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AUGUST 2, 2013

San Juan County Fair

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VOL. 3 NO. 44

No money to continue

State out of funds to recover title company victims’ losses DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Bobby Willis is living at a home in Missouri, where he wears an ankle monitor and checks in with his attorneys once a week. While he faces criminal charges, an IRS investigation, a seizure of his assets and a Willis potential federal grand jury, the state of New Mexico has run out of money to continue the

process of making his alleged victims whole. The New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department’s Financial Institutions Division entered a contract in April 2012 with Darryl Millet, an Albuquerque-based forensic accountant, to provide receivership/legal services to the agency and “perform duties of liquidating” the assets of those associated with

New Mexico Title and Escrow, namely Bobby Willis, Carrie Willis, Cassidy Willis, Chad Cox, Kyle Finch, Jennifer Olson, JJ Bond Investments, Golden Rule LLC and Willis Asset Management. Millet was tasked with receiving claims for losses suffered by some 900 clients of New Mexico Title and Escrow and finding assets for liquidation purposes to help those who suffered losses through Willis’ alleged poor business practices to

* Willis

A16

Lupita Sandoval, of Bloomfield, shares copies of payment receipts with Craig Dunbar, of the PRC, during the May 1, 2012 public hearing regarding New Mexico Title and Escrow.– Debra Mayeux file photo

Shop cheaper this weekend Tax free shopping begins today at noon DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Brown’s Shoe Fit employee Isaac Olivarez helps a customer find the right fit. School supplies, clothing, computers and other back-to-school items will be available without paying gross receipts taxes beginning at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 2, and ending at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. – Josh Bishop photo

Back-to-school shopping will be a little bit cheaper this weekend during New Mexico’s tax free holiday. Governor Susana Martinez announced the event July 30, saying parents, teachers and students can

purchase school supplies, clothing, computers and other back-toschool items without paying gross receipts taxes beginning at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 2, and ending at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. “The beginning of the school year can be an expensive time for parents, teachers and students,” Martinez said. “In these challenging

economic times, this weekend will provide much-needed relief for New Mexicans as our children return to school. Most importantly, it will give them the opportunity to get the supplies they need for a successful school year at a lower cost than usual.” One thing parents typically buy

* shopping A2

Discrimination case

Search is on

Former FPD detective files suit in U.S. District Court

City posts Shelter exec job online

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune A former Farmington Police Detective, who was fired four months short of his retirement, has filed a discrimination case in U.S. District Court. Sgt. Robert Perez had a longstanding New Mexico District Court case against the city, but after leaving law enforcement in late May, his case was transferred to Federal Court in early June. Since the beginning of the case, the city of Farmington has expended $130,758.79 in attorney’s fees to Modrall, Sperling, Roehl, Harris & Sisk, P.A. The funds were listed in July 26 Tri-City Tribune story as payouts, along with other attorney’s fees in a

similar case filed against the department by Sgt. Frank Dart. In the past couple of years the city has a “total cost to date of all claims involving the police department of $227,032.92,” according to City Attorney Jay Burnham. With regard to the Perez case, the detective sergeant was fired Feb. 14 from the Farmington Police Department after completing 19 years and eight months of service. The San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office quickly hired the detective to allow him an opportunity to work four more months and gain his retirement. Perez left the Sheriff ’s Office the end of May and moved to Las

* Perez A8

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Damage at Veteran’s Park.- Josh Bishop photo

Damaged Police check reports of vandalism at park DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Four bronze eagles, representing the branches of U.S. military stand proudly atop cement bases in Veterans Memorial Park. When Steven Rogge and his family visited the park, near the

Blues Traveler Inside Coming to Aztec Speedway

on Aug. 24

A12

50¢

Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Parade..........................................A9 Pets of the Week ........................A11 Fair Royalty ................................A14 Sports...........................................B1

Animas River off San Juan Boulevard, this week, they noticed damage to the statues and their bases. He was distressed by possible vandalism to the memorials. Rogge, of Farmington, and

* vandalism

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The search officially is on for a new Animal Welfare Director for the Farmington Animal Shelter. Strategic Government Resources, a Keller, Texas-based recruiting company, posted the position on its Website job board July 29, after two weeks of it being listed without a description under the “executive searches” coming soon category. Farmington Parks Recreation and Cultural Affairs Director Cory Styron announced the city had contracted with the firm during a

* shelter

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Connie Mack World Series Business.......................................B4 Nosey Nellie .................................B6 Real Estate.................................B11 Pawsitively Pets .........................B13 NYT Crossword..........................B14 Movies........................................B15

Ribbon Cutting, schedule & rosters A7 - A10


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

SATURDAY

93/63

91/61

Isolated T-Storms Sun

Rise Set 6:14 a.m. 8:23 p.m.

Partly Cloudy

for their children at the start of each school year is a pair of shoes, and Dan Sheesly at Brown’s Shoe Fit said he is prepped for the tax-free holiday, which will provide addi-

93/63

Partly Cloudy

Rise Set 6:15 a.m. 8:23 p.m. Sun

Sun

shopping

SUNDAY

tional savings on shoes he already has on sale. “We have some pretty aggressive sales, and this is another great opportunity for people to save more money,” said Sheesly, who promotes shopping local by making purchases at locally owned business-

Rise Set 6:16 a.m. 8:22 p.m. Sun

MONDAY

88/61

Isolated T-Storms Rise Set 6:17 a.m. 8:21 p.m. Sun

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

89/62

Isolated T-Storms Rise Set 6:18 a.m. 8:20 p.m. Sun

THURSDAY

88/59

90/60

Isolated T-Storms

Partly Cloudy

Rise Set 6:18 a.m. 8:19 p.m.

Sun

Rise Set 6:19 a.m. 8:18 p.m.

es. “That keeps local people employed. It keeps the money in San Juan County, and we turn around and spend it locally.” During the tax-free holiday, the state will not collect gross receipts taxes on several back-to-school

items, but there are limitations placed on some items. Those limitations include a $100-limit on clothing, footwear and accessories, a $1,000-limit on computers and a $500limit on computer-related items. School supplies under $30 will be tax free

and other school items such as calculators must be under $200, while maps and globes should be under $100. With these items tax free, the governor estimates New Mexicans will save up to $4 million on their purchases.

“This is a win-win situation for both our residents and businesses,” Martinez said. A complete list of taxfree items can be accessed by visiting the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department website at tax.newmexico.gov.

value of bronze, and it is so disappointing that someone would do this to what is representative of all the veterans and those who fought for their country since 1776 right up through the war in Afghanistan,” Standley said, adding this would not be the first case of vandalism at the site. The first instance caused authorities to put in high definition cameras at the

park to catch any possible criminal acts. After visiting the park with a Farmington Police Detective, Standley said it is not vandalism but a “weathering” of the surface. “There is not evidence of hammering or chiseling away at it,” Standley said. Rogge said he and his wife contacted the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department to let them

know about the damage, and Standley said the parks department has been responsive. Jimmy Edwards, the site’s original contractor, visited the park and concurred it was weathering of the concrete tiles, so a work order was submitted to have him repair the “ongoing deterioration of the site.” Standley said. Standley looks forward

to the repairs because the park is a “wonderful asset to the veterans and the community.” Rogge echoed that sentiments saying, the National Guard’s eagle represents the local servicemen. “We have all of those guardsmen who live here. When soldiers come down here for ceremonies, it is good luck for them to rub the eagle,” Rogge said.

vandalism his family have been longtime supporters of the park and place flowers on the statue bases each month and have done so for the past eight years. He believes the damage was from an attempt to steal the big bronze birds. “It’s ridiculous. The concrete is broken, and there are marks on the eagles where you can see they’ve been trying to remove

them,” Rogge said. “In eight years, while we have been putting flowers on the eagles, this is the first time we have witnessed someone trying to do this.” Former Farmington Mayor Bill Standley, who founded the park during his tenure as the city’s father, went down to the park, concerned that someone might be attempting to steal the birds. “I understand the


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS AN ADVENTURE IN THE ARTS This exhibit from the collection of the Guild Hall Museum on Long Island includes 73 works of art from a stellar array of artists. They include: Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Thomas Moran, Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning, Peggy Bacon, Chuck Close, Max Ernst, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy Lichtenstein, and George Bellows, among many others. This exhibit will be displayed at the Farmington Museum, Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center through Sept. 22, 2013. An Adventure in the Ar ts, selections from the permanent collection of the Guild Hall Museum, was organized by the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, N.Y., in association with Landau Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Calif. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. ever y Sunday from May through the month of September. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan .com PICNIC IN THE PARK FOR PRESHOOLERS Preschool children and their families bring lunch and meet at the Riverside Nature Center for a picnic from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., followed by a story or activity and a stroller-friendly walk in the park. Learn about plants, insects, birds, and all the interesting wildlife. Feed the friendly ducks and go home in time for naps. This program continues weekly

through to September. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI AUG. 2 – FRI AUG. 9 CONNIE MACK WORLD SERIES Some of the best amateur baseball in the country is featured each summer at Ricketts Park in Farmington. Teams from the U.S. and Puerto Rico play in front of pro-scouts and college officials. Information: 505.599.1184 or www.cmws.org

FRI AUG. 2 TEA PARTY PATRIOTS The SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriots luncheon meeting will be 11:30 a.m. Friday at Los Hermanitos East Restaurant in Farmington. This is a forum meeting where all in attendance can bring up subjects of interest to them. For more information call 505.324.1102.

MON AUG. 5 – SAT AUG. 10 SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR Visit the largest county fair in New Mexico! Fair features livestock shows, exhibits, fiddler s contest, ar ts & crafts, vendors booths, live music performances and more at the San Juan County Fairgrounds, McGee Park, on Hwy. 64 between Farmington and Bloomfield. Information: 505.325.5415 or www.sanjuancountyfair.net

TUES AUG. 6 TEA PARTY PATRIOTS The SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriots General Meeting will be 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the Totah Theatre, 315 W. Main St. The speakers will be Farmington City Manager Rob Mayes and 2012 Congressional candidate Jeff Byrd. For more information call 505.324.1102.

FRI AUG. 9 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian arts and crafts vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

FRI AUG. 16 – SAT AUG. 17 THE ANNUAL SAN JUAN BI-FLY TOURNAMENT ON THE SAN JUAN This San Juan River Quality Waters tournament is strictly catch and release. Professional guides score all catches and release all fish. Call for details. Information: 505.325.0255

FRI AUG. 23 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422

SAT AUG. 31 SUN SEPT. 1 ANNUAL TOTAH FESTIVAL INDIAN MARKET & POWWOW Juried art festival offering authentic handmade American Indian Arts and Crafts of over 100 artists, an authentic Navajo Rug Auction (Saturday) and a contest Powwow. Festival is held at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. Information: 800.448.1240 or 505.326.7602 or www.totahfestival.farmingtonnm.org

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center:

505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 p.m. - 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Aug. 3 - Otis & the Rhythm Aug. 10 - Off the Interstate Aug. 17 - Grant & Randy Aug. 24 - To be determined Aug. 31 - NO DANCE – LABOR DAY HOLIDAY Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Aug. 21 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. -– 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Aug. 8 - Led by Bobbe Bluett Info: 505) 599-1380

50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1 Annex Building / Conference Room Cost: $14, or $12 for cardcarrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay to the instructor day of class. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

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SAT AUG. 17 WINE & SHINE CLASSIC CAR SHOW Visit Wines of the San Juan, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., for this classic car show in Blanco, N.M. Relax under the shady cottonwood trees in the San Juan River Valley with great friends, live music and delicious food. Spectators are free! Wines of the San Juan is located 40 minutes east of Farmington. For more information and to download a registration form, please visit www.winesofthesanjuan.com

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The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Duff 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

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Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.-1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques. Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390

ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information WALK LAPS IN THE GYM Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesdays, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturdays, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/S aturday, 8:30 a.m.

Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise you'll tighten and tone with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music, in just 60 minutes. This is your hour. Come try it out - 1st class is free! For more info call 5 0 5 . 3 2 0 . 5 3 6 4 , 505.599.1184 or visit www.jazzercise.com

MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information

FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Road Call 505.599.1167 for more information

ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30minute lessons are $20 or eight 30-minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday

CROSS POOL* 11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit

EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. Call 505.566.2480 for more information DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels that can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies! Please call us with any questions at 505.566.2480.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF SJC Want to help a “Little”? Sycamore Park Community Center is partnering with Big Brothers Big Sisters. Find out more at 505.566.2481 SENIOR FITNESS 9 - 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Info: 505.566.2481 COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 - 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 - 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy learning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Info: 505.566.2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Info: 505.566.2480 -8111 or 505.566.2480 SAN JUAN COUNTY VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m., pres-

entation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, August 15 Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions please contact coordinator Carol Kohler at 505.334.8111 or 505.566.2480 SPCC OPEN HOUSE 5 - 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23 Come check out the Sycamore Park Community Center and all that we have to offer in the fall at our annual open house. We will also have vendors present with whom we work throughout the year. There will be games and refreshments for everyone! This is a free event. Info: 505.566.2480 COMMUNITY YARD SALE AND CRAFT FAIR 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Get a booth and mark your calendars for Saturday, September 7 Join us for the Sycamore Park Community Yard Sale and Craft Fair. Booths are $10 per table for both the yard sale and craft fair. This will be an outdoor event. Bring the family and enjoy a fun day in the park! Info: 505.566.2480

Exclusively featuring


TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, August 2, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

Should GOP shut down government to end Obamacare? Senate Republicans are threatening to block any bill that continues funding for government operations if it also includes money for the 2010 Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. “This is the last stop before Obamacare fully kicks in on Jan. 1 of next year, for us to refuse to fund it,” Sen. Mike Lee of Utah said this week. But other Republicans aren’t on board: Sen. John McCain, the party’s 2008 presidential nominee, said the public is tiring of continuing threats to shut down the government. “Most Americans are really tired of those kinds of shenanigans,” he said. Should the GOP carry out its threat? How should Democrats respond? Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk, the RedBlueAmerica columnists, debate the issue. JOEL MATHIS: In January 1973, the magazine National Lampoon appeared on newsstands. Its cover image one of the most striking in all of publishing history: A dog filled most of the frame, a revolver held against its head by an otherwise-

unseen man off-camera. “If you don’t buy this magazine,” the cover text blared, “we’ll kill this dog.” Forty years later that cover pretty much sums up the governing philosophy of the Republican Party. Its leaders don’t have much to sell the public except one hostage situation after another. “If you don’t pass our agenda,” they blare, “we’ll kill this government.” When Obamacare was passed, Republicans complained mightily that it didn’t pass democratically enough. Yes, the bill received a majority of support in both the House and the Senate, and yes, it was signed into law by the president – and then, after all of that, it was found Constitutional by a majority of the Supreme Court. Never mind, some in the GOP said, “The bill didn’t get any Republican votes – its majority wasn’t big enough. Since then, the GOP has tried – by one count – to kill Obamacare 36 times. Thirty-six times it has failed. Unable to muster (as legislation must) the majority backing of both houses of

RED & BLUE STATES Joel Mathis & Ben Boychuk

Congress, never mind securing the support of the president. The Republican Party cannot achieve its aims using the democratic processes it claims were neglected during the passage of Obamacare. So the GOP is going to take everybody’s ball and go home. It’s almost beyond criticism. Republicans – House Republicans in particular – have convinced themselves that any compromise with the Obama agenda is untenable and must be defeated no matter the cost, and never mind that the president has twice been elected with the support of large majorities of the electorate. They act accordingly. All you can do is marvel. And hope, if you’re a Democrat, that when your party returns to minority status – as it inevitably will, that its leaders have watched, learned, and are as willing

to obstruct future Republican agendas. There is no tactic too unfair to be used anymore; partisans might as well gird for political battle with that understanding in mind. BEN BOYCHUK: Shutting down the federal government to defund Obamacare presents one of those old-fashioned “good news, bad news” scenarios for conservatives. The good news? As Americans figure out just how awful Obamacare is, support for the unpopular law craters. Just this week, a new CBS News poll found a solid majority of Americans – 54 percent – don’t like the law and more of them than ever – 39 percent – would like to see the law repealed. And for good reason. Millions of people are discovering what the law will mean not just for their lives, but for their livelihoods. Em-

ployers, spooked by the law’s mandates, are cutting hours to ensure their workers don’t exceed a 29-hour-a-week cap that would trigger expensive insurance benefits. That’s why President Barack Obama unilaterally decided to delay the “employer mandate” provisions of the law until after the 2014 midterm elections. No point in riling up millions of voters who might take out their wrath on Democrats who passed the law. The bad news? As unpopular as Obamacare may be, people regard Congress – especially the Republican-controlled House – with even greater contempt. The latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News Poll reports 83 percent of Americans say they disapprove of Congress, suggesting some legislators would struggle to win votes from members of their immediate families at this point. Defunding programs and even certain government jobs is well within Congress’ power. Republicans are well practiced at the art of depriving liberal causes of tax dollars. (Remember ACORN?)

LETTER

Defunding provisions of the badly misnamed Affordable Care Act would be a worthy effort – if Republicans had solid majorities in both houses of Congress. Sadly, they do not. How did we come to this pretty pass? The president and Congress for years have been unwilling and unable to pass a real budget. So they’ve settled for passing “continuing resolutions” that keep the government running. Every time one of these resolutions comes up for a vote, we have one of these showdowns. Somebody always threatens to shut down the government. Somebody always blinks. Shutting down the government to kill Obamacare might be worth the risk if Republicans didn’t blink. Fortune favors the bold – and boldness is not a virtue rewarded in politics. Ben Boychuk is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal. Joel Mathis is a contributing editor to The Philly Post. Reach them at bboychuk@ city-journal.org, joelmmathis@ gmail.com or www.facebook. com/benandjoel.

have your say

Apology to animals at Farmington Shelter

Manning case shows Army has work to do A military judge found Army Pfc. Bradley Manning not guilty of the most serious charge against him, “aiding the enemy.” The charge was unprecedented in a leaks case and one that, if it had stood, could make any journalist writing about national security, defense or foreign policy subject to prosecution for using classified material in a publication that might conceivably be read by an enemy. Manning is hardly getting off with a wrist slap. He was convicted on 20 other charges, ranging from espionage to “wanton publication of intelligence on the Internet.” For this, he stands to serve 136 years in prison, although that may be reduced to 116 as his sentencing hearing begins. But the Manning case raises troubling questions, not the least of which is how someone

DALE MCFEATTERS SCRIPPS HOWARD so junior could have access to so much presumably highly secret information. Unless the recruiter was desperate for bodies, Manning was an unlikely and unpromising candidate for military life with plenty of red flags in his background. He was a not-very-closeted gay; he was badly bullied by his father; his Welsh mother never adapted to life in the United States and took her son to Wales, where he was reportedly teased unmercifully by his classmates. On his return to the States, he had a falling out with his father and for a while lived in his car. As The New York Times

put it, he bounced “back and forth between places where he never really fit in.” One of those places was the U.S. Army, where in 2010 Manning, then 22, downloaded 700,000 files of military and diplomatic secrets, war logs and gun-camera videos onto flash drives. Manning wrote – government watchdogs, please note – that he exploited a system of “weak servers, weak logging, weak physical security, weak counterintelligence, inattentive signal analysis.” And we need a weak, psychologically troubled amateur snoop to tell us this? Manning justified his leak

of the information as a way of sparking debate on the military’s role in our foreign policy, as if our think tanks don’t do enough of that already. In the end, he was betrayed by some of the people he naively trusted with knowledge of what he was doing. Finally, it’s hard to believe that the U.S. military justice system condoned the conditions of his incarceration: 23 hours a day of solitary confinement, sometimes stripped naked, in a tiny cell. Manning’s case will be overshadowed by the greater, more deliberate and more damaging wholesale leaks of Edward Snowden, also a junior cog in the intelligence apparatus. But Manning’s recruitment, ease of access to classified information and his unacceptable treatment after his arrest show that the military still has work to be done.

Dear precious animals: This is my sincere apology to you for not helping in your terrible situation. I attended the City Council meeting on July 23 and did not do my part. I am not on the Board of any animal advocacy group; however, I do belong to the San Juan County Animal League. As such, when I realized no member was standing in front of the mayor and demanding (yes demanding) an answer to the question – What is the plan? – I could have stood – I could have asked. Joel Farrell, president of San Juan Animal League, had sent to the mayor, City Council and city manager an excellent letter on July 19. The letter was received. In the letter he asked 18 very pointed questions – some of which could be answered quickly or at least discussed at the meeting. The letter was not presented – I had a copy – I could have presented the questions. Back and forth, back and forth went the comments. Some were given rousing applause and some not. However, my little friends, nothing was accomplished Three Council members (most frustrated) tried to ask why nothing is being done – no one said “I have THIS plan” nor “I have a great INTERIM plan” nor “I propose we do this plan and implement it quickly.” I am sure there have been many excellent ideas – where were those? Have I been that naive as to how our city works? We were jumped to another agenda subject before we had a glimmer of hope regarding the shelter. I completely agree that the spay/neuter programs are most important. Many fine people work endlessly for their success, along with animal rescue, animal control, vaccination clinics and many others. My hope, however, was that together we would address and help solve the very problem of right now – today – which is the shelter itself. By doing nothing to help you last Tuesday, I and others only made you more, though unintentionally, tragic victims of our delays. Maggie Fishburn Hotline Coordinator San Juan Animal League


Opinion

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013 E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

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Fax: 505-516-1231

We need to restore the spirit of capitalism President Barack Obama went to Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., this week to rearticulate his vision for the American economy and to reassure the American people that, yes, he knows what he is doing. The president’s prodigious political skills are always on display, even in the most challenging circumstances. He can take dismal reality and spin a positive and optimistic picture that will inspire his supporters. And no matter how many facts may contradict the claims of the president’s vision, that vision never changes and there never seems a moment when he doubts that he is right. The president reminded the audience that he first spoke there eight years ago as a new senator.

He noted the changes that have taken place. He’s now president. He now has gray hair. But what has not changed is the inside of the man. His views have not budged an inch from those of the young senator of eight years earlier. According to the Wall Street Journal, the current economic recovery “is one of the weakest on record, averaging 2 percent. Growth in the fourth quarter of 2012 was .4 percent. It rose to a still anemic 1.8 percent in the first quarter, but most economists are predicting even slower growth in the second quarter.” Yet the president has no doubt that his policies are right. He ticks off the litany of big government programs that allegedly saved us from economic depression. And,

STAR PARKER SCRIPPS HOWARD with a slight nod that economic reality is not as rosy as he paints it, he concedes, “We’re not there yet.” Perhaps it’s again worth recalling the $831 billion stimulus package in 2009 that supposedly would keep unemployment below 8 percent. As unemployment galloped past 10 percent, never was there a hint of doubt from the president that his policies were right. We’re just “not there yet.” Now the president tells us we have to keep big, activist government going to save America’s languishing middle class. But the facts are that the

middle class has fared poorly under big government. As the Wall Street Journal reports, median household income – $51,761 – remains way below where it was before the recession started – $56,289 – and where it was when it began – $54, 218. But, perhaps most notable in the president’s remarks is what he did not say. A magnificent economic miracle has occurred during this presidency. But the president did not find it worth mentioning because it has nothing to do with government. Breakthroughs in tech-

nology have produced a boom in American energy production. American oil production is up 37 percent over the last two years, reversing 20 years of decline. As of last March, the United States has become the largest oil producer in the world. Oil imports have dropped to 36 percent of our total oil consumption, down from 60 percent in 2006 and the lowest level since 1987. No government planner could have ever dreamed of this type of miracle. It was not many years ago we were hearing about the world running out of oil. According to Mr. Obama, we are really dealing with different visions of how the world works. And he’s right. One is driven by government planning – socialism. The other is driven by

freedom and private ownership – capitalism. Our president seems to be genetically hardwired to the socialist view. And his portrayal of capitalism is harsh. But as the new American oil boom attests, it is freedom and capitalism that releases the human spirit, taps human creativity and produces prosperity that could never come from any government planner. Few things are harsher than a stalled economy. People wanting to work and can’t. Even Barack Obama’s charisma is failing to mask the fact that if America is to recover, we need to restore the spirit of capitalism. Star Parker is an author and president of CURE, Center for Urban Renewal and Education.

Hearing from loved ones has healing power I’m waiting for a phone call. If it comes while I’m writing this, I will instantly stop writing, drop my laptop like a flaming Tater Tot, and run to get the phone. Some people might take that personally, getting dropped for a phone call. It’s almost like being put on hold by someone who hears a “call waiting” beep and says to you, “Hold on, I’ll be right back.” OK, so it’s exactly like that. The difference is the importance of the caller. I wouldn’t put you on hold for just anybody. Randy is my grandson. He’s almost 3 years old. When he calls, I answer. Unless I’m in the shower, as I was this morning, when he left this message: “Hi, Nana, I ready to

take your order now. Call me back.” Randy likes to play “restaurant server.” He has a stack of photos of various dishes from which he will let you choose – unless you order over the phone, in which case, you have to guess what’s available. Tell him what you want and he’ll fill a plate with your choices and serve it up. It’s fun. And the prices are really quite reasonable. But when I called him back, his mom said he was taking a shower and would call me later. So I’m waiting. Speaking of phone calls, I’ve gotten a lot of them lately. Lucky me. I recently had some dental surgery that caused my face to swell up like the Goodyear blimp and forced

SHARON RANDALL SCRIPPS HOWARD me to spend quality time with my new best friends: pain pills and ice packs. The great thing about it is that my children and their others – bless them one and all – have been calling and texting and emailing to check on me. I know what you’re thinking. You’re right. Some people will do anything to get attention. My grandmother was notorious for her creative ways of getting her 10 children and 20-some grandchildren to call. Once, she actually faked a heart attack to get the

family together. I am not making this up. I flew from California to North Carolina, fearing I might not make it in time to say goodbye to her. Then I sat by her hospital bed and listened to her belly laugh as she confessed to me what she had done. “I’d rather you all come see me while I’m alive,” she said, “than to have you stand around at my funeral eating fried chicken and trying to think of something nice to say about me.” She liked to make a point. I didn’t understand

it then. But it makes sense to me now. What she meant to say was ... Wait. There’s the phone. Hold on, I’ll be right back. “Hello, my darling!” I say. “Hi, Nana. I ready to take your order now.” “Great!” I say. “I would like a salad and some kind of pasta. What kind do you have?” I hear him shuffling through the food pictures. “We have ... um ... bread.” “OK,” I say, “bread is good. For dessert I want cupcakes.” “We don’t have cupcakes, Nana. We have ... strawberries and ... strawberries.” “I love strawberries!” “OK,” he says. “Are you through talking now?” This means, “Will that be all for you this evening?”

“Yes,” I say, “thank you.” “You welcome, Nana. I see you later. I love you.” Then he puts down the phone. OK, I’m back. Where was I? Yes, I remember. What my grandmother knew then, and went to great lengths to explain, is something I am learning: When you are sick or in pain or just plain lonely, there is no better medicine than a visit or phone call – or email or text – from someone that you love. Nothing else comes close. Not even pain pills and ice packs. Maybe I should have dental surgery every week? Contact Sharon Randall at P.O. Box 777394, Henderson, NV 89077 or at www.sharonrandall.com.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Perez Cruces to be with his family. The detective’s firing came after nearly three years of alleged harassment and civil rights violations he claims were perpetrated by the city of Farmington Police Department and Administration. It culminated in Perez being placed on administrative leave after he wrote a report that named police officers, city employees and relatives of city officials as the beneficiaries of a nearly half million dollar embezzlement of taxpayer funds from the Farmington Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. After the list was made public on Jan. 9, Police Chief Kyle Westall and City Manager Rob Mayes, both defendants in the Perez case, put the detective on paid leave and trespassed him from city property. One month later Mayes fired Perez, and the officer said the firing was “because of report writing,” and he never in his career heard of another officer being fired for this reason. The city of Farmington stated in its response to the lawsuit that the “reports which had been authored by (Perez) appeared to be false, misleading, and disparaging to the city and to the public.” The reports stated that Mayes had allegedly hindered the Convention and Visitor’s Bureau investigation by telling city employees that former CVB Director Debbie Dusenberry had been found dead in the Arizona desert. This came after Perez reportedly asked the city manager to keep the finding quiet until he could interview Dusenberry’s former boyfriend. Mayes did not, but the city claims in its lawsuit response that Mayes, and the police department, “has an obligation to disclose information regarding the discovery of Ms. Dusenberry’s body to her next of kin.” Thus “Mayes was authorized and expected to” let people know her body had been found “as a part of his duties as city manager.” Other allegations made in the Perez report were that Mayes had contact with Dusenberry after she fled the community and was wanted for questioning in the case. Perez stated he based this on Dusenberry’s cell phone records. His reporting in this case was lauded by the New Mexico Attorney General’s Office for being thorough, but the city did not agree and terminated Perez. It is his belief that the issue dates back further than Feb. 2013, because Perez filed his first charge of discrimination against the city on July 29, 2010. This came after he testified in favor of former Farmington Police Sgt. Ron Anderson, who had an age discrimination suit against

the city of Farmington. After he testified in Anderson’s behalf, Perez alleges that then Police Chief Jim Runnels and then Deputy chief Kyle Westall “began telling other officers in the department that Sgt. Perez was secretly recording their conversation and he could not be trusted,” according to Perez’s complaint.

Perez has long denied recording other officers, so he filed the EEOC charge based on discrimination and retaliation for testifying in Anderson’s federal age discrimination lawsuit. The city ended up settling Anderson’s case out of court for an undisclosed amount of money. The next charge from

Perez came Sept. 16, 2010, in a Tort Claim Notice to the Mayor and Chief Runnels, four months after Perez investigated the death of Farmington resident Tamara Gallegos. Gallegos’ body was found in late May 2010, just days after she participated in a police-run “drink lab,” which is a training program for

police officers, where volunteers get intoxicated and police officers interact with them. While investigating the case, Perez learned that a Farmington Police Officer drove Gallegos home after the “drink lab,” and that officer “may have been the last person to see her alive,” according to Perez’ claim.

The city of Farmington denies this allegation in its response, which also states that Perez “involved” himself in the Gallegos investigation. Perez and his partner Det. Corporal Russ Bradford were assigned the case and were conducting interviews and gathering evidence when

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AND

MM LIFE LEISURE

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

‘Fun for Ewe and Me’

Parade goers celebrate start of fair season The San Juan County Fair Parade was Friday July 26 in Downtown Farmington. More than 20 entries were on hand to help celebrate the beginning activities for the fair. Winners in the 2013 San Juan County Fair Parade were; 4-H Float – First place ($50), Silver Dollar 4-H Club; second place ($40), Country Rebels; third place ($30), Shiprock 4H Fire Vehicle – First place ($50), Bloomfield Fire Department Marching Group – First place ($50), San Juan County Sheriff ’s Posse Matched Riders – First place ($30), San Juan County Sheriff ’s Posse Non-Profit Float – First place ($50), San Juan College Vehicle Group – First place ($30), Shriners Most Outstanding Vehicle – First place ($50), Gene Stark Youth Horsewoman – First place ($30), Browning Ranch Youth Horseman – First place, ($30), Browning Ranch Winners may pick up their cash prizes beginning Aug. 2 at the fair office in McGee Park during regular San Juan County Fair hours.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

prca tracks

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A longtime situation starts to move into a new phase. The question for the uncertain Lamb right now is whether to move with it. Facts emerge by midmonth to help you decide. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A talent for organizing your priorities allows the Divine Bovine to enjoy a busy social life and not miss a beat in meeting all workplace and/or family commitments. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) What began as a dubious undertaking has now become one of your favorite projects. Your enthusiasm for it rallies support from other doubters-turned-believers. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Accept the help of friends to get you through an unexpectedly difficult situation. There'll be time enough later to investigate how all this could have happened so fast. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Change is a major factor for the Big Cat through midmonth. Be prepared to deal with it on a number of levels, including travel plans and workplace situations. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might not like all the changes that have begun to take place around you. But try to find something positive in at least some of them that you can put to good use. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family member's unsettling experience could create more problems if it's not handled with care and love. And who's the best one to offer all that? You, of course. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) It might not be the right time for you to start a new venture. But it's a good time to start gathering facts and figures so you'll be set when the GO! sign lights up. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) The sagacious Sagittarius should have no trouble deciding between those who can and those who cannot be trusted to carry out a workplace commitment. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Surprise, surprise. It looks as if that one person you once thought you could never hope to win over to your side suddenly just might choose to join you. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) You might have to set aside your pride for now and accept a change that isn't to your advantage. Cheer up. There'll be time later to turn this around in your favor. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your creative self emerges as dominant through midmonth. This should help you restart that writing or arts project you've left on the shelf for far too long. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of encouraging others by example to come out from the shadows and enjoy life to the fullest.

Welcome Connie Mack players, coaches, and fans! The Connie Mack World Series festivities start Friday, Aug. 2! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the Connie Mack Parade on Main Street in Historic Downtown Farmington at 10:30 a.m. Enter parade lineup, which will begin at the intersection of Main Street. and Bowman Avenue, at 9:30 a.m. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not enough celebration for you, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the opening ceremonies that will take place after the 5:15 p.m. game and before the 8p.m. game on Friday, Aug. 2. All teams will be present. The excitement will continue on Sunday, Aug. 4, with the Home Run Derby at 2:30 p.m. and a Coaches Fungo Competition at 3:30 p.m. Come out and take in all the color and thrills of these extraordinary events. For more information, call 505.599.1184. Or see the website for game schedules at www.cmws.org.

Museum magic The evenings are warm and getting shorter, so enjoy the end of summer season with us on the back terrace of the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., for the Summer Terrace Series on Saturday evenings from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The program for Aug. 3, will feature Summer Classics Ensemble. Join us for only four more Saturdays until Aug. 31 for a variety of entertainment including country, pops, and jazz. Bring blankets or lawn chairs and relax on the terrace along the idyllic Animas River. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at the Museum, come a little early and view the Handmade local art exhibit. Or, for a small admission fee, come in to view the exciting travelling art exhibition, An Adventure in the Arts. See works by Warhol, De Kooning, Pollock, Lichtenstein, Johns, and more! For more information call 505.599.1174.

Friday, Aug. 9. From 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., sign your child up for the Junior Golf Program, 9-Holer Club, under a relationship with The First Tee of San Juan County. Meet at Civitan Golf Course, 2100 N. Dustin Ave., for this playing class, designed for PAR level and older PLAYer level kids who are able and anxious to play more golf. They will get instruction on form, pace, rules, etiquette, and more. The fee is $6, or $2 for Civitan pass holders, and may be paid at class. At 5:30 p.m., donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the Family Night Scramble. Come to PiĂąon Hills Golf Course, 2101 Sunrise Parkway, for this 9-hole scramble. Kids play free! To register for these last family programs of the summer season, contact the PiĂąon Hills Golf Course Pro Shop at 505.326.6066. Get more information at www.pinon-

hillsgolf.com. Call for Entries! The Totah Foundation is currently calling for artisans for its 25th Annual Totah Festival. Entry forms are available at totahfestival.farmingtonnm.org. The Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St., will host the festival on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 31 and Sept. 1. The Totah Festival began in 1988 with the idea of creating a marketplace for American Indian artists to share their skills and craftsmanship with the community, visitors, and each other. The Festival has grown to more than 100 artist booths, a Contest Powwow, and the renowned Navajo Rug Auction. For additional information on the Totah Festival, contact the Farmington Museum at 505.599.1174.

Families play golf! Mark your calendars for ington artist 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG. 7 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Aztec Schools 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Bell Ranch 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk with Jan Morgen

MONDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG. 5 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: 4 Corners Economic Development 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Farmington's Public Library - A Wow! experience during your visit 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News TUESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG. 6 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Community Health Improvement Council (C.H.I.C.) 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Library's Unique Story Time Doors - Carved by Farm-

THURSDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG. 8 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: San Juan College Building Trades Program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Gerald Cassidy 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG. 9 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Best Of 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Playas Noon: Book Buzz: Best of

August 8 - September 6, 2013 Reception: August 8, 3 to 5 p.m.

SAN JUAN COLLEGE Humanities Arts Gallery 505.566.3464

Chasing My Mind

Maryellen Morrow Art Exhibit

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library events Monday, Aug. 5 - 1 p.m. International Champion Magician Eli and his all-Teen Team combine comedy and illusion at the Farmington Public Library. This fast-paced show is packed with humor, music and audience participation. Come to the Farmington Public Li-

brary to see the show and to pick up your 2013 Summer Reading T-shirt. For more information, log on to www.infoway.org.

puter class. Learn the basics in today’s “Computer Basics” class. Registration is required and may be completed by calling 505.599.1270.

Tuesday, Aug. 6 - 9:45 a.m. Come to the Farmington Public Library for a free com-

Wednesday, Aug. 7 - 1 p.m. The Afternoon Delight Book Group meets at the Farmington

Public Library. To learn more about joining a book group, or borrowing materials for your book group, call 505.599.1260 or click on the “Kits To Go” link at www.infoway.org. Thursday, Aug. 8 - 9:45 a.m. Come to the Farmington

Public Library for a free computer class. This class will focus on “Intro Windows 8.” Learn all about the new features, and how to customize your computer’s settings to fit your needs. Registration is required. To register, go to www.infoway.org , click on the “Events Calendar,” and then click on the event.

aztec pets of the week

Woof. Our names are Shadow and Trudy. Shadow is a super handsome 2year-old male Lab. Trudy is a cutie pie, a 1-year-old female Lab-Heeler. We are good with other dogs and kids. We are well behaved and want nothing more than to please and have fun with your loving family. Adopt today.

(Left) We heard the place to be is on a farm or a ranch. Our names are Vaquero and Ben. Vaquero is a 1-year-old Aussie with beautiful blue eyes. Ben is a rugged, 8-year-old Shepherd-Hound. Both are good with other dogs. They need a job, family and love. Rush on down today. (Above) Let’s have some fun. These are Luigi and Mario. Luigi is a 1 þ-year-old Lab mix. Mario is a 2-year-old Shepherd-Hound. Both are good with other dogs and kids. They love to run, play and chase. Let these two tickle your funny bone and tug at your heart. Adopt today.

The Aztec Animal Shelter, 825 Sabena, is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily.

We are purring and cuddling machines! Shine the laser and it’s on! Our names are Dezi and Sam. Dezi is a spayed 11-month-old green-eyed Gray Tabby. Sam is a male, 3-year-old, orange fluff ball. Both are good with cats and kids. Sardines are a must.

farmington pets of the week

Seymour is a darling little gray and black tabby cat. He is as sweet and loving as can be. He would make a wonderfully happy playmate in any home. He is only about 6 months old and has a lot of love to give. Kayla is a beautiful long-haired tortoise-shell kitty. She would be a puuurrrrrfect new family member for you to take home. She will make your life complete and promises to be there for you no matter what life throws at you.

April is a sweet little guy who loves to cuddle. He is about 8 weeks of age, and loves attention and playing with his squeak toy. He is a little black Lab cross with a little bit of Shar-Pei in him. He has spunk and wants to be part of your family forever.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.)

Ashley is a rambunctious ball of energy. She is loving and sweet and enjoys dancing. You can get her to do anything for a treat, and will have a loyal friend for the rest of your life.

Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal.


A12

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Aztec Speedway concert Aztec Well 50th Anniversary celebration includes Blues Traveler concert LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The Grammy Award winning band, Blues Traveler, will rock out at Aztec Speedway on Aug. 24, being the first major band to perform at the venue, said Track Manager Mike Tenski. The concert also is part of a 50th anniversary celebration for the Aztec Well Family Company, which offers complete oil and natural gas drilling, well servicing, trucking, rentals, equipment, support services and supplies. “Aztec Well Service and its associated companies are mainstays in our community. For 50 years, Aztec Well Service has remained dedicated to the San Juan County Basin. There is no better way to celebrate 50 years as a company than to basically put on a big event on behalf of the community,” said Jason Sandel, who owns the company, Micon Land LLC, which operates Aztec Speedway. The gates into the venue will open at 5 p.m. and the local band, Those Devils, will open the show at 6:15 p.m. The band will be followed by the Arizona-based rock and roll band, Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers at 7:15 p.m. Blues Traveler will take the stage at 8:15 p.m. “We haven’t had anything this big around here, especially in Aztec, and we want to give back to the citizens of Aztec and the community in general,” Tenski said.

and free parking. Tickets can be purchased by going to www.brownpapertickets.c om or www.stimulate4c .com. Parking for the event costs $5. Food and drink vendors will be onsite during the concert. Blues Traveler features harmonica-laced musical sounds and defined pop music in the 1990s. They also are a Billboard TopTen charting band with gold and six-time platinum album. A couple of their famous songs include “Run-Around” and “Hook.” This concert is part of Sandel’s vision of using Aztec Speedway for more than just auto racing. He said not only is the venue trying to “stimulate the Four Corners and economic development overtone, but I’m also looking at how to stimulate the culture, creativity, and concerts in our community.” Sandel said he encourages the public to support the performing bands. “People need to buy tickets and show up and show this world class band that the Four Corners is behind bringing someone cool to the area. If we can do that, the possibilities are limitless.” Sandel said he also has contemplated building an amphitheater at Aztec Speedway and using the venue for motorcycle and monster truck events as well.

Blues Traveler

The Peacemakers

General admission seating is available for $30 per ticket in the bleachers.

Reserved seating is $45 per ticket, and VIP seating tickets are available for

$125, which includes a premium reserved seat, a beer, wine, and food tent,

24-Hour Emergency Water & Fire Restoration

and the organizational structure of the animal shelter, according to Mayes. These “obstacles” were worked out during the July 23 City Council meeting, when councilors agreed by consensus to further investigate the development of a low- or no-cost spay/neuter program. Council, however, did not give clear direction on the organizational structure of the shelter which is broken into three separate entities – the Farmington Animal Shelter, the Farmington Spay/Neuter Clinic and Farmington Animal Control, or park rangers. There was talk about moving the park rangers under the management of the Farmington Police Department, at which time Styron told the Council it was only something being investigated. Councilor Mary Fischer, however, stated that the park

rangers were told the move would be complete in 50 days. She also said the park rangers have been going on police ride-alongs to prepare for the change.

Styron, who said this move would be part of “culture change” also said previously that the park rangers

(505) 327-7923

shelter July 9 meeting of the Animal Advisory Committee. He estimated a director would be found within eight weeks. He reiterated the search efforts during a July 23 City Council meeting, saying he expected to welcome a new director on board within eight weeks. The job, however, was not posted and the search had not commenced. “The delay has been in dealing with four specific obstacles identified by the search firm specialist to our ability to attract the type of animal welfare director we want,” City Manager Rob Mayes said. “These obstacles were administrative and policy oriented. In other words, the person we want would likely not want us until these were addressed.” The four obstacles were the lack of a city commitment to a low- or no-cost spay/neuter program, an unclear job description, pay,

* shelter

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A13

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Tickets on sale today

Jonny Lang added to Fort Lewis schedule Tickets are set to go on sale Friday, Aug. 2, for two shows recently added to the 2013-2014 performing arts series in the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College. Tribal Seeds, with special guest Fortunate Youth, is set to perform Friday, Oct. 11, with Jonny Lang scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 23. Award-winning reggae group Tribal Seeds is known for its spiritually driven, refreshing rock vibe infused with the roots style of reggae music. With albums named by iTunes as the “Best Of ” in the reggae genre, Tribal Seeds’ authentic sound has brought the group to the forefront of the reggae rock genre, with a style and a sound that appeals to all ages across the United States and the world. Tribal Seeds’ special guest Fortunate Youth combines rootsy vibes and unique base lines designed to separate the band from other mainstream reggae bands. Featuring multiple harmonies, boisterous guitar solos and heavy keys,

Fortunate Youth offers a high energy show designed to leave audiences feeling euphoric and eager to hear more. Since the release of his 1997 major label debut, Lie To Me, the then-16year-old singer/songwriter Jonny Lang has built a reputation as one of the best live performers and guitarists of his generation. A blues artist who respects and reveres the traditions of the past, Lang embraces the more complex and evolved genres, grafting them to the blues foundation to create a hybrid sound that is simultaneously traditional and fresh. Lang is currently touring in promotion of his new studio album, Fight For My Soul, set to be released Sept. 17. Tickets for Tribal Seeds, with special guest Fortunate Youth – $19/$29, and Jonny Lang – $39/$43/$53, will be available Aug. 2 online at www.durangoconcerts.com or by calling 970.247.7657, or at the Ticket Office in the Wel-

come Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Durango. All sales final. Showtime is 7:30 p.m., with doors to the Concert Hall and concessions – serving beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks – opening at 6:30 p.m. On show day, the box

office at the Concert Hall will be open one hour pri-

or to curtain, and remain open through intermission.

When no intermission is scheduled, ticket sales will continue one hour past curtain. Purchase tickets to three or more Concert Hall productions in one sales transaction and receive 10 percent off each ticket. Discounts cannot be combined. The Community Concert Hall is a not-for-profit, multi-use performance venue located on the campus of Fort Lewis College. Its ability to bring a diverse spectrum of shows to Southwest Colorado is made possible through a partnership with the college, a state-supported, independent institution of higher education, and through financial and inkind contributions from generous members of the community.

Asleep at the Wheel

Texas-based Western Swing At Fort Lewis on Aug. 11 Asleep at the Wheel, the nine-time Grammy awardwinning band revered for sustaining Texas-based Western Swing music, returns to the Community

Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11. The dance floor will be open. Since the early 1970s, the Wheel has been the

most important force in Western Swing – a mix of big band, country and dance music popularized in the 1930s and 1940s

* Asleep at the Wheel B15

San Juan College Foundation Scholarship Scramble September 13 & 14, 2013 • Pinon Hills Golf Course Play Pebble Beach Golf Links®

Corporate Sponsors and teams are encouraged to call 505-566-3200 or visit www.sjcfoundation.org for more information. Two lucky players will each win two rounds of golf at the Glacier Club. All proceeds go to scholarships for San Juan College students.

Corporate Sponsors are eligible to win an exciting golf package to Pebble Beach Resorts®. Pebble Beach®, Pebble Beach Resorts®, Pebble Beach Golf Links®, their respective underlying distinctive images and golf hole designs are trademarks, service marks and trade dress of Pebble Beach Company. Hole No. 7 Pebble Beach Golf Links®. Used by permission. Pebble Beach® photo by Joann Dost.


A14

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Responsibility and experience

Fair Queen Taylor Hawks: Fair pageant builds character LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Being a member of the San Juan County Fair Royalty is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;great responsibilityâ&#x20AC;? but a â&#x20AC;&#x153;good experience,â&#x20AC;? said this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Queen, Taylor Hawks, who was crowned at the fair royalty pageant on June 29 at McGee Park. The pageant allows for local young women between 10 and 19 years of age to have a chance to be crowned and represent the six-day fair. The fair begins on Aug. 5 and lasts until Aug. 10. There were 12 contestants competing and each contestant was required to be an exhibitor at the county fair. The three categories in which the age groups competed were â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Miss,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Princess,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Queen.â&#x20AC;? Hawks, 17, said she was honored to be crowned Queen, because the county fair has been a big part of her life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always participated in the fair and becoming royalty is a great experience, es-

pecially because I can affect the younger girls. When I was young, the Queen made a great impact on me and now I

can do the same for these other girls,â&#x20AC;? said Hawks, adding she has participated in the county fair since she was 5 years old.

Ready to take the next step? N dt t k G GEDÂŽ l ?

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Get mor moree information infor on New Studen Student Orientation: 505-566-3270 abepr ogram@s abeprogram@sanjuancollege.edu www.sanjuancollege.edu/abe www w.sanjuanco .

When Hawks was 10 years old, she was crowned Little Miss and in 2010, she was crowned Princess.

Hawks has always showcased her goats during the livestock show. This year, however, she wants to do something different and show her pigs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve wanted to do that for a long time.â&#x20AC;? Hawks encourages other girls to participate in future pageants because it builds character. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It requires a lot of public speaking skills and confidence building for the young girls. It is a great responsibility and a good experience.â&#x20AC;? Autumn Constant from Farmington was crowned Âł1RUWKZHVWHUQ6XQĂ&#x20AC;RZHUV´E\'LDQH$LQVZRUWKLQWKH5RG+XEEOH&ROOHFWLRQ         

SAN JU

The 2013 San Juan County Fair Royalty.

Princess at the pageant. Senna Mason-Presley from Bloomfield was the runner-up in this category. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love to be around the fair and I love to help people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is what this is all about, to help out and represent the fair,â&#x20AC;? Constant said. At the pageant, the contestants were asked impromptu questions about the county fair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The impromptu questions are always nerve-wracking because you never know what (the judges) will ask you,â&#x20AC;? she explained. Constant, 16, said that in the past she showed goats, but this year she wants to exhibit her scrapbooking skills. In the Little Miss category, Fisher Easley Smith from Farmington was crowned and the runnerups were Renee Hadden from Aztec and Sunshine Tso from Bloomfield. The fair royalty has several responsibilities during the fair, according to Stephanie Hammons, pageant coordinator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the week of the fair, the girls go around and check on the vendors to make sure everything is going good and if they need anything. They also go to the different barns and help out with whatever is needed,â&#x20AC;? Hammons wrote in an email. The royalty also will hand out ribbons at various competitions, including the livestock show and the goat costume competition.

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A15

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

shelter would receive “paramilitary police training” and Police Chief Kyle Westall would rewrite city ordinances with regard to animal control so they fit better into the police department’s processes and procedures. Councilor Jason Sandel, during the Council meeting, said he believed the policy changes and ordinance re-writes should come from the top down. “That culture change comes from us, it goes to you, it goes down to staff and staff drives it,” Sandel said. He also wanted to be sure a new director would be in place to implement the “culture change” to which Styron referred. “We don’t have a person that is in charge. Therein lies the concern as it relates to culture change. If we don’t have a director at the time when we are moving into a new shelter … we still have unanswered questions,” Sandel said. The city has been searching for a potential

Animal Welfare Director since early May. There were two candidates interviewed on May 24, but by May 28 the decision was made to “close the search and not make any offers,” according to a July 29 memo from Styron to Mayes. Around June 4, Styron asked Farmington Human Resources to assist in finding a search firm that could locate a qualified “Animal Services Director.” By June 18 two proposals were received from Strategic Government Resources and less than 10 days later the city entered into a verbal agreement to use the Keller, Texas-based company, at a cost of approximately $15,000. Styron began working with Tommy Ingram, a lead recruiter with Strategic Government Resources, and between June 28 and July 10 Ingram gathered information about the state of the Farmington Animal Shelter from Styron. In his memo Styron said

the information provided included the pay range, which was too low. Ingram indicated that “most progressive cities in animal welfare have spay/neuter programs” and that “animal control is typically a law enforcement action.” Ingram also wanted to know about a facility license and euthanasia license for a shelter director. Styron told him that the shelter was working under Dr. Manuel Garcia’s euthanasia license and that “several staff (members) are licensed to perform euthanasia.” There are nine city employees who work in animal control and at the shelter who are licensed to perform euthanasia, and the shelter is licensed as a euthanasia agency by the New Mexico Animal Sheltering Board until November 18, 2015, according to a review of records at the animal shelter. When the research was completed, Ingram recom-

mended the city replace an assessment process with a “detailed questionnaire for the quarter finalists, recorded interviews for semi-finalists and extensive media search and reference check,” the memo stated. The media search was deemed a “good tool and proved beneficial to the process,” because Animal Services Director positions get a lot of public and media attention. The final agreement was made on July 14 and the final job description draft was approved and posted July 29. It also was sent to 60 individuals who expressed an interest in an animal services position. The four-page posting includes information about the region including information about the city, area residents, recreational opportunities, the airport and local government. It includes a description of what the city would like from an animal welfare director as well as information about the new

shelter. The posting stated that the director “organizes, manages and directs all activities of the city’s animal services department, including animal regulatory services and the operation of the regional animal shelter, and encompasses housing and caring for incoming stray and unwanted animals, adoption, public education, transfers, recovery of owned animals and spay and neuter programs.” The ideal candidate would be “a trailblazer and embrace the exciting opportunity to lead the transition to a new shelter and a new animal services philosophy.” Skills include being able to communicate, lead, manage and fundraise. The person also must have a love of dealing with both animals and people while demonstrating a “high level of integrity professionally and personally.” The qualifications include an associate degree

in animal science or a related field and six or more years of “progressively responsible experience in animal welfare, facility management and employee supervision.” The candidate also needs to have a good driving record and be able to obtain a federal DEA license for controlled substance registration. The salary range is $51,000 to $77,000 per year. Mayes applauded the process undertaken by Styron saying, “I concur with and commend the management and leadership of the search process conducted by Cory. While we are all anxious to get this position filed as soon as possible, settling for the wrong person is the worst thing we could have done. The wrong person could set us back years.” To apply for the position, visit governmentresource.com or email Ingram at TommyIngram@GovernmentResource.com.*

trative officials had learned the identity of a person of interest; but had not informed Perez and the other investigators about the person of interest,” his claim

stated. Perez also learned that administrative officials were gathering drinking lab documents and “revising” written statements from police officers who participated

in the lab. Perez and Bradford took the issue to his supervisor and to Runnels, asking that an investigation be opened into the activities by these other officials. Runnels reportedly told him if he persisted with the complaint “it would come back on him (Perez) and that they should hire lawyers because they were going to get sued for defamation if they pursued their complaints,” according to court documents. By July 28, 2010, the parents of Tamara Gallegos were frustrated that there was no “resolution in the death” of their daughter. They wrote a tort claim notice to the city of Farmington stating that the investigation into Gallegos’ death was “handled inappropriately, evidence from the autopsy has not been completely explained, persons of interest were not interviewed as we were told, the file of information of the investigating officers release to our family has discrepancies, untruths and evidence exists that a possible cover-up has taken place by the police officers.” The family filed a complaint against then Lt. Steve Burch for releasing information to an unauthorized

family member. The complaint did not name Perez or Bradford, but Runnels included them in the complaint, and the city alleges this was because of Perez’s “failure to complete the investigation in Ms. Gallegos’ death.” When Perez became a party to the Internal Affairs Investigation he filed another EEOC charge based on discrimination and retaliation. He attempted to seek employment at other law enforcement agencies in the state, but could not because the city kept the Internal Affairs Investigation open for eight months. When the investigation was closed in March 2011, the police department “made sustained findings” against him. Perez also wrote letters to the New Mexico Attorney General, the District Attorney and Mayes asking for an independent investigation. None occurred, and a month later Runnels told the local press that Perez conducted a “piss poor” investigation into the Gallegos death. The city denies this claim and stated that the statements published by various news media “may or may not have been accurately attributed to Chief Runnels,” according

to the city’s response to the lawsuit. Runnels retired shortly after the newspaper statements were made, after he showed up at a crime scene smelling of alcohol, which is a violation of police department code of conduct. Westall was appointed the new police chief, and Perez in February 2011 sought out a promotion to police lieutenant. He holds a master’s degree in criminal justice, which the city of Farmington, through their attorneys, “denies” in the lawsuit, and he is a Hispanic man, over 40 years old. He was overlooked for the position which was given to two Anglo males, whom Perez said are “significantly less qualified.” The city also denies this allegation. Perez filed another EEOC charge of discrimination and retaliation. Perez is claiming that he has been damaged by the city through “loss of income and benefits, including back pay, front pay, damages for emotional distress, humiliation, punitive damages and attorney’s fees and costs.” The city denies the claims and also stated that Perez is not entitled to compensation.

Perez the city opened a “potential liability” investigation led by Westall and other administrative officials. “Sgt. Perez learned that Westall and other adminis-

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A16

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

PNM-Navajo Nation partnership

Company sets up $1 million tribal education fund DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune When PNM entered an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency to address the Best Available Retrofit Technology issue to minimize regional haze, it allotted funds to economic development and training in the region. The company, while agreeing to shut down two units in 2017 at San Juan Generating Station, also promised to give $150,000 to the area’s Four Corners Economic Development group and to give the Navajo Nation $1 million for job training. The tribe agreed to the settlement July 25, when

Navajo President Ben Shelly entered into a memorandum of understanding with PNM CEO Pat Vincent-Collawn. The memorandum creates the PNM-Navajo Nation Workforce Training Program, which will be funded in $200,000 installments over a five-year period. The money will go toward training programs at Navajo Technical College in Crownpoint and at the San Juan College School of Energy, where members of the Navajo Nation will be able to qualify for $1,000 to $2,000 per semester to cover their educational costs. “We are extremely pleased with the collabo-

rative process that has allowed us to craft a meaningful way to invest into job readiness for Navajo members,” Vincent-Collawn said, during the signing ceremony in Window Rock. Navajo President Shelly said the program’s goal is to provide funding directly to Navajo students on both campuses. “We need to invest in our Navajo people and I believe this is an important way to do that. When we invest in our people, they make the Navajo Nation stronger,” he said. The payoff also is supposed to meet PNM’s goal of keeping San Juan County economically viable without

earlier 2012. “One of three main computer servers was missing from the building, and there were hundreds of files loose on desks throughout the building,” Millet stated in a January 2013 report. “Efforts were made to move documents to the appropriate files, but there are still a number of titles and deeds that cannot be identified as belonging to any particular file.” Also in this report, Millet listed the known assets belonging to those associated with the business. It showed that Bobby Willis had an annual income in 2008 of $73,000 and in 2009 of $60,000, yet he had significant property assets, including two business buildings in Farmington and a large office building in Michigan. Millet pointed out that the Willis family was being investigated by the IRS in Missouri, but the specifics of the investigation were unknown. “But the IRS has identified numerous assets held by the Willises in that state, including a large building. Millet wanted to liquidate the assets to cover the claims, because his account only had $387,877.38 in it and the “claims substantially exceed the funds on deposit. He has been unable to process claims because of an issue with Willis’ property in Michigan, and the fact that in June he was told his contract would soon expire. In a May 6, 2013, letter, the Financial Institutions Division told him his work would not carry forward into Fiscal Year 2014, because “unexpended loan monies from the June 21, 2013, emergency loan” could not carry forward. “The Financial Institutions Division will not seek renewal of your contract be-

cause of lack of funding,” James McKay, chief general counsel wrote. The state petitioned the court to terminate the receivership and discharge the receiver and place all of the money in a court registry. The motion on June 27 was denied by District Judge Raymond Ortiz, who also order Millet to set up a claim process. During the same hearing, Ortiz ruled that Millet, as the receiver, was to “immediately pay the sum of $217,653.89 to the Calhoun, Michigan County Treasurer,” to stop Willis’ office building in Marshall, Mich., from going into foreclosure because of unpaid property taxes. This was an issue Millet argued for, despite McKay’s constant objections. McKay, in emails to Millet, stated the “numbers will not allow us to support the delinquent taxes,” and he could not “justify the expenditure.” Millet responded to McKay saying that while he did not oppose terminating the receivership, he believed some issues needed to be

* PNM B3

Willis receive compensation. As of Oct. 25, 2012, there were $278,949.80 in escrow claims and $2.08 million in title claims. The escrow claims were to be handled by Millet, while the Public Regulation Commission stated it was handling title claims. Craig Dunbar, of the Insurance Division of the PRC, even went so far in a Nov. 2, 2012, email to Millet to say that “The insurance division has not seen this amount of claims.” The records combed through and developed by Millet, however, showed the losses to area residents that did business with New Mexico Title and Escrow. Those records he said were “abysmally poor” and “intermingled.” In a June 28, 2012, letter to Dunbar, Millet asked the Insurance Division to allow him to act as a receiver on the title side of the business as well. “Early indication from the forensic accounting process makes it clear that funds for title and escrow were intermingled on a regular basis,” Millet wrote. “It is very difficult to state with certainty whether some claims should be directed to the receiver and FID for the escrow business, or to the PRC for issues related to the title business.” He directed all title claims to the PRC, and did not take over that leg of the claim process. The PRC, in January 2013, still had not taken control of the “title plant,” leaving “the title plant in legal limbo,” according to Millet. Millet, however, did manage to come up with a good accounting of the business despite “paper and computer files related to the operation of New Mexico Title and Escrow being in disorganized condition,” when the office closed abruptly in

resolved, including the Michigan property, located at 410 East Drive in Marshall. Millet stated in the email that Willis’ attorney Michael Comeau “suggested that with termination the assets would go back to Mr. Willis. I understand he is playing games with the ownership of the Missouri assets he bought after leaving New Mexico.” Millet continued saying that he needed to do something with the property “so that Willis doesn’t (hypocritically, since he hasn’t paid the taxes in three years) come back and say I failed to act.” Willis, according to

Michigan records, had failed to pay taxes on the property in 2010, 2011 and 2012, thus leaving the high tax lien on the building. There also were “remediation” issues with the property, according to McKay, who said if the state were to clean it up and sell it the cost to the Financial Institution Division would be between $570,000 and $670,000, while the costs of tearing it down would approach $1.5 million, leaving a land value of $158,350. “In short, this property becomes like the Ft. Bayard property in New Mexico, where it cannot be torn down or remediated without

an extraordinary infusion of cash, and simply becomes a beached whale,” McKay wrote to Millet. Millet ended up following the court order and paying off the tax lien. At this point the case is still pending in New Mexico District Court.

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Info Session Thursday, August 8

Recharge Your Career! Discover how you can earn your Master of Arts in Elementary or Secondary Education

4:00 - 6:00 pm RSVP: 505-566-3480

Meet with UNM College of Education faculty and alumni. Learn how you can obtain your Master of Arts degree. Receive answers to any questions you may have. Join in the fun! Refreshments will be served. Event will be held at the UNM San Juan Center 3539 East 30th Street, 2nd Floor, in Farmington

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MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

B

More than a decade Vertical Radio broadcasts Connie Mack World Series

Broadcast schedule

(Above) Mark Strickland Interviews Coach Adam Morrissey of the StrikeZone Cardinals during the 2012 Connie Mack World Series. – Photos by Curtis Ray Benally (Above right) Announcer Marlin Wyatt examines the score book during the 2012 Connie Mack World Series as Mark Strickland (right) and Kirk Carpenter (Center) look on.

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner Anticipation is more than a Carly Simon song (look it up, young ones). Anticipation of the upcoming prep season is upon us as everyone has the hope and

promise of a new season and a chance to chase a championship. Everyone starts anew, 0-0. Football practice begins this Monday – Aug. 5 – with the rest of

FIRST TEE Tom Yost The drive sets the tone of the hole It is widely known among the golfing public that the putter is the most important club in the bag.

Golfers use the putter twice – sometimes three times – as much as any other club in their arsenal of tools. And while I agree about the importance of the put-

Game 1 - 5:15 p.m. Fri, Aug. 2 South Troy Dodgers v. Easy Cobb Yankees Game 2 - 8 p.m. Fri, Aug. 2 DBAT Leach v. Strike Zone Game 3 - Noon Sat, Aug. 3 Arecibo Lobos v. So. California Renegades Game 4 - 5:15 p.m. Sat, Aug. 3 Illinois Sparks v. Frozen Ropes Game 5 - 7:30 p.m. Sun, Aug. 4 Texas Stix v. Midland Redskins Game 6 - 5:15 p.m. Sun, Aug. 4 Loser #2 vs. Loser #3 Game 7 - 7:30 p.m. Sun Aug. 4 loser #4 v. loser #6 Game 8 - 5:15 p.m. Mon Aug. 5 winner

#1 v. winner #2 Game 9 - 7:30 p.m. Mon Aug. 5 winner #4 v. Winner #5 Game 10 - Noon Tue Aug. 6 Winner #7 v. Loser #8 Game 11 - 5:15 p.m. Tue Aug. 6 Looser #1 v. Loser #9 Game 12 - 7:30 p.m. Tue Aug. 6 Game 13 - Noon Wed Aug. 7 Game 14 - 5:15 p.m. Wed Aug. 7 Game 15 - 7 Wed Aug. 7 Game 16 - 5:15 p.m. Thu Aug. 8 Game 17 - 7:30 p.m. Thu Aug. 8 Game18 - 5:30 p.m. Fri Aug. 9 Game 19 - (if ) 8:30 Fri Aug. 9

Each August Farmington is alive with non-stop baseball for one week with the arrival of the Connie Mack World Series. For thousands, in and out of the Farmington area, Vertical Radio provides listeners with play-by-play color commentary analysis and interviews on each and every game. Vertical Radio also provides a look at the games through online streaming video and pictures posted to Facebook and Twitter. Vertical Radio has broadcast the Connie Mack World Series for 11 years, starting in 1999, taking a short break from 2002 to 2003. The station also recently signed a five-year contract to continue to air the series. The last nine years have given the radio station an opportunity to fine tune the broadcast. Broadcast staff, including local baseball coaches, brings an experienced voice of analysis to the games. Vertical Radio also gives plenty of air time to players and coaches visiting from out of the area. Aside from the broadcast, on the air in Farmington

* baseball B3

Throwing and blocking

the fall sports beginning the following Monday.

Lobos start practice for new football season

Dinallo Wins Summit Award Piedra Vista graduate Domi Dinallo was named the inaugural winner of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference’s Summit Award winner for women’s golf.

Can they throw the ball, and can they stop anyone? Those are the two questions for the University of New Mexico football team this season. The Lobos opened practice this week. UNM is coming off a 4-win season, which doesn’t sound like much but it’s an improvement over the last three years combined. It’s no secret the Lobos need to find a passing game. They were one of the top rushing teams in the country, but had trouble going airborne. “Can we throw the football enough to be balanced? That’s the big question,” said head coach Bob

* Hoerner B2 ter, I cannot overstate the importance of the driver. The club that begins the hole usually sets the tone for the hole. When a player hits a good drive, it gives them a positive outlook on the hole. Those happy feelings tend to release pressure and tension, resulting in a better second shot. Conversely, a bad drive

* Yost

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THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta Davie. “At the end of spring football, (quarterback) Cole Gautsche developed a lot,” said Davie. “Now

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how that translates in the fall is still unknown. He’s more confident, and I think that’s what did him

* Murrieta B2

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Murrieta in last year. He got thrown into the fire and then got the yips a little bit. He was afraid to let go of the ball. I think Cole will be much improved.” Gautsche will get some pressure at the starting spot from Clayton Mitchem. The junior college transfer had his spring ball cut short with a quadriceps injury, but Mitchem still gets good reviews from Davie. “Clayton Mitchem can throw the ball, there’s no question. He has big time skills, but can he pick up the offense quick enough? Can he command the huddle quick enough? Those are the questions

that need to be answered?” New Mexico ranked fifth in the nation with an average of 301.3 yards a game rushing last season. The Lobos rushed for more than 300 yards in 10 of their 13 games. Senior running back Kasey Carrier set a school record with 1,469 rushing yards. “Kasey was a pleasant surprise,” said Davie. “When I first got here, people told me they thought Kasey wasn’t that tough. Then when I saw him at the first practice I thought he was extremely tough. He played with a physical style.” “It’s going to be harder

for Kasey, just as it was late in the season for Kasey. First of all, we couldn’t throw it a lick, and second of all, people just geared up for Kasey running the football. I don’t think it’s realistic to have Kasey carry the ball close to 30 times a game like he did last season, but he may be more productive in the carries he has.” Davie cited the team’s depth at the running back position as a way to alleviate the load on Carrier. Sophomore Jhurell Pressley had 464 rushing yards and six touchdowns last season. Demarcus Rogers also returns after missing the last

10 games of the 2012 season with a knee injury. The Lobos were one of the worst defensive teams in the country. They gave up over 30 points a game. They gave up 40 points or more three times. Davie says there’s nowhere to go but up. “We really only have three players back that played much for us on defense last year,” said Davie. “I’m not being sarcastic when I say that’s probably a good thing,” he added. “We’ve got a lot of young players that are talented and enthusiastic. If we were a good team last year defensively, or even mediocre

defensively, we would have won more games.” Senior captain Jacori Greer will anchor the defensive line. Greer put on 18 pounds during the offseason to play inside and plug up the middle. The Lobos hope to get some defensive help from junior college transfer Brett Bowers who moved from outside linebacker during the spring. Senior inside linebacker Dallas Bollema returns for his final season wearing the Cherry and Silver. Bollema led the team in tackles in 2012 with 89, and added three interceptions.

Go big or go home UNM is in the process of putting in their new video scoreboard. It will be the largest single LED video display in the Mountain West. The new scoreboard will measure 32 feet high by 80 feet wide. “I rarely look at the scoreboard during the game, but I’m pretty sure I’ll be looking now,” said running back Kasey Carrier.

There is nothing ladylike about sports. It is contradictive to ask women to play aggressively and athletically then refer to them as the Lady Whatevers. P.S. No feminine equivalents like Elkettes or Fillies, either. After all what do you call the female Bulls? Cows? Lady Bulls? 2. All coaches and players receive due process from the NMAA. I’m still amazed how the athletes and coaches have no appeal process at work with the NMAA. Even the George Zimmermans of the world get due process, but as a high school athlete or coach you are guilty without the chance of proving innocence. Surely this is contradictory to sports’ mission of teaching the American values ? 3. Get rid of the football bye week. There is no need for a bye week. These are young men who can easily handle the schedule. Plus the football season is already too long, beginning the first week of August and ending four months later in December. This also means multisport athletes miss a quarter of their winter season 4. Shorten the basketball

season with no single game weeks. Speaking of too long, let’s move to basketball. Last season ran the length of five holidays on the school calendar from winter break through spring break. I realize that basketball season is dependent on access to the Pit, and Texas already starts so early that our border towns would have difficulty getting games, but the season could definitely be shortened on both ends. Again, this would help with multisport participation. 5. Create a soccer, softball and baseball district tournament. All three of these sports would benefit, fanwise, from district tournaments. These sports play multiple games in a single day during the season, so playing two or three in a weekend should be no big deal. I would especially like to see it in baseball where one dominant pitcher could not dictate a championship 6. Coordinate athletic and activity competitions better. Multi-activity parents have to wonder if the NMAA even considers that other events even exist. For example, for my

daughter to participate in All-State choir she has to miss a full week of basketball during the district season. Now I understand choices have to be made, but as long as the basketball season is, wouldn’t it be possible to schedule events that only coincide with non-district schedules? 7. Work to get some sanity in offseason programs. Here is where athletic associations basically threw in the towel, because it was impossible to enforce any set of rules. There used to be offseason rules about time – and even participating together. Now we can’t even agree on a single off week in the summer. Other industries are now making money on our lust for yearround sport success. 8. Institute a parental “score tax.” The score tax simply states that any time a parent is vocal about their own child’s individual scoring, as opposed to the success of the team, they get fined a single dollar. This would add thousands in revenue from basketball alone where “shoot” is a constant demand. Never mind “share

the ball,” “play hard” or “play together.” 9. Reward students who support each other by letting them in free. I realize that gate admission is necessary for athletic budget survival, but let them all in free. If students have $5 in their pockets, you’re going to get it at the gate or at concessions. I would rather they all be in the stands deciding where to spend that five bucks than not having to use the money just to get in. 10. Get rid of stupid rules. Oh where to begin. Let’s start with football. Remove the spot foul rule for holding behind the line of scrimmage. In today ’s spread offense world a holding penalty could be easily 20 yards. The intention of the rule was not to have a second down and thirty to go. While

we’re at it, take away the automatic first down for defensive holding. This penalty assumes an awful lot that the throw was coming that way, that it was accurate, and that the catch would have been made. In the spring, get rid of the designated player and the courtesy runner rules. No teenager needs a courtesy runner. It also changes strategy in the game that was never intended. And besides, baseball is intentionally slow and at a leisurely pace. The extra 30 seconds saved while the catcher puts on his gear is needed only – perhaps – three times a game, saving a whopping couple of minutes on a two and a half hour game. If only to live in a perfect world. Enjoy the upcoming season

“On paper, there’s no reason we should be better. But I’d be very disappointed if we aren’t a better football team,” concluded Davie.

Hoerner The Summit Award is presented to the student athlete with the highest cumulative grade point average after a minimum of two years and participation in an RMAC championship event. Dinallo was maintaining a cumulative 3.98 GPA during her junior season while majoring in sociology. Dinallo, who was the district 1AAAA champion her senior year at PV, already has an RMAC championship under her belt, as well as being named First Team All-Academic. She was selected as the preseason RMAC golfer of the year in 2013 This fall Domi will begin her senior year for Colorado State University-Pueblo where she is hoping to enter law school after graduation Changes As we roll into another prep season, here is the Top 10 List of changes the prep sports world should make for the benefit of all: 1. Remove the term “Lady” from all women’s sports teams. First of all, it is sexist. Second, it detracts from athletic competition.


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baseball at 88.9 FM, Vertical Radio streams its broadcasts online at VerticalRadio.org, a service to those families of players who can’t make it to Farmington in August. Kirk Carpenter oversees the broadcasts as executive producer. He also has a unique perspective of the World Series. He pitched as a pick-up player for the 1983 El Paso Natural Gas Gassers and has coached in the World Series on two occasions. “We definitely enjoy it,” Carpenter said. “Our goal is to paint a picture

of what is happening on and off the field for the folks at home.” Carpenter joins a staff of familiar names in the area, including Don Lorett, Chris Shay, Mark Strickland, and Emmet Fowler. Albert Velarde, and Johnny Curry are new to the staff this year. Vertical Radio regularly broadcasts local high school football, and boys and girls basketball, softball and baseball to complement Connie Mack City League play and the World Series. Their focus, however,

is Christian music. Vertical Radio signed on as KNMI FM in 1980 and still continues to operate translators to Pagosa Springs, Durango, and Cortez. KNMI is a program of Navajo Ministries, Inc. Carpenter and staff look forward to the World Series each year. “For me, honestly, it is an honor and a privilege. It’s a lot of work – the right kind of work – celebrating what is right with the world by watch young adults play America’s game, the right way.”

Attention Anglers Bi-Fly Tournament still has room for teams It’s not too late to enter the annual San Juan Bi-Fly Tournament, set for Aug. 16 and 17. There is room for a team of four, or for individual anglers. All proceeds benefit the Four Corners Home for Children at

Navajo Ministries. The event, now in its 19th year, is widely considered one of the elite trout fishing tournaments in the country. For more information, call Bi-Fly Coordinator Bob Fitz, 505.402.6995.

Yost sets the negative emotions in place, creating a series of compounding errors that soon follow. A drive in the desert, hazards or deep rough will also result in strokes being added to the player’s score as they are trying to get the ball back into a playable situation – i.e., on the fairway). The driver is the hardest club in the golf bag to hit, owing to a few factors. First, it is the longest club in the bag – and the longer the club, the harder it is to hit the golf ball in the mid-

dle of it. Second, the face angle on the club is the flattest. This means that the golf ball will have less backspin to get it into the air and more sidespin causing the ball to go to the left or to the right. There are a few things that a player can do to give them the best possible chance of setting a good tone on each hole by placing their drive in the fairway. Check the shaft for compatibility If your driver has a shaft

that is either too stiff or too flexible, the chances of hitting a good drive is minimal at best. Make sure that you have the right flex of shaft in your driver to fit your swing. Finding a PGA golf professional in this instance is almost a necessity, as they will help you with determining your swing speed and shaft flex. More loft for better accuracy If your driver has less than 9.5 degrees of loft, then chances are you are not hitting it as straight as

you could be. The more loft a driver has, the less the ball will spin sideways, causing it to go straighter. Once again, a PGA golf professional will best be able to fit you and a driver, but insist on hitting drivers with 10 or more degrees to see the benefits of accuracy over distance. Shorter is better The standard lengths of drivers in the market today are too long and too hard to hit straight. But don’t blame the club companies; they are simply satisfying

the need and craving of the consumer for more distance. Remember, shorter and straighter will beat long and sideways every day of the week. The shorter the shaft length, the more accurate you will be and that is the same reason you hit your 3-wood better than your driver. Low and slow Finally, swing the driver with tempo and balance. The harder and more violently you swing the club, the less likely you are to find your ball in the short

grass. Relax and have a positive mental image of where you want the ball to go – then let the swing happen instead of forcing it to. With the proper driver in the hands of someone who understands that accuracy is far more important than distance, the tone will be set to play some pretty good golf. I am not saying that you will never have to look for a golf ball again – but more often than not it will be your playing partner’s ball, not yours.

to have a strong economy,” PNM Vice President Ron Darnell told the Farmington City Council during a March 5 work session, where he presented the agreement. It states that PNM will retire coal-fired Units 2 and

3 at San Juan Generating Station by Dec. 31, 2017. The company also agreed to install selective non-catalytic reduction emission control technology on Units 1 and 4 in early 2016, so the units may continue operating without setting a retirement date, but with the knowledge that the plant “will be fully depreciated by 2052,” according to Darnell. The state of New Mexico has agreed to submit a revised state implementation plan, including a Best Achievable Retrofit Technology, or BART, determination for nitrogen oxides, NOx, for the

plant and to be submitted to the EPA for approval, Darnell explained. “PNM’s perspective is this will lead to more balanced fuel mix for PNM. Right now we are 60 percent coal and with retirement of the two units we will be 40 percent coal,” Darnell said of the plan. “It is not our intention to get out of coal, but we are more comfortable with 40 percent.” Once the agreement was made, it was clear several plant employees would lose their jobs, and electric generation from San Juan County would greatly decrease, so

the company agreed to “reinvest” in the community. PNM did this with the development of the PNM-Navajo Nation Workforce Training Program and by agreeing to pay the $150,000 membership dues to join Four Corners Economic Development. Vincent-Collawn said the company worked with the tribe, because it “demonstrated that same spirit of cooperative collaboration in finding an effective path forward for San Juan to meet the regional haze rule.” The goal of this new path is to prepare Navajo members for jobs that are in demand

and that are important to the Four Corners area and the Navajo Nation. The funds will go toward tribal members seeking certificates, associate and bachelor’s degrees from the local colleges. Tribal members can be 18 years of age or older may apply for the funds for use during the fall 2013 semester, which begins Aug. 19. For more information on how to apply, tribal members can call Navajo Technical College at 505.786.4107 or the San Juan College School of Energy at 505.327.5705.

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Foster parents needed Chlihaven working to create stability, family atmosphere for kids LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Childhaven strives to give stability and permanency to children who have experienced severe emotional disturbances, according to Childhaven Foundation Development Director Jamie Church, which is why the nonprofit organization is encouraging more people to partake in the foster care program. Clinical Director Susan Mullin, who is responsible for the Childhaven foster care program, said fostering children is beneficial because it “offers families a chance to parent and support children moving through an emotional healing process and recovering from traumatic events.” Childhaven specializes in treatment foster care, a higher level of care that requires more specialized training of foster families. “We are not looking for ‘Disneyland families’ because we recognize there is no such thing as perfect parents who exist,” Church said. “We are looking for parents who are willing to take on difficult issues and (help children) who really

Childhaven at 807 West Apache in Farmington is a shelter for children and youth who have suffered from abuse, neglect, and trauma. The shelter offers various programs including Family Support Services, Mental Health and Foster Care.

need families.” Similar agencies within San Juan County also are in need of foster homes, she added. “We are not the only agency looking for foster families, but I do think we have the advantage that we are not a humongous agency. So when foster parents call and have questions, we get right back to them. We are there for the foster parents.” According to the New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department,

there are nearly 2,500 children within New Mexico in need of short- or longterm foster care. Monica and Ed Nabson have been involved in the Childhaven foster care program since 1997. Since that time, they have fostered more than 55 children. “I worked in the Farmington schools as a special education teacher and we enjoy working with kids,” Monica said. The Nabsons are currently fostering a 4-year-

old boy and a 6-year-old boy. Ed said his favorite part about being a foster parent is seeing the children grow up. “When those kids come in they are very needy, but after they are nurtured, then they become nurturing to other people.” Monica explained that she has learned a great deal since becoming involved in the program. For these children and teenagers, she said, “I’ve realized how much treatment foster care is needed.”

There are several requirements to become a foster parent. Individuals must be 25 years old or older and pass background checks. Foster parents do not need to be married, but they must be at home for a majority of the day, Church said If parents wish to become part of the foster care program, they must complete 40 hours of training. “As a foster care home provider, a family will obtain training in parenting, life skills, and communication techniques, among many other topics. We focus on providing families 24/7 personal support and developing a fun supportive foster family community,” Mullen said. Childhaven also provides respite care, allowing foster parents who care for a child to have a break and give that child to a licensed family for a short period of time. “By having that great backup, you get a break and the kids get a break, but you know they are with licensed families who know what is going on,” Church said. For anyone who is interested in becoming a foster

parent, visit Childhaven at 807 W. Apache St. in Farmington and fill out an application. Once the application process begins, potential foster parents will be required to complete a background check and physical exam. “We want to put (the children) in a home with consistency and the treatment they are supposed to get. Oftentimes these things level out and they succeed. That potential is there, and we just have to have parents who can take that on and are willing to take that challenge and see the potential,” Church said. Mullen said two goals toward which Childhaven’s foster care program is striving are “introducing parenting curricula that will strengthen a family’s ability to support children with many different needs. We are also expanding our training and resources to accommodate homeschooling and provide specific parenting training based on individual children’s needs.” For additional information concerning the foster care program, contact Mullen at 505.325.5358 extension 143.

Students receive scholarships

Simpson, Nelson recognized for commitment to education LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Two San Juan College students were recognized for their dedication to education and received a scholarship from the Four Corners Employer Education Services at a July 31 meeting at SunRay Park and Casino. Bobby Simpson and Gabriel Nelson were two candidates who applied for the scholarship and were chosen by the non-profit organization. Simpson and Nelson each received $669. Four Corners Employer Education Services award scholarships to students three times a year. The scholarship money is raised during various seminars and workshops throughout the year. The scholarships are awarded to students based on need, according to the Four Corners Employer Education Services website. “We pored over the applications and I think we came up with the best candidates,” said Betty Asmus, Scholarship and Seminar Committee chairperson. There were eight students who applied for the scholarship. “I’m thankful for you all helping me out,” Simpson said, who is a Marine Corps veteran. Simpson was deployed to Iraq four times and it was difficult

Four Corners Employer Education Services President Tonya Nelson presents a college scholarship certificate to Bobby Simpson. Sitting is Gabriel Nelson, who also received a scholarship.

for him because “I had to leave my family behind.” His last tour in Iraq was extremely challenging after he learned his grandmother passed away. “She was my mentor and raised me. That opened my eyes to come back and make a change.” Simpson has attended San Juan College since 2009. He originally was working towards a Liberal Arts degree but is considering

changing his major. “I’m not sure what I want to do in life. I know I’m needed for something and I want to help out and give back,” explained Simpson, adding he has been volunteering at the Farmington Veterans Center. “You let me go to school and are allowing me to figure out what I can do to give back,” he said to the organization’s members.

Nelson did not enjoy attending high school, but his opinion on education changed when he began attending San Juan College. “Now I can’t wait to go back to school.” Originally from Arizona, Nelson has battled through alcoholism and drug addictions in the past. He spent 10 years in and out of jail, and on his last day at San Juan County Detention Center, Nelson knew he wanted

to change. “Seeing my kids come visit me behind a screen tore me apart. I turned to God and got my high school diploma and enrolled in San Juan College” in January 2013. During his first semester, Nelson made A and B grades in his classes. Once he graduates, he hopes to be a substance abuse counselor. “I believe I can do a lot to help people. Thank you for allowing us to be here and I appreciate the support I get,” he said. Students who are applying for the Four Corners Employer Education Services scholarship must submit a letter of recommendation from a teacher, instructor, or counselor in support of the educational goal. Applicants must also provide evidence of intent to enroll or continue in a degree or certification at the college for the next semester. To apply for the scholarship, visit the website 4cees.org and click on “Scholarships.” The Four Corners Employer Education Services is a non-profit organization that supports continued education through scholarships, educates employers about human resource issues through seminars and workshops, and supports the Career Expo job fair.


Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnlFDN LDSQN+ entq cnnq g`sbga`bj+ qtmr fnnc+ `udq`fdr 30 lhkdr odq f`kknm+ ehud roddc sq`mrlhrrhnm+ fnnc shqdr+ snvhmf aq`bjdsr+ rnld ancx c`l`fd+ $74/- 4/4,104,1278-

USED TRUCKS 1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

LEGALS

NEW MEXICO PUBLIC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT STUDENT NUTRITION BUREAU PUBLIC RELEASE

Registered Nurse Needed For In-Home Health Care

This is the public release that will be sent to Tri-City Tribune Community Newspaper and our website at fms.k12.nm.us and posted at the Central Administration Office as well as all school sites. On 8-8-2013 these groups must be advised of program availability, new programs, or changes date in existing programs.

Minimum two years home health experience preferred. Applicant must possess a current State of New Mexico License. Applicant must be able to pass all necessary background checks and possess a valid driverʼs license with an acceptable driving record. Please apply at 408 N. Auburn Avenue Farmington, NM 87401 USED TRUCKS

SUVS/VANS

1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS 1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

MISC. SGD E@QLHMFSNM Qhn cdk Rnk Jhv`mhr `mc sgd R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx `qd ronmrnqhmf sgd dudms ³Chmhmf Vhsg Sgd Cd`c½ nm Rdosdladq 10rs+ eqnl 3ol sn 7ol `s sgd Fqddmk`vm Bdldsdqx+ 05/5 MCtrshm+ E`qlhmfsnm+ ML- Sghr dudms vhkk qdoqdrdms 01 ne sgd d`qkhdrs `qd` ohnmddqr onqsq`xdc ax knb`k `bsnqr `mc ghrsnqx ateer@ a`qadptd vhkk `krn s`jd ok`bdShbjdsr `qd `u`hk`akd `s Gnv`qcºr Bkd`mdqr+ Gns Rstee Ro`r+ `mc R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx- Enq lnqd hmenql`shnm+ b`kk 4/4,215,/076 nq 4/4, 22/,8566-

Farmington Municipal Schools announced its policy for free and reduced price meals served under the National School Lunch and/or School Breakfast Program(s). All schools and the central office have a copy of the policy which may be reviewed by any interested party. The following family size and annual income criteria will be used for determining eligibility: Eligibility Criteria HOUSEHOLD SIZE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 For each additional person add:

Reduced-Priced Meals $21,257 $28,694 $36,131 $43,568 $51,005 $58,442 $65,879 $73,316 +7,437

Children from families whose income level is at or below the levels shown are eligible for free or reduced price meals. Application forms are being sent to all homes, along with a letter to households. To apply for free or reduced price meals, households should fill out one application for the household and return it to the school. Additional copies are available at the principal’s office in each school. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year. The information provided by the household is confidential: it will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility. Information may be verified at any time during the school year by school or other program officials. For the school officials to determine eligibility, each household that is now receiving SNAP benefits (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly the Food Stamp program TANF) must provide its SNAP case number or TANF number as well as the signature of an adult household member. All other households must provide the following information on the application: names of all household members; the social security number of either the parent/guardian who is the primary wage earner, or the adult household member who signs the application, or a statement that the household member does not possess one; the amount of income (before deductions for taxes, Social Security, etc.) each household member received; how often the person receives the income; where it is from, such as wages, retirement, or welfare; and the signature of an adult household member certifying that the information provided is correct. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size increases, the household should contact the school. Such changes may make the children of the household eligible for meal benefits. Foster children who are the legal responsibility of a welfare agency or court are eligible for benefits. Foster child means a child whose care and placement is the responsibility of the State or formally placed by a court with a caretaker household. A foster child is categorically eligible for free meals without further application. For purposes of determining eligibility for school meals for other children in the household, the foster child is considered a member of the household in which they reside. The foster child’s income is only considered when the foster family applies for meal benefits for the non-foster children in the household. If a household has foster children and wishes to apply for such meals for them, the household should contact the school for more information. Directly Certified Households Households that receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly the Food Stamp program) or TANF benefits may be directly certified to receive free meals. These households are not required to complete an application, and will be notified by school officials of their eligibility. SNAP and TANF households should complete an application if they are not notified of their eligibility by August 15, 2013. School officials determine whether households are directly certified to receive free meals based on documentation obtained direct benefits. Households who are notified of their eligibility but do not want their children to receive free meals must contact the school. Under the provisions of the free and reduced price policy. (Determining Official) will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the official, he may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he may make wither an oral or written response to the following: NAME: Judy Pruitt, Student Nutrition Secretary ADDRESS: 301 N. Court, Farmington, New Mexico 87401 PHONE NUMBER: 324-9840 ext. 1042 Legal No.113 Date 8/2/2013

It's been reported that the Paul Simon found the inspiration for his hit song "Mother and Child Reunion" in a chickenand-egg dish he was eating in a Chinese restaurant. You might be surprised to learn that a flamingo cannot eat unless its head is upside-down.


B6

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013 LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

CUBBY MINI STORAGE P.O.BOX 227 4340 US HWY 64 KIRTLAND, NM 87417

NOTICE OF SALE

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

TO: Waymon Wright PO Box 955 Fruitland NM 87416 Lecoy Jack 2700 Municipal Dr Farmington, NM 87401 Lisa Duncan PO Box 2633 Farmington NM 87499 Cheryl Becenti PO Box 2004 Gallup NM 87305 Corrina Bitsue PO Box 1075 Fruitland NM 87416 Vivian Duncan #4 Road 6257 Kirtland NM 87417 Don Duncan PO Box 374 Kirtland NM 87417 Notice is hereby given that a sale of miscellaneous household and personal items will be held to satisfy debt of back rent. The sale will be held on or after August 17, 2013 at Cubby Mini Storage 4340 US Hwy 64 Kirtland, NM 87417. Legal No. 108 Dates 7/26, 8/2/2013

LEGALS IN THE DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SAN JUAN STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BELVA THACKER FIELDSTED, Deceased. No. D-1116-PB-201300037-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Belva Thacker Fieldsted. All persons having claims against this Estate is required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney, Val. R. Jolley, Jolley Law Firm, P.C., P.O. Box 2364, Farmington, New Mexico 87499, or filed with the San Juan County District Court, 103 South Oliver, Aztec, New Mexico, 87410. DENNIS DON FIELDSTED Personal Representative of the Estate of Belva Thacker Fieldsted, Deceased P.O. Box 253 Waterflow, NM 87421 JOLLEY LAW FIRM, P.C. VAL R. JOLLEY Attorney for Personal Representative P.O. Box 2364 Farmington, New Mexico 87499 (505)327-6116 Legal No. 114 Dates 8/2, 8/9/2013

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Self-Service Storage Lien Act [48-111to 48-11-9 NMSA1978], that the following personal property is in Lien. The property is located at Armored Self Storage 4200 U.S. Highway 64, Kirtland, NM 87417. Nicole Dale PO Box 1011 Waterflow, NM 87421 Kids bikes, Tires, Microwave, Baby stuff, Misc. Naomie Begay PO Box 923 Shiprock, NM 87420 TV, Misc furniture, Bikes, Boxes, Tubes, Misc Kristin Hosteen PO Box 1070 Shiprock, NM 87420 Washer, Dryer, Couches, Misc On August 9, 2013 at 8am the above property will become the sole property of Armored Self Storage, to be sold or disposition to satisfy the lien on said unit. AUCTION WILL BE HELD AT A FUTURE DATE to be added to the invite list contact asstorage7@qwestoffice.net or 505-598-9983. Legal No.107 Dates 7/26, 8/2/2013 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PARTIES Presbyterian Medical Services (PMS), a notfor-profit health and human service agency, is pleased to announce its intent to apply for federal funding assistance through the New Mexico Department of Transportation’s Transit/Rail Bureau, Transit Section for the Farmington Community Health Center/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR) Program and Project Shield. Farmington Community Health Center/PSR Program is an array of services for individuals with severe and/or persistent functional impairment as a result of a mental disorder. The requested funding assistance will help Farmington Community Health Center/PSR Program acquire additional vehicles to transport consumers to facilitate training and development of like skills. Project Shield offers daytime habilitation and employment services to adults with developmental delays and/or disabilities within San JuanCounty. The requested funding assistance will help Project Shield acquire additional vehicles to transport clients to and from job sites, center-based training, and daily activities. In compliance with the federal funding requirements, all other transportation providers within the Farmington, New Mexico area have the right to request a public hearing on the aforementioned proposal. We invite your written comments or participation in the project. We will respond to all requests received before August 16, 2013. Written requests can be mailed to John C. Griego, 1422 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM, 87501-4391. Legal No. 112 Date 8/2/2013

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JIMMIE R. COOPER, Deceased. No.D-1116-PB-201300036 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that JOHN M. COY and PAMELA COY have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of this Estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to Larry T. Thrower, THE THROWER LAW FIRM, P.C., attorney for John M. Coy and Pamela Coy, Co-Personal Representatives of the Estate of Jimmie R. Cooper, Deceased, 411 North Auburn, Farmington, New Mexico 87401 or filed with the Eleventh Judicial District Court, 103 South Oliver Drive, Aztec, New Mexico 87410. Dated July 25, 2013 Larry T. Thrower Attorney of John M. Coy and Pamela Coy Co-Personal Representatives of the Estate Of Jimmie R. Cooper, Deceased 411 North Auburn Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Legal No.110 Dates 8/2, 8/9/2013 STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SAN JUAN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF M A N N E N CLEMENTS, Deceased. No. 5480 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that M. Wesley Clements has been appointed Personal Representative of this Estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative at the following address: M. Wesley Clements 640 CR 4990 Bloomfield, New Mexico 87413 Or filed with the Probate Court of San Juan County, New Mexico at the following address: 100 South Oliver Drive, Aztec, New Mexico 87410. DATED this 29th day of July, 2013. T. Ryan Lane Attorney for the Estate of Mannen Clements P.O. Box 1020 Farmington, New Mexico 87499 505-325-1804 Legal No.111 Dates 8/2, 8/9/2013

’K, so NN’s going to the San Juan County Fair. Only this year, NN is NOT going on the day they check in the pigs for the pig show. NN did that last year, and when she got on the fairgrounds some cowboy dude herded her down to the scales behind the pig barn, made her get on the scales to see if she “met weight,” then announced to the entire whole fair world that she was overweight and did not make the “class.” Just because NN had on her ever-so-cute Miss Piggy outfit and might be just a tad too “fluffy,” and just because she smelled like bacon – chocolate dipped bacon is wonderful and good and NN had, like, three pounds before she headed out to the fair – should not have made that cowboy dude think she was an entry in the pig show. NN was a tad insulted that the cowboy dude didn’t recognize her as Miss Piggy’s double in all of the Muppet movies and for reals thought she was there as someone’s show pig. NN has been known to snort a bit like a pig – but only when something is really, really funny and when she has a mouthful of any adult beverage – but she hasn’t been a “show” pig since she left the lights of the Vegas Strip, just so’s ya know. NN was the headliner, the top attraction and the real deal when she starred in the OffThe-Vegas-Strip show, “Mizz Piggy Goes Vegas” and won an award for portraying Mizz Piggy (“Miss Piggy” is copyrighted and you can’t just use that name on accounta you feel like it. There were like twelve dozen attorneys for the Muppets who attended the performance opening week and took exception to the fact that NN was pretending to be Miss Piggy and slapped her and the show’s director/producer/Steffan Spielfurg, with a copyright infringement thingey and stopped the show until we got all the posters/flyers/postcards/billboards changed to “Mizz Piggy.” Whatever) at the Off-The-Vegas-Strip awards ceremony that is shown in countries all over the world, but not in the USA on accounta Steffan Spielfurg is in the Witness Protection Program and can’t have his face, name, nose or rear end shown anywhere in the States because of some alleged charges against him. Anyway, NN won that award, which was a big deal because that year was the Year of the Pig and all the biggies on OTVS

were portraying Porky Pig, Petunia Pig, Babe and Wilbur, but it was NN’s exceptional and moving portrayal of Mizz Piggy that stole the hearts, the souls and some of the wallets and designer handbags of those who attended her performance. There were people who were so jealous of NN winning that major award they attempted to discredit her performance because they said it was “typecasting” and NN didn’t have to “act” at all and that gave her an “unfair advantage.” Whatever. The award still has NN’s name on it, although the faux gold has mostly fallen off, partly because Mojito, the Devil Kitten, thinks it ’s a scratching post. Whatever. So NN’s going to be at the fair like all week, catching the livestock shows, checking out the exhibits, visiting with the people and enjoying fair food. NN also plans to get cozy with the Bellamy Brothers – NN knows they will love her when they know her – and Pam Tillis, who NN would like to portray someday in Branson on accounta NN thinks she and Pam are almost identical twins. For reals. NN plans to ride all the carnival rides again this year, but has promised to carry a designer barf bag with her at all times and on all rides or they will never, ever, ever let her on one of those whirly twirly rides again. Ever. Again. Whatever. NN knows she’ll see a lot of fun people at the fair and while most of ’em beat feet the other way when she makes her entrance on the Midway, she sees ’em anyway and will have a report next week on the three people who are nice to her and stop to admire her designer barf bag and her designer fair outfits – NN has purchased all of the cowboy boots with hooker heels Fredericks of Hollywood had on its “Clearance on Accounta No One Else Will Buy ’em” shopping site. NN loves the county fair and she especially loves the baked goodies Ann Huish always takes to the Fair Board Office. NN can usually get into the Fair Board Office by complaining about something (last year, she complained there wasn’t a kissing booth and offered to set one up and donate the money to a good cause – NN’s Hooker Heel Fund – but those fair board people, namely Billy Huish and Darrin Church, who NN discovered are like the Fair Police, suggested she take her “good cause” and her “attitude” and her “cleavage” and leave the fairgrounds on accounta the fair is all about “family morals” and “family values” and NN and her outfit didn’t fit either one), and she always manages to create some kind of scuffle and grabs some of the baked goodies, but most ’specially the Snickers cake. Just sayin’.... In other news this week, peo-

ple had birthdays. NN still wasn’t invited to the birthday parties to eat cake and ice cream and enjoy adult beverages, but wishes a Happy Birthday anyway to Jan Tomko, Mike Ziems (who NN wishes would gift her with one of those snazzy Mustangs that Ziems Ford Corners has on its lot. NN looks REALLY good in a Mustang, just so’s ya know, and having NN driving one of ’em around town would be good for Mike’s business. Just sayin’.... ), Ron Baca (who NN is pretty sure she’ll see at the fair), Mark Lewis (who NN knows from a gazillion years ago and who still calls her a friend, which is special), Rachel Corley, Dan Dpesh and Jodi Stamper (who is the bomb and one of NN’s faves). Levi Gilbert celebrated his third birthday, which NN loves, and the beautiful and sweet Allica Brielle Hemphill came into this world this week and was welcomed by her proud parents, Chrissy and Ashton Hemphill and her aunt, Laura Huish. Tana and Dave McCall were spotted at St. Claire’s celebrating their anniversary and Charley Tyler was helping his beautiful wife, Jerre, pick out cute shoes at Animas Valley Mall last week, Scott and Tonya Eckstein are on vacay (again!) in Florida, Asa Oakes asked the beautiful Stella Mintz to be his wife this week (she accepted!!), and Randy Large is “in a relationship.” Becky Harrell is having fun with her two new “babies,” puppies Abbie and Lexi, and Cheryl Sitton has a new “page,” “Cheryl’s Kitchen ideas.” Steve Bortstein continues to post photos of beautiful women on his Face Book page, but never ever one of Nosey Nellie, who was once declared the most beautiful woman in town (it was a ghost town with no other women, but an honor is an honor, just so’s ya know), and Monica Leaming and Cecilia Taulbee had an Arty Party at Studio 116 – which is owned by Karen Ellsbury, one of NN’s most favorite people. NN attended the San Juan County Fair Parade last week and noted all the nice police officers from the Farmington Police Department who were helping keep the parade safe for everyone, the city of Farmington’s Street Department and Civic Center staff for helping make the parade a success and was glad to see Mike Waybourn as the Parade Marshal. NN tried to carjack Gene Stark’s way cool classic car, but ole Gene snatched those keys from NN’s hot little hand before she could get ’em in the ignition. So, NN is headed to the fair this weekend (barbecue cookoff is Saturday and NN LOVES her barbecue!) and all of next week and next weekend, and hopes to see “ewe” at the fair!


B7

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Stepping up to the

Community helped make $600,000 Ricketts Park renovation possible LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Local Connie Mack World Series ballplayers and fans will have one more thing to be proud of at this year’s tournament after the renovation of Ricketts Park’s entrance was unveiled during a July 30 ribbon cutting ceremony. Local elected officials and the Farmington Chamber of Commerce Redcoats celebrated the renovation project, which includes a brand new ticket area and retail space. “I can’t say enough about the (Connie Mack committee) and the appreciation for the people who made this project possible. The fundraising process is a challenging task – without the giving of the people who have a love for the game, community, and the kids,” said Kim Carpenter, Connie Mack World Series Association president. The project cost was more than $600,000 and much of the money was raised through donations

by residents and businesses. “I think it is a testament to the community sport and spirit here. This is great to see the community come out and support this,” Farmington Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs Director Cory Styron said. At the entrance, hundreds of bricks on the ground have donors’ names etched into them. Plaques, also recognizing the donors, line the entrance. Uselman Construction was the project contractor, along with eight subcontractors – ABC Door Company, Four Suns Builders, Medallion Heating Inc., National Roofing, Nightlight Electric, Southwest Masonry, Sun Glass, and M&R Plumbing. “The big thing is the excitement and how great it looks. We still have some work to do but I think overall it really is a great attribute to local baseball – and the positive comments we have heard have been great,” Carpenter explained. On Friday, Aug. 2, the 49th first pitch will be

Connie Mack World Series Association President Kim Carpenter and Farmington City Councilor Dan Darnell cut the ribbon at the unveiling of the new Rickett’s Park entrance on July 30. Carpenter and Darnell are surrounded by members of the Chamber of Commerce Redcoats.

thrown at the Connie Mack tournament, which is the longest-standing amateur baseball tournament in the United States. At the ribbon cutting, the Farmington baseball team, Strike Zone, expressed excitement about the ballpark’s renovated entrance. “This is really an honor for everyone to come together and get this done

for us. Just to help out the entire city and make us feel more important,” said Jacy Cave, Strike Zone pitcher. Cave will play for the New Mexico Junior College baseball team this fall, as pitcher and first baseman. Ricketts Park, which is owned by the city of Farmington, was built in 1963 and the first Connie Mack tournament happened in

the summer of 1965. Since that time, Ricketts Park has undergone several renovation projects, including the construction of a $200,000 wall, upgrading the bathrooms and locker rooms, adding showers, and making lighting improvement to the park. “You look at how things have evolved and where we are today. One thing is Farmington, San Juan

County, and the people here are not complacent. They are here to provide excellence,” Carpenter said. Farmington City Councilor Dan Darnell also expressed thanks to everyone who donated to the newest renovation project. “This was such a great partnership. If you look around at the names and the bricks and plaques, this just didn’t happen because someone snapped their finger, there were so many people involved in putting this all together.” Carpenter said the renovation of the park’s entrance is the first phase of several future phases. “We will continue to make this venue better, and the aesthetics. This is the first phase and it will continue as we raise money for various phases and needs.” This year’s Connie Mack World Series begins on Aug. 2 and ends on Aug. 9. Along with the Farmington Strike Zone, there are three teams from Texas playing as well as teams from Illinois, Southern California, and Puerto Rico.


B8

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

CONNIE MACK WORLD SERIES

Welcome Connie Mack Players and Fans!

August 2 - 9, 2013

Partners Assisted Living Services

PA LS

B9

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

313 N. Locke Ave.

505-325-9600

For all your insurance needs. STAN BAKER 424 E. Main • 505-327-5077 stan@acins.net • www.armstrongcouryinsurance.com

ROUND 1

ROUND 2

ROUND 3

ROUND 4

ROUND 5

ROUND 6

ROUND 7

1/2 off ALL APPETIZERS

SOUTH TROY DODGERS (North Atlantic) Winner #1 Game #1 5:15 Friday, August 2 EAST COBB YANKEES (Southeast) Game #8 Winner #8 5:15 Monday, August 5 D-BAT LEACH (National Qualifier) Game #2 8:00 Friday, August 2 Winner #2 STRIKEZONE (Host) Bye ARECIBO LOBOS (Puerto Rico) Winner #3 Game #3 Winner #3 12:00 Saturday, August 3

with purchase of entree. Limit one per table. Expires 8/31/2013

Game #16 5:15 Thurs., Aug. 8

Game #18 5:30 Fri., Aug. 9

Game #15 7:30 Wed., August 7

TEXAS STIX (South Plains) Game #5 7:30 Saturday, August 3 MIDLAND REDSKINS (East Central)

Bye Winner #4 Game #9 7:30 Monday, August 5

Game #12 7:30 Tue., August 6

TAX FREE WEEKEND!

Southern California Renegades

Great shoes, fair Great shoes, fair prices, excellent service, no games!

124 Main St • Farmington M-F 9-6 Sat 9-5

Bye

Game #16 7:30 Thurs., Aug. 8

Do You Hear... but Don’t Understand? The industry is changing but our commitment to our clients and our service has not.

Loser #1 Game #11 5:15 Tue., August 6 Loser #9

Loser #4 Winner #7 Game #7 7:30 Sunday, August 4 Game #10 12:00 Tue., August 6 Loser #5 Loser #8

2401 San Juan Blvd • Farmington

visit us at www.ecistaffing.com

Game #14 5:15 Wed., August 7

Sandia Hearing Aids has locations in Cortez, Durango, and Farmington N.M. to service you and your Hearing Aid needs

David & Jessica Saxon Established 1958

Game #13 12:00 Wed., August 7

We work everday to earn and keep your trust. Call today for a FREE Hearing Test

800-329-0266

Remaining Teams Winner 6 Winner 8 Winner 10 Winner 11 Winner 12 Loser 12

All games are PM. *After the third round, pairings will be determined each round by Rule 11 - AABC Official Handbook (Remember that Winners vs. Winners and Losers vs. Losers if both Losers games are natural)

505-326-6644

2901 E. 20th St. • Farmington 505-324-8877 • 324-8066 Fax

Bye

Loser #2 Winner #6 Game #6 5:15 Sunday, August 4 Loser #3 Bye

• Cargo Tailers • Flat Bed Trailers • Bed Liners • Running Boards • Tool Boxes • Fuel Tanks • Bed Rails • Grills & Bumpers • Camper Shells • Tonneau Covers • Bug Shields • Chrome Handles • Grill Guards

Welcome Connie Mack Players & Families

If Needed

Winner #9

Loser #1

2012 CONNIE MACK WORLD SERIES CHAMPIONS

505-326-2000 3500 E. Main St.

Game #19 If Needed 8:00 Fri., Aug. 9

SO. CAL. RENEGADES (West) ILLINOIS SPARKS (North Central) Game #4 5:15 Saturday, August 3 FROZEN ROPES (American Qualifier)

Curbside Carry Out• Catering

www.cmws.org Good Luck Connie Mack Players!

6007 E. Main • Farmington 505-327-1933 • Toll Free: 1-800-748-2816

A Downtown Tradition Since 1952

5:30am Mon-Fri• Open 6am Sat

119 E. Main Street Welcome Connie Mack Players, Family & Friends!

www.f-fire.com • email: sales @f-fire.com

@

Home of the “Heep” & the “Two Car Pile Up”

S

ts r o p

We Love Our Sports!

San Juan Nurseries 800 E. 20th St. • Farmington 505.326.0358 www.sanjuannurseries.com facebook.com/sanjuannurseries twitter.com/SJNurseries

Animas Valley Mall Across from the food court

505-324-0230


B10

Shirt Number 01 02 03 05 07 08 09 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 21 22 23 40 44

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

SOUTH TROY DODGERS

EAST COBB YANKEES

REGION: NORTH ATLANTIC COLORS: CARDINAL, GRAY LEAGUE: ATLANTIC COAST ELITE BB CITY: SOUTH TROY, NY

REGION: SOUTHEAST COLORS: NAVY, WHITE LEAGUE: METRO CONNIE MACK CITY: ATLANTA, GA

Bat Throw B/T LL RR RR RR LR RR RR LR LR RR RR RR LL RR LR RR RR RR LL

Player's Name MAVIST FREDERICK KEVIN SMITH NICO CHURCH GREG HOTALING DYLAN SPRAGUE JOHN VALENTE CHRIS LA VORGNA DAN MAYNARD JOE FORAN RYAN MC GRATH KEVIN CONNOLLY WILL HEWITT CHRIS MILLER RYAN HENCHEY JUSTIN YURCHAK ERIC MUELLER DAVID MILLER TYLER CHILDROSE MIKE PASTORE

Year Grad. Position Age Height Wgt HS/College OF 18 5'09" 170 2013 SS, P 17 5'11" 165 2014 OF 19 6'04" 180 2013 OF, IF 18 5'07" 175 2013 IF 18 5'11" 175 2012 P 18 6'01" 180 2014 OF 18 6'02" 185 2012 C, OF 16 5'10" 185 2015 3B, SS 18 6'01" 180 2013 1B, P 18 6'01" 195 2012 P 19 6'00" 185 2012 P 18 6'00" 180 2013 OF 18 6'00" 185 2013 C 17 5'10" 165 2013 3B, SS 16 6'01" 190 2014 OF 18 6'02" 175 2013 P, OF 18 6'02" 175 2013 P, OF 17 6'02" 175 2014 P 18 5'11" 195 2012

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 33 LOST: 7 TIED: COACHES KEVIN ROGERS MANAGER GARY SPRAGUE ASSISTANT COACH TODD BRADLEY ASSISTANT COACH WAYNE JONES PITCHING COACH GEORGE ROGERS OWNER/CEO

Shirt Number 01 02 03 05 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 22 24 25 29 32 34 40

Player's Name STEPHEN WRENN, JR RYAN GRIDLEY WILL CRAIG WADE BAILEY JASON DELAY ELI DICKENS JORDAN VERSTEEG MATTHEW GORST BRANDON GOLD MASON WARD CONNOR JUSTUS SETH PIERCE CONNOR JONES BRYAN WHITE PATRICK WISEMAN TANNER SHELTON MATT PHILLIPS NATHANIEL LOWE PAYTON SMITH ERIC KNOX CODY HARDAGE MATT MIXON

D-BAT LEACH Player's Name HUNTER COURSON KRAMER ROBERTSON JAKE ROGERS NICK RAMOS WILL FOX LAWSON VASSAR LUKE HOYL MATT HERRICK JAKE ELLIOTT SETH JONES BRYANT COLLIER SHELDON NEUSE SEAN THOMPSON OCTAVIO RODRIGUEZ AUSTIN HUCKABA NIKO BUENTELLO GRANT SCHNEIDER TY BOLAND LUKE JONES RYAN THOMAS QUINTON PILE JACOB PATTERSON

Bat Throw B/T RR RR RR RR LR RR RR RR RR LL LR RR RR LL RR LR RR LL RR LR RR LL

Year Grad. Position Age Height Wgt HS/College C, OF 18 5'11" 180 2012 IF 18 5'10" 170 2013 C 18 6'01" 185 2013 OF 18 5'08" 170 2013 IF 18 6'00" 160 2013 P 18 6'03" 190 2013 UT 18 6'00" 185 2013 P 18 6'03" 185 2013 P 18 6'07" 200 2013 P 18 6'02" 190 2013 OF 18 6'02" 210 2013 IF, P 18 6'00" 190 2013 P 18 6'01" 195 2013 P 18 6'05" 190 2013 OF 18 5'10" 170 2013 IF 19 6'03" 210 2013 P 17 6'03" 200 2014 P 18 6'00" 200 2013 P 19 6'03" 180 2012 IF, P 18 6'04" 230 2013 P 18 5'09" 165 2013 P 17 6'02" 185 2014

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 33 LOST: 4 TIED: 0 COACHES PAT LEACH MANAGER ROSS HAWLEY ASSISTANT MANAGER JB GADD ASSISTANT COACH JEFF THOMAS TEAM ADMINISTRATOR HANK HARPER BAT BOY

Shirt Number 02 03 04 06 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 18 19 20 24 25 27

ARECIBO LOBOS Position OF, P SS OF P 1B, LF IF OF P P OF P P 3B 3B, P C P OF P P C

Age 19 18 18 17 19 18 18 18 18 17 18 17 18 18 18 18 17 18 18 18

Height 5'08" 5'09" 5'11" 6'00" 6'00" 5'11" 5'11" 5'07" 6'00" 6'01" 6'00" 6'00" 5'11" 6'01" 6'00" 5'09" 6'00" 6'00" 5'09" 5'07"

Wgt 185 140 180 150 192 160 170 145 180 165 135 145 160 180 170 135 150 150 145 180

Year Grad. HS/College 2012 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2013 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2013 2012 2012 2014 2012 2013 2013

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 22 LOST: 3 TIED: COACHES RAFAEL PEREZ MANAGER JAVIER CORNIER ASST. BUS. MGR LUIS RIVERA COACH ROBERTO SANTA COACH P DWIGHT RIVERA OWNER GABRIELA CORNIER BAT GIRL

Bat Throw Player's Name B/T CONNOR DUGAN RR JEREMY JOHNSON RR MATT HUFFHINES LL BYRON MYERS RR CODY BOWER RR AUSTIN TAFT RR BEN WILEY RR MATT MARTIN LR IAN DOUGHTY RR ALEC TAFT RR DANNY ROWLEY RR TRISTIAN RIZNEK RR JACY CAVE RR CONNOR CALVERT RR INDALECIO ORLANDO ROMO RR SEAN BLANCHARD RR DILLAN VIGIL RR ZAC ALGRIM RR CONNOR MAYES RR CLAY MILLER LL

Bat Throw B/T LL LR LR LR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RL LL RR RR RR RR LR RR RR RR LR

Position Age OF 18 2B, SS 18 3B, SS 18 C, 1B, 3B 17 P 18 P 18 OF 18 C, 1B, 3B 18 P, 3B 18 P 18 OF 18 P, 1B 18 P 18 IF, OF 18 OF 18 P 18 P 18 IF, OF 18 P 18 C 18 P, 1B 18 P, OF 18

Height 5'10" 5'08" 5'10" 6'01" 6'02" 6'01" 5'08" 6'00" 6'01" 5'10" 6'01" 6'01" 6'02" 5'11" 6'02" 6'01" 6'05" 6'00" 6'03" 5'11" 6'05" 5'11"

Wgt 155 160 185 200 230 190 165 220 197 155 185 200 210 175 185 175 253 170 190 185 220 175

Year Grad. HS/College 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

Shirt Number 02 03 05 06 07 09 11 13 14 15 16 17 21 22 23 25 27 30 32 33 34 42

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 31 LOST: 5 TIED: 0 COACHES GARRICK PRANCHKE MANAGER BRIAN MC LAIN ASST, COACH

Age 18 18 18 19 18 18 19 18 19 18 18 18 19 19 18 18 19 18 18 18

Height 6'00" 6'00" 6'03" 5'11" 5'11" 6'00" 5'11" 6'02" 5'10" 5'11" 6'00" 5'07" 6'02" 6'01" 6'01" 5'08" 6'00" 6'00" 6'04" 5'11"

Wgt 170 180 185 190 155 180 175 185 160 165 200 155 195 215 195 185 175 195 200 190

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 49 LOST: 4 TIED:0 COACHES JAMES BEAVERS, MANAGER HERSCHEL BLOOM, ASST. MANAGER NICK SCHERER, COACH DAVID BOYD, COACH JOE HUDSON, COACH BRYAN FARMER, PITCHING COACH EDDIE BURNS, PITCHING COACH TJ RICH, COACH MANUEL DASILVA, TEAM MANAGER ANDREW MAXWELL BULL PEN CATCHER RENE BEAVERS, BUSINESS MGR

Year Grad. Position Age Height Wgt HS/College IF 18 5'10" 185 2013 2B, SS 18 6'00" 170 2013 P, OF 18 6'00" 175 2013 P 18 6'01" 185 2013 OF 18 6'01" 185 2013 OF 18 5'09" 175 2013 P 17 6'05" 190 2014 SS, OF, IF 17 5'10" 165 2014 P, OF 18 6'03" 195 2013 IF 17 5'09" 160 2014 C 19 6'01" 205 2012 IF 17 6'01" 180 2014 P, 1B 18 6'03" 175 2013 OF 17 6'00" 170 2014 P 19 6'02" 200 2012 OF 18 5'10" 160 2013 3B 18 5'11" 170 2013 C 16 6'00" 195 2014 P 17 6'02" 200 2013 P 19 6'01" 190 2013

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 28 LOST: 7 TIED: 0 COACHES ADAM MORRISSEY, MANAGER ELI FREESE ASSISTANT MANAGER RYAN FRALEY ASSISTANT COACH DAMIAN LOVATO ASSISTANT COACH CHAD THORNTON, BAT BOY JACOB THORNTON, BAT BOY CHAD A THORNTON BUSINESS MGR

Player's Name A.J. PUCKETT DARREN MILLER JOE CORRIGAN CHRIS DIXON AARON DI GIAMARINO DANIEL PATZLAFF ALEX LAYTON RYAN KAYODA ISAIAH TERRAZES TYSON MILLER CHRIS CASTELLANOS FRANKIE RIOS BROCK LUNDQUIST JOE PRIOR BRIAN SERVEN GRANT DYER PEDRO FIERROS TREVOR HALL TURNER BUIS JACOB NIX LUCAS HERBERT GAVIN COLLINS

Bat Throw B/T SR RR RR RR RR SR RR RR RR RR LL RR LR RR RR RR RR RR LR RR RR RR

Position P 2B, 3B, P 1B P P, LF 2B, SS OF P P P P SS CF RF 3B, P P P P LF P C C, RF

Age 18 17 18 18 18 17 18 18 18 18 17 18 17 18 18 18 18 16 17 17 16 18

Height 6'04" 5'09" 6'03" 6'01" 6'00" 6'00" 6'00" 6'02" 6'01" 6'04" 5'11" 5'11" 5'11" 6'01" 6'02" 6'01" 6'01" 6'03" 6'01" 6'04" 6'00" 6'01"

Wgt 180 170 200 200 170 175 170 180 200 185 175 185 175 200 190 170 175 205 185 215 175 200

Year Grad. HS/College 2013 2014 2013 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2015 2013

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 41 LOST: 6 TIED: COACHES SI PETTROW MANAGER BRUCE BROWN COACH CRAIG JURCZYK COACH JEFF BROWN COACH BILLY LASHER COACH PAT EVANS COACH

FROZEN ROPES Shirt Number Player's Name

02 03 04 05 06 07 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 25 29 38 39

BRADY USHERWOOD JORDAN GOODE CORY SCHEIBNER LUKE HAMBLIN LANDON WILSON BRYAR BARNES BRETT GANNAWAY JOE BAKER JORDAN GIBBS COOPER COLDIRON ANTHONY HERRERA TYLER JOHNSON CARSON CHILTON JESSE COX TANNER SONNENBERG MICHAEL BRINSKA BRIAN DEAVER GRANT GLAZE TAYLOR BECERRA KEENAN WINGFIELD HUNTER SEALES LOGAN MICHAELS

Bat Throw B/T

RR RR RR LL LL RR RR RR RR RR RR LR RR RR LR RR LL RR RR RR RR RR

Year Grad. Position Age Height Wgt HS/College

SS, 2B C P OF, P P C, P P SS, 2B OF, SS 2B, SS 2B, P C P 1B, OF 3B, 1B P, C OF, P P 1B P OF P

18 19 18 19 18 17 17 17 18 18 18 18 18 18 17 18 19 19 18 18 18 18

5'11" 5'11" 6'00" 6'00" 5'11" 6'00" 6'03" 5'11" 5'11" 5'11" 5'09" 5'09" 6'00" 6'02" 6'01" 6'03" 6'01" 6'05" 5'11" 6'01" 6'01" 6'02"

165 205 170 165 175 170 175 165 190 165 160 175 165 190 170 200 180 200 205 190 190 205

2013 2012 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 37 LOST: 16 TIED: COACHES DANNY FLORENCE MANAGER ZAC SENF ASST. COACH COREY THORNTON ASST. COACH

MIDLAND REDSKINS REGION: EAST CENTRAL COLORS: NAVY, MAIZE LEAGUE: QUEEN CITY CONNIE MACK CITY: CINCINNATI, OH

REGION: SOUTH PLAIN COLORS: SCARLET, ROYAL LEAGUE: SUPER 8 CITY: DALLAS, TX Position OF, P SS P P IF 3B, OF UT P, SS P 2B OF, 1B P, OF P P C, 1B OF P C, 1B P C

Year Grad. HS/College 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2015 2013 2012 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014

REGION: AMERICAN COLORS: NAVY, RED, WHITE LEAGUE: BOYS BASEBALL, INC. CITY: MCKINNEY, TEXAS

TEXAS STIX Bat Shirt Throw Number Player's Name B/T 01 HAYDEN PARKER LL 03 MASON BAKER RR 04 ZACHARY KORNELY RR 06 JACOB DE LA CRUZ RR 07 CASEY DICKERSON RR 09 CONNER MC GUIRE RR 11 TARAN KILIAN RR 12 TANNER BUXTON RR 14 JOHN WESTON SIMMS RR 17 MACKAY JACOBSEN LR 18 CHRISTIAN GONZALES RR 21 DALTON ALGEINE RR 22 TY DAMRON LL 23 ANDREW PICCIN RR 28 ZACHARY JENKINS RR 29 LUCAS WEARDEN LR 32 JON CHIDESTER RR 33 HUNTER SOUTHERLAND S R 34 LOGAN SCHULTE RR 38 CLARK KAHAWAII RR

Wgt 173 175 215 180 195 175 185 212 185 170 190 205 190 200 220 210 175 230 180 205 210 175

REGION: WEST COLORS: NAVY, WHITE, RED LEAGUE: USA PREMIER BASEBALL CITY: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

ILLINOIS SPARKS Player's Name COREY KRUPSKE DAVID CRONIN DAN DURKIN TOMMY HAYES KYLE CRAWFORD JAMES FRAINEY KEVIN SICHER SCOTT FOLTZ YIANNI PAVLOPOULOS MATT MILLER BRYAN KLENDWORTH AUSTIN DODSON JACK GAINER BEAU FILKINS CONNOR MCLAIN CONNOR RYAN BRIAN HENRY BILLY QUIRK ERIC DUZAN TOM SPEAR ALEC NELSON CHAD DEGROOT

Height 6'02" 5'09" 6'03" 5'08" 6'00" 5'10" 6'06" 6'02" 6'02" 6'04" 6'00" 6'01" 6'02" 6'02" 6'05" 6'03" 6'01" 6'03" 5'11" 6'03" 6'05" 5'10"

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RENEGADES

REGION: NORTH CENTRAL COLORS: RED, BLACK, WHITE LEAGUE: ILLIANA CITY: ORLAND PARK, IL Shirt Number 06 08 09 11 13 14 15 16 18 21 22 23 25 27 30 34 40 44 48 50 59 87

Age 18 17 18 17 18 18 18 18 18 17 18 16 17 19 16 18 18 1B, OF, 3B17 P, OF 18 OF, P 17 C 17 C, OF 17

REGION: HOST COLORS: NAVY, RED LEAGUE: FABC CITY: FARMINGTON, NM

REGION: PUERTO RICO COLORS: RED, BLUE, WHITE LEAGUE: FABIAN PEREZ, ARECIBO CITY: ARECIBO, PUERTO RICO Bat Shirt Throw Number Player's Name B/T 03 ELIEZER CRUZ LL 11 JEREMY RIVERA VALERA S R 17 NICOLAS LUGO RR 19 ALEX CHRISTOBAL VIDOT R R 22 MILTON ADORNO RR 29 ARNIEL RIVERA OLAVARRIA R R 31 JOHNNY RUIZ PIZARRO S R 32 MARVIN GALARZA RR 34 ROBERTO SANTA RR 36 JAY FELICIANO RR 38 JOSE CHAPARRO MUNIZ R R 39 JOSHUA PEREZ RR 40 STEVEN VELAZQUEZ RR 41 ANGEL PEREZ RR 42 IAN RUIZ RR 44 HECTOR TORRES RR 49 ANDY NIEVES RR 51 FELIPE CABRERA LL 65 KEVIN SERRANO LL 77 ALFREDO PEREZ RR

Position OF IF IN, OF, P IF, OF C P, C, UT P P IF, OF, P P, OF, 1B IF P, OF P P P, OF, 1B P P

STRIKEZONE CARDINALS

REGION: NATIONAL COLORS: COLUMBIA BLUE, RED LEAGUE: BOYS BASEBALL, INC CITY: DALLAS, TX Shirt Number 02 03 04 05 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 16 19 20 22 23 24 28 34 47 51 55

Bat Throw B/T RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR LL RR LL LL RR LR LL RR LR RR RR RR RR

Year Grad. HS/College 2013 2013 2013 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2013 2013 2012

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 31 LOST: 8 TIED: COACHES NICK HEITZ MANAGER BRETT RAY COACH DAX POWELL COACH SHANE DAVENPORT COACH 8

Shirt Number Player's Name

Bat Throw B/T

Year Grad. Position Age Height Wgt HS/College

02 03 04 05 08 09 10 12 13 15 17 18 22 24 25 27 28 29 32 34 38 40

LL RR RR RR RR LR LL RR SR RL LR RR LR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR

P IF P SS OF OF OF IF P P OF, 1B C P P P P P C OF P P P

WYATT SHORT ZACH BECKNER TRAVIS LAKINS DEREK DELER JR MANUEL RODRIGUEZ JR JACK SCHAAF ANDREW BENINTENDI JACOB RICHMOND TJ NICHTING ZACH COOK JOSEPH GELLENBECK CHUCKIE ROBINSON III TANNER SCOTT JOHN WESLEY RAY CORY WILDER CHRIS MOURELLE STORM RYNARD JARETT RINDFLEISCH ZACH SHANNON TJ ZEUCH JR MATT RUPPENTHAL BROCK BARGER

18 18 19 18 18 17 19 18 18 18 18 18 19 18 18 18 17 17 17 18 17 17

5'10" 5'11" 6'01" 5'10" 5'11" 6'01" 5'10" 6'02" 5'10" 6'02" 6'06" 6'02" 6'02" 6'04" 6'04" 6'02" 6'00" 6'01" 6'02" 6'08" 6'04" 6'07"

170 170 165 170 180 185 160 185 150 190 220 220 210 195 195 175 178 210 210 220 225 230

2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2014 2013 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2014

Team Record for Year : 2013 WON: 42 LOST: 3 TIED: COACHES J.P. HAYDEN, JR., MANAGER DAVE EVANS, ASST. MANAGER MARK HOPKINS, COACH BRIAN HILER , BUS. MANAGER BART HAMMACK , COACH NEIL WEISS, TRAINER BILL SCOTT, STATISTICIAN CHUCK WARDEN, COACH DR. DENVER STANFIELD TEAM PHYSICIAN

Welcome Connie Mack Players! Good Luck! 505-324-2008 • 825 N. Sullivan • Each franchise is independently owned & operated


MM REAL ESTATE

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

This big family home at 4771 Sundance Road in Farmington has enough extras and space to satisfy the needs of everyone in your family. For Mom, there’s a huge open kitchen with a center island that includes a cook top and more cabinets than she will ever need. It also includes ceramic tile floors and stainless appliances. There are two separate living areas that allow the parents and the kids to entertain separately or get together for game night. Everyone will love the beautiful plush green backyard that can be accessed from the family room, dining room or master suite. Mom and Dad will enjoy the large master suite that includes a walk-in closet, a master bath with double vanities, a garden tub, sit-

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

ting area and a space that could be a sunroom for Mom or an office for both. With four bedrooms and two baths there’s more than 2,700 square feet of space for the family. The open floor plan assures easy access to everyone. There is an attached oversized garage, refrigerated central air conditioning, and sprinkler systems and landscaping in both the front and backyards. This home, in the Sunrise Subdivision, has been pre-inspected and is ready for you and your family to move right in. Priced at $379,000, you can call Sam Todd at RE/MAX of Farmington, 505.327.4777, for more information or to set up a private showing.

fÉÅxà{|Çz yÉÜ

everyone

B11


B12

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Farmington

MM

Bloomfield

Aztec

  

Kirtland

   

MM  

Sunday, 1:00 - 3:00pm

LISTINGS   

5950 E. Jackrabbit Junc. • Farmington Nice SW style home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, single level on 2.5 Acres fully fenced...vinyl, chain link and Vinyl white rail. 2 car oversized garage with unique man cave and extra storage.

Bill Allen 505-793-2661 CENTURY21 SoWesCo Realty 505-325-2100

$

357,000

2310 Southside River Rd. • Farmington

5001 Hallmarc Dr. • Farmington

2003 Oak Creek MH on .8 AC+/- with irrigation for yard and garden area. Large master with sitting room. New & newer floor covering & paint. Water feature with koi pond. Large concrete patios, pergola & hot tub, RV access, covered porch & patio, Stainless steel appliances, custom cabinets & island with wet bar. Double carport.

Very nice 2 story Victorian farm house on 1 +/- irrigated acre (irr. as per owner) Halford Ditch also well for irrigation, large covered patio, pergula, outdoor fireplace, an 8 x 10 storage, a 14 x 24 block shed/shop/storage.

Bill Allen 505-793-2661 CENTURY21 SoWesCo Realty 505-325-2100

$

Bill Allen 505-793-2661

211,000

CENTURY21 SoWesCo Realty 505-325-2100

$

295,000

Hopi Street shooting

Police arrest, charge Wilson, with murder DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune A man, who originally told police he had nothing to do with a July 27 shooting on Hopi Street, has been arrested and charged with murder. When Levi Wilson, 31, of Kirtland, showed up at San Juan Regional Medical Center Saturday evening for treatment of a gunshot wound to the left hand and right arm he claimed he had been shot in an incident separate from the Hopi Street shooting that left one man dead and three others injured. Wilson of Kirtland was not initially a suspect, but after further investigation the Farmington Police Department realized Wilson allegedly fired the shot that killed Christopher Valdez, an innocent bystander. Valdez, 40, reportedly heard gunshots being fired and stepped out of his house to see what was happening. That’s when he was shot in the chest and died at the scene. The shooting happened at 101 E. Hopi St., where Michael Tafoya, 27, was

living. Tafoya reportedly had several guns laid out in front of him, when Lawrence Kellywood, 26, of Kirtland, and Wilson showed up at his home. Tafoya told police he did not know Wilson or Kellywood and he doesn’t know why they came to his door. He also said that Kellywood fired first, according to Police Det. Sgt. Brandon Lane. After the first shot was fired a gun fight ensued, but authorities are not certain why. “We haven’t had anybody give a clear motive for why that happened,” Lane said. Lt. Taft Tracy said the incident seems to be isolated and not typical of the neighborhood. “We had a situation for whatever reason where somebody didn’t like somebody else and they decided to have a shootout. It could happen anywhere in Farmington, and we need to be prepared to react to that,” Police Lt. Taft Tracy said when asked about the safety of the neighborhood. In the area of North Orchard, there are a lot of rental units and the police department does respond

to calls about transients walking north on Orchard as they travel to get to Brookside Park, Tracy said. “As far as violent crime, I wouldn’t say it’s greater in that area than anywhere else in Farmington.” In this case, Tafoya was reportedly shot by both Wilson and Kellywood. He suffered gunshot wounds to the left arm and armpit. Also injured was Kathleen Keck, 26, who received treatment for gunshot wounds to her right arm and left chest. Both Keck and Tafoya are expected to recover. Kellywood was shot in the face and arm and is expect to recover. He has the longest criminal record of all those reportedly involved in the shooting incident. Kellywood faced several criminal charges in 2007 including robbery, driving under the influence and battery on a peace officer. He pleaded no contest to those charges in district court, according to nmcourts.com. In January 2010, Kellywood was charged with and pleaded to shoplifting, driving without a license

and fleeing from a police officer, court records show. He pleaded no contest to a criminal sexual contact charge in July 2011, and also faced a drug charge from February of this year. After the shooting incident, he faces a charge of attempted murder in the first degree. Wilson’s criminal history

was limited to traffic violations, according to court records. Now, he is charged with first degree murder, attempted murder in the first degree, conspiracy to commit murder in the first degree, shooting at a dwelling and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Farmington Police are

continuing their investigation into the shooting and detectives are asking anyone with information about the vehicle in which Kellywood and Wilson may have fled the scene, or anyone with information about the shooting, to call Farmington Police at 505.599.1005 or Crime Stoppers at 505.334.8477.

San Juan Local First Business Members AMF Clean-up Animas Credit Union Armstrong Coury Insurance Artifacts Gallery AVI Animas Valley Insurance Bedrooms Plus Browns Shoe Fit Co. Budget Blinds Carpet One Floor & Home Cheney-Walters-Echols, Inc. Citizens Bank Denae’s Boutique Desert Hills Dental Employee Connection Fish Window Cleaning Four Corners Federal Credit Union Glyphic Design and Development Gwen Alston, CPA, PC Integrity Dental by James Cole Kathy’s Discount Party Store KNMI Vertical Radio

Live True 22, LLC Lusk Family Dentistry Majestic Media Millennium Insurance Namaste House Next Level Audio & Video Parker’s Office Products Partners Assisted Living Services S2 Consulting, Inc. San Juan Reproduction San Juan Veterinary Hopital Si Senor Spotless Solutions Sun Glass LLC The Shoe Shoppe The Vacuum Shoppe Three Rivers Brewery Ubru at Home Wal Art Gallery Wines of the San Juan

Thank you for Shopping Locally! Strengthen Your Local Economy... Each dollar you spend at independent businesses returns 3 times more money to our local economy than one spent at a chain a benefit we all can bank on.

www.SanJuanLocalFirst.org San Juan Local First is a non-profit organization.


B13

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Diabetes in dogs and cats

Keeping pets at healthy weight reduces risk Even dogs and cats eating healthy diets can suffer from diabetes. As with diabetes in humans, sometimes a dog’s body’s stops producing enough insulin or the cells of a dog’s body are unable to use the insulin that is produced. When either condition occurs, the result is diabetes mellitus, which causes excessive thirst and urination and extreme hunger accompanied by weight loss. To stabilize sugar levels, insulin therapy is the treatment at the onset of Type I Diabetes, and is usually required for the life of the dog. Cats, on the contrary, may have episodes of transient diabetes, or Type II Diabetes, which can be apt to be controlled by diet. Diabetes mellitus is a disease that manifests as an inability of the animal’s body to use carbohydrates (sugars) properly. This occurs either because the pancreas does not manufacture sufficient quantities of the hormone (insulin) which the body requires for this function, or because the body’s cells no

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson longer recognize insulin properly. The downside of this fundamental aberration in carbohydrate utilization is that these basic energyproviding nutrients (sugars) are not able to enter the body’s cells to “feed” them. Instead, they linger in the bloodstream while the body itself literally starves. By way of handling this starvation state, the body does things such as beginning to break down certain tissues – fats for example – and mobilize stored sugar (glucose) in the body in an attempt to generate energy with which to feed itself. In the absence of the insulin required to allow sugars to gain entry to the cells, these efforts typically lead to a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis. Moreover, when sensitive tissues such as the brain don’t re-

ceive the required amount of energy, serious neurologic disruption – and death – can result. Diabetes mellitus is considered a multifactorial disease in origin, meaning that a variety of factors play into its individual acquisition. In cats, obesity is considered a primary risk factor for diabetes. Certain drugs (such as corticosteroids) as well as a possible genetic predisposition (in Burmese cats) also contribute to developing the condition. In dogs, a genetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus plays a larger role than obesity or exposure to certain drugs. Symptoms in dogs and cats are similar • Excessive thirst and urination: This happens because the huge quantity

Answers to this week’s puzzles J A W A

I M A X

U T A H

N I N O

N O D E P O S I T

A S C A P

S H A L L

S A L M A

S P I T S

H A T H A

A K E E M

X K E I R E R S T H O S P M A O C K A E B A N E D Y M E I S R O S

P A N I C E N O S

A M T O O

C A T C H A B S U T S E N T A W I I S T H

R C O R H E W D E C E T O N B E Z A D A R S B O E L L Q U A U E N I Q U M U S A M E N R T H F R A E A M E

A M A J

G E T A T O A N N E T E O D O D M A A N O E S T S I A F L Y L S

H A S T A G E R T E A U O M E E L S R D V E P E D E T E U P L E S A L I N C I P O L B A L L E R A S E E S E A S T L I I N G K N O A H G R E S

L A I N

H E R E W E G A U G U I N

L A C T A S E U F Y O E A H B O

E V I T A

N I T T I

S L E E T

U N G E R

I N A N E

N E R T S

S P R I N K L E R

K E A N

I N T S

I O N S

A S T O

of sugar in the bloodstream spills into the urine and pulls water out of the bloodstream along with it, thereby causing increased urine production and urination. Increased drinking is the body’s way of trying to compensate for increased water loss through urination. Due to the high levels of bacteria-attracting sugar in the urine, urinary tract infections are a routine finding, as well. • Appetite increase paired with weight loss: This happens because when sugars cannot enter cells, the body is unable to effectively use the food it takes in as energy. Hunger is never satisfied despite a typically ravenous appetite, and weight loss is almost always a feature. Other symptoms may include: • Urinary accidents in the house • Vomiting • Dehydration • Lethargy (tiredness) Veterinarians may suspect canine diabetes if any suspicious clinical signs, such as increased drinking and/or urinating, have been observed at home. After performing a thorough physical examination, your veterinarian may recommend some of these tests to help confirm a diagnosis: • CBC, or complete blood count, and chemistry profile: When a pet is ill, these tests are commonly performed together during initial blood testing to provide information about the pet’s organ systems. The CBC and chemistry profile

may show dehydration, elevated blood sugar level, or other changes that occur with diabetes. • Fructosamine: Fructosamine is a protein in the blood that binds very securely to glucose. The fructosamine level is therefore a close estimation of the blood glucose level, but it is less likely to change due to stress and other factors that affect the blood glucose level. Additionally, the fructosamine level indicates where the blood sugar levels have been during the previous two to three weeks. In a dog with diabetes, the blood sugar levels are usually high for long periods of time, which would be reflected by an increased fructosamine level. Affected breeds Predisposed breeds include the Miniature Schnauzer, Standard Schnauzer, Poodle, Australian Terrier, Spitz, Bichon Frise, Samoyed, and Keeshond. Dogs of any breed, however, may acquire diabetes. In cats, the Burmese breed is predisposed. Treatment In the long term, dogs with diabetes are often treated by insulin injection to help the body’s needy cells use sugar more efficiently. Dietary changes can also help by tempering sudden spikes in blood sugar level. Insulin injections, however, are generally started at the time of diagnosis and are required long term to control the disease. Most commonly,

dogs require twice daily injections. In the short term, some patients require hospitalization. Some may even need intensive care should their presentation be complicated by a variety of other problems secondary to the diabetes – this is common scenario. After treatment begins, periodic blood and urine tests are generally recommended. This helps ensure that the insulin dosage is right for your dog. Your dog’s weight, appetite, drinking and urination, and attitude at home can all provide useful information that helps determine if his or her diabetes is being well managed. Your veterinarian will consider all of these factors when making recommendations for continued management. Many dogs live active, happy lives once their diabetes is well regulated. However, insulin therapy and regular monitoring at home and by your veterinarian are necessary for the rest of your dog’s life. Many pet owners use glucose tests to check their pet’s blood, just as people do! Prevention Keeping your dog at a healthy weight can help reduce his risk of developing diabetes. However, for dogs that are genetically predisposed, their risk for developing disease remains higher even if they maintain a healthy weight. A great source of information on diabetes is the w e b s i t e www.petdiabetes.com.

DON’T MISS OUT ON LOCAL NEWS! MM

Puzzles on page B14

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B14

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle ARTFUL THINKING By Tracy Bennett / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

4

5

19

Across 1 Whammy

54 Daughter of James II

5 Where les enfants might play

55 Where there’s Wi-Fi availability

9 Rendered speechless

57 Get ready to drive

15 Female lobsters

60 Former six-term senator from Indiana

19 Every which way 20 Subject for a mariachi band 21 Insubstantial

61 More yang than yin: Abbr.

22 Like Voldemort

62 Monetary bribes, in slang

23 Artist’s favorite spiritual?

64 What a star probably has

26 Ablution, e.g. 27 Firefighter ’s need, maybe 28 Summer Olympics host after London 29 ___ vu 30 Food item a cook might flip 32 Prescription pain medication 35 Nos. in a directory 37 Look for 38 Several, in Seville 40 Cool with what others are doing 42 Go (for) 43 Christmas song line from an artist? 47 Batman villain 51 What Mississippi cheerleaders ask for a lot 52 How you might do something gross 53 Cagney or Lacey: Abbr.

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

65 N.R.A. piece?: Abbr. 68 Artist’s favorite Broadway musical? 70 Revival meeting miracles

99 Cuts some slack

11 Topper

103 “Zero Dark Thirty” locale

12 Ancient

105 Castaway’s construction 107 Rough position? 108 Sedona maker 111 The Roman way 112 How the expert artist passed her exam? 116 “The Cosby Show” boy 117 Last word in the Torah 118 Rain man? 119 Inclination 120___ Club

71 ___ Zulu (warrior dubbed Africa’s Napoleon)

121 River that “sweats oil and tar” in T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land”

72 Atlantean superhero of DC Comics

122 Predoctoral tests, for short

73 ___ Field

123 Approximately

75 Defrocked villain on “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” 76 Vista opener? 77 Roman of film 81 Michigan college 82 ___ generis 83 Part of an umpire’s count 86 Put in writing 87 Parts of an orrery 89 Artist’s expression for “Such is life”? 92 Easter purchase 93 Worth all the hype, as a film

16 “On This Night of a Thousand Stars” musical

51

52

55

45

36

53

67

68

58

59

50

78

79

80

70 73

74

77 83 89

84

85

86

90

91

93

94

36 Before, poetically

103

104

111

112

116

117

118

119

120

121

122

123

97

49

64

95

96

48

60

63

82

92

18

54

69

88

17

42 47

62

16

37

46

61

87

15

31

41

57

81

14

22

35

56

66

13

34 What Morehouse College lacks

98

99

100 101 102

105 106

107

113

108 109 110

114

115

39 Little muchacho

45 First chimp to orbit Earth

10 Bronze

44

12

30

40

76

4 Certain Jaguar

98 Finger

39

43

11

26

34

75

44 Pay to cross town, maybe

95 “Tsk!”

33

72

3 Like old unrecyclable bottles

8 Buffet cabinet

32

10

29

71

42 Liz of “Garfield,” e.g.

7 South Korea’s ___ Tae Woo

28

25 Party host’s convenience

2 What’s big at the movies?

6 Playground retort

27

24 Flawed, as mdse.

33 “Laborare ___ orare” (Freemasons’ motto)

9

25

65

31 Reposed

8

21

18 Wintry mix

41 What the tipsy artist had at the bar?

5 Pre-exam feeling, maybe

24

17 Capone’s top henchman

1 Tatooine race in the “Star Wars” saga

9 Key of Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet: Abbr.

94 Snorkeling aids

15 Artist’s line of weary resignation?

38 Home of Kings Peak Down

23

38

7

20

13 Patchwork quilts have lots of them 14 “Good point”

6

46 Pay to cross town, maybe 47 Pop icon? 48 “The Odd Couple” role 49 Daft

56 What the artist confused people with?

66 “Congress ___ make no law …”

88 Watchful ones?

67 Actress Hayek 69 Prefix with poise

90 Access charge, of a sort

101 Some templegoers

58 Norse source for Loki lore

74 Pain and suffering

91 Debatable sighting

104 Birdbrain

59 Dash

77 “Gay” capital

93 Words to live by

106 “___ fair …”

60 Dairy consumer ’s enzyme

78 Summer lawn sight

95 Blurts (out)

79 New Jersey’s ___ University

96 ___ yoga

109 Discoveries of Michael Faraday

62 Erotic

80 QB mistakes: Abbr.

50 “Phooey!”

63 Good wife in “The Good Earth”

53 Gauntlet thrower ’s challenge

65 Org. protecting music copyrights

84 Turn to bone

82 Holy mlle. 85 Apiarist’s woe

100 Phycologist’s study

89 Holy city of Iran

102 Pro vote

110 Regarding

97 Arabic name meaning “wise”

113 Easter purchase

98 J. Carrol ___, Oscar nominee for “Sahara”

114 ___’easter 115 “Boardwalk Empire” network

thought for the week “Look at life through the windshield, not the rear-view mirror.”

— Byrd Baggett

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page B13


B15

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies 2 GUNS

SMURFS 2

Rating: R Synopsis: Two crooked undercover officers - one from the DEA and the other from the Navy - unknowingly lead investigations on the other in this crime thriller from director Baltasar Kormakur. Mark Wahlberg, Denzel Washington, and Bill Paxton head up the starring cast.

Rating: PG Synopsis: The Smurfs team up with their human friends to rescue Smurfette, who has been kidnapped by Gargamel since she knows a secret spell that can turn the evil sorcerer's newest creation - creatures called the Naughties - into real Smurfs.

RED 2 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: In RED 2, the high-octane action-comedy sequel to the worldwide sleeper hit, retired blackops CIA agent Frank Moses reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a missing portable nuclear device. To succeed, they'll need to survive an army of relentless assassins, ruthless terrorists and power-crazed government officials, all eager to get their hands on the next-generation weapon. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris, London and Moscow. Outgunned and outmanned, they have only their cunning wits, their old-school skills, and each other to rely on as they try to save the world-and stay alive in the process.

THE CONJURING Rating: R Synopsis: Before there was Amityville, there was Harrisville. "The Conjuring" tells the true story of Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga), world renowned paranormal investigators, who were called to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Forced to confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens find themselves caught in the most horrifying case of their lives.

PACIFIC RIM Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: When legions of monstrous creatures, known as Kaiju, started rising from the sea, a war began that would take millions of lives and consume humanity's resources for years on end. To combat the giant Kaiju, a special type of weapon was devised: massive robots, called Jaegers, which are controlled simultaneously by two pilots whose minds are locked in a neural bridge. But even the Jaegers are proving nearly defenseless in the face of the relentless Kaiju. On the verge of defeat, the forces defending mankind have no choice but to turn to two unlikely heroes-a washed up former pilot (Charlie Hunnam) and an untested trainee (Rinko Kikuchi)-who are teamed to drive a legendary but seemingly obsolete Jaeger from the past. Together, they stand as mankind's last hope against the mounting apocalypse.

THE LONE RANGER Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: From producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Gore Verbinski, the filmmaking team behind the blockbuster "Pirates of the Caribbean" franchise, comes Disney/ Jerry Bruckheimer Films' "The Lone Ranger," a thrilling adventure infused with action and humor, in which the famed masked hero is brought to life through new eyes. Native American spirit warrior Tonto (Johnny Depp) recounts the untold tales that transformed John Reid (Armie Hammer), a man of the law, into a legend of justice-taking the audience on a runaway train of epic surprises and humorous friction as the two unlikely heroes must learn to work together and fight against greed and corruption.

THE WOLVERINE Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Hugh Jackman returns as Wolverine in this sequel to the member of the X-Men's first solo outing. Mark Bomback and The Usual Suspects' Christopher McQuarrie penned the script, which takes its inspiration from the Chris Claremont/Frank Miller Marvel miniseries from the 1980s dealing with the character's adventures in Japan as he fights ninjas in the ceremonial garb of the samurai. Knight and Day's James Mangold directs.

R.I.P.D. Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds headline the 3D supernatural action-adventure R.I.P.D. as two cops dispatched by the otherworldly Rest In Peace Department to protect and serve the living from an increasingly destructive array of souls who refuse to move peacefully to the other side. Veteran sheriff Roy Pulsifer (Bridges) has spent his career with the legendary police force known as R.I.P.D. tracking monstrous spirits who are cleverly disguised as ordinary people. His mission? To arrest and bring to justice a special brand of criminals trying to escape final judgment by hiding among the unsuspecting on Earth. Once the wise-cracking Roy is assigned former rising-star detective Nick Walker (Reynolds) as his junior officer, the new partners have to turn grudging respect into top-notch teamwork. When they uncover a plot that could end life as we know it, two of R.I.P.D.'s finest must miraculously restore the cosmic balance...or watch the tunnel to the afterlife begin sending angry souls the very wrong way. Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.

DESPICABLE ME 2 Rating: PG Synopsis: Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment's worldwide blockbuster Despicable Me entertained audiences around the globe in 2010, grossing more than $540 million and becoming the 10th-biggest animated motion picture in U.S. history. In summer 2013, get ready for more Minion madness in Despicable Me 2.

TURBO Rating: PG Synopsis: A freak accident might just help an everyday garden snail achieve his biggest dream: winning the Indy 500.

THE HEAT Rating: R Synopsis: Uptight FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) and foul-mouthed Boston cop Shannon Mullins (Melissa McCarthy) couldn't be more incompatible. But when they join forces to bring down a ruthless drug lord, they become the last thing anyone expected: buddies. From Paul Feig, director of "Bridesmaids."

GROWN UPS 2 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns (with some exciting new additions) for more summertime laughs. Lenny (Adam Sandler) has relocated his family back to the small town where he and his friends grew up. This time around, the grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their kids on a day notoriously full of surprises: the last day of school.

Asleep At The Wheel by Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys. Formed out of reverence for Wills’ freewheeling, eclectic sensibility, Asleep at the Wheel and founder Ray Benson are said to have boldly defied the fickle lures of mainstream – and thrived – by keeping the distinctly American art form of Western Swing alive and kicking. “I think Bob Wills is one of the iconic figures of popular music – one of the people who set the standard in the way we do music today,” Benson said in an interview with CBS Sunday Morning. Typically featuring 8 to 11 musicians, the group has gone through myriad personnel changes – nearly 100 members have passed through the ranks – but the larger-than-life, 6’7” frontman Ray Benson has held the band together, keeping Asleep at the Wheel a viable recording and touring concern, maintaining devotion to classic-style Western Swing. Core members currently touring are Benson (lead guitar, vocals), Jason Roberts (fiddle, guitar, mandolin and vocals), David

Sanger (drums), David Earl Miller (base, vocals), Dan Walton (piano), Elizabeth McQueen (acoustic guitar and vocals) and Eddie Rivers (steel guitar, sax). Benson formed Asleep at the Wheel in Paw Paw, W.Va., in 1970 – playing straight-ahead country – but soon shifted to Western Swing, thanks to influences from Merle Haggard and Commander Cody, and moved the band’s base to Austin. Hit singles followed, including Choo Choo Ch’Boogie, The Letter That Johnny Walker Read, and One O’Clock Jump. The nine-time Grammy award-winning band has also been named “Best Country & Western Band” by Rolling Stone, as well as “Touring Band of the Year” by the Academy of Country Music. Benson received the Texas Medal of the Arts in 2011. Tickets for Asleep at the Wheel – $24/$34 – are available on-line at www.durangoconcerts.com, by calling 970.247.7657, or at the Ticket Office in the Welcome Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Down-

town Durango. All sales final. Showtime is 7:30 p.m., with doors to the Concert Hall and concessions – serving beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks – opening at 6:30 p.m. On show day, the box office at the Concert Hall will be open one hour prior to curtain, and remain open through intermission. When no intermission is scheduled, ticket sales will continue one hour past curtain. Purchase tickets to three or more Concert Hall productions in one sales transaction and receive 10 percent off each ticket. Discounts cannot be combined, and all sales final. The Community Concert Hall is a not-for-profit, multi-use performance venue located on the campus of Fort Lewis College. Its ability to bring a diverse spectrum of shows to Southwest Colorado is made possible through a partnership with the college, a state-supported, independent institution of higher education, and through financial and inkind contributions from generous members of the community.


B16

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

08/02/13-08/05/13

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts R

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

11:15 1:50 4:30 7:20 9:55 DAILY

1:30 7:10 DAILY

3:45 8:45 DAILY

11:50 2:25 5:05 7:35 10:10 DAILY PG

No Passes or Discounts PG 3D*

No Passes or Discounts R

PG-13

PG

PG

3:50 8:35 DAILY PG

3D*

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

4:40 9:20 DAILY

10:45 1:15 6:15 DAILY

10:40 4:20 10:00 DAILY

12:10 2:30 5:00 7:30 10:05 DAILY

PG

No Passes or Discounts 12:00 2:20 7:00 DAILY

11:20 2:00 4:25 6:50 9:30 DAILY

ANIMAS 10

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG 1:30 6:30 DAILY

No shows before 4pm on Tuesdays

PG-13

EVERY TUESDAY FREE KIDS SHOW

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts PG 3D*

Pickup your free tickets at any 7-2-11

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG 2:20 7:10 DAILY

2:00 6:50 DAILY

No Passes or Discounts PG-13 11:10 1:50 4:35 7:30 10:10 DAILY

PG

PG

PG

PG

(Allen 8 only) Tuesdays 9:00am 11:20am 1:40pm

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

1:20 7:00 DAILY

10:50 1:20 6:10 DAILY

PG-13 3D*

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

11:00 4:00 9:00 DAILY

10:30 4:10 10:00 DAILY

PG-13

11:40 4:20 9:10 DAILY

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

11:50 4:50 9:30 DAILY

1:10 7:05 DAILY R

PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts

COMING SOON

11:20 1:40 4:15 6:45 9:20 DAILY

August 7

August 7

12:00 2:30 5:15 7:40 10:05 DAILY

August 9

12:10 3:30 6:40 9:50 DAILY

August 9

August 16

12:50 3:40 6:20 9:20 DAILY

August 16

August 16

10:20 4:05 9:55 DAILY

August 21

August 23


Friday Aug. 2 Saturday Aug. 10

Aww Freak Out!

New ride give you a 360 degree view of the fair DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune It’s time to Freak Out at the San Juan County Fair Carnival. The new ride at this year’s fair is the Freak Out, a giant, quasi salt and peppershaker ride, where fairgoers are swung around 360 degrees, going upside down and all the way around. “The carnival is a big draw at the county fair,” said Billy Huish, fair board president. New rides

and ticket specials keep people coming back to enjoy the rides and the carnival midway. This year, while there will not be a Mega Pass, there will be ample opportunities to ride at discount prices. The carnival opens this Friday, Aug. 2, with a Pay One Price discount from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Riders will be able to pay $20 and ride all the rides they want for those four hours. On Saturday, the Pay One Price discount continues from 4 to 8 p.m.

Ronnie Huyckaby and Camille Sanders

The carnival will stay open Saturday until 11 p.m., but the “Pay One Price” bracelet will only be available from 4 to 8 p.m. The carnival also will be open Sunday from 5 to 11 p.m., even though the fairgrounds close at 8 p.m. Saturday. The real fair fun kicks off Monday, Aug. 5 with Kid Day and Carnival Special. “Everyone is a kid that day, when it comes to the carnival,” Huish said. While kids 12 and under get

Pam Tillis

into the fair free with two canned food items, the carnival special will include an unlimited ride bracelet for $20, good between the hours of 5 and 10 p.m. Tuesday brings a new special to the fair. It’s “Two for Tuesday,” when two carnival bracelets will be sold for the price of one between the hours of 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. “People get into the fair on a two-for-one price, and then the carnival has the discount as well,” Huish said.

The carnival will be open until 11 p.m. Tuesday, but the bracelets are good between the hours of 5 and 8 p.m. only. The “Two for Tuesday” discount also marks the last day for the “pay one price” bracelets at the county fair. The carnival will be open for regular-priced rides from 5 to 11 p.m. Aug. 7 and 8, from 5 p.m. to midnight Aug. 9, and 1 p.m. to midnight Aug. 10, which is the last day of the annual San Juan County Fair at McGee Park.

Bellamy Brothers

Three talented groups concerts Two nights of great entertainment Aug. 9 and 10 The San Juan County Fair will enjoy the music of three talented groups at the fair on Friday, Aug. 9, and Saturday, Aug 10. Friday Aug. 9 Pam Tillis, daughter of country music legend Mel Tillis, began her career at the age of 8 when she performed for the Grand Ole Opry. In the years since, Tillis has enjoyed a great fan base, with many of her songs topping the charts. Tillis’ hits include Maybe it Was Memphis, Shake the Sugar Tree, Cleopatra, Queen of Denial, Spilled Perfume, and Mi Vida Loca. In 2002, Tillis revived her singing career when she was signed by Sony Music Entertainment/Epic Records roots subsidiary Lucky Dog and debuted It’s All Relative: Tillis Sings Tillis, which is a collection of her father’s material. In 2007, Tillis launched her own record

label, Stellar Cat Records, and in 2013, she joined with Lorrie Morgan – a headliner at the 2012 San Juan County Fair – for a Grits and Glamour tour. Tillis is a popular country star and is expected to draw huge crowds at this year’s fair when she appears at 8:30 p.m. Friday night. Saturday Aug. 10 On Aug. 10, the Bellamy Brothers will take the stage at McGee Park for the fair. In the more than 37 years and 50-plus albums, the Bellamy Brothers also has a fan base that continues to follow them and enjoy their music. The Bellamy Brothers first big hit was Let Your Love Flow, which was a number one hit in 15 countries. Because of their international popularity, the Brothers have been traveling ever since, playing to big crowds across the world. Other hits the Bellamy Brothers have

given to the world of country music include If I Said You Had A Beautiful Body Would You Hold It Against Me and Redneck Girl. Once honored by Billboard as the Top Country Duo, the Bellamy Brothers will certainly have fans rocking and singing along when they appear at the San Juan County Fair. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 9 and 10, at 7 p.m. In addition to the music provided by seasoned country music stars such as Tillis and the Bellamy Brothers, Camille Sanders with Ronnie Huckaby of George Strait’s Ace in the Hole Band will perform both Friday and Saturday nights. First time in New Mexico, Camille Sanders with special guest, Ronnie Huckaby, of George Strait’s Ace In The Hole

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Friday Aug. 9 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Camille Sanders w/Ronnie Huckaby of George Strait’s Ace in the Hole Band 8:30 p.m. Pam Tillis Concert, Open Air Pavilion, Food Midway Saturday Aug. 10 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Camille Sanders w/Ronnie Huckaby of George Strait’s Ace in the Hole Band 8:30 p.m. Bellamy Brothers Concert All shows at the Open air Pavilion: there is no special admission fee to hear these talented singers. By paying the regular gate fee, visitors to the San Juan County Fair can enjoy some of the best that country music has to offer!


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Good eats!

BBQ Cookoff set for Aug. 3 at fairgrounds

LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune As a way to kick off the San Juan County Fair, several businesses and teams will participate in the annual BBQ cookoff that will open to the public at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, at McGee Park. The cook-off has been a tradition where groups cook their barbecue throughout the evening and then serve it to the public and

Good Luck!

to all the competitors at the 2013 San Juan County Fair From the San Juan County Fair Board

judges the next day. Tickets to attend the cook-off are $9 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Gwen Gonser, fair board member who oversees the BBQ , said at least 10 groups will participate in this year’s cook-off, including the companies Sunland Instruction, Inc., Enterprise Products, and H & S Valve, Inc. Carl Dallas has cooked his brisket for the cookoff since 2006. Each year, his team, Big Country BBQ , cooks up several tasty dishes to serve. “We get a different company to sponsor us and this year I believe it is Encana Corporation,” he said. Jenny Rogers also is a member of the team. Dallas said he enjoys cooking for the competition because of the “camaraderie” among the different groups. “We have gone through the ups and downs as far as teams participating, but we are on an upswing,” he said about the number of teams participating this year. “The public participation has already been tremendous.”

This year, Dallas and Rogers are cooking brisket, pork, a side dish and a

dessert for the competition. Dallas said that usually,

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Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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San Juan County Fair Board at the parade on Aug. 26.

Serving young people Fair board works hard to create fair memories for all For the members of the San Juan County Fair Board, serving the young people of San Juan County is an honor and a privilege. Several of the members of the board share their thoughts about the San Juan County Fair. Ben Hazelwood is the president of the fair board

and has served on the board for six years. “I look at this (serving on the board) as giving back to people who did this for me and my children. The success of the fair is because of the dedication of the board and the support of the community.” Hazelwood always looks forward to seeing Earl and

Dorothy North at the fair and never gets tired of Frito pie! Hazelwood also said people would be surprised that it takes an entire year to plan the week of the fair. Billy Huish is the vice president of the fair board. Huish has served on the fair board for 27 years and

* board C6

entertainment Band, will perform as the opening act on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 9 and 10, at 7 p.m. during the San Juan County Fair. Camille Sanders hails from Concan, Texas, and is a 17-year-old singer, songwriter, and musician. She has recorded two studio albums, performed across Texas – both solo and with her band – including several guest appearances on radio, television, and the famed Austin Rodeo and the San Antonio

Livestock Show and Rodeo. Ronnie Huckaby was born and raised in Waco, Texas. He began playing music at age 6 and formed his first band at 11. His professional career was then born and has led to his position for the last 31 years as the Band Leader and Pianist for country music superstar George Strait and the Ace In The Hole Band. Huckaby has performed at Camp David with George Strait, and fellow Ace In

The Hole Band Member, Rick McRae, for former President George H.W. Bush and First Lady Barbara Bush. When Ronnie is not on tour with George Strait, he and several of his musical colleagues have formed the Texas Jamm Band Featuring Members of George Strait’s Ace In The Hole Band. They perform regularly for fairs, festivals, corporate events, casinos, club dates, and rodeos across the country.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

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Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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County Fair Schedule Friday Aug. 2 Carnival Pay One Price Deadline for Open Horse Show Entries 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.: Commercial Booths set up Noon: Open Horse Show Entry Deadline, accepted in the Fair Office 6 p.m. – 10 p.m.: Carnival POP (pay one price - $20) 6 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 7:30 p.m.: New Country Auto’s Buck’n’ Bull Bash & Mini Bull Riding, Memorial Coliseum Saturday Aug. 3 Entry Day and BBQ Cookoff Carnival Pay One Price 10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.: Entries taken in agriculture products, food preservation, baking, decorated cakes & cookies in the Convention Center 10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.: Needlework, hobbies & crafts, fine arts, photography, gems & minerals, quilting, spinning & weaving, scarecrow & porcelain dolls in the Multiuse Building 8 a.m.: Open Horse Show, Memorial Coliseum 9 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.: Commercial Booths set up 4 p.m.: BBQ Cookoff (cooking begins earlier) Food Midway 4 – 8 p.m.: Fools Gold Band, Open Air Pavilion, Food Midway 4 – 8 p.m.: Carnival POP (pay one price - $20) 7:30 p.m.: New Country Auto’s Buck’n’ Bull Bash & Mini Bull Riding, Memorial

Coliseum 8 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 10 p.m.: Grounds Close Sunday Aug. 4 All Buildings Closed to the Public Livestock Check In 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Animals check in (beef, poultry, rabbit, goat, swine, lamb, horse & llama) **Goats, Beef, Swine, Lambs & Llamas must check in at RV 5 south entrance 4:30 p.m.: Rabbit Showmanship Test, Rabbit Barn 5 p.m.: NBHA Barrel Race, Memorial Coliseum 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 8 p.m.: Grounds Close Monday Aug. 5 Kids Day & Carnival Special Kids 12 and under admitted into the fair with two canned food items. All items will be donated to the ECHO Food Bank Kids Carnival Day (everyone is a kid) 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. $20 ride bracelet Wizard Challenge – Convention Center 8 a.m.: Fairgrounds Open 8 a.m.: Goat Show, Jeanette Nichols Show Ring, Lamb Barn 8 a.m.: Rabbit Show, Rabbit Barn 9 a.m.: Poultry Judging, Stark Poultry Barn 10 a.m.: Convention Center Opens 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.: Carnival POP (pay one price $20) 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 5 p.m. – 9 p.m.: Floriculture Entries

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Taken, Multi - Use Building 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.: Karaoke Contest Hosted by Clear Channel Radio, Small Patio 6 p.m.: Outhouse Race Check In Rabbit Showmanship, Jeanette Nichols Show Ring, Lamb Barn (This will begin 1 and ½ hours after the completion of the rabbit show) 6:30 p.m.: Outhouse Race, Behind Food Concessions 7 p.m.: Caitlin Cannon and the Artillery, Open Air Pavilion, Food Midway 10 p.m.: All Buildings Close 11 p.m.: Fairgrounds Close

Concessions 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.: Karaoke Contest Hosted by Clear Channel Radio, Small Patio 6:30 p.m.: Barnyard Olympics, Memorial Coliseum 7 p.m.: Gospel Night, Open Air Pavilion, Food Midway 10 p.m.: All Buildings Close 11 p.m.: Fairgrounds Close Wednesday Aug. 7 Special Needs Day & Senior Citizens Day Senior Citizens and Citizens with special needs admitted free into the fair Wizard Challenge – Convention Center

Tuesday Aug. 6 Two for Tuesday Two get into the fair for the price of one. Two Carnival ride bracelets for $20 - 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts & Leaders in uniform admitted free into the fair Wizard Challenge – Convention Center 8 a.m.: Fairgrounds Open 8 a.m.: Lamb Show, Jeanette Nichols Show Ring, Lamb Barn 8 a.m.: Open Rabbit Show, Rabbit Barn 8 a.m. – 9 a.m.: Flowers Placed into arrangements, Multi Use Building 9 a.m.: Poultry Judging, Stark Poultry Barn 10 a.m.: Convention Center Opens 10 a.m.: Floriculture Judging, Department closed until judging is completed 12 p.m.: Dog Show, Memorial Coliseum 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.: Two for Tuesday in the Carnival two ride bracelets for $20 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 5 p.m.: Lawn Mower Races, Behind Food

8 a.m.: Fairgrounds Open 8 a.m.: Swine Show, Jerry Connelly Show Ring 10 a.m.: Convention Center Opens 2 p.m.: Special Equestrian Horse Show, Memorial Coliseum 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.: Carnival Open 6 p.m.: Open & 4-H Llama/Alpaca Show, Beef Barn 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.: Karaoke Contest Hosted by Clear Channel Radio, Small Patio 7 p.m.: Laurus Band, Open Air Pavilion, Food Midway 10 p.m.: All Buildings Close 11 p.m.: Fairgrounds Close Thursday Aug. 8 Lions Day Kids 12 & under admitted free with an old pair of eye glasses to be donated to the Farmington Evening Lions Club. Wizard Challenge – Convention Center

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board believes the San Juan County Fair continues to be successful because of the kids and the support of the community. Huish enjoys visiting with all the families who come to the fair and never gets his fill of funnel cakes and curly fries. “I think people would be surprised that this (the fair) is a yearlong project, especially working with ven-

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dors and getting the entertainment.” Darrin Church is the treasurer of the fair board and has served on the board for 12 years. He believes the fair remains successful because, “We have the support of the community. We still have a very strong 4-H and FFA presence in the schools and we have a consistently successful Junior Livestock Sale, which brings us back to the community support. We also have great entertainment on Friday and Saturday night.” Church admitted he eats his fair share of Frito pie during the fair. Kim Martinez has served on the San Juan County Fair Board for 24 years. Before being elected to the board, Martinez was the department head over RV parking. “We put the fair on for the love of the fair, not for the money,” Martinez said. “We try our best to make the fair a family affair and many people have generations of fair exhibitors.” Martinez especially enjoys visiting with her relatives from Kirtland and Waterflow during the fair and never gets tired of the roasted corn and “Billy Huish’s mom’s cakes!” Martinez echoed the thoughts of Hazelwood, Huish and Church that people would be surprised

how early the board begins plans for the fair. The board reviews the fair at its October meeting and sets dates and fair assignments for the next year’s fair. Clifton Wages is in his first year as a board member. He wanted to serve on the board to help the kids in the community. Wages also believes the San Juan County Fair remains successful because of the support from the community. And his favorite food at the fair? “Funnel cake is always the best at the fair.” Dorothy Nobis is also serving her first year on the fair board. Nobis has volunteered for the fair for more than 15 years. “The San Juan County Fair continues to be successful when other fairs across the country are struggling because the people of San Juan County love and support the fair,” Nobis said. “They come out year after year to encourage the kids, buy livestock at the sale, and enjoy the food and entertainment. And they bring their families, because the San Juan County Fair is known for family fun at affordable prices.” Nobis said she always enjoys seeing the kids who have grown up at the fair bring their own kids to share in all that is good about a county fair. As for fair food, Nobis said she likes Ann Huish’s baked goods best of all. “Even though I have volunteered for the fair and worked with the fair board for years, I really had no idea how much time and effort is put into making the San Juan County Fair the best in the state. The fair board members work incredibly hard and I’m not sure people understand that,” Nobis said.

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Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

BBQ they begin the brisket around midnight and then they “pull it off ” and prepare

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check your fire every hour and make sure it is good and level, and then you need to baste your meat with any type of marinade. You are busy the whole time.” The various judging categories include best pork dish, beef dish, side dish, and barbecue sauce. The money that is raised at the BBQ cook-off will be used for college scholarships, awarded to students who are members of the local 4-H club or Future Farmers of America. “Come out and support the kids,” Gonser said. The Frazier Carnival at McGee Park will be open to the public during the BBQ cook-off. The carnival will offer thrill rides, children’s rides, games and carnival food beginning on Aug. 2. Special ride bracelets will be available.

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Goat Costume Contest

A popular event at the fair When Sally Hood steps into the Jerry Connelly Show Ring at 7 p.m. Aug. 8 to host the Goat Costume Contest at the San Juan County Fair, she’ll be celebrating 50 years of participation in the fair. Hood was in 4-H when she was 9 years old and started her own 4-H club at the age of 19. Over the years, she’s watched her children – and now her grandchildren – enjoy many of the same events – and a lot of new ones – each year at the county fair. “It’s just a joy,” Hood said of the fair. “Every year, my entire family takes our campers to the fair and spend a week’s vacation. The fair is family oriented and it’s just a joy for me to be out here and part of it.” The Goat Costume Contest had been a regular event at the fair for many years, but lack of interest took it off the fair schedule. About five years ago, Hood asked the fair board to bring it back, with the promise of taking care of it herself. “The Goat Costume Contest is a lot of fun,” Hood said. “We get the kids and the adults involved and it’s open to everybody. There’s no entry fee and no require-

ments. You just dress yourself and your goat up and you show up.” Last year, 10 adults and 35 youngsters participated in the contest, Hood said proudly. “I get different judges every year and they decide who worked the hardest on the costumes and they decide who wins.” At 11 a.m. on Aug. 10, Hood will be in yet another show ring – this time in the Beef Barn, where she’ll oversee the Stick Horse Race. Participants for the Stick Horse Race must sign up prior to the race. There are eight divisions, with youngsters from the age of 2 through 10 years old participating. There is also a special division for special needs children. “Every kid gets a prize,” Hood said, “and the winner of each division gets a stick horse.” Watching the kids race to the finish line is as exciting for Hood as it is for the kids and their families, who cheer them on. Hood expects to be around for her 51st year at the San Juan County Fair next year. “It’s just such a joy for me and I can’t imagine not being part of it,” she said.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR

CONCERTS Pam Tillis Aug. 9

9 pm

The Bellamy Brothers Aug. 10 â&#x20AC;˘ 9 pm

Camille Sanders

August 9 & 10 Opening Act Free with paid admission to fair.

McGee Park


AUGUST 2, 2013

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Road work Widening of Foothills Drive

Pg. 2

MAJESTIC MEDIA

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VOL. 3 NO. 44

Recognized for excellence Donald Hornbecker is 2013 National Distinguished Principal JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist Kirtland Elementary School Principal Donald Hornbecker has been named the New Mexico 2013 National Distinguished Principal by the New Mexico Association of Elementary School Principals, said Dr. Karen R. Jones, the association’s state executive director in Las Cruces. The award will be presented by the National Association of Elementary School Principals during a black-tie awards dinner and dance at the end of a twoday conference – including a reception at the State Department – in October in Washington, D.C. The winners include elementary principals representing their states from across the country, as well as a few middle school principals, a handful of religious schools, and two overseas schools. Hornbecker is the sole representative for the state of New Mexico. The honor is the third for a Central Consolidated School District principal in less than a decade. Newcomb High Principal Raul Sanchez received the award in 2009 when he was principal of Ruth N. Bond Elementary in Kirtland; while CCSD Director of Elementary Schools Phil

KES Principal Donald Hornbecker works with a student during summer school.

Principal Donald Hornbecker laughing during an interview.

Kasper received the award in 2004 when he was principal of Eva B. Stokely Elementary in Shiprock. “At the helm of every successful school is a successful principal,” said Gail Connelly, the executive director for the National Association of Elementary School Principals in Alexandria, Va. “Our National Distinguished Principals program provides us with an opportunity to recognize the outstanding leadership of these principals and their commitment to creating successful learning communities. Because of them, students thrive academically, teachers grow professionally, and communities are strengthened.” Hornbecker, who was nominated and selected by his fellow principals in a state-wide process conducted by the New Mexico

* Hornbecker 2

CCSD has best GPA in San Juan County JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist The Central Consolidated School District earned the highest-grade-point average in San Juan County, scoring higher overall than neighboring Farmington, Aztec, and Bloomfield school districts on the School Grade Report Cards released in July 2013 by the New Mexico Public Education Department. “I’ve said ever since I’ve been here, and when I was a principal, the test scores have never been the students’ problems. It was based on adult decisions. We We want your stories Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

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can show our kids are as good as kids anywhere,” said CCSD Superintendent Don Levinski, who began work on transitioning the district – by rewriting curriculum – to state Common Core standards shortly after being named superintendent in May 2011. CCSD was also the only district in the county to receive a passing grade, based upon overall school-grade-point averages. CCSD also outperformed neighboring Gallup-McKinley County School District to the south. “Compared to where our district was two years ago, today it’s like night and day,” CCSD

School Board President Matthew Tso said. “Things have dramatically turned around. The New Mexico Standards Based Assessment that was given this year was much harder, much more challenging, and more difficult. Our students and teachers rose to meet that challenge. Our students performed very well on that test, overall.” Kirtland Central High School, led by Principal Shawna Becenti, was only one of two schools in the county to earn an A. The school raised its grade from a C last year. “It’s a great feeling. Our students, teachers, and parents

Navajo President Shelly Drought relief signed Pg. 3

worked really hard,” Becenti said. “You could feel the energy level at school assemblies, school presentations, and faculty meetings that we were on the road to excellence. It doesn’t stop though – we have a lot more work to do. “Common Core and our focus on college and career readiness helped,” Becenti said, adding, “We also implemented an Ignition Program, which is peer-topeer mentoring. It takes upper classmen and pairs them with freshmen. It provides our students with support – not only from their teachers, but from a student mentor.”

Newcomb High, under the leadership of Principal Raul Sanchez, and Shiprock High, led by Principal Rick Edwards, earned B’s. Shiprock High was .7 points from an A, while Newcomb High was 1.1 points from an A. The schools, which had D grades last year, “had explosive growth,” CCSD School Board President Matthew Tso said. “The success of our school occurred only because all of the parties involved had a buy in to the things we did – the staff, the students, the administration, the chapter houses,” Sanchez said. “Our model was we were

* GPA 2

Patrick Gregoire Farmington teen picked to compete in the Nature Valley First Tee Open Pg. 3


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

Two-phase widening plan

Phase 1 of Foothills’project awarded to local company DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The Farmington City Council decided July 23 to take on the widening of Foothills Drive in two phases by agreeing to offer a contract for design services to Souder, Miller and Associates. The decision came after both Councilor Dan Darnell and Mayor Tommy Roberts stated they would rather have a local company design one phase of the plan than have one non-local company design the entire project. “This Council has expressed an interest in seeing more work stay local,” Roberts said. “Obviously we are constrained by the guidelines of procurement code. When we have a local company – we are happy when that occurs.” Darnell previously asked the Council to reconsider a June 18 decision to rewrite the request for proposal to include the entirety of Foothills Drive. This came after Darnell said he learned Souder, Miller and Associates might leave Farmington if

In the first phase of design and construction, Foothills will be widened from the intersection of Pinon Hills Boulevard to Lakewood Drive. The rest of the roadway will be widened in a second phase expected to be designed within 18 months after it goes to a request for proposal. – Josh Bishop photo

they did not receive the contract. “We heard from the procurement department that if we put it back out to bid, it might result in a non-local company being rated above a local company,” Roberts said. “We can award a proposal to a local company and that has some bearing on my decision.” Staff also stated that de-

signing the entire length of Foothills Drive would cost an additional $300,000 and was not a move the city needed to make. City Manager Rob Mayes said there would be no “economies of scale” to do the Foothills project in two phases, so he supported spacing the project out. Councilor Jason Sandel wanted to know if the traffic

Hazardous Walking areas FMS LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Farmington Municipal School District is extending its bus transportation to students residing within legal walking distance to schools because of hazardous walking conditions identified by the district’s

transportation department. According to the New Mexico Transportation Division, “No school bus route shall be maintained for lesser distance than one mile one way for students in grades kindergarten through six; one and onehalf miles one way for students in grades seven through nine; and

plan supported by the Council separated the Foothills project into two phases. “It just broke the Foothills project at Lakewood South and Lakewood North as a second phase of construction and build,” said Jeff Smaka, public works director. The project has been on the books since 2007 and was supposed to have been included in the FY 2013

budget but, according to Mayes, it was left out. “Staff took responsibility for the error and it was reauthorized for 2014,” he said. Sandel wanted to know how long it would take to get the entirety of Foothills Drive widened if this were separated into two phases. “Is it reasonable to expect if what we did was wait for build out of the first phase and then go to a request for proposal for the second phase, then we wouldn’t have a design for phase two until 18 months after the design is completed?” Mayes said the process could be accelerated if the Council agreed to earmark the $6 million for the entire project. Sandel pointed out that this is a “very important project” for traffic flow in north Farmington, and not having it “shovel ready” with a design in hand could impede the ability of the city to receive funding from the state for the project. He said he would approve the bid for phase one, if the city could move immediately into the

bid process for the second phase. Darnell stated he was concerned about the additional $300,000 of “budgetary impact” that would come from developing a design for the second phase of the project. Mayes said there is money available. “To that point, I would feel more comfortable if we could sererate those two. It’s not that I am unopposed,” Darnell said, “I just want to make sure we have that $300,000.” Sandel asked that the item be placed on a future agenda in short order, so a request for proposal can be written for phase two. “This is a road that we have identified as a bike route. It is scary. We need to do everything we possibly can to move this project forward as quickly as possible,” he said. “I’d very much like to get this design done.” The Council unanimously agreed to award the first phase contract to Souder, Miller and Associates and continue to discuss the second phase of the project.

extends bus routes to assure safety

two miles one way for students in grades 10 through 12.” The identification of hazardous walking conditions, which can include busy intersections, heavy traffic, and no sidewalks, allows for a student to be transported to school by a school bus even though they live within walking distance

from a school. Walking routes to schools are evaluated every five years to determine whether the routes are safe, according to Farmington Schools Transportation Supervisor Billy Huish, who said the district works with the Farmington’s Public Works and Police Departments to

complete the study. The walking route conditions are then presented to the Farmington School Board and the state transportation director, so they may improve extended bus routes. Those new bus routes, approved

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Hornbecker Association of Elementary School Principals, has been principal of Kirtland Elementary since it opened in 1986. He was principal of Nataani Nez Elementary in Shiprock for three years prior to that, following in the footsteps of a principal who had been there for 18 years. When the opportunity arose for Hornbecker to start a new school closer to his home, he took it. “I was principal of

Nataani Nez, trying to run that school and hire staff for this school at the same time,” Hornbecker said, adding, “How many times does a brand new school open and you can start it? I was able to come here. You start from scratch. There’s no history. Everything you do, from our school name to the uniforms to our colors, you had to work with the community and with the kids,” he said. “We were registering kids in one

door, and this door over here we were moving in furniture.” He taught 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade for about eight years at the old Grace B. Wilson Elementary and at Ruth N. Bond Elementary prior to starting his career as a principal at Nataani Nez Elementary and then Kirtland Elementary. Hornbecker earned his bachelor’s degree at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colo., and his master’s

degree from Northern Arizona University. He and his wife, Gloria, live in Farmington. Their son Peter attends New Mexico State University and is studying to become an educator. What is the secret of your longevity? “I had just really good staff to work with and a community that is supportive. We’re here for the kids. We’re trying to help them grow and to learn. That’s what we do.

That is our calling.” Why did you go into education? “I wasn’t the best student (at their age), and I was not a very good reader. I thought I could get into education to help kids that are having problems, and to help them succeed. Knowing where I came from, you would know how they are feeling, and how to help them be successful. Hopefully, I have done that. “Emotionally it’s tough

for kids where learning is a challenge, where they have to work at it and be encouraged. They have to be able to set goals and to not give up on themselves,” Hornbecker said. “You have your top of the line kids. They’re sponges. They just learn automatic. And you have those who have to struggle. You’ve got to be able to help build their self-esteem so you have good citizens when they leave. That’s what we hope for.”

a lot of our schools across the district, especially the schools that made massive gains in growth,” Tso said. “Despite a lot of the challenges we have, being a largely rural district, it shows our students are doing incredibly well. Our students and teachers and administrators did an impressive job.” Also earning B grades were Nizhoni Elementary, led by Principal Patricia Marquez; and Ojo Amarillo Elementary, led by Principal Abena McNeely.

Nizhoni Elementary showed strong growth by raising its letter grade from an F to a B in one year; while Ojo Amarillo Elementary went from a D to a B in one year, Levinski said. “I’m so proud of my students and my teachers who work so hard,” Marquez said. “The state and district initiatives provided us with the necessary tools to meet our goals – Common Core implementation, moving toward quarterly district assessments, and

assessments teachers do on the spot to let students know where they are at.” The district has rewritten curriculum in reading, math, science, and social studies to match state Common Core state standards. CCSD also tests students using its own quarterly assessments that are designed to measure both proficiency and growth, while exceeding the rigor of the state’s annual Standards Based Assessment. “The real heroes are all the teachers who worked

on curriculum – the teachers we pulled out of the classrooms to write Common Core curriculum based upon deep alignment with state Common Core standards,” Levinski said. “It increased the rigor of the curriculum, and led to kids thinking at a higher level. From Assistant Superintendent Pandora Mike all the way through to our teachers at our schools – they are the real heroes.” See New Mexico Public Education Department 2013 School Report Cards

for Kirtland Central High, Shiprock High, Newcomb High, Career Prep Alternative High, Kirtland Middle School, Tse’ Bit Ai’ Middle School, and Newcomb Middle School. Also see Report Cards for Eva B. Stokely Elementary, Grace B. Wilson Elementary, Kirtland Elementary, Mesa Elementary, Naschitti Elementary, Newcomb Elementary, Nizhoni Elementary, Ojo Amarillo Elementary, and Ruth N. Bond Elementary.

GPA not a D school. We refused to believe that.” Other top performing CCSD schools – those who earned a B grade – include Grace B. Wilson Elementary, under the leadership of Principal Steve Carlson, and Kirtland Elementary, led by Principal Donald Hornbecker – who was named the New Mexico 2013 National Distinguished Principal by the New Mexico Association of Elementary School Principals. “I’m very impressed by


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Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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Drought relief

Navajo President Shelly signs $3 million bill Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly signed a bill that provides $3 million for drought relief for the Navajo Nation. “We need to get help out there to the communities. We declared an emergency because of the drought, now we need to make resources available to help our people. We are in dif- President Shelly

ficult times and thankful for the recent rains, but we still have to create plans to manage the drought,” President Shelly said. Legislation CJY44-13 provides about $1.4 million to the Department of Agriculture for feral horse roundups, $202,761 to the Department of Resource Enforcement, and the remain-

der to the Navajo Department of Water Resources for well and windmill repairs. This legislation is similar to the one President Shelly vetoed early this month because of budget technicalities. “As a leader, I must adhere to the laws of the Navajo Nation. I support drought relief, and I am thankful that we could work through the laws of our Nation to provide much needed resources to our Navajo departments and Rangers,” President Shelly said.

The money will come from the Undesignated Unreserved Fund Balance. On July 1, President Shelly declared an emergency because of drought conditions throughout the Navajo Nation. According to tribal precipitation statistics, Western Agency is about 65 percent below normal precipitation amounts this year, while Fort Defiance Agency is about 63 percent below normal. Northern and Eastern Agency are about 55 percent below average, while

Chinle Agency is about 30 percent below average precipitation levels. President Shelly also signed a memorandum ordering all executive departments to help update and revise a drought management plan. “We are going to help our people through these tough times. I know it’s difficult with little vegetation for our livestock and smallyielding crops. We are strong people and we will persevere through these challenging times,” President Shelly said.

FMS transportation

Huish, employees earn praise for efficiency LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Bus drivers for the Farmington Municipal School District cover more than one million miles on average during a school year, according to Transportation Supervisor Billy Huish. But the bus drivers are not busy only when school is in session, they also transport students to various activities during the summertime. The district’s transportation department was recognized during a July 11 school board meeting, when Piedra Vista High School Track and Field Coach Mark Turner applauded the department’s employees. “We have the best bus barn in town. These guys have never failed to be on time and ready to go. The drivers are fantastic,” he explained. “The maintenance people always have us set up and ready to go.” During Turner’s 32 years of experience riding on the district’s school buses, he has been on only one that has broken down. The efficiency of the transportation department

Farmington Municipal School District’s school buses travel more than one million miles every school year. Front row from left, Billy Huish, transportation supervisor; Beverly Galbraith, secretary, Josh Jolly, mechanic. Back row from left, Robin Davis, assistant supervisor; Debra Klem, employee; Danny DeVargas, mechanic.

is based on the “great” employees, explained Huish, who has been the transportation supervisor for 12 years. “It all goes back to your staff. I’m proud of our department and we have a great staff down here. Without them, we wouldn’t get the praise

we do from the people.” There are 68 route buses that transport more than 5,000 students to and from school. The department also utilizes seven activity buses and 12 spare buses. During the 2012-2013 school year, the activity

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buses made 1,194 trips to sporting events and extra-curricular activities. This summer, there are 19 buses transporting students to various school-related activities. “It just depends; some summers we run three or four buses and some summers we run more than 20 buses,” Huish explained. School Board President Sandy Schumacher emphasized the importance of bus safety at the board meeting saying, “You don’t understand until you have a child and you are putting them on one of those buses.” The transportation department constantly ensures safety by requiring its bus drivers to complete eight hours of training every semester. Several weeks ago, more than 400 bus drivers from Farmington and surrounding districts attended a bus training program at San Juan College. There, San Juan County Fire Marshall Chris Cardin and

Ted Lasiewicz is the new Farmington Schools Chief of Operations. His responsibilities include overseeing the transportation department, food service, and the operations of the administration building and schools.

New Mexico Transportation Department officials talked to the drivers about bus safety. “We try to bring in people from outside (the district) so it is different and the (drivers) get the training they need,” Huish explained. Ted Lasiewicz, new chief of operations for Farmington Schools, also recognized the transportation department’s hard work during a July 23 in-

terview. “The bus barn has performed very well over the years and has made an endeavor to save money by performing much inhouse maintenance – that allows the district to save money – instead of sending it out to have it done,” Lasiewicz explained. “The personnel involved also are really dedicated to the district and helping out as much as possible.” Lasiewicz began his new job after former Chief of Operations James Barfoot announced his retirement. He said he was asked by Superintendent Janel Ryan if he was interested in the position. Before becoming a Farmington Schools employee, Lasiewicz was the New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority regional manager, which covered districts in the Northwestern region of the state. Lasiewicz accepted his new position because of “the fact that I’m a Farmington resident and basically feeling I could do quite a bit to help the district out and stay inside my own backyard instead of driving all over the place.” The chief of operations’ responsibilities include overseeing the district’s schools and administration building operations, the food service, and the transportation department. During his time as chief of operations, Lasiewicz said he hopes to “continue the high performance in the district as it relates to the departments under my control. The district has a good reputation throughout the state as being one of the best districts because of education and the viewpoint of taking care of maintenance and efficiently constructing new buildings. So I hope to ensure that those positive activities continue.”


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

State of the Navajo Nation Shelly, Jim speak to Navajo Council at summer session opening WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly and Vice President Rex Lee Jim jointly delivered the State of the Navajo Nation report during the opening day of Navajo Council’s Summer Session on Monday afternoon. President Shelly and Vice President Jim delivered their speech almost entirely in the Navajo language and mostly followed the written report. The Council voted 17-1 and approved the report. According to the written report, President Shelly and Vice President Jim outlined several ongoing projects from the most recent information regarding FEMA

reimbursements, the 4G broadband project, Navajo Transitional Energy Company and a job training initiative in which Public Service Company of New Mexico will provide Navajo students $1 million through the next five years. “Working with PNM, our goal is to provide funding directly to Navajo students in fall 2013 at both Navajo Technical College and San Juan College. We need to invest in our people, and I believe this is an important way to do that,” the President’s report stated. PNM plans to provide $200,000 a year to help pay for job training for Navajo students. PNM pro-

posed the plan to President Shelly nearly a year ago after the U.S. EPA ruled that PNM-owned San Juan Generating Station had to reduce emissions to reduce haze. “Through this process, the Navajo Nation has been involved and worked actively with the U.S. EPA, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez and the New Mexico Environment Department, and PNM,” the report stated. The report also updated the Council about the 4G LTE broadband project which is expected to be completed soon. The project received more than $30 million through American

Recovery and Reinvestment Act and when completed would bring a 4G LTE network to the Navajo Nation. President Shelly also updated the Council about NTEC and the potential of a Navajo owned coalmine. NTEC is a transitional company that was started to buy out BHP-Billiton’s Navajo Mine. When the mine is purchased, BHPBilliton would manage the mine until 2016. Experts expect the mine to generate as much as $200 million annually for the Navajo Nation. Though the deal isn’t finalized, President Shelly said previously signed Mem-

oranda of Understanding with Lawrence Livermore Labs and Sandia National Laboratories would help the Navajo Nation explore the future of coal energy for the Navajo Nation. The President’s report stated that about $5.5 million has been reimbursed to the Navajo Nation from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Some of the reimbursements have been nearly a decade in waiting. “We are thankful that the Department of Emergency Management was able to complete tasks that were left undone for nearly a decade. They are now putting forth new uniform

practices that will ensure that in the future, reimbursement payments will be processed in a much more efficient manner. This could not have been done without the assistance from the Chapters and administrative staff,” the president’s report stated. Vice President Jim updated the Council about Na'nizhoozhi Center, Inc., or NCI, in Gallup, and the work he and President Shelly have been doing. NCI is schedule to close and reopen under a different name and the Navajo Nation has 25 weeks to finalize a plan that includes the Navajo Nation managing the detox facility.

Local teen headed for Pebble Beach Gregoire from The First Tee of San Juan County, N.M., to play in 2013 Nature Valley First Tee Open The First Tee of San Juan County, N.M., is sending Patrick Gregoire to compete in the 2013 Nature Valley First Tee Open at Pebble Beach, an official Champions Tour event that will be held Sept. 27 through 29 and televised internationally on Golf Channel. Gregoire will join 80 other participants from The First Tee chapters for the event, which is in its 10th year. Gregoire was selected by a national panel of judges who evaluated playing ability and comprehension of the life skills and character education learned through their involvement with The First Tee. Almost 150 applications were submitted.

His golf career at The First Tee of San Juan County, N.M., began six years ago when Gregoire was age 11. He is homeschooled and plays his high school golf at Piedra Vista High School, where he has played on the varsity team his sophomore and junior years. Gregoire is a 1st degree black belt in Taekwondo and is also heavily involved with the First Baptist Church in Farmington. He has also helped with the Special Olympics State Golf Competition the past four years. Gregoire and the other juniors will be teamed with 81 Champions Tour players and 162 amateurs as they compete for the pro-junior title at Pebble Beach Golf

Patrick Gregoire

Links and Del Monte Golf Course. Play will be conducted on Pebble Beach Golf Links and Del Monte Golf Course on Friday and Saturday, and the final round will be played on

Pebble Beach on Sunday. “This is the ultimate experience for participants of The First Tee,” said chapter Executive Director, Thomas Yost. “Patrick is the first participant selected to play

The First Tee Open from our chapter and there isn’t a more deserving person that we have worked with. Patrick is the epitome of what our curriculum is all about. He incorporates our Nine Core Values in his daily life and has worked hard on his golf skills to accomplish what he has. We, as a chapter, are thrilled to have Patrick selected for this life-changing experience. He will remember this for the rest of his life.” “It is an incredible blessing to have the opportunity to get to play a golf course (Pebble Beach) that I have always dreamed of playing,” said Gregoire, “and to get to play side by side with a senior tour player. It has been hard to get my mind

around it. It is just absolutely incredible.” The First Tee of San Juan County, N.M., is one of 188 chapters around the country and in select international locations. Serving the San Juan County and southwestern Colorado communities since 2005, more than 10,000 young people have been served through chapter programs and The First Tee National School Program, which is in six San Juan County elementary schools. To learn more about The First Tee of San Juan County, N.M., visit www.thefirstteesanjuancounty.org. For more information on the 2013 Nature Valley First Tee Open, visit www.thefirstteeopen.com.

No-to-low-cost spay/neuter

City considering plan to control animal overpopulation DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Farmington’s new director of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs is championing the city getting into the no-to-low-cost spay/neuter business. Cory Styron says the only way to have a world-class animal shelter in Farmington is to control the animal population in the area. He doesn’t want to do this by euthanasia, but through prevention of unwanted animal pregnancies. He brought the idea to City Manager Rob Mayes, who is asking the Council to seriously consider getting into the veterinary business. “The paradigm shift we are presenting to you is to become a leader in spay and neuter in San Juan County,” Mayes said. “As the public sector, we need to get into this. Whether it is

encroaching on private business – the stakes are too high. … This is a population issue.” Councilor Mary Fischer has been proposing no-to-low-cost spay and neuter for the past several years, but her cries fell on deaf ears until a recent upheaval at the Farmington Animal Shelter that left the city facing tough decisions about policies at a new shelter, which will be full two weeks after opening. Styron said that one unspayed cat can lead to 40 unwanted kittens in six months. “Those cats are going to reproduce a whole lot quicker than dogs,” he said, suggesting the city come up with a plan to spay or neuter some 2,000 animals outside the auspices of the animal shelter. “It’s not any different than having indigent healthcare in the community,” Styron said. “It provides a needed service for members of our community and

it is the only way to change the intake population of animals.” He also added it is time to compete with the veterinarians. “It was a conscious decision by an elected body in the past that they did not want to compete with local business to provide those services. The population problem has become a social issue,” Styron said. “The people in need of this are not seeking veterinary services in town. We need to compete with the local veterinarians to provide this service. This is not a battle Marcy and I can fight anymore.” Mayes suggested the Council earmark $100,000 to $125,000 for an “aggressive” spay/neuter clinic. “This is the only way to stop this vicious cycle,” he said. Shelter Consultant Marcy Eckhardt said the problem lies with irresponsible pet ownership – people who adopt a pet, but can’t afford the veterinary bills.

They allow their animals to breed and have unwanted puppies and kittens. “We could – this summer – if we had the resources, have 400 animals in foster programs,” she said. “We need to double and triple that until we have spay/neuter take effect and we don’t have boxes and boxes of kittens coming in every day.” Eckhardt said the city has to push for no-to-low-cost spay and neuter. “It has to be made available here, or we have no hope getting ahead of this.” There are several non-profit organizations already working in the community to provide low-cost spay/neuter services. This includes the Humane Society of the Four Corners, working out of the Aztec Animal Shelter, and Dogsters, a Colorado-based organization. “We have partnered with Dogsters to do five spay/neuter

clinics in Farmington,” said Molly Bondow, a member of San Juan Animal League. “It is a set fee, not income based. Total cost we present to the owner. If they feel they cannot afford that, the animal league underwrites the cost of that spay or neuter. We have neutered more than 500 animals in four clinics with an average cost of between $60 to $80.” Leslie Jedry, a member of the Humane Society of the Four Corners, has volunteered at some of the Dogster clinics. “The one thing I want to say about lowcost spay and neuter – it is the elephant in the room. It is not available. If we could get these litters down, we are going to lower the cost of running our shelter. Low-cost spay/neuter is essential,” she said, adding that the veterinarians in the area still will get business from pet owners

* pets

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Summer session Shelly signs 3 bills into law Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly signed three different bills into law Tuesday, all of which were passed by the Navajo Nation Council last week during their summer session. “With my signature, I am pleased to know that we are making progress in the Navajo Nation. Some of these changes are being made slowly, but we are persevering through and patiently creating change in the government that is stable,” President Shelly said. First, the president’s signature on legislation CJY37-13 took another step to create the Narbona Growth Fund, a holding corporation. Pending approval by the Secretary of

Interior, the fund could provide tax incentives enticing large corporations to expand their businesses on the Navajo Nation. In addition, the fund could also provide an avenue for potential business to operate as a joint venture, LLC, or as other corporations and would be able to perform business without federal taxes. “We set this up from Division of Economic Development and the President’s Office to provide income to the people. When the fund gains traction, it will generate income. We envision that this action will attract manufacturing to the Nation. As an example, Raytheon Corporation, which exists on the Nation – if they

received a new contract to build more defense systems and if they choose to go under this new corporation, they will be exempt from federal taxes. The company can save millions of dollars, which they can put into the Fund or the business,” Albert Damon, DED director, said. Another incentive is that once the fund is set up as a federal charter, the Navajo Nation people would act as preferred stockholders and would eventually earn dividends from the Narbona Growth Fund. “We are creating new ways to care for our people,” President Shelly said. “We also are hoping the Narbona Growth Fund will be a way to lure big businesses to the Navajo

Nation. I want to see retail, manufacturing and other businesses help to strengthen our Navajo economy,” President Shelly said. President Shelly signed legislation CJY-36-13 that strengthens Navajo sovereignty by providing $354,297 to the Real Estate Department to develop a Navajo Land Title Data System. The new system would incorporate a digital database for land records on the Navajo Nation. Goals of the new system would be to enhance data storage, protect data, establish Internet protocols that allow Navajo home site lease holders to pay their home site lease payments over the Internet, and create an online tracking system for

land lease applications. “We need to update one of the most important databases in the Navajo Nation. Having better records will strengthen our long-term planning and will help keep accurate records of our lands. We need that to strengthen our sovereignty going forward. Strong recordkeeping is a sign of a strong nation,” President Shelly said. The third bill President Shelly signed approves use permits for Navajo Tribal Utility Authority for the San Juan River AnimasLa Plata Water Supply Project and the San Juan River “Run of the River or Native Flow” Water Project. Legislation CYJ-34-13

establishes water permits for NTUA to supply water to the Shiprock area from the two water projects. In 2012 a water pipeline was completed that allows more water, and the permits provide the approval to use more than 7,200 acre feet of water from the two water projects. “Providing clean and safe drinking water to the Navajo Nation has always been high on my priority list. This water is part of the Southern Ute Settlement Act of 2000 and we are benefitting from the water settlement. The local Shiprock area will now have more safe drinking water to their availability, making the community safer and healthier,” President Shelly said.

Campfires OK BLM lifts of fire restrictions in area The Bureau of Land Management Farmington District Office has lifted all fire restrictions for all public lands administered by the BLM in northern New Mexico for San Juan, McKinley, western Rio Arriba, northwestern Sandoval, Colfax, Harding, Los Alamos, Mora, Rio

Arriba, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Taos, and Union counties. Most areas have received enough rainfall or increased humidity levels to safely remove the fire restrictions that have been in place since earlier this year. The lifting of fire re-

strictions has been coordinated with other federal and tribal land management agencies and the New Mexico State Forestry Division. While our areas are now less prone to wildfires, the public is asked to continue being careful with fire when visiting public lands.

As recreation and fuel wood gathering activities resume on public lands, please be cautious while traveling on muddy area roads. Stay tuned to weather forecasts for area predictions on flash flood warnings. Although northern New Mexico continues to re-

ceive much needed moisture, the opportunity for wildfires still exists. Remember not to park in dry grassy areas and make sure your campfire is completely out by drowning it with plenty of water. For information on fire restrictions on Federal lands, go to: www.nmfire-

info.com. For more information regarding fire restrictions on state lands, go to www.nmforestry.com. For further information, contact Pat Pacheco, Fire Management Officer, at 575.751.4767, or Mark Lujan, Public Education Specialist, at 575.758.8851

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calendar ONGOING EVENTS AN ADVENTURE IN THE ARTS This exhibit from the collection of the Guild Hall Museum on Long Island includes 73 works of art from a stellar array of artists. They include: Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Thomas Moran, Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning, Peggy Bacon, Chuck Close, Max Ernst, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy Lichtenstein, and George Bellows, among many others. This exhibit will be displayed at the Farmington Museum, Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center through Sept. 22, 2013. An Adventure in the Ar ts, selections from the permanent collection of the Guild Hall Museum, was organized by the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, N.Y., in association with Landau Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Calif. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. ever y Sunday from May through the month of September. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan .com PICNIC IN THE PARK FOR PRESHOOLERS Preschool children and their families bring lunch and meet at the Riverside Nature Center for a picnic from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., followed by a story or activity and a stroller-friendly walk in the park. Learn about plants, insects, birds, and all the interesting wildlife. Feed the friendly ducks and go home in time for naps. This program continues weekly through to September. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI AUG. 2 – FRI AUG. 9 CONNIE MACK WORLD SERIES Some of the best amateur baseball in the country is featured each summer at Ricketts Park in Farmington. Teams from the U.S. and Puerto Rico play in front of pro-scouts and college of-

ficials. Information: 505.599.1184 or www.cmws.org

FRI AUG. 2 TEA PARTY PATRIOTS The SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriots luncheon meeting will be 11:30 a.m. Friday at Los Hermanitos East Restaurant in Farmington. This is a forum meeting where all in attendance can bring up subjects of interest to them. For more information call 505.324.1102.

MON AUG. 5 – SAT AUG. 10 SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR Visit the largest county fair in New Mexico! Fair features livestock shows, exhibits, fiddler s contest, ar ts & crafts, vendors booths, live music performances and more at the San Juan County Fairgrounds, McGee Park, on Hwy. 64 between Farmington and Bloomfield. Information: 505.325.5415 or www.sanjuancountyfair.net

TUES AUG. 6 TEA PARTY PATRIOTS The SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriots General Meeting will be 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the Totah Theatre, 315 W. Main St. The speakers will be Farmington City Manager Rob Mayes and 2012 Congressional candidate Jeff Byrd. For more information call 505.324.1102.

FRI AUG. 9 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian arts and crafts vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

FRI AUG. 16 – SAT AUG. 17 THE ANNUAL SAN JUAN BI-FLY TOURNAMENT ON THE SAN JUAN This San Juan River Quality Waters tournament is strictly catch and release. Professional guides score all catches and release all fish. Call for details. Information: 505.325.0255

SAT AUG. 17 WINE & SHINE CLASSIC CAR SHOW Visit Wines of the San Juan, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., for this classic car show in Blanco, N.M. Relax under the shady cottonwood trees in the San Juan River Valley with great friends, live music and delicious food. Spectators are free! Wines of the San Juan is located 40 minutes east of Farmington. For more information and to download a registration form, please visit www.winesofthesanjuan.com

FRI AUG. 23 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422

SAT AUG. 31 SUN SEPT. 1 ANNUAL TOTAH FESTIVAL INDIAN MARKET & POWWOW Juried art festival offering authentic handmade American Indian Arts and Crafts of over 100 artists, an authentic Navajo Rug Auction (Saturday) and a contest Powwow. Festival is held at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. Information: 800.448.1240 or 505.326.7602 or www.totahfestival.farmingtonnm.org

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 p.m. - 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Aug. 3 - Otis & the Rhythm Aug. 10 - Off the Interstate Aug. 17 - Grant & Randy Aug. 24 - To be determined Aug. 31 - NO DANCE – LABOR DAY HOLIDAY Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Aug. 21 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380

HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. -– 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Aug. 8 - Led by Bobbe Bluett Info: 505) 599-1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1 Annex Building / Conference Room Cost: $14, or $12 for cardcarrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay to the instructor day of class. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 - 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.-1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques. Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity

Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information WALK LAPS IN THE GYM Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesdays, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturdays, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, inter val-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/S aturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise you'll tighten and tone with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music, in just 60 minutes. This is your hour. Come try it out - 1st class is free! For more info call 5 0 5 . 3 2 0 . 5 3 6 4 , 505.599.1184 or visit www.jazzercise.com LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30minute lessons are $20 or eight 30-minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday CROSS POOL* 11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday

Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Road Call 505.599.1167 for more information EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. Call 505.566.2480 for more information DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels that can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies! Please call us with any questions at 505.566.2480. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF SJC Want to help a “Little”? Sycamore Park Community Center is partnering with Big Brothers Big Sisters. Find out more at 505.566.2481 SENIOR FITNESS 9 - 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Info: 505.566.2481 COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 - 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 - 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy learning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Info: 505.566.2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Info: 505.566.2480 -8111 or 505.566.2480 SAN JUAN COUNTY VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m., presentation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, August 15 Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions please contact coordinator Carol Kohler at 505.334.8111 or 505.566.2480

* calendar 7


SHIPROCK

Friday, August 2, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

7

A home away from home

Connie Mack players become part of the family DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The Connie Mack World Series – behind the scenes – is what host families experience when they welcome players into their homes. The host families must be available the week of the series to provide transportation to and from baseball practice as well as to the games. They also feed the boys, do their laundry, provide them with a bed and literally become their home away from home. “They become a part of your family,” said Pam Erickson, who has hosted 29 boys in 12 years. “The boys were so good with my kids,” she said. “When they left on the bus there were tears.” Erickson and her husband Andy are big baseball fans and they enjoy the Connie Mack World Series. Opening their home to boys from the Southeast region has allowed them to learn about different cul-

The Erickson family, of Farmington, show off their Connie Mack World Series Memory Wall, which includes items from the 29 teenage Connie Mack ball players that have stayed with them in the past 12 years. – Debra Mayeux photo

tures and places. It also gave them a first-hand look into the workings of American Amateur Baseball League. “It’s a sacrifice – how hard these kids work and how sweet they are,” Pam said. “You get to see the personal side of Connie Mack.” Andy added that the

players work hard. “They put a lot into it,” he said, adding that the ballplayer’s families also make sacrifices for their boys to get a shot at playing major league ball. The Ericksons say that hosting ballplayers has opened doors for them and their family as well. They have followed their “foster”

boys’ careers and visited universities where the boys are playing. They have traveled to Florida, Mississippi and other places to visit their boys. They even have attended the weddings of former Connie Mack players. Coach Nick Sherer, of the East Cobb Yankees, was one of their “foster”

boys. They attended his wedding and are excited to see him this year when he brings his team back to the World Series in which he once played. “We had Nick the first two years we did it,” Andy said, adding they look back and celebrate his success. “We enjoy seeing them be successful in whatever endeavor they choose,” Pam said. The Ericksons have a memory wall that is dedicated to Connie Mack players and they even have a dog named, “Flea” after the nickname of one of their foster boys. “We treat them like our own,” Pam said. That is what makes a great Connie Mack host family, according to Vickie Campbell, a member of the Connie Mack World Series Committee. She is tasked with finding host families. “We are always looking,” Campbell said. “It takes about 100 families to make it work.” The host family program

is unique to the Connie Mack World Series. It offers players a home to stay in while they play in Farmington. Without the host family program, Campbell said the series might not be in Farmington. It benefits the community in several ways, and the host families have an opportunity to give back to Farmington by opening their homes. “It’s a lot of fun and rewarding. People give up their summer vacations for this,” said Campbell, who still needs host families. More families needed She needs five or six families willing to welcome Spanish-speaking players from Puerto Rico into their homes, as well as others to fill in, if an existing family has an emergency. To become a Connie Mack World Series host family log onto conniemackfamilies@live.com or call Campbell at 505.947.0326.

pets in need of vaccinations and wellanimal checks. “We’re very excited for the spay/neuter policy. We are excited about the changes that are happening, and the voice of the animals getting to bark,” echoed Summer Creech, president of the local Humane Society. Councilor Dan Darnell wanted to know if the local veterinarians had been consulted. “I wouldn’t use this service for my animals. My vets know my animals, I would take my animals to my vet. I could sure see this being an advantage to others. I’m not sure what the impact would be to the private

vets,” he said, adding that he, along with Councilor Fischer, has championed a low-cost mobile spay/neuter clinic that could be taken to out-lying areas of the county. Styron said the county might help with costs if the clinic was offered to residents outside of Farmington. “The county has been aware of all of the developments all along. They’ve been at the table with us. They, like us, are concerned that we are being overrun with a population that is almost a black hole – either death by euthanasia or the black hole of the cost,” Mayes

added. Dr. Manuel Garcia pointed out that even with “no-to-low-cost spay and neuter, somebody has to pay the bill.” He entered a “handshake agreement” with the shelter in 2007 to provide veterinary services at the facility. He and other veterinarians have come in and done spay/neuter procedures in the city’s spay/neuter clinic. He encouraged the city to compare shelter numbers from 2007 to 2013. “Your numbers have dropped,” he said. “Maybe there is a happy medium, where we can do targeted no-to-low-cost spay/neuters. A lot of local vets

are ready to step up and do some time down at the shelter.” Dr. Margie Alvarez, owner of Valley Veterinary Clinic, said she also would help low-cost spay/neuter on a needs basis. “I’m all for doing it and going to the shelter for free,” she said. She also commented on the city’s adoption rate, which has dropped. The cost of adoption is $100, but many say that is too high. Alvarez pointed out the adopted animals are already spayed or neutered and have a microchip. “That is very reasonable, yet some people cannot come up with the money to pay for an animal that

has everything. It has a lot to do with the mentality of the people here,” she said. Mayor Tommy Roberts asked if the city should consider subsidizing adoption costs on a needs basis. Eckhardt said that 70 percent of the people who visit the shelter fall into the category of “low-income” families. She added that if they can’t afford the $100 adoption fee, then they “don’t have the money to pay for veterinary care.” The Council decided to continue discussions about the feasibility of a no-to-low-cost spay/neuter clinic.

safe walking area. • Lower La Plata Highway, Twin Peaks and Troy King Road, near the new Tibbetts Middle School building, because there are no sidewalks. If any of these walking routes are improved in the future, the extended bus routes will be discontinued, according to the State Transportation Division. Most walking conditions to the district’s schools are safe, said Anngela Wakan, Farmington Safe

Routes to School director. “There is pretty good infrastructure and we are working to make it better because we are in the process of getting grants to get more sidewalks,” she said. If students live near their schools and the walking conditions are safe, Wakan encourages them to walk to school. “I think having kids walk safely to school helps their health and allows for them to get to know their neighbors better. I think it helps Farmington

be a better community,” Wakan said. Safe Routes to School is trying to start “walking school buses” where “at each of the elementary schools, adults or volunteers will take turns walking with their kids and picking up other kids along the way,” Wakan explained. “Parents are concerned for their children’s safety and having an adult present will help with those concerns.” Other activities being organized by Safe Routes to School include

a “Bike Rodeo,” or bike safety course, at Sycamore Park Community Center and the Walk Across America program, where students keep track with a punch card of how many times they walk to school. “At the end of the year, we will have a pool party for anyone who participated,” Wakan said. For more information about the Safe Routes to School program, visit the website farmingtonwalkandroll.org.

safety by the board during the July 11 meeting, include: • Hines Road and U.S. Hwy 64, near Bluffview Elementary School, because there are no sidewalks and students must walk through irregular vehicle traffic and across parking lots. • Wildflower Parkway and Wildflower Mesa Drive, near Esperanza Elementary School and Mesa View Middle School, because there are no sidewalks and the shoulder is not wide enough to provide a

calendar SPCC OPEN HOUSE 5 - 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23 Come check out the Sycamore Park Community Center and all that we have to offer in the fall at our annual open house. We will also have vendors present with whom we work throughout the year. There will be games and refreshments for everyone! This

is a free event. Info: 505.566.2480 COMMUNITY YARD SALE AND CRAFT FAIR 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Get a booth and mark your calendars for Saturday, September 7 Join us for the Sycamore Park Community Yard Sale and Craft Fair. Booths are $10 per table

for both the yard sale and craft fair. This will be an outdoor event. Bring the family and enjoy a fun day in the park! Info: 505.566.2480 FARMINGTON MUSEUM 3041 E. Main St. Call 505.599.1174 for more information www.farmingtonmuseum.org

FARMINGTON MUSEUM EXHIBIT TOURS By appointment Let an experienced docent at the Farmington Museum be your host for guided tours of the permanent and visiting exhibits. Tours are FREE and available to the public by appointment. Any size group is welcome! Call 505.599.1169 for more information about

the Museum’s current exhibits or to schedule a guided tour. SUMMER TERRACE MUSIC SERIES 6 - 7:30 p.m. Saturdays, through August Join the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park each Saturday evening during the summer months for some live, local entertainment at our

10th Annual Summer Terrace Music Series. Admission to this program is FREE. Remember your folding chair and dancing shoes! Info: 505.599.1174 Aug. 3 – Summer Classics Ensemble Aug. 10 – Close Enuff Aug. 17 – Chokecherry Jam Aug. 24 – TBA Aug. 31 – Trumpet Geezers


8

SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, August 2, 2013

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Tri-City Tribune 08022013  

Weekly newspaper in Farmington, New Mexico

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