facilitate the safest possible work environment for our staff and the customers they serve. • We should strive to use only products with zero derivatives of formaldehyde. • We should provide our stylists with certifications and ongoing training in the art of hair straightening. AS SALON PATRONS AND GUESTS: • Seek out salons that prioritize training and require certification of their staff. • Inquire about a stylist's specific area of expertise and certification. • Ask about brands in use and their respective formaldehyde content • Visually inspect cleanliness, and inquire about ventilated workspace and the use of up-to-date tools such as fume irons. We believe that everyone should be their own safety advocate, and keep in mind that no beauty service is worth risking your health.

In light of recent public concerns, we set out to determine the safest and most efficacious method of delivery for the highest salon-quality hair smoothing and straightening. We not only researched the finest product offerings, but spoke directly with medical experts in skin protection and breathing to ensure that we were doing everything possible at our salons, during delivery and hair treatment, to protect our staff and clients above all else. The Federal Government has responded by engaging the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and several State OSHA programs in investigating questions and complaints about possible formaldehyde exposure. Some products labeled "formaldehyde-free" may be "misleading" according to recent

368 PARK AVE, GLENCOE 847-501-3100 www.pascalpourelle.com

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#FITNESS

GET A

LEG UP

5 MOVES FOR GREAT LEGS BY CHRIST Y COUGHLIN

Ready to strengthen and shape your legs for spring? Jordan Shackelford, managing partner at Shred415 North Shore, Make It Better’s “Best Small Gym” of 2015, recommends these five easy, do-anywhere leg moves.

SQUAT WITH LEG RAISE

Muscles worked: quadriceps, abductors (leg muscles on the outside of your leg) and gluteals (butt) Step 1: Place a resistance band around your ankles. Stand with legs shoulder-width apart. Step 2: Lower down to a squat, keeping your chest up and your butt back. Step 3: Push to stand, and raise your right leg out to the side. Alternate sides for a total of 20.

SQUAT WITH KNEE RAISE

Muscles worked: quadriceps, hip flexors, lower abdominal and gluteals

Step 2: Lower down to a squat, keeping your chest up and butt back. Step 3: As you push to stand, bring your right knee up to meet your right elbow. Alternate sides for a total of 20.

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PHOTO BY CHRISTY COUGHLIN

Step 1: Stand with legs shoulder-width apart. Join your hands together at chest level.


#FITNESS

DEAD LIFT WITH AN OVERHEAD PRESS

Muscles worked: hamstrings, lower back and shoulders Step 1: Start standing with legs apart, holding an appropriate weight (start with 5 pounds) in both hands, at hip level. Step 2: With knees slightly bent, back straight, head up, bend down until you feel your back starting to round. Step 3: Push to stand and press the weight overhead with bent arms. Lower the weight back to hip level. Repeat 10 times.

LUNGE WITH A TWIST

Muscles worked: quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors (muscles of the inner thigh), calves, obliques and gluteals Step 1: Start standing, feet apart, holding a weight in both hands, elbows bent at 90 degrees. Step 2: Step forward with your left leg into a lunge. Make sure your left knee does not go beyond your ankle. Step 3: While in the lunge, twist to the left using the weight to guide your twist. Step 4: Move out of the twist and straighten legs before dropping back into the lunge and twisting again. Step 5: Return to the starting position and do the right side. Repeat 10 times on each side.

CALF RAISES

Muscles worked: all the muscles of the calves and feet Step 1: Start standing with feet slightly apart. Hold a weight at chest level with both hands. Step 2: With an upright posture, rise up onto your toes. Step 3: Slowly lower down. Repeat 10 times. Add some cardio and enjoy strong, shapely legs that will power you through the day â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and may turn a few heads along the way. Want more fitness tips? Watch our 8-minute fitness videos online at MAKEITBETTER. NET/FITNESSGUIDE

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THE MONALISA TOUCH IS CHANGING WOMEN’S LIVES BY PARTNER S IN PELVIC HE ALTH

Do you experience dryness, itching, burning, painful urination or pain during intercourse? Over 40% of women experience these types of symptoms in menopause, during treatment for breast cancer, and while breastfeeding. The MonaLisa Touch treatment is a painless alternative to surgeries or hormone creams. This treatment delivers gentle laser energy to the vaginal wall that stimulates a healing response, generating new collagen in the tissue and enhanced moisture levels in the vaginal canal. Women report symptom relief after their first treatment and even greater improvement after second and third treatments. The MonaLisa Touch is a revolutionary procedure performed by an experienced urogynecologist in the Chicago area, Dr. Sanjay Gandhi. Because it really works, women feel more comfortable talking about the procedure and about a condition they once kept to themselves.. Irene says – “I most certainly believe that the Mona Lisa really helped me! I thank the Doctor for his suggestion in trying it out. It has even helped with some of my bladder symptoms!” Patricia says – “I finished my third treatment of the Mona Lisa Touch at the end of July. The Mona Lisa Touch is a laser treatment that helps with dryness, which is uncomfortable... and the vagina needs natural lubrication to stay healthy. The procedure takes only 10 minutes right in the office, there is no discomfort and you can go about your day right afterwards. This is painless with no prep needed for a whole new life. I would definitely recommend his treatment to anyone who thought sex after menopause was over. Results were a dream come true! Dryness gone and the fear of painful intimacy also gone! Thank you, Dr. Gandhi and Staff!”

partners inpelvichealth

.com

Michele says –”I have been on tamoxifen for four years now. Since my second MonaLisa treatment I hardly ever have the urgent feeling to urinate. No more all of a sudden running to the bathroom. Since my third treatment I noticed a big change! While doing yoga, for sometime now, I always felt “open” vaginally, I no longer have that feeling. I feel normal again.”

North Shore Urogynecology Sanjay Gandhi, MD

Lake Forest | Gurnee | Woodstock | Chicago 847-234-1100 | partnersinpelvichealth.com


# R E L AT I O N S H I P S

Rachel Bertsche with husband, Matt Levine, and their daughter, Maggie.

MY HUSBAND LEFT HIS LAW FIRM TO SELL POT BY R ACHEL BERTSCHE

When my husband called from work last August to announce he was going to quit his steady job to pursue his dream of starting a business, I wish I could say I was entirely supportive. That there wasn’t a pit in my stomach at the thought of him sacrificing his stable law career to work for a startup. A startup that we were unsure would ever open for business. A startup that might never get government approval to conduct business at all. A startup selling pot. At the time, Matt and his business partners were pursuing licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana in the state of Illinois. In 2013, then-Governor Pat Quinn signed The Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act into law — making Illinois

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the 20th state to legalize medicinal pot. The four-year program officially kicked off in January 2014, but applications for companies to actually grow and sell weren’t accepted until late September of that year — so when Matt decided to leave the legal world for what seemed to me like some real-life version of “Weeds,” we still didn’t know if his company, Green Thumb Industries (GTI), would be awarded any of the 21 coveted cultivation licenses. I knew they had a good shot — that he had partnered with smart, hard-working professionals who were committed to making this happen — but there was also so much that was out of their capable hands. What if the licenses were never awarded? What if the program just never took off? What if the person reading the applications was ... I don’t know ... high?!?

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE AUTHOR.

How I came to terms with my husband’s unorthodox career change.


And what, I wondered, was our 1-yearold daughter going to someday tell her friends that her daddy does? “He’s a drug dealer”? But, I also knew that Matt had been looking for a career shift. For years, he fantasized about joining a startup, but after nearly a decade as a lawyer, a switch seemed daunting. So when the GTI opportunity came along — in a new industry with a chance to get in on the ground floor — it was too good to pass up. Ultimately, my desire to have a husband who was happy in his career outweighed my litany of concerns and hesitations. Matt gave notice at his law firm the next day, and two weeks later — on our fiveyear anniversary — he spent his final day as a practicing lawyer. Six months later, GTI got the news they were hoping for — they won three cultivation licenses and one dispensary license, making them the most decorated group in the state. My husband would officially be selling marijuana for a living. The year since has been a whirlwind. Sometimes, I forget entirely that Matt is working in an industry that was, until recently, illegal. GTI is run like a top-notch, ultra-professional business in any industry, with a focus on making sound business decisions that are best for their investors and clients — in this case, patients, and often very sick ones. Matt’s days are spent making sales calls, managing personnel and meeting with doctors. If there’s a difference between GTI and other non-marijuana companies, it might be that they know they’re under a microscope and make their decisions with perhaps even more attention to doing business by the book. Other times, Matt’s job takes him to a hemp farm in Kentucky, and I’m reminded that we’re in uncharted waters. Like when I was working in my downstairs office one day, and overheard our daughter’s nanny on the phone. “Did I tell you what Maggie’s daddy does for a living?” she said excitedly to whoever was on the other line. “He sells marijuana!” No one ever giggled over Matt’s law career. Read the rest of Rachel’s story online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/MARIJUANA


#DININGREVIEW FEATURE

Table to Stix Ramen 1007 Davis Evanston 847-859-6847

Shoyu Ramen

Chicken Karaage

RAMEN ON THE NORTH SHORE

TABLE TO STIX IN EVANSTON BY JULIE CHERNOFF

It’s the first true ramen restaurant on the North Shore, and it’s very, very good — not to mention reasonably priced. This is a pretty compact menu, with eight small bites (i.e., appetizers) and three types of ramen to choose from. Some of the starters you’ve seen before (looking at you, edamame and gyoza), but a few have a fresh spin, like the Spicy Edamame ($4) pods tossed in a thinned-out version of gochujang, a fermented Korean pepper condiment, which had us licking our fingers. The Chicken Karaage ($5) are not your typical chicken nug-

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gets; they are marinated and then dredged in potato starch and spices, which makes for a thick and crunchy coating. The chicken is served with spicy aioli for dipping. Perhaps best of all were the Brussels Sprouts ($4), deepfried and tossed with a wasabi-tinged dressing. Bonito fish flakes, perched on top of the hot sprouts, wave and writhe, almost too spectacular to eat. But when you do — and you will— you’ll be rewarded. A winner. As for ramen, the main event, there are three varieties of broth available: miso, shoyu and tonkotsu. Along with the

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JULIE CHERNOFF

It’s an unprepossessing location sandwiched between a bustling Gigio’s Pizza and a sadly empty Asian Express, but the small new storefront that is Table to Stix Ramen on Evanston’s Davis Street is poised to make a big impact.


Tonkotsu Ramen

deeply flavored broths, Chef Kenny Chou makes fresh ramen noodles, and they are silky and supple, with just the right amount of toothsome bite. The Shoyu Ramen ($12) is a soybased broth, the clearest and lightest of the three. It’s garnished with two crispy tempura prawns, half an ajitama (soy-marinated) egg, braised bok choy (menma), wood ear mushrooms, a few slices of colorful cured fishcake, and chopped scallions. The Tonkotsu Ramen ($13) is the real showpiece, the creamy, porky broth filled with soy-braised pork belly, ajitama egg, kernels of sweet corn, menma, fish cake and fresh bean sprouts. Feel free to spice it up a bit with chile oil, or add one of the toppings (priced from 50 cents to $2), such as kimchee, fried tofu or seasoned ground beef Desserts are limited to green tea ice cream and mochi ice cream balls, but you’re not coming here for that. You’re here for the big bowl of soul-stirring comfort. (Note: A liquor license is currently in-process, so there's no alcohol allowed. They hope to receive the license sometime this spring.) Check out more reviews online.  MAKEITBETTER.NET/DINING


#FOOD

Mana Food Bar

VEG OUT! 7 MUST-TRY VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN RESTAURANTS Whether you eat strictly vegetarian or vegan – or you’re just curious about trying different diets or dishes – you’ll want to check out these restaurants that are killing it with veggie-friendly options. MANA FOOD BAR

A Michelin Bib Gourmand winner for the second year in a row, Mana is no stranger to the limelight. Taste hot and cold plates with international flavor such as Maki, raw vegetables wrapped in collard greens with ponzu sauce ($10), and Pickled, three kinds of house pickles to delight the taste buds (small $4, large $7). Or opt for heartier hot dishes including the popular Mana Slider, a brown rice and mushroom patty topped with spicy mayo ($4 each). 1742 W. Division St., Chicago, 773-342-1742

LYFE KITCHEN

While LYFE does serve meat, its vegetarian and vegan options are plentiful. Crunch Bowl, anyone? Quinoa tabbouleh, fresh crunchy vegetables, avocado, arugula, edamame, hummus, chipotle vinaigrette and fireman’s hot sauce make for a delicious and nutrient-rich salad ($9). Another customer favorite is the Thai Red Curry Bowl with broccoli, eggplant, peppers, peas, wheat berries and Thai basil in a coconut curry sauce with garlic-lime tofu ($12). Various locations LYFE Kitchen 80

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MANA FOOD BAR PHOTO BY JULIE CHERNOFF, OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH RESTAURANT

B Y C A R LY H U R W I T Z


#FOOD

NATIVE FOODS

This fast-casual vegan restaurant specializes in seasonal dishes, desserts and homemade drinks. Look for hearty vegan creations like the Oklahoma Bacon Cheeseburger, made with sliced seitan, melted cheddar, caramelized onions and tofu bacon topped with BBQ sauce, ranch, carrots, tomato and romaine. For a flavor blast, try the Avocado Crunch Wrap with crispy coconutbattered avocados and a sweet mango-slaw and fries. Wash it all down with a glass of watermelon Fresca. Various locations

PROTEIN BAR

If you need a quick meal to power through your morning, try the rich Avo-Matcha, a smoothie made of avocado, raw honey, matcha green tea, almond milk and vanilla protein. Fuel up at lunch or dinner with a savory bowl of organic quinoa blend mixed with spinach, basil pesto and parmesan. Various locations

BLIND FAITH CAFE

For over 30 years, Blind Faith Cafe has served fresh and innovative vegetarian cuisine. The weekend brunch features fresh twists on the classics, like Poached Eggs Florentine, homemade biscuits topped with wilted spinach, poached eggs, spinach cream and aged parmesan ($12). Don’t forget to try the bakery, which has vegan and gluten-free versions of tiramisu, strawberry-rhubarb shortcake and chocolate cake. 525 Dempster St., Evanston, 847-328-6875

KARYN’S RAW BISTRO

Karyn’s serves up simple, clean vegan meals with flavor, color and texture, made with all-natural organic and raw foods. The “Spaghetti & ‘Meatballs’” is a lovely gluten-free combination of marinated zucchini noodles with walnut meatballs and marinara sauce ($12). You won’t feel guilty about treating yourself to Karyn’s Skinny Cream, which you can top with granola, coconut flakes, cinnamon pumpkin seeds, cacao nibs and mixed berry sauce. 1901 N. Halsted St., Chicago, 312-255-1590

LYFE Kitchen

THE CHICAGO DINER

“Meat-free since ‘83,” this diner serves up a host of classic comfort foods, all sans meat. Sink your teeth into the decadent Pierogi Quesadilla with sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, green onions, sautéed mushrooms and Daiya® Cheddar, all folded into a tomato basil tortilla with vegan dill sour cream ($11). 3411 N. Halsted St., 773-935-6696 Hungry for more? Check out three more great vegetarian and vegan restaurants online at MAKEITBETTER.NET/VEGETARIAN


#BOOKS

IS MARIE KONDO’S

‘MAGIC OF TIDYING UP’ REALLY LIFE CHANGING? BY PA M E L A R OT H B A R D

I consider myself a neat person and my heart skips a beat when I drive past The Container Store. But then, via the Make It Better Cynics’ Self-Help Book Club online book club, I read New York Times best-seller “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” by Marie Kondo, which has a chapter entitled “Storage experts are hoarders.” Ouch. “Putting things away only creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved,” Kondo writes.

Kondo divides the work of “tidying up” into two stages: First, decide whether to keep something, then decide where to put it. It’s clear that I’ve only been focusing on the latter.

The book’s argument for emptying your purse everyday is that “it would be cruel not to give it a break at least at home,” but when we finally arrive home, we are the ones who need the break.

Though some of my book club members were hesitant, we agreed to try Kondo’s tips. What follows is a rundown of the advice that flopped and that which changed our lives.

“Never, ever ball up your socks” Kondo devotes three pages to sock storage, suggesting we fold socks two to six times and roll stockings “like a sushi roll.” We decided that triple-folding socks isn’t the best use of our time.

WHAT CHANGED OUR LIVES “Does this spark joy?”

THE CYNICS’ CONSENSUS

If not, let it go. This is the main criterion by which you should decide what to keep. Kondo says, “We should be choosing what we want to keep, not what we want to get rid of.” Gather every like item and hold each one to see how it makes you feel. It sounds hokey, but it works.

We cynics had rocky moments — like when one member declared that she spends so much time cleaning that using her free time to read about it is just too much. And we all agreed that the book was too long; one reader suggesting that Kondo “discard” her wordiness.

Kondo says that when letting go of items that no longer spark joy, you should acknowledge their contribution and let them go with gratitude. One reader said, “It seems strange, but it has helped me get rid of things I had previously held onto for no reason other than the thought that I may use them, or because they made me happy years ago.”

However, positive changes far outweighed our little annoyances. For the first time, all of my clothes fit into my closet, saving time wasted on a seasonal closet swap. One reader stretched Kondo’s ideas past tidying and said that in adopting a mindset of being surrounded by joyful things, “I’ve given up Starbucks so I can buy fresh flowers each week for my bedroom and office. They bring me so much happiness that I don’t miss that latte.”

“Follow the correct order of categories” Tidy by category; tidy easy categories first. Kondo says to start with clothing, and then move on to books, papers, miscellany and finally things with sentimental value. By the time you get to the last category, you’ll have become adept at listening to your inner voice to make decisions and will feel bolstered by your neater home.

For me too, Kondo’s book didn’t only declutter my physical space, but my mental one as well. Considering each item forced me to further define who I am now rather than clinging to all of the selves I’ve been before. The process is about getting to know yourself better. Though it initially felt like a narrowing of options to let things go, ultimately this purge feels like freedom.

WHAT FELL FLAT

Learn more about the Cynics’ Self-Help Book Club at MAKEITBETTER.NET/CYNICS

“Empty your bag every day”

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# T H E AT E R

“Arcadia”

SPRING THEATER BY ROBERT LOER ZEL

“ARCADIA”

March 16 – April 17 | Writers Theatre, 325 Tudor Court, Glencoe 847-242-6000 | writerstheatre.org Michael Halberstam, stalwart artistic director of Writers Theatre, has shown an affinity for Tom Stoppard’s plays in the past. So it seems fitting that Halberstam is christening his company’s new space with this 1993 Stoppard masterpiece. Critics have called “Arcadia” the greatest play of our time. Dancing back and forth between the early 1800s and the

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1990s, it’s a complex comic-tragedy exploring science, history and changing notions of what utopia is — along with plenty of poetry, romance and wit.

“DEAD MAN WALKING”

April 16 – May 15 | Piven Theatre, 927 Noyes St., Evanston 847-866-6597 | piventheatre.org The origins of this play go back to 1993, when Sister Helen Prejean, a spiritual adviser to death row inmates, wrote a best-selling book about her experiences. Actor Tim Robbins directed a film version in 1995, and the true story even became an opera in 2000. Now, Mikalina Rabinsky is directing the professional premiere of Robbins’ stage version.

“MARY PAGE MARLOWE”

March 31 – May 29 | Steppenwolf Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted St., Chicago | 312-335-1650 | steppenwolf.org Anytime Tracy Letts writes a new play, it’s a major event. He

PHOTO BY SAVERIO TRUGLIA. CHAON CROSS PICTURED.

In the world of local theater, the most anticipated opening in March and April isn’t a play — it’s a new venue. Writers Theatre opened the doors of its new Jeanne Gang-designed building in Glencoe in February. The beautiful structure features two performance spaces and promises to be an accommodating home for this consistently outstanding company. The first production inside its walls is a must-see — but, of course, it isn’t the only local show worth seeing.


won the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award in 2008 for “August: Osage County,” and he’s had only a couple of plays since then. The title character of his latest script is an accountant from Ohio who has led what seems to be an ordinary life. Seven actresses (Carrie Coon, Lindsay Crouse, Laura T. Fisher, Caroline Heffernan, Annie Munch and Rebecca Spence) will portray Mary Page Marlowe over the span of her lifetime.

“EVITA”

April 1 – June 5 | Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire | 847-634-0200 | marriotttheatre.com Northwestern theater professor Amanda Dehnert directs Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s popular musical, which follows Eva Peron’s rise from poverty to first lady of Argentina. Does the show glamorize a government described by many people as a dictatorship? Or does it reveal its complexity? Critics have debated these questions, but there’s less argument about the musical score — it’s regarded as one of Lloyd Weber’s best.

PHOTO S COURTESY OF PENINSULA PLAYERS

“BUTLER”

March 11 – April 17 | Northlight Theatre, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie | 847-6736300 | northlight.org Richard Strand’s play tells the story of three slaves who escape during the Civil War, seeking sanctuary from a Union general. In spite of the war, law requires that these slaves must be returned to their owners. Does this sound like a comedy? Probably not, but a 2014 production in New York won praise for its lively, smart sense of humor. Greg Vinkler, right. Tim Monsion, left, from “Butler”.


# M I B P H I L A N T H R O P YAWA R D S

4th ANNUAL

B Y K AT I E J E N KO , S U S A N B . N OY E S , J E S S I C A S U S S A N D G A B R I E L L E TA S I O P O U L O S

C

elebrating our 4th Annual Philanthropy Awards means there have now been 31 nonprofit organizations, including this year’s six winners, getting the recognition they deserve for their impactful — and inspiring — work.

The sponsors who facilitate the awards expect nothing less. The Make It Better Foundation most gratefully thanks the following sponsors:

Each winning organization is showcased through professionally made videos and coverage across Make It Better platforms. Winners also receive networking opportunities and marketing training that will help to grow awareness and support of their work. All winners learn of their win in-person during our Philanthropy Awards Road Tour, which is always planned around National Philanthropy Day on Nov. 15. The winners will also be honored at a red-carpet celebration at Mesirow Financial on May 5.

• Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Foundation in honor of pathways. org (Human Services-Empowerment)

At Make It Better, because we work to be powerful, positive connectors, we are honored to be able to stand beside our winners to help them raise awareness, support and funds for their causes. The Make It Better Foundation’s academy of judges — thoughtful venture philanthropists — selects winners based on: ✓ Effectiveness ✓ Efficiency ✓ Leadership ✓ Scalability ✓ Excellence

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• Susan and Richard Kiphart (Arts)

• The Morris and Dolores Kohl Kaplan Fund of the Dolores Kohl Education Foundation (Education) • Dennis and Ann FitzSimons (Social Justice) • Edwardson Family Foundation (Human Services-Social Services) • Nancy Searle (Health & Wellness) • Michael Rosengarden of Autohaus on Edens (Road Tour sponsor) Keep reading to learn about the winning organization in each category and congratulations to all of this year’s winners! To watch the winners’ videos and for more details about the May celebration, go to MAKEITBETTER.NET/ PHILANTHROPYAWARDS

makeitbetter.net


# M I B P H I L A N T H R O P YAWA R D S

EDUCATION

ACADEMY FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP A nonprofit Chicago public charter school, the Academy for Global Citizenship is making waves in elementary education, working not only to create a class of scholars that care about their community as much as their grades, but to become a model for educational reform in Chicago and beyond.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIZ GILMORE FOR AGC

Founded in 2008 by Sarah Elizabeth Ippel, a Harvard graduate and former vice president of education on the governing board of the United Nations, the academy prides itself on developing “mindful leaders who take action both now and in the future to positively impact their communities and the world beyond.” The academy serves 90 percent minority and 81 percent low-income students and focuses on a holistic style of learning that includes classes on everything from notable leaders to the global issue of food waste. Recently, the Academy started work on their forthcoming sustainable campus project, which External Initiatives Manager Katherine Elmer Dewitt, says is an “extension of our mission to reimagine public education.” The school will use the marketing package from their Philanthropy Award to inform people about the cause and engage potential partners. —JS Location: Chicago

Award Sponsor: The Morris and Dolores Kohl Kaplan Fund of the Dolores Kohl Education Foundation

HEALTH & WELLNESS

FRESH START CARING FOR KIDS FOUNDATION A newcomer to Chicago, Fresh Start Caring for Kids Foundation has devoted the last 18 months to making a difference in the lives of children with physical deformities. The foundation provides no-cost medical services to children ages 1-17 through surgery weekends and follow-up medical care. A majority of the surgery hours and follow-up care are donated by a group of medical professionals, from anesthesiologists to registered nurses. Insurance companies deem many of the surgeries that Fresh Start performs luxuries rather than necessities. Without insurance to cover the costs, families are left to either shell out thousands of dollars or choose to forgo the surgery altogether.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DANNY DIAZ PHOTOGRAPHY

Fresh Start is based on a similar foundation in San Diego and is in partnership with the Plastic Surgery Foundation. Eventually, the center aims to be a model to be replicated around the country. “We intend to use the video to help us leverage marketing in the area,” Chicago Regional Director Utica Gray says, noting that the goal for the foundation’s second year is to “get the word out.” —JS Location: Arlington Heights

Award Sponsor: Nancy Searle

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# M I B P H I L A N T H R O P YAWA R D S

HUMAN SERVICES – EMPOWERMENT

GIGI’S PLAYHOUSE

Walking into GiGi’s Playhouse you are immediately met with a wave of smiles, giggles and most of all, an exuberant energy. Such a spirited atmosphere, however, stands in stark contrast to the sterile room Nancy Gianni first attended following her daughter’s Down syndrome diagnosis. “There were great support groups but they always took place in an extra room in the hospital, in the church,” recalls Gianni. “I thought to myself, ‘Why does it always have to be in some extra room; why can’t there be a place for us?’” Seeking a place where resources and support could blend with a hopeful and positive outlook, Gianni founded GiGi’s Playhouse in 2003. Location: Hoffman Estates

“I imagined a place where all you felt was belief and celebration, all you saw was accomplishment. It wasn’t going to be scary.” At GiGi’s Playhouse, children and adults of all ages have access to a variety of educational and therapeutic programs at no cost to families. Combining learning with fun activities, GiGi’s programs are dedicated to developing speech-language, social and motor skills. Not only do the programs serve children and adults diagnosed with Down syndrome but they also provide a network of support for parents and families. Both staff and volunteers are there to help parents encourage high expectations for their child to succeed in social, educational and employment opportunities in the future. For adults, GiGi’s Playhouse offers an opportunity to join a unique educational program, GiGi University (Gigi U). Innovative and goal-oriented, GiGi U provides a 12-week curriculum that focuses on development of confidence, health and wellness, career skills and interests. Once completed, students move on to complete an 18-week internship hosted by GiGi’s Playhouse’s own Hugs and Mugs Gift Shop and Café. —KJ

Award Sponsor: Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Foundation in honor of pathways.org

SOCIAL JUSTICE

JAMES B. MORAN CENTER FOR YOUTH ADVOCACY

Founded more than 30 years ago, the James B. Moran Center for Youth Advocacy (once the Evanston Defender Project) works to provide lowincome Evanston youth and their families with integrated legal and social work services.

The school-to-prison pipeline (children who do not graduate high school are three times more likely to be incarcerated in their lifetime) is the biggest worry of those who work at the Center for Youth Advocacy and their main goal is to ensure that Evanston youth are able to move past a chapter in their life that has been limiting their success. Currently, the Center for Youth Advocacy is working to identify children who have undiagnosed learning or emotional disabilities and might otherwise be at risk of falling into that pipeline if they are not successful academically. “If we can identify those kids and help them stay in school, then that’s where we can have the biggest impact,” Communications Manager Kelly Austin says. The center also works to expunge clients’ records. They even have a help desk set up at the Skokie Courthouse to serve the greater community on this front, as clearing a record often helps make individuals more employable. —JS Location: Evanston

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Award Sponsor: Dennis and Ann FitzSimons

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# M I B P H I L A N T H R O P YAWA R D S

ARTS

SNOW CITY ARTS

It all starts with a knock on the door and brief question, “Do you want to make art today?” At Snow City Arts (SCA), teaching artists aim to educate and inspire hospitalized children through one-on-one instruction in the visual arts, creative writing, music and filmmaking. To the teaching artists, they are students, not just patients. Hoping to give back some of the independence children lose while hospitalized, SCA teaching artists engage the students in conversations about their interests. “We transform the hospital, the place full of machinery and white lab coats, into an art studio,” explains Executive Director Carrie Spitler.

The child’s passions guide the teaching artist’s curriculum and often snowball into larger projects. Spitler recalls a favorite moment when a young woman’s interest in elephants turned into a full stop-motion animation film. “We were working with a young woman who had come in from out of state for treatment. She had brought this big stuffed elephant with her,” reflects Spitler. Her passion for the animal was obvious. “We created a storyboard, narrative, used green screen and by the end of her treatment had a complete film.” (Watch the film online at makeitbetter.net/elephant) Teaching artists document every interaction and piece of art their students create and compile a report to be sent to schools for potential credit. In that way, SCA is more than art therapy — it’s art education. SCA provides individualized instruction to patients at Rush Children’s Hospital, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Memorial Hospital of Chicago, John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County and Children’s Hospital University of Illinois. —KJ

Location: Chicago

Award Sponsor: Susan and Richard Kiphart

HUMAN SERVICES – SOCIAL SERVICES

HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES AND MAINTENANCE FOR THE ELDERLY (H.O.M.E)

For the past 30 years, Housing Opportunities and Maintenance for the Elderly — H.O.M.E. for short — has helped seniors remain independent and active in their communities by offering intergenerational living opportunities and a variety of citywide support services. “We’re really a lifeline for these folks,” remarks Executive Director Bruce Otto. That lifeline can be as simple as helping seniors reach the grocery store. Many of the seniors H.O.M.E. serves live in food deserts, meaning access to healthy food is extremely limited. H.O.M.E. provides a bus to the grocery store, pharmacy and medical services for seniors.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH ORGANIZATION

The help does not stop there. H.O.M.E. also offers an “Upkeep and Repair” program that provided more than 700 emergency home repairs for low-income seniors in 2014, according to their annual report. Most impressively, H.O.M.E. offers intergenerational housing where families, students and seniors live together and blend social activities for a dynamic understanding amongst generations. Students living in the three housing complexes support seniors as needed, whether that be helping them travel to medical appointments or assisting with activities. Otto recalls a touching story of moving a senior, who had previously been living in her car, to the housing complex. “That was one of my favorite moments. Now she has real housing and friends — it really has become a home for her.” —KJ Location: Chicago

Award Sponsor: Edwardson Family Foundation

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PHILANTHROPY AWARDS BY THE NUMBERS

SNOW CITY ARTS » 1,000 students served » One-on-one arts education workshops for hospitalized kids in Creative Writing, Theatre, Media Arts, Music and the Visual Arts

» 4 partner hospitals

GIGI’S PLAYHOUSE » 100,000 volunteer hours each year » 46,000 free program sessions serving those with Down syndrome » 29 locations » A $5 contribution would provide one personalized word strip or one Nuk brush JAMES B. MORAN CENTER FOR YOUTH ADVOCACY » 100k+ people served each year » 100 youth served through City of Evanston Diversion program » 90 days of out-of-school suspension avoided annually through the intervention program » 7/10 court-involved clients comply with terms of their probation or supervision » 8/10 youths improved school attendance, disciplinary records and grades FRESH START » $0 the cost to the patient’s family for surgery and medical expenses » Ideal number of surgeries in the coming fiscal year: 30 » Number of surgeries performed by Fresh Start: 28 » $800,000 in donated medical care » A $5 contribution would provide medical photography for one patient for one Surgery Weekend THE ACADEMY FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP » 450 students » 851 Kilowatt hours (KwH) of energy produced each year through solar panels » 37.5 lbs. of waste diverted from a landfill through composting and recycling each week » 160,000 organic meals served each year » A $5 contribution would yield a 100 percent organic breakfast, lunch and snack, for one student prepared from scratch by an in-house

H.O.M.E. (HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES AND MAINTENANCE FOR THE ELDERLY) » 3,156 trips made by shopping bus in 2015 » 698 repairs made to low-income senior households » 500+ volunteers » $10 per month pays for an outing for senior residents to keep them engaged in their community and support their sense of well-being » 19-cent fundraising efficiency (the amount spent to raise $1 in charitable contributions)* *Source: Charity Navigator

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#PHILANTHROPY

GI V E T H I NGS

B Y G A B R I E L L E TA S I O P U LO U S

SUPPLY HOSPITALIZED CHILDREN WITH A CREATIVE OUTLET u Snow City Arts (2015 Philanthropy Award Winner) 312-942-6991 | snowcityarts.org Donate Model Magic, watercolor paper, watercolor palettes and other art supplies to Snow City Arts. This 2015 Philanthropy Award winner aims to enable and inspire the artistic sensibilities of hospitalized children. Snow City provides young patients with instructors to help them cultivate their creative writing, music, painting, photography and filmmaking skills. For details regarding sending or dropping off donations, call their office at Rush University Medical Center (312-942-6991). For other additional information, please email info@snowcityarts.org. A SNOW CITY TEACHING ARTIST AIDING IN WATERCOLOR TECHNIQUE WITH A STUDENT

GI V E SU PP ORT Surgery Weekend Program where surgeons and other medical professionals donate their time to give reconstructive surgeries free of cost to disadvantaged youth. Your generous donations make it possible for these surgeries to take place and cover the costs of the patient’s transportation to and from appointments, as well as lodging and food during the Surgery Weekend. For more information contact Utica@ freshstartkids.org.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EACH ORGANIZATION

RAINBOWS STUDENTS FROM ALTUS ACADEMY IN CHICAGO

p DONATE TO HELP CHILDREN WHO HAVE SUFFERED LOSS Rainbows For All Children 847-952-1770 | rainbows.org Donate to Rainbows For All Children to support youth as they navigate grief and heal from loss. Everyone reading this knows at least one grieving child who could benefit from Rainbows’ services. Whether that loss is from death, divorce, deployment or other life-changing events, your generous donations make it possible for programs to be offered at all schools free of charge. Rainbows’ mission is to help children everywhere smile again, and with your help they can achieve this. For more information contact bob.thomas@rainbows.org. HELP GIVE CHILDREN A FRESH START Fresh Start Caring For Kids Foundation (FSCFKF) (2015 Philanthropy Award Winner) 847-513-3326 | freshstartkids.org/donate/ Transform the lives of infants, children and teens by giving them a Fresh Start. Three times a year FSCFKF has its

q PROVIDE LOW-INCOME YOUTH WITH LEGAL AND SOCIAL WORK SERVICES The James B. Moran Center for Youth Advocacy (2015 Philanthropy Award Winner) 847-492-1410 | moran-center.org Support youth advocacy by donating to The James B. Moran Center. Your support helps to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline that is all too common for low-income youth. The Moran Center is an advocate for the idea that young people have a “unique propensity to change when given the opportunity.” These opportunities are provided by supplying children and teens with the legal and social support they need so that they can focus on improving their futures. For more information contact kaustin@moran-center.org.

THE MORAN CENTER RESTORES LIVES BY PROVIDING THERAPEUTIC COUNSELING AND LEGAL ADVOCACY.

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#PHILANTHROPY

GIVE TIME

PHOTO COURTESY OF BERNIE’S BOOK BANK

VOLUNTEERS SORTING AND PROCESSING BOOKS IN THE BERNIE’S BOOK BANK WAREHOUSE

t VOLUNTEER AND SPEND YOUR DAY IN THE BOOKS Bernie’s Book Bank 847-780-7323 | berniesbookbank.com Give back by getting involved through Bernie’s Book Bank drop-in volunteer opportunities. The bank works hard to increase book ownership for at-risk infants, toddlers and children all around Chicagoland. Volunteers are a huge part of what makes this possible by donating their time to work in the warehouses collecting, processing and distributing new and gently used children’s books. Drop-in opportunities available Monday–Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. For specific times and other details visit berniesbookbank.org/volunteer/

PHOTO <CREDIT>

DONATE YOUR TIME TO FOSTER THE INDEPENDENCE OF OLDER ADULTS North Shore Senior Center 847-784-6000 | nssc.org Northfield’s North Shore Senior Center is on a mission to enhance the well-being of older adults with your volunteer support. The center has a variety of volunteer needs, from driving residents to/from doctor appointments to becoming a “Friendly Visitor” and keeping homebound clients company. The NSSC is located at 161 Northfield Road in and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more detailed information contact Kathy Schimmelpfennig at kschimmelpfennig@nssc.org.

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#BETTERMAKERS

BETTER MAKERS AND THEIR IMPACT

14TH ANNUAL FUR BALL NOVEMBER 17, 2015 The Drake • $1.6 Million

PAWS

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPARENGA PHOTOGRAPHY, FOTIO AND JONNY BLACKSTONE PRODUCTIONS

Dave Sutton and Mary Beth Schaye of Evanston

Meteorologist Cheryl Scott, Fur Ball Grand Ballroom emcee, with her dog, Lola

PAWS Chicago Founder Paula Fasseas of Chicago with Jake and Stephanie Henry of Kenilworth

This annual event raised $1.6 million to continue the expansion of PAWS Chicago’s programs and services that contribute to the reduction of the number of homeless pets euthanized in Chicago. Glenn L. Felner and Bonnie Davis of Glencoe

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Presenting Sponsors Barbara Bradford and Robert Sherman of North Barrington of A. Marek Fine Jewelry

Barbara and Richard Rinella of Kenilworth with dog Spencer

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2015 Fur Ball Co-Chairs Michael and Melissa Canning of Inverness and Corey and JP Marchetti of Kenilworth

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#BETTERMAKERS

Jackie and Dan Corboy, Rob and Nina Kaye, Erin and Chuck Loeher, Kevin and Mary Speicher, all of Wilmette

Carolers provided live entertainment.

Children in the Catholic Charities Child Development Center

Mary Anne Moschner, President of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago Monsignor Michael M. Boland, Al Moschner and Archbishop of Chicago Blase J. Cupich

Hannibal Buress, originally of Austin, signs a T-shirt for Bryan Rosenburg of Chicago, 2016 YLD campaign chair

Dana Borojovich of Chicago, Louie Whitesman of Chicago, Deric Tikotsky of Miami, and Michelle Siegman of Chicago

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Paige Gross, Bridget Gross, Jim Gross and Marin Gross

BIG E VENT FUNDR AISER | DECEMBER 12 , 2015 Sheraton Chicago • $250,000 Photos by Robert F. Kusel

JEWISH UNITED FUND OF CHICAGO

JUF & Young Leadership Division (YLD) at work

Nanciann Moschner, Chris Moschner, Mary Ann Moschner, Al Moschner, Anna Moshcner and Matt Moschner, all of Lake Forest

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN REILLY PHOTOGRAPHY

26TH ANNUAL SPIRIT OF ST. NICHOLAS BALL | DECEMBER 4TH, 2015 Hilton Chicago • $1.2 Million

makeitbetter.net

Comedian Hannibal Buress

Alex Entratter of Chicago and YLD Board President Michael Oxman of Chicago

Jordan Kovalsky of Chicago, Maya Kroll of Highland Park, Lindsay Appleman of Chicago, and Pearl Plotkin of Chicago

PHOTOS BY

CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF THE ARCHDIOCESE OF CHICAGO


#BETTERMAKERS

CHILDREN’S ONCOLOGY SERVICES AND ONE STEP PROGR AMS

PHOTOS BY LOL PHOTOGRAPHY

President of Children’s Oncology Services Jeff Infusino, Development Officer Katie Weil, Director of Programs Darryl Perkins, Jr. , Social Media Coordinator Colleen McGrath and Program Coordinator Lauren Kunkel

FLIGHT GAL A | NOVEMBER 13TH , 2015 Sheraton Chicago • $225,000

John Talaber of Schererville, Ind., Amber Pflughoeft of West Bend Wisc., Chris Eilers of Winnetka, Hailey Danisewicz of Chicago FLIGHT Event Committee: Jeff Infusino of Schaumburg , Katie Weil of Skokie, Darryl Perkins, Jr. of Chicago, Colleen McGrath of Chicago, Lauren Kunkel of Chicago, Julie Wilson of Chicago, Mary Cortopassi of Chicago, Sue Infusino of Schaumburg, Andrea Gyann, Donna DeSimone of Chicago, Tina DeSimone of Chicago, Nick DeSimone of Chicago and Sam DeSimone of Chicago

Board of Directors, Front Row: Stuart Lissner of Winnetka, Bill Strotman of Deerfield, Brian Gryll of Glenview, Sam De Simone of Elmhurst, Danialle Goldman of Highland Park, Neil Posner of Chicago, Jeff Infusino of Schaumburg. Back Row: Board Chair of Buffalo Grove Janel Huston, Edwin Shinitzky of Evanston and Jennifer Schneiderman of Chicago

BIKR AM YOGA NORTH SHORE

Amber Pflughoeft sharing stories of how the organization impacted her fight with cancer

FEED THE WORLD YOGA TOUR | NOVEMBER 22ND, 2015 Bikram Yoga North Shore • $14,445 to date

PHOTOS BY HOLLY MCGREGOR

Brooklyn and Braden sell juice to the yogis with all proceeds benefitting the cause.

BYNS Co-Owner Holly McGregor, Feed The World Yoga Tour Founder Rachel Kuhn and BYNS Co-Owner Heidi Bernover

Yogis who participated in the class taking a moment to send love out to our children globally that the Feed The World Yoga Tour helps.

“84 people, 84 hearts, 84 miracles going beyond their ordinary, packing 27,216 meals, feeding and nourishing 74 children for a year...in just two hours. And this global community is just getting started!” Photo Courtesy of Rachel Kuhn

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#GIVEBACK

FASHION STATEMENT

LOCAL TEENS LAUNCH SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS BABY APPAREL LINE BY JESSICA SUSS

Teens today are more socially conscious than ever. Twitter campaigns and Instagram hashtags provide daily opportunities to dial into the latest issues. Tired of feeling like adults have tasked the next generation with tackling everything from cancer research to global warming, five North Shore high schoolers banded together to give the youngest generation a voice — in the shape of politically charged baby onesies

“We wanted to do something with babies because we were sick of hearing, ‘We don’t need to deal with that, the next generation can deal with it,’” Berkman says. “We wanted to stress that the next generation is here, and we need to give them a voice.” One of the first onesies to be created reads “Born Perfect” (proceeds go to the charity Best Buddies, which creates opportunities for one-to-one friendships, mentorship and employment opportunities for people with disabilities) and spawned the name for the company. The students wrote the mission statement by asking: What is each person born to be?

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“You can be whoever you want to be and there really isn’t a limit,” Berkman says. From there, Born to Be Tees was, well, born. The onesies currently retail for $15. One-third of that goes to the retailer, a third toward operating costs and a third toward the actual charity with which the onesie is aligned. Wendy Abrams, Jake and Katie’s mother, helped the kids with the seed money to get Born to Be Tees off the ground, but from there she and the rest of the parents have taken a significant backseat. “It’s been good, as a parent, watching them go through the process,” Wendy said. “Waterkeeper Alliance [one of the charities the group’s proceeds benefits] was like, ‘Sure, we’re thrilled to be your partners.’ Stand Up to Cancer was more contractual and much more formal, and it’s all a good learning process.” Visit borntobetees.com to purchase a onesie or to learn more.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TELL DRAPER PRODUCTIONS, INC

Twins Jake and Katie Abrams, Caroline Berkman, Casey Borovsky and Tyler Froelich are the founders of Born to Be Tees, a company that lets babies speak for themselves, even before their first words. Featuring onesies plastered with slogans such as “I’ll Stand Up To Cancer…Just As Soon As I Can Stand” and “Change My Diaper, Not My Climate,” Born to Be Tees has partnered with a number of related charities and pledged to donate a third of its proceeds.


SPONSORED CONTENT

IS YOUR TEEN READY TO BE A BABYSITTER OR CAMP COUNSELOR?

If your teen has the qualities that you would want in a babysitter – someone who is dependable, organized and punctual – then they may be a good candidate. Start them off with some training with an American Red Cross babysitting class. They’ll learn valuable skills and it will help them determine if caregiving is something that they really want to do. They will also learn how to start a babysitting business of their own and perform basic first aid skills. NOT JUST FOR GIRLS In the past, these Red Cross classes were primarily comprised of girls but more boys are now participating. Last year, nearly 10 percent of students enrolled in Red Cross babysitting courses

were male. That number is expected to grow as boys realize they enjoy the extra money, fun and responsibility that come with these positions, and families increasingly begin to seek out and request active young men for these roles. Boy or girl, both need to be trained to do the job well. TAKE A CLASS Visit www.redcross.org or call 1 800 REDCROSS to find a class near you. Online & in-person options are available for youth ages 11 and older. DOWNLOAD A FREE LIFESAVING APP Get the free American Red Cross First Aid app on your phone. It helped me decide quickly whether or not to take my son Owen to the hospital when, as a toddler he touched a hot lightbulb (we went and he’s fine). Find them in your app store or at redcross.org/apps.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE AMERICAN RED CROSS

B Y M A R T H A C A R LO S , C H I E F C O M M U N I C AT I O N S O F F I C E R A MER IC AN R ED CROSS O F CHIC AGO & N O RT H ER N ILLINOIS & N O R T H B R O O K M O M


# C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

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7 TAKE A LOOK AT SOME RECENT INSTAGRAMS

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1. Behind-the-scenes of our fitness video shoot. 2. Philanthropy Award winners. 3. A Motivation Monday. 4. The Snowbelt at The Ashburn at the Loews Chicago O'Hare. 5. Associate Publisher, Michelle Morris, starting her Saturday with a stop at the new Winnetka Mrs. Green's. 6. Philanthropy Editor, Gabrielle Tasiopoulos, tests out the aerial hammocks at Yogi Barre. 7. Our January/February magazine. 8. Thanks to the Family Empowerment Center for sharing this great photo of some of the Warming Hearts and Hands recipients. 9. Cakes from Vanille look like art. 10. A fabulous event with Beverly Johnson. 11. Sue Markgraf and Publisher, Susan B. Noyes. 12. Wansas Tequila makes for tasty cocktails.

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Make It Better March / April 2016 Digital Edition  

Getting to Know the Stars of Lyric opera's "The King and I" - JET-SET SPRING FASHION - REAL ESTATE Tips & Trends - 4TH ANNUAL PHILANTHROPY...

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