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MAY 17, 2013

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Riverfest Fine Arts, Crafts Fair reception May 24

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VOL. 3 NO. 33

Budget increase Liquid Natural Gas City ups FPD State, local officials: Exporting LNG will create jobs legal, liability DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

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The leader of a New Mexico research institute dedicated to prosperity and job creation for New Mexicans has come out in favor of opening up foreign trade of liquefied natural gas, or LNG. Paul Gessing, president of the Rio Grande Foundation, said the nation could increase its economic output by $200 million immediately and create 2,000 jobs by exporting LNG to countries such as Japan. He presented the idea to the local Tea Party meeting during a May 7 talk, and also met with several San Juan County businessmen on May 8 to share the idea. “Philosophically, this view flows directly from our support for free markets, but it also is a product of our desire to strengthen New Mexico’s economy by providing new markets for natural gas produced within our borders,” Gessing said. Gessing also has spoken with members of the state’s Congressional Delegation, saying it is time for a “great Kumbaya moment” that would

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DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

The Largo Wash is filled with numerous oil and gas compression and pump stations to extract natural gas from the area. Natural gas can be converted to liquid and shipped for use in energy production.

Ready for repairs

Council awards $61,000 of CDBG money to Childhaven DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Childhaven will be able to move forward with much needed repairs to its kitchen, nursery and toddler play area after the City Council agreed to award a portion of a nearly $100,000 in leftover Community Development Block Grant, or CDBG, funds to the non-profit organization. Childhaven Director Erin Hourihan told the Council that the facility needed to complete $61,000 in repairs to keep its shelter

for children operational. “The need is great to repair the building, as it is 19 years old now,” she said. “There is an urgency to this project. The repairs need to be made to ensure the health and welfare of the children.” She showed pictures of cracks in the tile floor and the drywall. “These photos are a bit alarming. What is the likelihood of you not passing an inspection with it like this?” Mayor Pro Tem Mary Fischer asked. Hourihan said she had concerns with the

kitchen, where the damage to the floor was so severe she feared a State inspector might close the area, where 10,700 meals are prepared on an annual basis for children living at the facility. “The cracks in the kitchen surprised me. With the next kitchen inspector, if he or she has an eagle eye that will be a violation,” Hourihan explained. “We haven’t been through a violation before. They could shut a kitchen down.”

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Farmington Police have seen a “more violent pattern” when it comes to crimes, City Manager Rob Mayes told the City Council during a May 10 budget work session. This “violent pattern” has led the city to budget more funds toward its legal defense and general liability fund, creating a pattern of paying out more to settle lawsuits than to defend them, according to the budget numbers. Councilor Jason Sandel addressed this issue during the meeting saying, “I don't see general liability as defending ourselves, but I see it as what we have to pay out in terms of losing that defense. The budget numbers show we are going to defend less and pay out more.” Mayes responded by saying the process for developing a liability fund is not easy. “The liability budget is problematic. It is the biggest guesswork,” Mayes said. The city sets up a single liability fund to cover all of its departments, which led Sandel to

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Community loses legend

Double homicide

Redhorse trial county growth, progress returns to Farmington Ogilvie integral part ofDEBRA MAYEUX Both were very active in their church Tri-City Tribune

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The Eleventh Judicial District Courthouse is playing host to the McKinley County District Attorney this week in the third trial of Alex Redhorse, a 21-year-old Gallup man accused in double homicide. The DA has tried on two separate occasions to achieve a verdict of guilty in this case that involves stories of drug use, guns and partying among a group of young adults living in Gallup in April 2011. Redhorse was a member of the group and had partied with murder victims Dusty Rye and Alec Armijo, both 20 at the time

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Donna Ogilvie

4 Corners Harmony

Barbershop quartet concert Saturday night

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50¢

A “beacon of light in the community” went out on May 14, when Donna Ogilvie died. Ogilvie, 82, was a pillar in San Juan County, where she lived for many years. She was a newspaper woman, an actress, an animal lover and, most importantly, a voice for the people. Ogilvie came to Farmington with her husband, the Rev. Tom Ogilvie, who pastored the First Presbyterian Church for 20 years. Tom died May 14, 1997.

Inside Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Arts...............................................A9 Birth Announcements .................A10 Pets ............................................A11 PRCA Tracks..............................A12

as well as the church community. The meeting hall at First Presbyterian Church is named in Tom’s memory. Donna worked as a newspaper reporter at The Farmington Daily Times under the leadership of Lincoln O’Brien. She worked her way up to editor and covered many important stories that shaped the growth and development of the region. Once leaving the newspaper, Donna took on several marketing and public relations positions. She worked at San Juan Regional Medical Center and San

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Special Olympics Torch Run Sports.........................................A13 Real Estate.................................A17 Business.....................................A19 Classifieds/Nosey Nellie.............A20 Games........................................A22 Movie listings..............................A23

First responders, law enforcement raise funds

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

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budget question whether the department heads lack responsibility for their employees’ actions. “I'm asking for some accountability back to the department,” he said. The police department is accountable, according to Police Chief Kyle Westall. “Nobody is more zealous than our department than not paying out claims. For $126 anyone in the state can file a lawsuit for whatever they want,” Westall said. “If a police officer is involved in a shooting, we are probably going to get sued, no matter how justified the shooting,” Police Chief Kyle Westall said. This discussion focused on three police officer-involved shootings that have happened in Farmington since Jan. 1, 2013. The first shooting was the afternoon of Jan. 1 in the 900 block of Loma Linda Avenue, when 49-year-old Mark Chavez called police to the scene of an alleged homicide. Upon arrival, Sgt.

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Shawn Scott approached the house to investigate. He was confronted by Chavez, who was holding a metal pipe. Chavez refusing to drop the weapon, moved aggressively toward Scott, who fired his department issued handgun into Chavez. Two bullets hit Chavez and he died from the injuries. The Chavez family filed a Tort Claim Notice on March 25 with the city of Farmington, thus putting it on notice of its intent to sue under a civil rights violation claim. The second shooting was the evening of Jan. 22 at a home in the 500 block of Leighton Avenue. A woman called from the house to report a domestic violence incident. Officer Jeremy Hill responded to the home, where he heard screaming coming from inside. He entered the residence to find 33-year-old Daniel Rey in the kitchen and coming at him with a “machete.” Hill fired his departmentissued handgun at Rey six times, with five bullets hitting

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and killing the man. The third shooting was March 22, when Officer Chris Blea stopped a pickup truck in the area of Cherry Lane for an alleged seatbelt violation. The passenger got out of the car and ran. Michael Chavez wasn’t stopped until he ran into a parking lot on the corner of 15th Street and Schofield Lane, where he allegedly brandished a cell phone that Blea thought was a gun. Blea fired multiple shots at Chavez, striking the man in his “elbow, foot and back” according to a Tort Claim Notice filed on April 10 by Chavez’s attorney Arlon Stoker. Chavez survived the incident, but was unarmed at the time. Blea also shot numerous area businesses and vehicles parked in the lot. “Either he is grossly incompetent, lacking the basic skills, training and judgment necessary to be entrusted with using deadly force, or he committed a felonious criminal act pursuing and shooting an unarmed man,”

TWENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL

NO ENTRANCE FEE

May 24, 25 & 26 Memorial Day Weekend Berg & Animas Parks Farmington, NM Friday 7-9 pm • Saturday 10am-7pm • Sunday 11am-5pm www.RiverReachFoundation.com for complete schedule WIENER DOG RACES FREE LIVE MUSIC RAFT RIDES Sat. & Sun. — 10am-6pm Flexible Flyers 970-247-4628 for advance tickets $15 adults $10 kids 7-12 yrs. old.

Saturday at 11am Entries begin at 9:30am Fee is $5 per dog Info: Dona @ 326-4724 or 320-5870.

KAYAK RODEO

ROVERFEST

Sat. — Noon - 3pm Near the rapids at Rocky Reach Landing 947-8804

10K, 5K RUN & 2 MILES WALK Saturday, May 25 MUST PRE-REGISTER by Friday, May 24 at 1pm Information:Farmington Recreation Center: 599-1184. Start time is 8am Animas Park Parking Lot $20 runs, $12 Walk.

KIDS ACTIVITIES MAGIC ‘N FUN SHOWS Saturday 12:30-1pm Chicken Little 1:30-2pm Mark R. Board 5:45-6:15pm Red White & Blue Sunday 12:30-1:50pm Silly Snake Sisters 4:15-5pm The wonders of Nature sponsored by AT&T

CRAFTS PETTING ZOO

Jim Suhler & Monkey Beat Rock/Blues Friday — 7-9pm Saturday ‚ 5-7pm

Mississippi Heat Blues Harmonica & Vocals Sunday — 3-5 pm

Sunday — 8-10am at the Red Barn in Animas Park MUCH MORE MUSIC fun walks with your dog; INCLUDING LOCAL TALENT $10 per dog or 2/$15 Music times subject to change To benefit the San Juan Animal League

4-H DOG DEMONSTRATIONS Sunday — 11am-1pm River Reach Terrace

4 CORNERS OLD CAR CLUB CAR SHOW

FINE ART SHOW AT THE RED LION PLEIN AIR ART COMPETITION ARTS AND CRAFTS VETERANS MEMORIAL SERVICE at the All Veterans Memorial Park area Saturday — 1-2 pm by Aztec VFW Post 614

Sunday near Cottonwood Landing 326-0800

ONE NATION GOURD DANCE honoring all Veterans Sunday — 11am-4pm Veteran’s Plaza

DISC GOLF Tournament Sat

In cooperation with the City of Farmington PRCA Riverfest Logo by Cynthia Nelson

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Stoker wrote in the Tort Claim Notice. While there were the shootings which could lead to liability payouts, the police department also is in a legal battle with a former detective, who believes he was wrongfully fired. Farmington Detective Sgt. Robert Perez was fired from his nearly 20-year position with the city on Feb. 14, 2013. Mayes’ fired Perez after he conducted a yearlong investigation in the embezzlement of more than a half million dollars from the Farmington Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. The firing came after an Internal Affairs Investigation was completed. It cited Perez for “truthfulness” and “unsatisfactory performance” with regards to police reports the sergeant wrote in connection with the visitor’s bureau investigation. Perez filed a Tort Claim Notice on March 7, putting the city on notice of his intent to sue. Corporal Russ Bradford, a former partner of Perez’s,

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also has a pending discrimination claim against the Farmington Police Department, as does Sgt. Frank Dart. Both Bradford and Dart remain employed by the agency. City Attorney Jay Burnham said his department tries to figure out where the lawsuits will come from. This year he said they will be coming from the police department. “We've had three police officer shootings. We try to guess where the lawsuits are going to come from – we think that is where they will come from,” Burnham told Sandel. Sandel wanted to know why the “liability” dollars were not taken out of Westall’s budget. “There’s no real accountability on a department-todepartment basis. There is no real accountability for their liability to the city,” Sandel said. “Let’s say we have a police liability case, and we guessed what that would be. We could give them more money

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or take cops off the street,” Mayes said. “It works best for us to have it in central pool.” Sandel did not agree. “If they did have their own liability line item, then they would be more responsible for what that budgeted amount was,” he said, adding that if the police department liability budget was higher the city could “mandate” training. “You could evaluate dollars, you could make changes.” Mayes said those “tools” are in place. “I think we have some of the highest trained police officers in the country. We have added more non-lethal training – it is variant on what they experience in the field,” Mayes said. Westall added that he has the “best-trained managers” the department has seen, and his officers go through “the most aggressive reality based field officer training – certainly the best in state if not the best in the country.”

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Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS LIVE HORSE RACING SunRay Park & Casino brings live horse racing to Farmington each week through June 23rd. Races are held on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Tuesdays. Simulcast horse racing year-round. SunRay Park & Casino is located off Hwy. 64 between Farmington and Bloomfield. Information: 505.566.1200 or www.sunraygaming.com AROUND THE PARKS IN 8 SATURDAYS WALKING PROGRAM The City of Farmington Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs invites walkers to participate in this free program over 8 Saturdays between May 4th and June 22nd from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. During the program we will visit 8 of the parks listed in the “Farmington Trails and Walking Guide.” Everyone is welcome to participate at any time during the program. Come walk the designated park with family, friends and pets. Register online at www.fmtn.org. Information: 505.599.1484 BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422

or www.fmtn.org/museum

FRI MAY 17 ASTROFRIDAY “Path of Totality” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. A stargaze follows, weather permitting, at 8:30 p.m. The Planetarium reser ves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or www.sanjuancollege.edu /Planetarium/index.htm

FRI MAY 17 SAT MAY 18 FRI MAY 24 SUN MAY 26 GOD OF CARNAGE Theatre Ensemble Arts presents “God of Carnage” at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Little Theatre. God of Carnage (originally Le Dieu du carnage) is a play by Yasmina Reza. It is about two pairs of parents, one of whose child has hur t the other at a public park, who meet to discuss the matter in a civilized manner. However, as the evening goes on, the parents become increasingly childish, resulting in the evening devolving into chaos. Information: 505.326.2839

SAT MAY 18 DUTCH OVEN BAKING For a real treat during camping or backyard cooking, try baking in a cast iron Dutch oven. If this is a new type of cooking for you, come to a demonstration and get some hands-on experience, recipes and tips from an ex-

pert at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center. Donna Thatcher will be demonstrating several recipes from start to tasting during a twohour outdoor session at 9 a.m. Bring a lawn chair and dress to spend the time outdoors around the fire in the sun and breezes of spring. Registration is required for this pioneer skill. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI MAY 24 SUN MAY 26 RIVERFEST Area rivers are celebrated with a festival of music, food, entertainment, a 10K and 5K run & walk, riverside trail walks and river raft rides. Festival takes place at the River Reach Terrace, corner of Scott Ave. and San Juan Blvd., and at Animas Park, just off of Browning Parkway in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1140 or www.riverreachfoundation .com

SAT MAY 25 RIVERFEST 10K & 5K RUNS AND 2-MILE WALK Register in advance at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Rd., or online at www.fmtn.org/prca, for this annual Fun Run and Walk. This beautiful course weaves throughout Animas and Berg Parks during Riverfest. There will be no race day registration, register by Friday, May 24th at 2 p.m. Information: 505.599.1184

THURS MAY 30 SUN JUNE 2 AZTEC FIESTA DAYS Celebrate the arrival of summer in Aztec with the Hot

Spot Car Show, a parade, live music, vendors, food, the Bennett’s Amusements Carnival (May 31-June 3) and the Burning of Old Man Gloom. Call for specifics! Information: 505-334-7646 or www.aztecchamber.com RACHAEL CARSON: THE WOMEN OF NATURE BY ANN BEYKE Rachael Carson was a marine biologist when few women dared to tread water. Her life-long love of nature and science led to her research on how uncontrolled chemical use devastated wildlife and food sources. Her bestselling book, Silent Spring, detailed this devastation and led to the eventual ban on DDT in the United States. Ann Beyke has performed in local theater, film, television for nearly 25 years. She is pleased to bring to life one of the most influential women in modern history at the San Juan College Little Theatre at 7 p.m. This free event is part of the Chautauqua Learning Series. Information: 505-3349325.

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287

50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7– 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. May 18 – Ramblin’ Fever May 25 – NO DANCE – MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Info: 505.599.1380 HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Info: 505.599.1380 JUNKIN’ WITH JUDI IN DURANGO Depart at 7:30 a.m. Friday, May 17 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Bring money for shopping and a bag to carry all your treasures home. We will stop at a few yard sales and continue on to visit thrift stores in Durango, Colo. Buy your own lunch in Durango. Cost is $5 and you must be 60+ years of age. Info: 505.599.1390 FOOT CARE AND DIABETES 10 – 11 a.m. Wednesday, May 22 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This class will help you learn about proper nail care, proper footwear, and how to prevent or delay problems with your feet. Class is taught by Basin Home Health. Info:

505.566.2287 ACTING 101 – NEW CLASS! 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, May 28 through July 23 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Or do you want to be one? Join us Tuesdays for excitement and creativity at Acting 101. This is a beginner class for 50+ wanting to learn and create through acting. The basics of acting will be taught through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have lots of fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. We will also attend the Sandstone Theater Production of “Grease” on Thursday, July 11. The class will put on a performance during the final session, showcasing scenes worked on throughout the course. Come expand your mind and create with us! This is an Encore Class brought to you by San Juan Community College and taught by Melissa Souers. For information and registration, call 505.566.3121. SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX On-going Classes 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

Be Prepared for Company “Advice You Can Grow With”

800 E. 20th St. • Farmington 505.326.0358 www.sanjuannurseries.com facebook.com/sanjuannurseries.com

The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Duff 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

PRODUCTION Jennifer Hargrove jennifer@majesticmediausa.com Michael Billie michael@majesticmediausa.com ADVERTISING SALES Shelly Acosta shelly@majesticmediausa.com Felix Chacon felix@majesticmediausa.com Deyan Valdez deyan@majesticmediausa.com Aimee Velasquez aimee@majesticmediausa.com LEGALS legals@tricitytribuneusa.com

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Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: .50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 50. 599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays

Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Information: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays (NEW DAY!) and Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information Monday through Friday, noon

to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Th ursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise you’ll tighten and tone in just 60 minutes with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music. This is your hour. Come try it

out –1st class is free! For more information call 505.320.5364 or 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com RIVERFEST 10K, 5K, & 2-MILE WALK Race starts at 8 a.m. sharp Saturday, May 25 Join us for our annual Riverfest 10K, 5K, & 2-Mile Walk on Memorial Day weekend. Both runs and walk will start and finish at the Animas Park parking lot area and run along the scenic river trails. The 10K & 5K races will use electronic chip timing! All entries receive a T-shirt and there will be age group awards, both male and female, for the 10K and 5K. Register online at webtrac.fmtn.org or in person at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road. Registration ends Friday, May 24 at 1 p.m. There is no race day registration! Entry fee is $20 for runs and $12 for walk. Information: 505.599.1184. LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave.

Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday. Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30-minute lessons are $20 or eight 30minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday

EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Ave. For more information call 505.599.1167 EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday

SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

CROSS POOL* 11:15 am – noon p.m. Monday – Friday

AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. For more information call 505.566.2480

budget Mayes also pointed out that when a liability claim is made against the city, the department head is made aware of the claim and receives reports throughout the process. “They get the report; they are involved in the investigation in the settlement. .... They are very involved,” Mayes said.

The only department not completely involved is the legal department, according to Burnham, who admitted he doesn’t have enough attorneys to handle the claims. He has to hire outside legal services to take on the lawsuits. “Three attorneys aren't enough to do litigation. If you

would have a litigation department in the city attorney’s office you would need three or four attorneys in there,” Burnham said. His office is made up of three attorneys – himself, Jennifer Breakell, and Jason Ely. “I'm assigned to the Council. We're very busy. We're working hard on the volume of telephone

calls and emails we receive every day,” Burnham said. “If someone is in litigation and a case goes for a couple of weeks of trial you wouldn't have that service to department heads. That same attorney can't do both.” The city spends $297,000 a year on outside legal costs, Councilor Mary Fischer pointed

out. “In the olden days there was a lot more in-house litigation. We were operating with two attorneys. When we went to three it was going to free up more time for litigation,” she said. Despite the $297,000 payout in defense, the city has budgeted $500,000 to the liability fund.

Sexual Assault Services of Northwest New Mexico would like to say

Thank You to ALL of our 3rd Annual SASSY Tortoise and Hare Run/Walk

Sponsors & Donors! ½ Marathon Donors ($1,000+) Kysar Insurance 10K Donors ($750+) Domestic Violence/ Sexual Assault Task Force 5K Donors ($500+) RC Mobile Home Transport Bunny Hop Donors ($250+) Bob and Janet Burns Wellness Solutions Tortoise Donors ($100+) Citizens Bank Desert Hills Dental Care Freytag & Farrar Jewelers San Juan OB GYN – Dr. Karabin State Farm - Trudy Goldsmith

In-Kind Donors Cascade Water & Coffee Service City of Farmington Clear Channel Radio Three Rivers Brewery Garrison Graphics Majestic Media Natural Grocers San Juan Signs Simpson Law Office Stoad Screen Printing Williams Goodie Bag Donors Citizens Bank Farmington Police Department Natural Grocers San Juan Medical Foundation Wells Fargo

($50+) Steve Oldfield & Associates, CPA Prizes & Raffle Donors Amy Kay – Mary Kay Rep • Baskin Robbins • Best Buy Canon Café • Conoco/Phillips Downtown Salon & Spa • Great Harvest Bread Company Nearly Famous-Totally Glamorous Willow Wicks Candles Wines of the San Juan THANK YOU to our video/photographer: Betty Archer THANK YOU to Baskin Robbins in Farmington for coupons for our Kid Participants! SASSY Logo designed by ‘Art by Little Fish’ ~ Artist, Tina Codling ~ THANK YOU!


TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, May 17, 2013

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E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com Phone: 505-516-1230 Fax: 505-516-1231

Donald Trump: The rape apologist Donald Trump thinks it’s a no-brainer that so many American servicewomen are raped by their fellow soldiers. This week, when the increase in these crimes is the subject of a Senate hearing, Trump tweeted: “26,000 unreported sexual assults (sic) in the military—only 238 convictions. What did these geniuses expect when they put men & women together?” I normally ignore The Donald as a publicity-hound half-wit celebrity shill. But now that he’s a rape apologist, he deserves a response: The natural product of men and women together is not sexual assault. Rape is not an eventuality. It’s not a method of conception as (thankfully still-a-Congressman) Paul Ryan likes to refer to it. It’s not a means of

God “gifting human life” as former Senator Rick Santorum believes. There’s not illegitimate rape and legitimate rape as former Congressman and 2012 senatorial candidate Todd Akin felt the need to clarify. There’s just consensual sex and a felony. Rape is a crime. So Trump’s “genius” solution would be to ban women from military service? Segregate the sexes? What about the men who are sexually assaulted by other men? Them too? If we’re going to blame an entire gender for their innate rape-ability, it’s worth mentioning men can also be raped. But that nuance isn’t what Trump is tweeting about. It’s the idea that men are just going to commit rape,

TINY DUPUY CAGLE CARTOONS so women need to be covered, hidden, separated, escorted, and armed. A burka and a Beretta: Welcome to Trump’s America. Ah yes, weapons profiteers conveniently think the cure to rape is arming all women. Well servicewomen are all armed. Try again. The gun-dealing industrial complex, specifically the NRA, likes to MondayMorning-Quarterback all tragedies. How could it have gone better? If you had their product on you. Guns are a crime panacea, especially when coupled with hind-

sight. Trump has basically blamed all servicewomen for being assaulted. They’re culpable in their own rape because a) they’re women and b) they’re serving alongside men. Instead of blaming the victims, how about blaming rapists? Instead of banning women, how about banning the perpetrators? We are so conditioned for deference to all who wear the U.S. military uniform that it’s hard to be critical, because everyone who serves is automatically dubbed a

hero, regardless of whether their service is heroic or not. The idea that they could commit hideous crimes is uncomfortable. It’s akin to pedophile priests. Because these are holy men whom we are taught are pillars of their communities, the idea of them being child rapists is tough to accept. We like it when there are good guys and bad guys. Not where there are purported good guys who also commit sexual assault. We need our boogeymen not to be morally complicated for us. Just simply and purely evil is best. In the context of rape, the victims are easier to vilify. They could have been asking for it. They could just have “buyer’s remorse” as former Colorado senatorial candidate

LETTER

Ken Buck put it. They could be lying. They could have put themselves in that position. They could have worn the wrong thing. They could be trying to destroy a good man. They could be too attractive. They could have decided to work in the U.S. military. No wonder rapes are the most underreported crime we have – we assume rape victims are partially responsible. Rape is something that can be avoided by a victim so the culprit is entitled to some understanding. Separate the rapists from the military, not the women. And bring our troops home. TinaDupuy.com, distributed exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. Email her at tinadupuy@yahoo.com. have your say

CCSSI is government takeover of our children’s education

Arrest of alleged U.S. spy in Moscow has elements of farce Russia's propaganda apparatus may need an infusion of fresh talent to impart a much-needed touch of realism for what movie theaters used to call "selected short subjects." This arcane branch of Russian cinematography began with a regular series of propaganda films showing Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president and former prime minister, engaged in all manner of macho activities – hunting, fishing (from which, unlike regular practitioners of those sports, he never emerged empty-handed), wrestling, target-shooting, leading a flight of cranes in an ultralight aircraft. Alas, the Putin videos jumped the shark when he emerged from scuba-diving in the Black Sea brandishing artifacts from an ancient shipwreck that his Kremlin handlers later admitted had been planted. Thus, the arrest of U.S. diplomat Ryan Fogle on spy

DALE MCFEATTERS SCRIPPS HOWARD charges, fortuitously recorded in detail by a state-funded TV station, spurred skepticism and suspicion, rather than outrage, in both countries, according to The Washington Post. To those reactions we would add a third: derision. The Post said “there are a number of credulity-straining details in this incident so bizarre that it’s difficult to square them with what we know about how the CIA actually works.” Considering how successful the Russians were in infiltrating the CIA during the Cold War, they should certainly know how it works, and it works a lot better than the clumsy attempt to frame the third secretary at the U.S. Embassy

in Moscow, if you believe he wasn’t a spy. Fogle was arrested for allegedly trying to recruit a Russian counterterrorism officer specializing in the Caucasus, an altogether reasonable thing to do considering the alleged Boston Marathon bombers originated there. But Fogle was arrested with a clumsily written letter – the Post compared it to the writing in a Nigerian email scam – offering $1 million a year for his expertise. Only Afghan President Hamid Karzai gets that kind of money from us. The spy kit included a map of Moscow – surely the Russian FSB knows there’s a smartphone app for that – two wigs that looked

like they came from a cheap theatrical-supply store, a knife, flashlight and – get this – a compass. We know budgets are tight, but the guy would at least have had a GPS. Fogle was returned to the U.S. Embassy and told to get out of the country. The U.S. has been expecting something like this since the FBI broke up and expelled 10 members of a sleeper Russian spy ring in 2010. Russian officials assured their American counterparts that the Fogle incident would not affect relations with the U.S., which are not too good but improving, or upset joint cooperation on international issues. The whole incident shows that somebody – more likely them than us – is not ready for prime time. A compass? Really? Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, www.shns.com

To the Editor: I was sick as I read that Farmington schools are implementing the Common Core State Standards Initiative, or CCSSI, and that all of New Mexico is falling in step as well. It takes little research to understand why Common Core is such a threat to the U.S. and why several states are rebelling. People of New Mexico, I beg you to wake up. Please talk to your schools and state legislators and abolish this massive government takeover of the education of our children. Senators and House Representatives have indicated the Department of Education has violated the structure of the education system by bribing states with taxpayer funded “Race to the Top” moneys and “No Child Left Behind” waivers to adopt CCSSI, and that the Obama Administration was advancing “education reform policy” without Congressional authorization. Current federal law specifically prohibits federal involvement in school curricula. CCSSI is touted as a “voluntary” and “state-led” scheme but clearly is not state led. CCSSI shifts the power to set school standards and curricula away from the states, denying parents the right to hold accountable those planning the education of their children in public schools. According to lawmakers, the Obama Administration circumvented Congress to avoid privacy protections in U.S. law and is using federal bribes to coerce state governments into collecting vast amounts of private, sensitive information on students and parents. Parents need to understand their child is being tracked and information can be shared among companies, government agencies, unions, and others. This is an invasion of privacy! Eagle Forum chief Phyllis Schlafly said “This process bypasses parents and state and local school boards, and will fundamentally transform education by dictating what every child will learn and not learn,” adding that Common Core was a “dictatorial” part of the president’s effort to “fundamentally transform” the nation. “Obama Core is a comprehensive plan to dumb down schoolchildren so they will be obedient servants of the government and probably to indoctrinate them to accept the leftwing view of America and its history.” Compare: Currently, tests have right-or-wrong answers, and the majority of test questions are generally scored objectively. CCSSI assessments are subjectively scored based upon evaluators’ cognitive domain (opinions, feelings, and emotions) and may also utilize artificial intelligence. The types of questions on assessments might include students’ opinions/beliefs/emotions, performance-based projects, simulations, and/or open-ended responses. Adrienne Carruth Bloomfield The Tri-City Tribune invites readers to submit letters. They can be emailed to editor@tricitytribune.com or faxed at 516-1231. Letters can also be mailed or dropped off at 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Letters should not exceed 300 words and must include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be published. Letters may be edited for length or content.


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Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

LNG not only bring jobs to New Mexico, but also increase state dollars. Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall have expressed an interest in opening free trade with Japan. Congressman Steve Pearce also is interested in boosting the state’s exports of natural gas, according to Gessing, who has spoken to representatives for all three men. Farmington City Councilor Jason Sandel said Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham also is on board. “Her goal is jobs, jobs, jobs.

Pearce is energy, energy, energy,” Sandel said. “I think we’ll have strong support from the delegation.” The problem is the delegation has to convince the Obama administration to go along with the idea of exporting LNG, despite roadblocks from environmentalists and lobbyists in the manufacturing industry. Gessing said both groups are trying to stop this movement, and Sandel is frustrated by this as well. “I’m a little concerned that you have energy plants, or coal plants, chemical plants and manufacturing plants with a desire to in-

crease their profits rather than put Americans to work,” Sandel said. Gessing agreed, saying these groups seem to be afraid that LNG exports will increase their costs of doing business in the U.S., and this is a false assumption. “Because of the supply, you’re not going to see prices go up in the U.S. They would probably stabilize,” Gessing said. In researching this issue, Gessing turned to data from the HIS Global Insight which stated that “exports would create over 100,000 direct, indirect, and economy wide jobs and have an im-

mediate impact resulting in between $3.6 and $5.2 billion in potential revenues.” According to the US Energy Information Administration, New Mexico produces 5.3 percent of total U.S. natural gas, thus making it likely that New Mexico would experience a similar ratio of economic benefits. Gessing believes 2,000 new jobs would be created and at least half of those would come to New Mexico and San Juan County. “You could use 1,000 high-paying jobs right now,” he said. LNG is considered to be a clean burning fuel, but environmentalists don’t like

it because it involves fracking to access it. The environmentalists also do not like coal, because it is considered dirty. Sandel said the country has to decide what its energy policy will be, and if it invests in natural gas then there are numerous opportunities. “Will we make the switch from archaic coal and dirty coal to clean-running natural gas,” he asked, pointing out that the city of Farmington’s Public Utility Commission just entered an agreement to purchase more coal-fired electricity from PNM. “We continue to invest millions of dollars in old

technology. LNG is new dollars going into new technology,” Sandel said. Gessing agreed that LNG can be the energy of the future, which increases revenues for the nation, reduces carbon emissions over other energy sources, reduces trade deficits, and shows the government has a principled support of free trade with a desire to develop closer relations with foreign people and governments. “If we have an existing trade agreement, we can export it,” Gessing said. “LNG exports are a true win-winwin policy. President Obama should act now.”

program also operates safehouse interviews and offers behavioral health services to children from the ages of birth to teens. There are an average of 20 children in the shelter each day, and Childhaven averages 160 children going through it each year, according to Hourihan. “We provide them clothing, food and recreational activities, and take children to school and appointments as is needed,” she said. Hourihan explained that Childhaven receives Federal and State funding, but 80 percent of that money goes to nights of care for children. “We apply to the county in-

digent fund that is calculated on a loss overall that we would have,” she said. The foundation also applied for United Way funding and city funding. “Those funds just barely make up the operational costs for the shelter,” she said, adding that the money had to be used for care of the children. CDBG funds in the amount of $61,685.51 would help pay for repairs to the building, which the city actually owns. The Council also agreed to award $37,730.49 to the Four Corners Foundation for the expansion transitional living apartments that will be up to standards put forth by the American with Disabilities Act. When the project first got off the ground there was a plant to have one ADA compliant apartment, but because of need, the Four Corners Foundation decided to put in four ADA compliant apartments in its 7,200-square-foot transitional living facility to be constructed on 5.25 acres of land off of Hydro Plant Road, according to Karen Broten, executive director of the Four Corners Founda-

tion. She explained that the foundation had purchased land from the city of Farmington and completed all of the pre-construction activity before breaking ground on two housing units to be constructed on the lot. This includes a 13,600-square-foot emergency shelter that could house 60 individuals and four families. The homeless individuals essentially could move into the transitional apartments. “The CDBG funds are focused only on the transitional housing apartments. It will serve the homeless who have achieved stability and are working toward independent living,” Broten said, adding that there is a “critical need” for these types of services. Broten told the Council that this week 12 families and two individuals were turned away from the PATH homeless shelter, because there was not enough room. “That’s a tragedy every day,” she said. The new shelter should be completed by December 2013 to provide shelter when the weather gets colder. The total cost for the

project is about $3 million and the Four Corners Foundation has raised $2 million. Police week In other Council business, Fischer proclaimed the week of May 12-18 as Police Week in recognition of the service city police officers provide to their citizens. “Law enforcement officers play an important role in protecting the property and lives of our citizens,” Fischer said, reading the proclamation, which also pointed out that 60,000 assaults are reported each year against police officers, with almost 20,000 law enforcement officers in the U.S., dying from these assaults. “Every year throughout the nation, ordinarily a little over 50 police officers are lost in the line of duty. It’s a very dangerous occupation,” Police Chief Kyle Westall said. “These guys work the streets every day and are out there protecting us. I am very proud of these guys and the work they do every day.” Fischer added a thank you to the officers and their families who allow them to serve.

Childhaven The other area in need was the place where infants and toddlers are cared for, bathed and sleep. There were ceiling, drywall and plumbing issues in there. “It is the nursery and toddler play area, where the shelter kids reside and play during the

day if they are not going to school or preschool. They nap there on the floor during nap time,” Hourihan said. Childhaven takes in abused, traumatized and homeless children, offering them a safe place to live in a controlled environment. The

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theatrical productions could be performed in downtown Farmington. She directed many of those plays and also was an avid performer. After San Juan Stage Company ended, Donna worked with the late James Childers, theater director at San Juan College, to build an outdoor amphitheater at Lions Wilderness Park. Childers and Ogilvie met with playwright Sharon French and the Anasazi Pageant was born. The pageant became a favorite among community members and tourists visiting the area. It grew into a fullfledged, city-run production company – Sandstone Productions – in run by the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department. She helped develop the Anasazi Foundation, which raises money to contribute

to Sandstone and the continued efforts of cultural development in Farmington. “Donna had a passion for anything musical,” said Nancy Brown, a longtime friend and administrator at First Presbyterian Church. Brown fondly recalled a trip to London the Ogilvies took her on for her 40th birthday. “We hit all the big Andrew Lloyd Weber shows,” she said. “When we went to London together, it was a wonderful, wonderful experience.” Ogilvie loved politics and was a life-long Democrat, who worked on several political campaigns on the state and local level. Ogilvie had a passion for learning. In 2002, when San Juan College wanted to develop an education program for

seniors, she was on board with Encore Senior Learning. “She was involved with the founding of Encore,” said Leisl Dees, director of Encore. “Donna was a highly valued member of the Encore Advisory Council, and she will be missed. She embodied the Encore spirit of life-long learning.” Dees said Ogilvie not only took classes, she shared what she learned in those classes, always working to make the community a better place. Ogilvie often put her journalistic talents to work within the organizations she served, and it was not different with Encore, Dees said. “Donna wrote all of our press releases and newsletters.” Ogilvie did the same for the San Juan Animal League and The Pet Project, because animals were another of her passions.

of their deaths. It is alleged that Redhorse, Rye and Armijo drove into the McGaffey Wilderness Area of the Cibola National Forest on April 17, 2011, but only Redhorse made it out alive. The State is trying to prove that Redhorse shot Rye in the back of the head, while the man was driving in the forest. Armijo reportedly fled but was allegedly chased down by Redhorse and also shot in the back of the head with a 12-gauge shotgun. Both bodies were then doused with gasoline and set on fire. It took Assistant District Attorney Lyndy Bennett and Defense Attorney Sam Bregman all day on May 14 to seat the jury, made of San Juan County residents. The trial began May 15 with a “surprise” witness, who was not allowed to give his full testimony in front of the jury. Bennett and his office had tracked down Redhorse’s

older brother who was serving felony probation in San Francisco and was able to come to Farmington to testify about his brother’s alleged involvement in the crimes. When he did take the stand, the jury was not present, because District Judge Grant Foutz wanted to have “dress rehearsal” to see what the elder Redhorse would say. The testimony was fraught with “hearsay,” according to Bregman, who pointed out that Anthony Redhorse stated all of the information about his brother was given to him by his father. This contradicted prior statements Anthony gave to the New Mexico State Police, and Bennett tried to get him to change his story. When Anthony Redhorse would not change the testimony, the judge decided not to allow the testimony in as evidence. The jury also heard from Alex Redhorse’s friends David Davert and Ryan Molina, who admitted to being drug users at the time of the crime. They, however, did

testify that Redhorse told them he had killed Rye and Armijo when they picked him up on April 18, 2011, in a hospital parking lot. They heard from Miranda Huffman, who said he has been friends with Redhorse since elementary school. She stated that he texted her and asked for a gun and a ride to Albuquerque. She said her father was a retired “cop” so Redhorse knew she had guns. Huffman testified that she did not give Redhorse a gun or a ride, but she also admitted to being addicted to heroin at the time of the homicide. She even said that she had purchased “weed” fro-m Rye and Armijo and “did heroin” with them. Bregman pointed out each of the witness’s weaknesses and addictions, and also attempted to make it clear that no one who took the stand had any forensic evidence tying Redhorse to the crimes. He did this in the last two trials and both ended with hung juries.

The trial will resume Friday, May 17, and is expected to continue into next week.

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Ogilvie Juan College, where she was tasked with writing a book that outlined the history, growth and development of a New Mexico State University satellite campus into a full-fledged two-year community college under the leadership of Dr. James Henderson. “I always thought Donna handled her assignments very well,” Henderson said. “She was a very nice, very kind person and always there to do whatever we needed to have done.” Her love of theater led to Ogilvie to work on numerous projects with the now-defunct San Juan Stage Company. She helped the community theater group acquire a lease to the Totah Theatre from the Allen family so that live

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“She worked long and hard putting together the new regional animal shelter,” Brown said. “She had a passion for animals.” Another tidbit Brown shared about Ogilvie was that she loved to collect Kachina dolls and had several of them. Brown added that Ogilvie missed Tom, and their evenings together. “They would always watch Jeopardy together to see who could come up with the answer. That was a big hole to fill after he died.”

Now, Ogilvie is leaving a hole in Farmington and San Juan County, one recognized by Farmington City Councilwoman Mary Fischer, who called for a moment of silence in recognition of Ogilvie’s passing during the May 14 City Council meeting. “Her passing is certainly a loss to her family, her friends, and the people and animals of San Juan County,” Fischer said. Services for Ogilvie will be at 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 25 at the First Presbyterian Chuch, 865 N. Dustin.

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FRIDAY, MAY 17, 2013

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(Above) Gourd art by Peter Kewitt of Durango, CO. (Left) Acrylic painting by Doug Miller of Farmington. (Below) Fiber art by Betty Reed of Kirtland

2013 Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair reception May 24 The Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair opens with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, May 24, at the Red Lion Hotel, 700 Scott Ave. The art fair continues from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, May 25, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 26, and is held in conjunction with the 27th Annual Riverfest Celebration at Berg Park. The Fine Arts and Crafts Fair will include the work of 24 Four Corners artists selected by show juror Ann Smith of Durango. Smith is best known for her large abstract floral paintings. Her award winning images have been shown by the National Watercolor Society, the Rocky Mountain National Water Media Exhibition, and the Western Federation of Watercolor Societies. Her work has been featured in various books and magazines, including “The Watercolour Artist’s Colour Mixing Bible” and “Southwest Art.” “Next year it would be great to have twice as many entries for this art festival. People don’t realize how much artists like to meet the person who takes home a piece of art that was lovingly created in their studio. It’s much more personal than a gallery sale,” Smith said when asked about the jurying process.

Jewelry by Lou Mancel of Aztec.

Several artists are new participants to the event this year and a wide variety of media will be on display and for sale, including: paintings, photographs, woodwork, jewelry, clay, metal, fiber, drawings, and gourd art. The public is invited to vote on which artist’s work they like the best. The artist with the most votes will receive the “People’s Choice” award. The Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair is sponsored by the Northwest New Mexico Arts Council, ConocoPhillips, American Classifieds, Wal Art Gallery, Art Supply House, New Mexico Arts, and the Red Lion Hotel.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

Worms we share Pet owners can contract worms from dogs and cats Dogs and cats may transmit potentially dangerous worms to you and your family. Worms – not a terribly popular topic, but one that could cause you and your pet a stay in the hospital. Veterinarians see the problem every day, but most dog and cat owners are unaware of the problems and risks, and do not know that hookworms and roundworms may transmit harmful diseases to family and friends. “Many pet owners are unaware that intestinal roundworms and hookworms could pose a health threat to their pets and even family members,” said Dr. Peter Schantz of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a veterinarian and specialist in parasites. “It is important for pet owners to learn about these potential dangers and why it

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson is necessary to protect their dogs and cats form these infections.” Interestingly, many puppies and kittens may actually be born with these worm infections, contracted from the mothers, and can easily acquire new infection from soil and other sources in the environment. The scary thing is that pets with worms can be a cause of infection for humans. Small children are especially vulnerable. They may be infected through contact with contaminated feces, soil, sand, plant life or other objects. Because children’s play habits bring them into close contact with objects and

areas that may be contaminated by feces of pets, they are more likely than adults to be infected. These areas include sandboxes, playgrounds, patios and backyards. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 10,000 cases of toxocariasis (human infection with roundworms) occur every year in the United States. And the disease is not simple. Children infected by roundworms and hookworms can suffer from a serious condition called larva migrans, which may result in permanent visual or neurological damage. Dogs infected with

roundworms and hookworms can suffer form abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, loss of appetite, severe weight loss or even sudden death. Some dogs may be infected without showing any signs of illness. Roundworm and hookworm infections are treatable; however, prevention is a much better strategy. “The steps pet owners take now to protect their pets from roundworm and hookworm infections will greatly benefit the health and development of the pet, as well as reduce the risk of transmission to people,” said Dr. Schantz. “Veterinarians can provide pet owners with de-worming and preventive medications that will help keep their dogs and cats healthy. Elimination and prevention of these infections in pets

March 2013 Nicole and David Santistevan, Waterflow, Lane James, 7 lbs 12 oz, 5:28 p.m., March 1, 2013 Ashley and Kelly Maxwell, Farmington, Bryant Munroe, 8 lbs 8 oz, 10:21 a.m., March 3, 2013 Meghan and Bryan Crawford, Farmington, Bronson Pierce, 6 lbs 9 oz, 12:14 a.m., March 4, 2013 Brianne and Victor Boyd, Aztec, Knox Robert, 7 lbs 13 oz, 4:59 p.m., March 5, 2013 Natasha and Alex Cummins, Farm-

ington, Nadalyn Daisy, 9 lbs 5 oz, 4:43 p.m., March 8, 2013 Janessa Bitt and Reuben Hogue, Aztec, Tatum Naye, 8 lbs 2 oz, 4:03 a.m., March 19, 2013 Sarah and Phillip Thiel, Farmington, Kase Shelton, 7 lbs 8 oz, 4:24 p.m., March 20, 2013 Geneva and Torrance Lee, Bloomfield, Damascus Xavier, 7 lbs 10 oz, 3:22 a.m., March 20, 2013 Rachel and John Baker, Farmington, Kody Gavin Lee, 6 lbs 9 oz, 11:38 a.m., March 25, 2013 Tara and John Weatherly, Farmington, Wren Margeaux, 7 lbs 14 oz, 1:32 a.m., March 25, 2013 grams 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Hammel Museum - Story of a brewery Noon: Book Buzz: Guest: Cheryl Campbell, Farmington Public Library

MONDAY – MAY 20 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Community Learning Center/Kids Kollege 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Sun Dagger of Fajada Butte in Chaco Canyon 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News TUESDAY – MAY 21 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Attorney Eric Morrow 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: "Pistol Pete" Eaton - The Real Gunslinger 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday WEDNESDAY – MAY 22 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Presbyterian Medical Services: Mental Health Awareness 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Colcha embroidery 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk with Jan Morgen THURSDAY – MAY 23 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: San Juan County Partnership 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Anne Noggle - Flier and Photographer 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY – MAY 24 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Sycamore Park Community Center: Summer Pro-

KNMI Vertical Radio 88.9 FM Farmington 90.5 FM Durango, CO 90.9 FM Pagosa Springs, CO 100.9 FM Cortez, CO www.VerticalRadio.org MONDAY – FRIDAY 5 a.m. – 5:30 a.m.: Focus on the Family 5:30 – 6 a.m.: Adventures in Odyssey 6 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.: "The Morning Show" with Devin and Rachel 9:30 a.m. – 10 a.m.: "Four Corners Spotlight" with Jim Baker May 20: Superintendent of Schools – Janel Ryan May 21: Kids Fest – Candy Land – Shawntay Wolfe May 22: Eubank Counseling Center – Bill and Linda Eubank May 23: River Fest – Bill and Donna Diers May 24: Ducks for Bucks – Lisa Chavez 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 p.m. – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" SATURDAY Noon – 2 p.m.: The Weekend 22 10 – midnight: The HypeChristian Hip Hop Show SUNDAY 5 – 6 a.m.: Focus on the Family's Weekend Magazine 10 a.m. – noon: The Weekend 22

5. Limit all contact with unknown animals or environments. Learn to recognize potentially contaminated soil, sand, and other objects. 6. Maintain strict control of your pets when outside, preventing fecal ingestion or contact. 7. As children are particularly vulnerable to intestinal parasites, teach them about the dangers of ingesting or coming in contact with feces or possible contaminated soil. 8. If your pet is outside a lot, have an annual fecal test performed by your veterinarian. This is a perfect example of how you can work with your veterinarian to simply and inexpensively prevent a potentially serious disease. Once you do, then stop worrying and enjoy your four-legged family members.

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also is beneficial for the health of the human members of the family.” Here are eight steps you can take to help prevent this problem and protect your family and your pets: 1. Talk with your veterinarian about de-worming your puppy or kitten at an early age and keep up a regular de-worming schedule to prevent another infection. 2. Give your pets a monthly prevention, which protects your dog against heartworms and treats and controls roundworms and hookworms. 3. Clean up properly after your pet, especially around your home and lawn. Use tools for clean up to avoid direct contact with your pets’ waste. 4. Wash your hands after handling your pets or their feces.

Elise Byers, Farmington, Houston Carter, 6 lbs 10 oz, 1:30 p.m., March 25, 2013 April 2013 Lacey and Bradley Griswold, Aztec, Lindzy Bo, 7 lbs 3 oz, 1:52 p.m., April 2, 2013 Elizabeth and Cliff Bannowsky, Aztec, Silas, 6 lbs 14 oz, 1:03 p.m., April 3, 2013 Anna and Jaime Rueda, Shiprock, James Elias, 8 lbs 11 oz, 12:36 p.m., April 3, 2013 Autumn Faasse and Kevin Cornish, Aztec, Zarielle Faye, 6 lbs 11 oz, 4:31 p.m., April 5, 2013 Cassandra Johnson and Jewerl Watchman, Shiprock, Hunter Nikolai, 7 lbs 8 oz, 7:24 p.m., April 9, 2013 Bonnie and James Harris, Farmington, James Baxter, 7 lbs 15 oz, 3:24 p.m., April 10, 2013 Jasamine Clark and Tyray Jensen, Aztec, Dwayne Curtis, 6 lbs 15 oz, 2:20 p.m., April 23, 2013

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A11

Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

aztec pets of the week The Aztec Animal Shelter, 825 Sabena, is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily. (Left) These are Marty and Hashee! Handsome boys, aren’t they? Marty is a 1-year-old Aussie mix. Hashee is a 3-year-old Husky mix. These fellas are great with other dogs and kids. They are ready for camping, fishing, hiking and the dog park! Hurry and adopt today. (Below left) We are Bella and Todd. We both are very energetic and lots of fun! Boy, do we love to romp and play. Bella is a spayed 1-year-old black Lab. Todd is a 2-year-old male Shepherd/Staff. mix. We will keep your kids busy and tired! Come and adopt us today. Meow. We are Squeaks and Kitten. We are both on the shy side. Would love to have a quiet, loving family adopt us. Maybe you’re lonely now that your kids are going off to college? Squeaks is a beautiful black 4year-old female. Kitten is a sweet 8-year-old female Lilac Point. Please bring them home to cuddle. (Left) These beautiful girls can help you relax after a long day. Both are very good-natured and happy. Their names are Merlot and Chardonnay. Merlot is an 8-month-old Lab mix. Chardonnay is a 3-year-old Heeler mix. Both are good girls who get along with other dogs and kids. Adopt these precious, sweetie pies today.

farmington pets of the week (Right) Jerry is a wonderful boy who needs a loving home. He is a Pit bull mix with a beautiful red coat. He is loyal and a deep thinker. He is pondering the nature of the universe and would love to do that while hiking with you. He would also love to curl up with you during a movie. In two words, he’s a solid friend.

Angel is a large 2-year-old tom cat who came in as a stray. He is very sweet and affectionate and we are hoping to find the home where he came from. If you have lost or found a pet, we ask that you please contact us at 505.599.1098 and give us the information for your missing animal or of an animal that you have found.

Reeses is a pretty kitty who needs a gentle owner that will give her lots of kisses and hugs. She is as sweet as the candy and will warm your heart every day of the year. All she requires is a place to curl up, food, toys and she will be the happiest cat in the whole wide world.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from

noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80;

Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when

Savannah is a beautiful Lab mix who would make a great companion or family dog. She is full of energy and will keep you and your children entertained for hours. This girl will make your summer rock.

the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the

opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal.

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A12

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

prca tracks Get Golf Ready If you have ever thought about picking up a g o l f club, either for the first time or returning to it once again, you can make golf your sport for a lifetime. The Get Golf Ready Program at Piñon Hills Golf Course, 2101 E. Sunrise Parkway, is designed to introduce you to the game of golf in a whole new way. Instruction will begin on the practice range, move to the putting green, and finish on the golf course. The student will be introduced to both Civitan and Piñon Hills Golf Courses. This program is targeted towards new players, but could be a great refresher course for anyone looking to get more out of the game of Golf. The next class is from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 21, to Friday, May 24. Go to pinonhillsgolf.com or call 505.326.6066 for more information. Enjoy, explore, & engage… E³ Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave., is offering this very special program for families. Children + family + math = a whole lot of fun. Yes, having fun with math is possible. From 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 17, families can get together and work on great activities that will help math be more fun for everyone. This will be the last Friday Night Math program for the academic school year. Space is limited, so call and register your family soon for this free program. For more information call 505.599.1425. Get back to baking basics! For a real treat during your summer camping or backyard cooking, try baking in a cast-iron Dutch oven. If this is a new type of cooking for you, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., on Saturday, May 18, come to a demonstration at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park, 3041 E. Main St., on the back terrace. Get some hands-on experience, recipes, and tips from an expert. Donna Thatcher, educator for the Riverside Nature Center, will demonstrate several recipes from start to tasting during the two-hour outdoor

session, Dutch Oven Baking. Space is limited, so please call and pre-register. Bring a lawn chair and dress to spend the time outdoors around fire in

sun and breezes as we revive this pioneer skill. For registration and more information call 505.599.1422. Something for everyone Do some spring cleaning, and sign up for a booth at the Annual Flea

Market sponsored by the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center. Mark you calendars for Saturday, June 1, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., where you can hunt for those perfect treasures, listen to live music, and have lunch. This big event takes place inside and outside of the Bonnie Dallas Senior Cen-

ter, 109 E. La Plata St., and outside at the Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Spaces are available to rent. Seniors 60+ can rent a space for $10; spaces are $20 for 59 and younger. Outside spaces include a tent, table and two chairs, the inside spaces include one six-

foot table and two chairs. We have had over 100 vendors and over 3,000 shoppers in past years, so the opportunities to buy and sell are endless. We will sell lunch (Hamburgers-on-the-grill or Frito pies) for $5. For more information call 505.599.1390.

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MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 17, 2013

A13

FHS Hall of Fame

Athletes, coaches will be honored on May 24 LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Several former Farmington High School coaches and student athletes have left an imprint on the school’s athletic history and will be honored next Friday, May 24, as they are inducted into the FHS Hall of Fame. The FHS Hall of Fame ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. on Friday, May 24, at the FHS main gymnasium, and the public is invited to attend. Since 1991, coaches and student athletes have received this honor, and next week’s ceremony will be the seventh time FHS has inducted individuals into the Hall of Fame. Richard Wallace, FHS assistant football coach and a Hall of Fame Committee member, said individuals are chosen to be a part of

the Hall of Fame through various nominations. “There are a lot of criteria for inducting coaches and athletes,” Wallace explained. “It is based on success in high school and things that they did during their high school career that made an impact on the school and their team.” There are four former FHS student athletes who will be inducted into the Hall of Fame. These athletes include Neil Merrion for gymnastics, Autumn Anderson for softball, Mike Colerick for baseball, and Jeff Clark for tennis. The former FHS coaches who will be inducted include Marv Sanders, a former FHS boys basketball coach, Gary Graham, former FHS softball coach, and Roy Johnson, former FHS wrestling coach and assistant softball coach. Graham was with the

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta My kind of town… Chicago is… Former Lobo Tony Snell hopes he made a big impression in the Windy City this week. Snell was among a group of college basketball players in Chicago for the NBA draft combine. When Snell announced he would forego his senior season at UNM to enter the NBA draft, most mock projections had him as a mid-to-late second round

pick. But as the draft approaches, Snell is making believers out of some NBA scouts. At least two mock drafts have Snell being drafted in the 1st round. NBADraft.net listed Snell going in the first round (No. 19 overall) to the Cleveland Cavaliers. RoundballDaily.com also believes Snell will be taken in the first round. Kells Dayton writes, Snell is an intriguing

Round one of the baseball and softball playoffs are in the books as the survivors move on to this week’s quarterfinals, semifinals and championships. Things are looking good for the district, with favorites in every championship this weekend. Good luck to all. Last Week… State champions were crowned in golf and tennis this past week. Last weekend in Albuquerque the Farmington tennis team reached the finals in both

boys and girls. The No. 11 seeded Lady Scorpions lost to Los Alamos 5-4, stopping the Farmington championship run at four. The boy’s team also finished second, losing to No. 11 Academy who ran their title streak to 11 in a row and 19 of the last 20. Piedra Vista’s boys reached the semi-finals before falling to Academy. The Lady Scorpion doubles team of Merrion/Nguyen finished second while the Scorpion doubles team of

FHS softball team from 1989 to 2004 and was the head coach from 1997 to 2004. During his time with the high school, the softball team won six state championships. “We were always one of the top teams in New Mexico,” Graham said. Since retiring from FHS, Graham was the pitching coach at Marist College

in New York and is now the Shiprock High School baseball coach. “It is nice that they selected me. We did a good job helping out FHS and I’m proud to be a member of the Hall of Fame,” Graham said. “The Hall of Fame selection is not about me; it is about the players and their commitment to being successful.”

prospect because he already has a skill that will suit him well in the NBA (he can shoot the heck out of the ball). He’s also got NBA size and length, and could become a good defender at the small forward. Like most prospects, he’ll need to add some muscle, but the potential is there for Snell to help an NBA team immediately next season. For that reason, a playoff team could bet on him late in the first round. It’s important for Snell, or any other prospect, to be selected in the top 30 picks because first round draft choices are guaranteed a contract. The NBA draft

is June 27. Looking for a date University of New Mexico men’s basketball coach Craig Neal told us this week he is still looking to fill a few holes in the 20132014 schedule. “Not a lot of people want to come here with the team we have coming back,” Neal said. “We did get the Marquette game in Vegas, we’ve got Kansas, I’m working on the marathon game (on ESPN). They just haven’t given me a team we’re gonna play, so then if they give me a team I

* Picks A22

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner Hunt/Pavlik came in as the 5th seed to take the doubles championship. Down in Las Cruces the state golf champions were crowned. Piedra Vista’s boy’s team came in 4th place. After a horrendous start, the boys put up the lowest team score of the tournament on the second

day with a 307. On the girl’s side, Kirtland finished fourth and the Lady Tigers followed up in fifth. Individually Aztec’s Brooke Raney finished in third and Piedra Vista’s Riley Rahm and Kirtland’s Tristin Goodwin were tied for eighth. On the baseball diamond

Johnson coached wrestling at FHS for 24 years. “Any time you get inducted into the Hall of Fame and it’s done by your peers – I feel really honored. I put a lot of time at Farmington High School and it meant a lot to me.” He is now the Aztec High School softball coach. Johnson said his entire family, including his eight children, will be at next week’s Hall of Fame ceremony to support him. Johnson said his most memorable experience from coaching wrestling was when the team won the state championship in 1992. “It is always exciting to win the state championship during your career.” Johnson also was the FHS assistant softball coach when Graham was the head coach. “I coached softball with

tony Snell

Piedra Vista and Farmington found little resistance in Bernalillo and Centennial, finishing them off by the 10-run rule in three of the four games. Bloomfield also advances with a 2-1 series win over Portales. Aztec didn’t quite fare as well, losing to Los Alamos two straight. In softball the county flexed their muscles at all levels. As expected, Piedra Vista wasted Roswell’s travel budget eliminating the Coyotes in three innings, well worth the seven hours and

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Gary (Graham) for 20 years and we are best friends and it is exciting to go into the Hall of Fame with people you admire and I appreciate the things they brought to the school,” Johnson explained. Three teams also will be inducted into the Hall of Fame, including the 1992 FHS wrestling team, the 1997 FHS softball team, and the 1986 FHS boys basketball team. “These teams are all state championship teams,” Wallace explained. Emma Weaver, who has attended many FHS sporting events since the 1980s, will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame as a “Special Contributor.” “I think it will be a great evening inducting some great Scorpions and I think it will be a neat evening for everyone to be a part of,” Wallace said.

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376 miles. Aztec handled Deming to move on. Farmington pulled off the upset of the week as the No. 111 Lady Scorpions took down No. 16 Valencia putting three district teams in the final eight. Bloomfield beat Sandia Prep 10-0 to advance in 3A. Navajo Prep moved on, defeating Laguna. The district track meet went right as expected; the PV boys and Aztec girls won the district titles just as they have most weeks

* Picks A22

SIOHN A C AT ST

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A14

Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

The game of golf is in the midst of a crisis. With time being of the essence in society today, the general public is making a choice not to play as much golf. When the Professional Golfers Association recently researched this topic, their findings brought up two distinct points: time and money. The time factor seems to be the critical argument against playing golf. With a round of 18 holes lasting an average of four hours and 30 minutes, the case is being made that it takes too long to play. Factor in the time it takes to drive and warm up and you are looking at the better part of five hours for the enjoyment of this great game. The second argument is

money, which I have a problem with – especially in San Juan County. Golf has never been more affordable, and with the green fees at our area courses being the lowest in the country, money shouldn’t even be brought into question. When the PGA presented its findings, many accepted the excuses and went about their daily lives. A few independent agencies, though, voiced opinions that contradicted those findings with the “fun factor.” Their reasoning stated that if something is fun, then the public will find both time and money to partake in that activity. So what can you do to make the game more enjoyable? First, don’t let the past

dictate what is acceptable now. You don’t have to play 18 holes or even 9 holes, as a rule. Playing however many holes in the time frame allotted is still considered playing golf. This goes especially for family outings with your children – play however many holes will make you happy. Play from a distance-appropriate location based on your skill level. Just because the golf course has put different color tee boxes at the beginning of each hole, doesn’t mean that you have

to start from there. You can tee it up from 100 yards or 250 yards, depending on your age and ability level. Nothing becomes more frustrating than teeing it up from 400 yards away and having it take 10 shots just to get to the green. The letter of the law says to play from the tee markers – the spirit of the game says to play from wherever will make you happiest and the game most enjoyable. Throw the scorecard away and focus on the good shots that you hit instead of the bad ones. I have

11. METS: New York appears to be targeting college bats. If Collin Moran doesn’t get to the Mets, they’ll pick between Peterson and Mississippi State outfielder Hunter Renfroe. PROJECTED PICK: D.J. PETERSON. Peterson is currently hitting .410 and leading the Lobos in runs, homers and RBIs. I will have more on Peterson in the coming weeks. Moore, Moore, Moore Mark my words, Moriarty’s Matt Moore is going to the MLB All-Star game this year. Tuesday night Moore picked up his seventh straight win when the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Red Sox. The 23-year-old left-hander tied Washington’s Jordan Zimmerman for the major league lead in victories and became the first Tampa Bay

starter to begin a season 7-0. He also tied a club record by winning his eighth straight decision dating to September. In the Pack Former New Mexico State defensive end Donte Savage signed a contract with the Green Bay Packers this week. Savage participated in the team’s rookie camp last weekend on a tryout basis and the Packers obviously liked what they saw. Savage played in all 12 games with the Aggies last season, recording 45 tackles and three sacks. Savage is the third N.M. State football player this off season to sign with an NFL, following Jeremy Harris, who was drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the seventh round of the NFL draft and wide receiver Kemonte Bateman, who signed as a free agent with the Denver Broncos.

Savage joins former Aggie defensive back Davon House on the Packers’ roster. Toughen up Finally, UNM men’s soccer coach Jeremy Fishbein released his schedule for the upcoming season. He calls it “one of the toughest in the nation.” UNM will play eight teams that made the NCAA Tournament last season, including the last two national champion runner-ups (Georgetown, Charlotte). UNM is coming off a 17-4-1 season with a

FIRST TEE Tom Yost

touched on this in previous articles, but when a round of golf is over, the majority of time is spent telling our friends about the shots we missed, instead of the good shots we hit. Try playing the game with only a couple of clubs rather than your full set. This will get you using your imagination and will have you hitting creative shots that branch out from the norm. Routines and predictable outcomes spawn boredom, while going against the grain and hitting crazy shots with different clubs makes it fresh and fun again. Play games within your group to shake things up a bit. Instead of playing your own ball, play alternate shot where you and your

partner take turns hitting. Or try to vary the wager made to get you and your foursome out of the same old routine. Finally, I suggest a modified Stableford Scoring System for a round. This attaches a point value to the score that you make instead of a word – par, bogey, etc. For example, a birdie could be worth five points, while a double bogey scores you zero. Assigning points toward your score makes golf more like a game that people can understand rather than having a plus or minus in front of a number. The goal is to start having fun with this great game that we love, because when we have fun we will find the time.

second consecutive Sweet 16 appearance in the 2012 NCAA Tournament. This will

also be the first year the Lobos will play as a member of Conference USA.

sports don’t like, I don’t have to play the game.” Neal also told us they are talking with San Diego, UAB and Nebraska. “We also have teams like New Orleans that aren’t as high level as teams we’ve played in the past, but our schedule is already so tough,” added Neal. They’ve also talked with Wisconsin Green Bay and Loyola Marymount. “Hopefully the San Diego game will be done in the next couple days.” UNM’s matchup with Kansas just got a little more intriguing. Earlier this week, Andrew Wiggins announced he plans to play for the Jayhawks. Wiggins is one of the highest-rated prep recruits since LeBron James. He’s a 6’8” forward from West Virginia. The Lobos will face Wiggins and Kansas on Dec. 14 in Kansas City, Mo. The Lobos will get paid $90,000 to play the Jayhawks. First things first UNM first baseman DJ Peterson is projected to be a 1st round pick in the MLB Amateur Draft this summer. Baseball America predicts Peterson will be the 11th overall pick in the draft, going to the New York Mets. In his mock draft, Jim Callis writes:

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Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

picks team is to get to the top it will be behind their sprinters, led by Zach Johnson, and continue their dominance in the distant events. The state semifinals begin today in baseball and the double elimination softball tournament goes on with the finals on Saturday. Piedra Vista looks for their fourth straight and has a bit easier side of the bracket with Los Alamo, then Los Lunas or Santa Teresa today. Farmington has a tougher matchup with Academy, then potentially No. 12 Goddard. The odds are

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we’ll see round five of Farmington-PV Saturday for the championship, and it’s anyone’s game. Bloomfield advances to the semis if they can get by No. 11 Hope Christian. PV softball continues its journey towards a Great Number Eight with the final eight playing today with the championship on Saturday. PV and Aztec look to meet up in the winner’s bracket semifinals. Farmington has the potential to be in the mix as well. Jal knocked off Navajo Prep in the quarterfinals, so the Eagles have some work to do to

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State Track and Field Championships at UNM. Softball Loser’s bracket elimination begins at 8 a.m. The Winner’s brackets finals is at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 18 Baseball State 3A Championship at 10 p.m. at UNM. State 4A Championship at 3 p.m. at UNM. Track State Track and Filed Championships conclude at UNM. Softball 4A State Championship at 10 a.m. at UNM. 3A State Championship at noon at UNM. Sports on the Radio Prep Sports Weekly with Rick Hoerner & Walter Dorman every Saturday at noon on KENN 1390 and kennradio.com. All Piedra Vista baseball games will be on 107.9 KPRT Pirate Radio and 1070pirateradio.com. All Farmington High baseball games will be on 1390 KENN and kennradio.com. Radio coverage of state softball will be on 88.9 Vertical Radio. Quick Hitter … Tiger Woods won the Players Championship this past weekend, but the story that won’t go away is whether or not Tiger intentionally pulled a club from his bag while Sergio Garcia was in his back swing, which apparently caused him to hit a bad shot. Now Tiger claims that a marshal told him Garcia had already hit and he was good to go. My golf game is, well,

lousy, so I guess I’m not one to judge, but how much of a mental midget are you if you can’t handle a slight disturbance in your backswing? There is no other sport where absolute silence is mandatory. The ball is not even moving. In baseball there are thousands of people talking, yelling or cheering while a batter tries to hit a ball coming at them upwards toward 100 miles an hour. Basketball players have thousands screaming at them and those stupid balloons waving constantly every time they shoot a free throw. Bowlers have noise around them constantly. Yet somehow golfers, even hacks, must have absolute silence to hit. Poor Sergio. Tiger’s clubs didn’t seem to be the problem on 17 the next day.

1. Who was the first second baseman to win backto-back National League MVP Awards? 2. Name the catcher who holds the modern majorleague record for most passed balls in a season. Answers 1. Joe Morgan of the Cincinnati Reds, 1975-76. 2. Texas' Geno Petralli, with 35 in 1987.

this season. State Previews… The state track meet begins on Friday at UNM with both the PV boys and Aztec girls in the role of favorites. Looking at best times, both squads should be in the running for the title. Of course Los Alamos and Academy will be in the mix as well. PV’s Zhianna Flores could be the star of the weekend, likely winning the 100, 200 and 300 hurdles. Flores, along with the Lady Panther throwers, will keep PV in the hunt with Aztec. If the Panther boys

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A16

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Fridya, May 17, 2013

Torch Run raises awareness

County first responders, law enforcement raise funds for Special Olympics LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Law enforcement and first responders in San Juan County and local Special Olympians ran side by side during the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run on May 14, which raises awareness and money for the Special Olympics program. Individuals who participated in the 6.7 mile run raised money for the Special Olympics by registering for the run and buying T-shirts. Last year, $900 was raised during the Torch Run. “I think this has become a part of our lives, and through this endeavor we have made friends and family that will never be replaced. The goal of the Law Enforcement Torch Run is to help with funding and to raise awareness of the Special Olympics and our awesome

athletes,” said Jenny Dennis, the Torch Run’s Regional Coordinator for Northwestern New Mexico. Dennis is an employee of the Farmington Police Department. Employees from the District Attorney’s Office, San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office, Farmington Police Department, Farmington Fire Department, Shiprock Police Department, and the United States Bureau of Land Management participated in the run, Dennis said. “We have tried to become the Four Corners Law Enforcement Torch Run and work as a team with all agencies in the area.” Farmington Police Officer Jared Stock has been involved in the Torch Run for four years. “The Olympians are amazing people and they overcome challenges every day and we wanted to show them sup-

Law Enforcement members and Olympians run to the finish line during the Law Enforcement Torch Run on May 14. The run benefits the Special Olympics program.

port. The least we can do is be out there and run with them.” When the more than 30 runners jogged into the Animas Valley Mall parking lot, Olympians joined them for the final stretch. When the run was finished, participants chatted and enjoyed slices of pizza. Ryan Hanson has been

involved with the Special Olympics for 19 years and his favorite sport is bowling. On his upper arm is a tattoo of a lit torch with the words “Flame of Hope” arched above. “I feel so great and I love to hold the Special Olympics flag,” Hanson explained. He also is on the local Torch Run board and went to the

national Torch Run board meeting in Minneapolis, Minn. Special needs students from Esperanza Elementary School also joined in on Tuesday’s fun. Natalie Alley, special education teacher, said this event is good for the students because “it gets them out in the community to see that they can participate and do all of these sports. I just think it is good for awareness of special needs.” Shawn Archuleta, with the Farmington Police Department, is a Torch Run veteran and has participated in the event for 23 years. She is now the Torch Run’s assistant state director. Archuleta explained that more than 700 law enforcement personnel throughout New Mexico participate in the run in May. “After that we congregate in Albu-

querque on May 31 for our (Special Olympics) state games.” Along with the Torch Run, local law enforcement organizes several other events throughout the year to raise money for the Special Olympics. These events include a Polar Bear Plunge in January, Tip-A-Cop, where officers bus tables at a restaurant, and the Guns and Hoses Softball Tournament, which will be on Saturday, June 8, at Ricketts Park. Last year, law enforcement raised $19,000 from these events. The first Torch Run happened in Wichita, Kan., in 1981. Since then, more than 85,000 law enforcement officers across 35 nations have participated in the cause. In 2011, more than $43 million was raised for Special Olympics Programs worldwide.

Four Corners Harmony McPhly joins local barbershop quartet for concert Saturday night LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Sounds of harmonizing voices will ring through the First United Methodist Church on Saturday, May 18, as several barbershop quartet groups perform during their annual spring concert. The Four Corners Harmony Barbershop Chorus is hosting the event, which

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will begin at 7:01 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the doors and cost $4 for students and seniors and $7 for adults. “It will be a fun time. The quartets are fun to listen to and we are getting better every year,” said Robin Harris, Four Corners Harmony Barbershop Chorus member. There will be several local barbershop groups performing, including Four Corners Harmony Barbershop Cho-

rus, Patchwork, Grizzled Bears, and Forth Right, a group made up of Piedra Vista High School students. The guest barbershop quartet is McPhly, a Denver-based group that competed in the Barbershop International Society Competition several years ago. “At one time they were the Rocky Mountain District quartet champions,” said Virginia Pevey, Four Corners

Harmony Barbershop Chorus director. Since it is the 75th Anniversary of the Barbershop Society, the pieces being performed at Saturday night’s concert will reflect the history of barbershop quartets in America. “Most of it is a wide variety of old and some new songs that are written in barbershop style because

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Located in the Animas Subdivision, this established home at 4502 Pacific St., has so many updates it looks and feels like it was built yesterday. A lot of time and care has been put into this home. Besides the wellmanicured front and backyards, you’ll find new tile flooring, countertops, kitchen back splash, kitchen sink, windows, complete bathroom remodel and new composite fencing. There is also new ductwork in the attic that has been redone to separate heating and cooling systems, and new insulation. The open living room features a large fireplace and beautiful wood ceilings. The kitchen in this 3bedroom, 2-bath home offers ceramic tile floors and a breakfast bar, and there is a dining area with lots of light. The beautiful backyard has lots of space and a storage area. There is an attached two-car garage with garage door opener. It has been pre-inspected and all repairs are complete.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17 2013

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Business

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

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Celebrity Roast

Construction at AutoMax earlier this year.

Farmington School Board member Kyle Rhodes talks about Farmington Municipal Schools Superintendent Janel Ryan at the “roast” that was attended by about 350 people.

Janel Ryan roast raises funds for Four Corners Home for Children About 350 community members turned out for the fourth annual “Celebrity Roast,” featuring Farmington Municipal Schools Superintendent Janel Ryan, on Thursday, May 9, at the newly remodeled Farmington Civic Center. More than $15,000 was raised for the Four Corners Home for Children, a program of Navajo Ministries in Farmington. The childcare program at Navajo Ministries has provided a place of hope and healing to hundreds of dependent children since 1953. The Four Corners Home for Children is licensed to care for up to 28 children, and its three community homes are currently full. Ryan, who has served as Farmington’s Superintendent of Schools since 2004, said she was honored to be part of the event. Navajo Ministries also is home to an on-site elementary school that is part of the Farmington Municipal Schools system. “When they asked me to be involved in the roast this year, I was more than happy to be the brunt of a few jokes to help out children in need,” Ryan said. “This was a lot of fun, and I’m pleased that so many people came here tonight to raise funds for the Four Corners Home for Children.” Roasters included Farmington School Board member Kyle Rhodes, former Farmington Assistant Superintendent Mary Lou Sheppeck, Dorothy Nobis,

The Farmington Chamber of Commerce help AutoMax celebrate the completion of the 18-month rennovation at a recent ribbon cutting. – Josh Bishop photo

New look

AutoMax completes 18-month renovation LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune

Ryan said she was more than happy to be the brunt of a few jokes to raise money for the children. The event ended up raising more than $15,000 for the Four Corners Home for Children.

Adam Kinney, Dr. James Henderson and Joe Rasor, Superintendent of the Bloomfield School District. “We want to thank Janel for being a great roast honoree this year,” Navajo Ministries Vice President Eric Fisher said. “This is now our fourth year to put on one of these events, which have become an annual tradition, along with being a good fund-raiser for our childcare program.” Along with the roasters, students from Farmington Municipal Schools were an integral part of the evening. Students from the Navajo Ministries Elementary School began the evening by leading the crowd in the “Pledge of Allegiance,” first in English and then in Navajo. The dinner portion was highlighted by musical performances from the Farmington High School Chamber Orchestra and the Piedra Vista High

School Chamber Choir. In addition, students from the Farmington Schools Culinary Arts program and Navajo Preparatory School handled the serving duties for the large crowd. This year’s major and prime sponsors were Merrion Oil and Gas, San Juan Regional Medical Center and PESCO. Many others were table sponsors, and dozens of businesses donated items for the silent auction and gift raffle baskets. “We want to thank everyone who made this another wonderful event,” Fisher added. “It takes a lot of staff members, volunteers and many others throughout the community to help put a major event like this together. Now, we’ll look forward to next year’s roast, which will be held sometime in the spring.” Next year’s honoree will be selected in the fall by a roast committee.

A used car dealership on East Main Street in Farmington underwent a year and a half renovation that gave the business a more appealing look for its clients. AutoMax, located at 5220 E. Main St., had its grand opening after the renovations were completed during the first week in May. The renovations included the construction of a new 8,000-square-foot shop in the back of the building, tiling the floors, and remodeling the outside of the building. “The building was an old oil and gas building and we put a facelift on it,” said Thomas Hawkins, AutoMax general manager. Hawkins explained that the addition of a large auto shop will allow for mechanics to recondition more used vehicles. “The last two years, the business has been up quite a bit since coming out of the recession,” he said,

AutoMax renovations include the construction of a new 8,000-squarefoot shop in the back of the building, tiling the floors, and remodeling the outside of the building. – Josh Bishop photo

adding the mechanics spend 20 hours on each vehicle and the new shop gives them space to work on more vehicles. Another addition to the business was an appraisal lane, which lets customers pull their vehicles into the lane and receive an appraisal from an employee. “We do free appraisals for our customers,” Hawkins explained. “Adding this lane speeds up the process.” Hawkins said he thinks the renovations will appeal to future clients. AutoMax is located in “the growing side of town and we want

to fit in with the neighborhood,” he said. AutoMax is a franchised business that sells preowned vehicles with affordable payments. Hawkins said the Farmington location stocks around 200 various vehicle models and each vehicle that is sold already has a guaranteed warranty. “These renovations will help the business,” Hawkins explained. “Everyone is nervous about the economy, but from the auto dealer standpoint,” the auto business is beginning to pick up.


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CLASSIFIEDS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

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NEW CARS 2013 HYUNDAI Elantra GT. Was $26,665, now $20,987 (only 590 miles). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z23898A. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

USED CARS 2005 CHEVROLET Monte Carlo. Was $7987, now $6987 (great school or second car). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z247367. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2007 CHEVROLET Cobalt (CP39010A), $5,455. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2007 KIA Spectra (Y36092A), $6,945. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2007 PONTIAC Grand Prix (Y00585A), $9,865. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

Nosey Nellie gets the distinct impression that Oliver, the Cat Who Won’t Stop Talking, and Mojito, the Devil Kitten, want her to redo the catio. Not that Oliver and the DK are subtle, on accounta they’re not. In fact, they can be very “in your face” when they want something, which is most of the time. Mostly, the DK wants eight meals a day, plus snacks and a bedtime buffet. Oliver just wants champagne to come out of the bathroom faucet, which he thinks is his own private drink provider. Oliver voices his displeasure all the time when all he gets outta that faucet is water and is quick to direct NN to the wine crawl space where he stands in front of the champagne he and the DK ordered from Pampered Pets one time and maxed out NN’s credit card. Who knew Pampered Pets

2008 PONTIAC G5 (Y39213A), $8,488. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 DODGE Charger SE. Was $21,282, now $18,987 (great car at a great price!). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z109985. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2008 TOYOTA Yaris. Was $9987, now $7987 (see our Cash Corral). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z211013. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 KIA Sorento, 33,195 miles. Sale price, $22,687 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H225388. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2010 CHEVROLET Cobalt. Was $8997, now $7995 (see our Cash Corral). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z148789. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 NISSAN Altima (Y184345), $16,895. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

USED CARS

2010 CHEVROLET Impala (Y243460), $9,546. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2011 HHR (Y09136A), $12,458. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 CHEVROLET Impala LS. Was $17,987, now $15,987. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z144341. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 CHRYSLER 200, $15,868. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

sold Champagne for the Discriminating Cat at a hundred bucks a bottle. Three bottles and NN’s card was declined which sent Oliver into a whining fit that lasted for three days. Whatever. NN took a short vacay last weekend to visit the Perfect Child in Albuquerque and when she came home, she found an architect’s drawing of the catio and a bill for 500 bucks for the drawing. NN thinks there is nothing much wrong with the catio. It provides Oliver and the DK with the sights, sounds and smells of the outdoors without letting them be outdoors, where Mojito would terrorize the neighborhood while Oliver watched for the cops. It’s happened before, which is why, in addition to the screens in the catio, there are also bars that have a little bit of electricity in ’em so that when Mojito attempts to climb them, he is zapped just enough so his fur looks like an out-of-work, out-ofpractice hairdresser gave him a really bad perm. Whatever.

2012 NISSAN Altima, 31,275 miles. Sale price, $17,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H198239. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 TOYOTA Yaris, 30,948 miles. Sale price $14,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: HJ013695. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

USED TRUCKS 2001 FORD F‐250 Super Cab, two wheel drive, Powerstroke diesel, 214,461 miles. Sale price, $7,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H49027A. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2005 CHEVROLET Colorado (Y52133A), $9,875. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

Oliver met NN at the door and chatted her over to the drawing of the new and improved catio. Mojito was having his sixth meal of the day, but did join them when he finished off that full bag of cat food. NN is forced to take on extra work just to pay for Mojito’s imported kitty caviar and the dry cat food the DK also orders from Pampered Pets. NN just wishes the cats had jobs to help pay for the kitty caviar and the Pampered Pets cat food or that the Internal Revenue Service (ever wonder why they call it a “service” when it is anything but serviceable?) would at least let NN declare Oliver and the DK as expensive dependents or deduct the $700 a month it costs her to keep ’em fat and happy. Whatever. NN poured herself a big glass of Girls Are Meaner and a chaser of Sweet Jenner Rose and sat down to review the architect’s drawing. It had a kitty bidet in the litter box, which was enclosed in a bidet/litter room created from Roman marble with a

USED TRUCKS

2006 CHEVROLET Avalanche (Y29465A), $15,858. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2006 DODGE Ram 2500 4x4 Quad Cab, Cummins diesel, 143,276 miles. Sale price, $17,900 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H49726A. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2007 FORD F‐150 2x2, 70,621 miles. Sale price, $17,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H53061a. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2008 DODGE Ram 1500 (Y160678), $10,454. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. HI‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2008 GMC 1500 (Y24979A), $12,454. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2011 FORD F‐150 4x4 Super Crew, 49,150 miles. Sale price, $27,387 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: HD68364. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2011 GMC Sierra 1500 regular cab 4x4, 32,193 miles. Sale price, $18,987. Stock #: H47693A. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

USED TRUCKS

SUVS/VANS

2011 GMC Sierra 1500 two wheel drive, extended cab, 16,779 miles. Sale price, $22,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H51387A. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2011 JEEP Compass, 32,622 miles. Sale price, $18.987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H234791. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 FORD F‐150 Super Crew two wheel drive, 58,499 miles. Sale price, $22,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H35503A. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 NISSAN Titan Crew Cab 4x4. Was $30,268, now $26,987 (only 19,000 miles and excellent condition). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z316325. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

SUVS/VANS 2004 CHEVROLET Blazer. Was $7995, now $6987 (see our Cash Corral). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z164425. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2011 JEEP Liberty, 51,908 miles. Sale price, $16,987 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H579588. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 CHEVROLET Suburban (Y121065), $37,452. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 DODGE Grand Caravan SXT. Was $20,327, now $18,987 (low miles). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: MPR347254. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com. 2012 FORD Escape (YC28401), $22,985. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2007 CHEVROLET Trailblazer (Y04099A), $9,265. Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 KIA Soul, 31,685 miles. Sale price, $15,995 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H375157. Hi‐ Country Auto Group, 1‐ 888‐663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2007 CHEVROLET Traileblazer LS, was $9087, now $7975 (see our Cash Corral). Plus TTL & Dealer Transfer. Stock #: Z188425. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730; www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

2012 NISSAN Mirano, 22,967 miles. Sale price, $24,787 plus TTL and dealer transfer fee. Stock #: H213517. Hi‐Country Auto Group, 1‐888‐ 663‐2730. www.‐ hicountryautogroup.‐ com.

caviar bar in case littering takes longer than the DK can be away from food. It had a sunken game room with a big screen TV (Oliver and the DK LOVE the animal channel, the food channel and the occasional “K” rated movie), a wet bar with champagne flowing from the faucets and kitty Kool-Aid on tap, and a loft with beds covered in mouse fur comforters. It had catnip growing out of every nook and cranny you can imagine AND it had refrigerated air. It was nicer than any house NN has ever lived in or homesteaded or “borrowed” from people who are on vacay and leave the house key under the fake rock in the fake water feature in the fake grass. Whatever. NN couldn’t believe her eyes and thought she had seen everything until she saw the little bitty note at the bottom of the drawing with the total cost of the catio reno. The architect, who represents the firm of Upscale Rooms for Cat Houses and has done work for felines of such notables

as Garfield, the Cat; Felix, the Cat; Sylvester, the Cat; Morris, the Cat; Odie, the Dog Who Wishes He Was a Cat; and Grumpy, the Cat, who Oliver and Mojito have followed on Face Book and ordered wall sized posters for their catio reno (at cost of almost $900, which Mojito charged on his own credit card when he intercepted NN’s mail and applied for a Platinum VISA card in the name of Ann O. Mous and got it. NN has trouble getting a credit card in her name or the name of any of her “associates,” and the DK puts a paw print on the signature line and gets a card with a limit of $15,000 AND gets free gifts every week. Whatever.) The expected costs of the catio reno (without any “unforeseen” or “unexpected” or “the architect needs more money for a vacay in Mexico for several years, while his attorney fights the courts for “unforeseen” and “unexpected” charges for catios for the rich and famous that the architect failed to deliver on) amounted to $55,809.22,

LEGALS

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF Kim Fairweather FOR CHANGE OF NAME No. D-1116CV2013-576-3 NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF PERSON AGE 14 OR OLDER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Kim Fairweather filed a Petition to Change Name in the Eleventh Judicial District Court in San Juan County, New Mexico at 103 So. Oliver Drive, Aztec, on the 30th day of April, 2013. The Petitioner seeks to change the Petitioner’s current name from Kim Fairweather to the name of Kim Hoyle. Legal No.85 Dates 5/3, 5/17/2013

5/10,

LEGALS THE FOLLOWING items located at AAA Mini-Storage; 1630 Murray Dr, 2016 Hutton Rd,.6208 E.Main, and 7231 E. Main Farmington NM will be sold or donated at the owners discretion by June 4, 2013 355 Sherry Charley PO Box 3334 Farmington, NM 87499 678 Evonnia Secatero PO Box 1054 Flora Vista, NM 87415 N-11 Julia Smith PO Box 6455 Farmington, NM 87499 Legal No.86 Dates 5/17, 5/24/13

which is way more than NN received when she was a star on the strip and a headliner for the Spunky Senior Ladies Pole Dancing Revue back in “the day,” when SSLPDR was on the cover of every entertainment magazine for old people in the entire world. Whatever. NN had a “come to mama” meeting with Oliver and the DK about the reno. NN suggested the catio currently attached to the casita is fine and while there isn’t any Roman marble, NN is more than happy to add regular marbles to their litter box for glitter and glitz while they do their thing, and they may have the old projector and home movies NN’s parents took of NN and her brother when they took accordion lessons for 10 years but never went beyond the beginner class, and went through 10 accordion teachers, all of whom are still in rehab attempting to recover from the pain of defeat. NN also offered to have a pitcher of Kitty Kool-Aid available to them every month that

* Nellie A21


The day of the concert is Armed Forces Day, so the quartet group also will sing a song to salute the men and women who serve in the military. The proceeds raised during the concert will benefit Four Corners Harmony Bar-

bershop Chorus. “We are a nonprofit group and the money used from the proceeds will help pay for music and scholarships,” said Four Corners Harmony Barbershop Chorus member Allen Lyon about a high school scholarship the group awards

to a student pursuing music. “We concentrate on our spring show and really build up to this point each year and make it good quality that everyone will enjoy,” Pevey explained. “A lot of the songs are old timey songs and a lot

of work goes into this. It is good clean fun and we make everyone laugh and have a great time,” Lyon said. Pevey said the concert also acts as a means of recruitment, and she encourages more men to join the Four Corners Harmony Bar-

A21 bershop Chorus. “If the public hears us singing and see how much fun it is, maybe more men in the area will come and join us.” The First United Methodist Church in Farmington is located at 807 N. Monterey Ave.

from behind the door, but is reluctant to try to peek in the back window for fear of what she’ll see. She is getting phone calls from the Platinum VISA card people, asking about the “surprising” charges on Ann O. Mous’s credit card. Whatever. NN heard about a “roast” Navajo Ministries was hav-

ing for Farmington Municipal Schools Superintendent Janel Ryan last week and thought she’d just pop in and see what was happening. NN at first thought the roast was gonna be a wienie roast and took her appetite with her, but found out it wasn’t that kinda roast at all. And the 300 people who were in the room

weren’t eating hot dogs, just so’s ya know. Nope, it was a really nice event, with people saying things about Super Janel that NN didn’t know about. Dr. Jim Henderson said one time (or maybe it was more than one time) SJ threatened to throw him off a cliff and into a river. And Mary Lou Sheppeck said Super Janel is afraid of mice and MLS actually brought mice to the event, which NN noticed made SJ shiver and shake. And Joe Rasor brought a big ole handbag with stuff in it that SJ uses (including a baseball bat that JR said SJ doesn’t use to hit baseballs!) and gave SJ all the stuff in the bag, but not the bag, which NN thought was a shame. It was a lovely pink bag that really, truly was not the perfect accessory for Joe’s outfit, but she didn’t want to say anything because Joe was pretty attached to his pretty pink bag. Whatever. Kyle Rhodes showed pictures of Super Janel that were a little less than flattering, NN thought, although it’s hard to get a photo of SJ that isn’t flattering on accounta she pretty much sets the standard for lookin’ good all the time, the wench. Whatever. Kyle showed those photos and poked a little fun at SJ and got a lot of laughs and talked about Super Janel’s body language. NN isn’t sure you’re s’posed to talk about “body language” in public, but it was Kyle and he’s like a major player on the School Board and NN guesses he can talk about anything he wants. Adam Kinney rode a stick horse up to the stage, which was weird enough, but the

horse had on clothes. He mentioned something about SJ being a “clothes horse,” but NN wasn’t sure that the horse and those clothes had anything much to do with SJ. Adam also tried to sell Super Janel some cheap jewelry (samples, NN is guessing from jewelry vendors Adam and his store, JA Jewelers, don’t do business with) and gave SJ hooker heels, which NN snatched when SJ wasn’t looking. They were way cute shoes and not Superintendent-y enough for Janel, so NN really did her a favor. Anyway, there were a gazillion people at the roast/party. Noted toasting and roasting Janel were Jim and Kay Baker (Jim is the president of Navajo Ministries and Kay is the bomb); Eric and Terry Fisher (Eric is the vice president of Navajo Ministries and Terry is also the bomb), Lisa and Jaime Chavez, Geri Johnson, Stacey and Mark Biel, Jill and Paul McQueary, Barbie and Nathan Duckett, Megan and Corey Freeman, Kathie and Cliff Freeman, Cindy and Tommy Roberts, Bill Standley, Mike Jakino and his lovely wife, Deb Dumont, Dianne Benally, Tonya and Scott Eckstein, Joyce Donald, Nancy Shepherd, Roger Sheak (NN’s NASCAR buddy), Amelia and Robert David, Bob and Gloria Lehmer, Bryan Freytag, Karen and Tucker Bayless, Tycie and Dr. Jim Henderson, Dee Ann Durbin, Barbara Chambers, Barbara Tedrow, Millie and Jeff Howle, and Mary Ann and James Gipson. Also seen chatting Super Janel up and enjoying the evening were Martha Bradley, Margaret and Gary McDaniel, Lisa Martin, Lin-

da and Larry Bomberger, Sandy and Chuck Schumacher, Janel’s handsome husband, Mike Ryan, Andrea and Pat Freeman, Mike and Shyra Isaacson, Carol and Mike Kirikos, Candace and Bill Young, Robyn and Chip Hoffman, Kathy Eveland, Dolores Cammon, Cindy Lyons, Kit Doerfert, David Eppich, Judy and Tom Hudson, Ron Price and his lovely wife, and Mary and Bob Culpepper Those who sponsored tables were Janel Ryan, Paul and Jill McQueary, the Farmington Rotary club, San Juan Association of Educational Retirees, Freytag-Farrar Jewelers, San Juan Regional Medical Center, Henry Production, Dugan Production, Mayor Tommy Roberts, Elementary School Principals, 7-2-11, New Mexico Gas Co-Ralph W. Miller Inc., The Daily Times, Sun Glass, San Juan County, Allen Theaters, San Juan Rotary Club, Jim and Kay Baker, Natalie’s Her, Him and Home; Jaynes Corp., Summit Foods, Larry and Linda Bomberger, Millennium Insurance and Farmington High School. Birthday cakes were enjoyed this week by James Simmons, Michelle Holmes, Fran Hanhardt, Lily Rose and Janell Winbray. Nosey Nellie offers her sympathies to the family and friends of Donna Ogilvie, who passed this week. Donna was a mentor to NN as well as a great friend, and Donna’s contributions to our community are legendary. Donna loved animals, San Juan College, writing, her church and her community. Her leadership will be missed, but it is her smile, her stories and her love NN will miss the most. Rest in peace, my friend.

Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

quartet

it is depicting the history of barbershop quartet singing in America,” Pevey explained. “It will be educational as well as entertaining.”

Nellie ends in “T,” which NN thought was a fair option. The cats, however, disagreed. So they have taken the champagne, the kitty caviar and the imported cat food into the back bedroom and locked the door. NN hears hammering and sawing and growling coming

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC - PIPELINE SAFETY San Juan County, New Mexico ConocoPhillips Company operates pipelines that transport pressurized natural gas in the state of New Mexico. Our goal is to share important safety information concerning our pipelines with our neighbors. For your protection and to ensure continuous uninterrupted service, please follow these safety procedures.

EXCAVATIONS – CALL before you dig Call 8-1-1 at least two (2) business days prior to any excavation, construction or similar activities occurring in or near the area of ConocoPhillips pipelines. Line markers and signs only indicate approximate locations of ConocoPhillips pipelines and therefore should not be relied on as precise information. As a member of the STATE, Colorado, and New Mexico One-Call centers (8-1-1), ConocoPhillips personnel are available (free of charge) to locate and mark exact pipeline locations in advance of any work being done and help coordinate work activities that concern our pipelines.

EMERGENCIES If you suspect a pipeline leak or other problem: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Evacuate from the area immediately and keep others away. Do not attempt to correct the problem yourself. Call 9-1-1 and notify local law enforcement agencies. Call ConocoPhillips Company at 1-800-688-0158. Avoid any ignition source (cigarette lighter, car ignition, etc.) Do not return to the area.

SAFETY is our primary concern.

Get ahead on a UNM degree tsmaller  classes, more interaction with instructor ttackle  a difficult class without a full course schedule tenjoy  courses from home via online or correspondence Take classes this summer before tuition increases for fall semester!

www.nmoncecall.org ConocoPhillips Company 3401 E. 30th Street Farmington, NM 87402 (505) 326-9700

24-HOUR EMERGENCY NUMBER 1-800-688-0158

sanjuanbgp.unm.edu (505) 566-3480 sjcbgp@unm.edu

SAN JUAN CENTER


A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle CRUNCH TIME By Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

4

5

6

19

Across

52 Obama’s birthplace

24 27

16 Neighbor of a Belarussian

26

114 Toledo tidbit

17 Corroded

30

63 Spanish precious metal

116 Subject of the 1998 biography “King of the World”

18 Alberta’s thirdlargest city, named after an animal

15 Banned apple spray

65 Writer Gordimer

117 Cute

22 Amérique du ___

19 American Dance Theater founder

67 Syrup source

118 Does spy work

24 Soccer header?

68 Johannesburg-born golf champion

122 George W. Bush acquisition of 2008

29 Noted taleteller

69 Birthplace of Harry Houdini

123 Homes up high

32 Old Cosby show

124 Developed

23 Early entrepreneurial efforts

73 “Survivor” construction

125 G.I. rations

34 Some successful plays, for short

126 That, in Tijuana

38 Pitch

74 On the fence 76 Jerks

127 Makes an assertion

39 Nursery gift?

25 Argued against 26 California’s old Fort ___

77 Jobs in technology

128 Hunt for water, say

42 Championship

55 Traditional

6 Turning point at the station?

59 Priest, in an Ogden Nash poem

12 Remote control abbr.

20 Planets and notes in the musical scale 21 Agitated

27 Turn (off) 28 Florentine attraction 30 Small African antelopes 33 When repeated, an engine sound 35 Feudal laborer

31 Withdrew

81 “Friends” co-star 84 River to the North Sea 85 Whenever 87 Not give ___ 89 Defense grp. that disbanded in 1977

Down

31

46 Native Nebraskan

1 Old gunfight locales

47 Crush competitor

2 French pantomime character

50 Deli offerings

3 How trout may be prepared: Var.

52 Certain tournaments

51 Okla. or Oreg., once

9

10

28 33

64

68

69

74

56

57

58

47

18

61

62

97

98

42

48

60 67

72

85

73 77

81

82

86

91

41

59 66

80

93

99

100

101

104

105 106 107 112

94

78

83

87

92

111

46

76

79

110

40

71

75

90

17

51

65 70

16

36

39 45

55

63

15 22

50

54

14

35

44

53

13

29

34

49

89

12 21

38

43

52

11

25

32

37

41 Grinning symbols 44 Vintage wheels

79 Doubters

8

20

23

110 Just makes the 7:47, perhaps

1 Fancy footwear

7

84 88

95

96

102

103

108

109

113

114

115

119

116

117

118

120 121

123

124

127

128

53 Perfectly fine

4 After-dinner order

54 Precipitousness

122

92 Something said before grace?

5 Barrett of Pink Floyd

56 What makes you you?

125

93 Big name in feminism

7 Start to give trouble to

57 Pool activity

38 Show-offs

58 “Well, well!”

71 Part of a trap

86 Nile Valley region

97 Naïve

40 Kind of tax

99 Sign of stress

8 It needs a signature

101 Ogre, to a kid

9 Fire

72 Fed. property overseer

88 Isak Dinesen novel setting

98 “Fuhgeddaboud-it!”

43 Food to go? 45 Santa’s landing spot

103 Arab League headquarters

10 Augments

60 Word before and after “to,” in a religious phrase

75 Flurry

89 Cutting comments

113 Certain

61 Purple shade 62 More suitable

78 Universal recipient designation

90 World’s leading exporter of bananas

102 Sleep problem, to Brits

115 Durango dinero

64 Touches

80 ___ Canals

66 Hydroxyl compound

82 “Great” kid-lit detective

91 Nail polish remover component

106 50-page book, maybe?

36 Serpent’s tail? 37 Running with scissors and others

48 Not so important 49 Court hearing 50 Persevered

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

104 German : Strasse :: French : ___ 105 Designer Gernreich 108 Carson’s predecessor 109 Blue Ribbons and others

6 “Oh my!”

11 “Hey!” 12 Good qualities 13 Situation after a leadoff single 14 Charge for bloodwork, say 15 Boy or girl lead-in

70 20th-century novelist whose first name is an anagram of 66-Down

83 You might have a good one after a breakup

126

93 Eagles’ org. 94 ___ d’Amérique 95 Harangues 96 Renounce

112 Chinese dynasty during the time of Christ

100 High pitch

107 ___ blank (had no idea)

supermarkets

119 Suffix with trick 120 Ungentlemanly sort

109 What’s expected 111 Sportscaster Collinsworth

121 Spanish precious metal

thought for the week “You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.”

— Winston Churchill

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A23


A23

Friday, May 17, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

IRON MAN 3

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: In Summer 2013, pioneering director J.J. Abrams will deliver an explosive action thriller that takes 'Star Trek Into Darkness.' When the crew of the Enterprise is called back home, they find an unstoppable force of terror from within their own organization has detonated the fleet and everything it stands for, leaving our world in a state of crisis. With a personal score to settle, Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a war-zone world to capture a one man weapon of mass destruction. As our heroes are propelled into an epic chess game of life and death, love will be challenged, friendships will be torn apart, and sacrifices must be made for the only family Kirk has left: his crew.

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Marvel's "Iron Man 3" pits brash-but-brilliant industrialist Tony Stark/Iron Man against an enemy whose reach knows no bounds. When Stark finds his personal world destroyed at his enemy's hands, he embarks on a harrowing quest to find those responsible. This journey, at every turn, will test his mettle. With his back against the wall, Stark is left to survive by his own devices, relying on his ingenuity and instincts to protect those closest to him. As he fights his way back, Stark discovers the answer to the question that has secretly haunted him: does the man make the suit or does the suit make the man?

MUD

THE CROODS

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Mud is an adventure about two boys, Ellis and his friend Neckbone, who find a man named Mud hiding out on an island in the Mississippi. Mud describes fantastic scenarios-he killed a man in Texas and vengeful bounty hunters are coming to get him. He says he is planning to meet and escape with the love of his life, Juniper, who is waiting for him in town. Skeptical but intrigued, Ellis and Neckbone agree to help him. It isn't long until Mud's visions come true and their small town is besieged by a beautiful girl with a line of bounty hunters in tow.

Rating: PG Synopsis: The Croods tells the story of the world's first family road trip. When their cave is destroyed, the Crood family must embark on a comedy adventure into strange and spectacular territory in search of a new home. As if patriarch Grug (Cage) didn't already have enough to handle, it goes from bad to worse when they encounter an imaginative nomad named Guy (Reynolds.) With Guy's help the Croods conquer their fear of the outside world and discover that they have exactly what it takes to survive - each other.

TYLER PERRY’S PEEPLES Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Sparks fly in the Hamptons when "regular guy" Wade Walker (Craig Robinson) crashes the preppy Peeples family reunion to ask for their precious daughter Grace's (Kerry Washington) hand in marriage. Wade might be a fish out of water among this picture-perfect East Coast clan always trying to keep up appearances, but he's not about to let himself sink. Instead, in a wild weekend of fun, dysfunction and hilarious surprises, Wade is about to discover there's room for all kinds of Peeples in this family, no matter their differences.

PAIN & GAIN

Rating: R Synopsis: Michael Bay directs this ripped-from-the-headlines tale of a group of bodybuilding criminals in this Paramount Pictures production starring Mark Whalberg and Dwayne Johnson. Anthony Mackie, Ed Harris, and Rob Corddry co-star.

THE GREAT GATSBY Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: "The Great Gatsby" follows Fitzgerald-like, would-be writer Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) as he leaves the Midwest and comes to New York City in the spring of 1922, an era of loosening morals, glittering jazz, bootleg kings, and sky-rocketing stocks. Chasing his own American Dream, Nick lands next door to a mysterious, party-giving millionaire, Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), and across the bay from his cousin, Daisy (Carey Mulligan), and her philandering, blue-blooded husband, Tom Buchanan (Joel Edgerton). It is thus that Nick is drawn into the captivating world of the super rich, their illusions, loves and deceits.

Answers to this week’s puzzles S A L O O N S

P I E R R O T

O P E N S

A L L O K

S A R C A S M

E C U A D O R

A T L E MON A D I B N O E WED O H U A T S T S E P A A T C E E T C O R N I E S

S Y D E S I S S P R Y E O A B U U R T I S S O N T R H E A B N L E

G O S H

A C T U P H O U N R L D N D A E C S O O Y O

S T A T U T E L A P S

N U B U D I SAT R A L E A W S A

C A P A D S N D S S T A T T E D O G S S R O K E P I N E D I N E E S THU N C H M O L E B L A S R B E E A S T P A A I N T G O E SUN A E R I S A Y S

V I R TUE S

O N E O N

L A B F E E

O F T A T O N E T R G A R S A N C A R T T Y I E R P A P A D E R E S S O

A L A S T A T U T T E D A V I I N S T A T M I N O I T L L A M E E S A Y H U S T E V Y S E A P FRI E D A C A I R A B S T A L C O V E A R O S D O W S

R E D D E E R A P T E R

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: An elite military unit comprised of special operatives known as G.I. Joe, operating out of The Pit, takes on an evil organization led by a notorious arms dealer.

42 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Hero is a word we hear often in sports, but heroism is not always about achievements on the field of play. "42" tells the story of two men-the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brooklyn Dodgers GM Branch Rickey-whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) to the team, breaking Major League Baseball's infamous color line. But the deal also put both Robinson and Rickey in the firing line of the public, the press and even other players. Facing unabashed racism from every side, Robinson was forced to demonstrate tremendous courage and restraint by not reacting in kind, knowing that any incident could destroy his and Rickey's hopes. Instead, Number 42 let his talent on the field do the talking-ultimately winning over fans and his teammates, silencing his critics, and paving the way for others to follow.

OBLIVION Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Tom Cruise stars in Oblivion, an original and groundbreaking cinematic event from the visionary director of TRON: Legacy and producers of Rise of the Planet of the Apes. On a spectacular future Earth that has evolved beyond recognition, one man's confrontation with the past will lead him on a journey of redemption and discovery as he battles to save mankind. 2077: Jack Harper (Cruise) serves as a security repairmen stationed on an evacuated Earth. Part of a massive operation to extract vital resources after decades of war with a terrifying alien threat who still scavenges what's left of our planet, Jack's mission is almost complete. In a matter of two weeks, he will join the remaining survivors on a lunar colony far from the war-torn world he has long called home. Living in and patrolling the breathtaking skies from thousands of feet above, Jack's soaring existence is brought crashing down after he rescues a beautiful stranger from a downed spacecraft. Drawn to Jack through a connection that transcends logic, her arrival triggers a chain of events that forces him to question everything he thought he knew. With a reality that is shattered as he discovers shocking truths that connect him to Earth of the past, Jack will be pushed to a heroism he didn't know he contained within. The fate of humanity now rests solely in the hands of a man who believed our world was soon to be lost forever. Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.

N O S I R E E

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A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

05/16/13-05/22/13

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 7:00 DAILY 1:00 SAT & SUN

4:10 7:10 10:00 DAILY 12:50 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 6:20 DAILY 11:50 SAT & SUN PG-13

PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

PG - 13

2:40 5:05 7:20 9:40 DAILY 12:20 SAT & SUN

3:20 6:10 9:05 DAILY 12:10 SAT & SUN

MUD

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts 2:30 6:00 8:55 DAILY 11:30 SAT & SUN

4:00 9:50 DAILY

PG 3D*

No Passes or Discounts 3:30 6:30 9:20 DAILY 12:30 SAT & SUN

3:10 9:30 DAILY

4:20 9:10 DAILY PG

Movie Gift Passes can be purchased at any location. Allen Theatres Gift Ticket Good for ANY movie, any time. Not good for special events. Cost: Normal adult evening price. Good for 3D film with additional cash upcharge.

Allen Theatres Discount Ticket Not good for 3D films or special events. Good for movies before 6:00 pm and nonrestricted movies after 6:00 pm for adults. Cost: Normal adult matinee price

ANIMAS 10

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts No Passes or Discounts PG-13 3D* 3D* PG-13 4:05 7:00 9:50 DAILY 1:40 4:35 7:30 DAILY 10:20 FRI&SAT 1:00 FRI - SUN 10:45 FRI - SUN PG-13

2:00 6:40 DAILY 11:40 SAT & SUN

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 3:30 6:50 9:55 DAILY 12:20 FRI - SUN

R

PG-13

3:05 6:10 9:10 DAILY 12:00 FRI - SUN

3:40 6:40 9:40 DAILY 12:50 FRI - SUN

PG-13

PG-13

PG

PG-13 3D*

No Passes or Discounts 2:50 6:00 8:55 DAILY 12:00 FRI - SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3:0 6:10 9:15 DAILY 11:50 FRI - SUN

2:40 6:30 9:20 DAILY 11:45 FRI - SUN

1:50 4:10 7:05 9:25 DAILY 11:20 FRI - SUN

2:00 7:10 DAILY PG-13

Online ticket sales available at COMING SOON

www.allentheatresinc.com

May 23

May 24

May 24

May 31

May 31

June 7

4:30 9:45 DAILY 11:30 FRI-SUN

June 7

June 12

June 14


MAY 17, 2013

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ENERGY WEEK Students attend event in Farmington

PAGE 2

VOL. 3 NO. 33

(Left) Gourd art by Peter Kewitt.

Jewelry by Lou Mancel of Aztec.

Acrylic painting by Doug Miller of Farmington.

2013 Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair reception May 24 The Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair opens with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, May 24, at the Red Lion Hotel, 700 Scott Ave. The art fair continues from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, May 25, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 26, and is held in conjunction with the 27th Annual Riverfest Celebration at Berg Park. The Fine Arts and Crafts Fair will include the work of 24 Four Corners artists selected by show juror Ann Smith of Durango. Smith is best known for her large abstract floral paintings. Her award winning images have been shown by the National Watercolor Society, the Rocky Mountain National Water Media Exhibition, and the Western Federation of Watercolor Societies. Her work has been featured in various books and magazines, including “The Watercolour Artist’s Colour Mixing Bible” and We want your stories! Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

50¢

“Southwest Art.” “Next year it would be great to have twice as many entries for this art festival. People don’t realize how much artists like to meet the person who takes home a piece of art that was lovingly created in their studio. It’s much more personal than a gallery sale,” Smith said when asked about the jurying process. Several artists are new participants to the event this year and a wide variety of media will be on display and for sale, including: paintings, photographs, woodwork, jewelry, clay, metal, fiber, drawings, and gourd art. The public is invited to vote on which artist’s work they like the best. The artist with the most votes will receive the “People’s Choice” award. The Riverfest Fine Arts and Crafts Fair is sponsored by the Northwest New Mexico Arts Council, ConocoPhillips, American Classifieds, Wal Art Gallery, Art Supply House, New Mexico Arts, and the Red Lion Hotel.

GED

Fiber art by Betty Reed of Kirtland.

Cuts College program helps students get degree

Cities facing budget crisis

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Tse' Bit Ai' and Kirtland middle schools attend Energy Week San Juan Basin oil and gas industry holds indoor and outdoor classrooms at Farmington Museum JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist Tse' Bit Ai' and Kirtland middle school students received a quick lesson in the science that drives the San Juan Basin’s oil and gas industry as part of the industry ’s Energy Week during April 18 field trips to the Farmington Museum Convention & Visitors Bureau. “The primary goal of this program is to tie the day in with the science curriculum in the schools, and to show the students how science is being applied in their own backyards.” To facilitate that effort, lesson plans focused on Earth science were specifically developed to provide continuity between the museum experience and classroom activities,” said George Sharpe, at Merrion Oil & Gas, in a news release. “A secondary goal of Energy Week is to educate the kids about one of the most important industries in the region and the state,” Sharpe added. “Tens of thousands of people work in high paying jobs in the industry, paying taxes, buying groceries, and volunteering in communities. In addition, the revenues generated from the industry are the lifeblood of the state cof-

Derek Hines, with ConocoPhillips, talks to Tse' Bit Ai' Middle School students during their field trip for Energy Week at the Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau.

fers, most of which goes to public education.” The students rotated through presentations in a classroom and exhibits inside the Farmington Museum, as well as oil equipment set up in the parking lot. Their teachers were working and retired professionals in the oil and gas industry – including from ConocoPhillips. “It ’s important they learn the difference between fossil fuel and renewable energy,” TBA science teacher Amy John said, adding the students did projects on this prior to the field trip. “(But) me teaching it is just abstract.

Tse' Bit Ai' Middle School students listen during a presentation in the Farmington Museum.

Us going out here is actually hands on – being able to ask questions to

these geologists about what they do.” “It gives them a bird’s

eye view of what is really going on,” John added. “They see these things,

but they really don’t know what they are for, out in the field.”

Bruce Gantner, a retired environmental engineer with ConocoPhillips, gives a presentation to Tse' Bit Ai' Middle School students at the Farmington Museum.

Kirtland Central has highest grad rate in San Juan County JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist Kirtland Central High School’s Class of 2012 had the highest graduation rate, at 80.7 percent, of any high school in San Juan County, according to statewide graduation rates released by the New Mexico Public Education Department. The Kirtland Bronco’s 80.7 percent graduation rate was more than 10 percent higher than the state average of 70.3 percent, as well as more than 10 percent higher than Farming-

ton High School’s 70.4 percent, Aztec High School’s 67.4 percent, and Bloomfield High School’s 70.3 percent. Kirtland Central’s graduation rate was more than 4 percent higher than Piedra Vista High School’s 76.4 percent. A stronger and more accountable attendance policy that resulted in a decline of unverified absences and in better communication with parents; credit recovery classes available during the school day; and an emphasis on college and career readiness by taking dualcredit college courses each contributed to student suc-

cess, said KCHS Principal Shawna Becenti, who took over the Bronco’s reins in the summer of 2011. “These (class of 2012) students were also the cohort (class) that had the GEAR-UP funding since 7th grade, and it moved with them,” Becenti said, adding that Kirtland Central begins working on

* KC

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School Board member Randy Manning on stage during the 2012 Graduation Ceremony. Manning, who was re-elected Feb. 5, 2013, to a fouryear term, has served on the CCSD School Board for approximately 20 years.


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Moving forward

College GED program helps students reach their goals DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Life’s challenges often cause hiccups in a person’s plan. Whether the plan is to find a new job, get married or graduate from school, the hiccups are there blocking the way. This was the case of Shont’e Maes, a 28-year-old Farmington resident, who never graduated from high school. Maes overcame the hiccups and walked across the stage May 9 at the San Juan College Learning Commons to receive her GED. Maes dropped out in her sophomore year to be with the love of her life, Derick Maes. At the time, it was the right thing for

her to do, and they had several happy years together. The couple had a daughter, 8-year-old Monique, and their life was good. Unfortunately in 2011, Derick died leaving behind a young widow, who was now a single mother and primary breadwinner in the family. Shont ’e knew she couldn’t raise Monique on a minimum wage salary from her job at Dairy Queen, so she decided to take a giant leap and head back to school. Shont’e enrolled in the San Juan College Adult Basic Education Program and began the journey toward completing her education. “I was nervous about going back to school,”

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Shont’e Maes, 28, earned her GED in November 2012, and walked with her San Juan College Adult Basic Education Program class in the May 9 GED graduation in the Learning Commons at San Juan College. – Photo by Debra Mayeux

she said. Shont’e’s class was a big one, and not everyone made it. She did make it, and passed the test in No-

vember 2012. “The teachers gave me so much encouragement. I loved the encouragement. They gave me drive,” she said. “I

think if it wasn’t for the teachers at the Adult Basic Education Program, I would have left and dropped out again.”

It was challenging, because she had trouble just waking up every day and getting out of bed without

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Lots of bargains

Largest annual flea market in the Four Corners is June 1 The Bonnie Dallas Senior Center is hosting their huge Annual Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 1. Inside or outside booths are available for rent. The cost of a rental space for ages 60+ will be $10; for anyone under

GED her husband. Monique, however, loves school and also encouraged her mother to quit the job at Dairy Queen and focus on education. “A lot of my family has been my big support,” Shont’e said. “My mom (Gloria Brady) gives me inspiration.” Since passing the GED test in November 2012, Shont’e has taken classes at San Juan College, learning that she loves to write and has strong grammar skills. She also is working on her math and sciences, because she would like to earn her certification in the Medical Laboratory Technician program at San Juan College. She encourages others who might be struggling not to “let their past and what people say about them have an effect on them, and to embrace who you really are, because even though having an education might sound nerdy, it’s really awesome.” Andrew Aldava, 24, is living by that advice. He never graduated from high school, after being expelled in his junior year. “I wanted to graduate, but it never happened,” he said. Aldava took his GED test, but did not pass. He also decided to enroll in the Adult Basic Education Program, as a “refreshment” to what he learned in high school. “What pushed me is a Iot of my family has their GEDs,” he said. “I was going to be the first to graduate from high school, but that didn’t happen.” Aldava took the initiative and made it happen when he walked across the Learning Commons stage and receive his GED as well. There were 126 graduates walking for their GEDs, out of 167 that completed the Adult Basic Education Program. In FY2013, there were 305 residents who passed the GED test to receive their certificate.

60, the cost will be $20. Mark your calendar to come out and shop for that special treasure! There will be close to 100 vendors selling everything from antiques to handmade crafts. Every year there are over 3,000 buyers and vendors that participate.

Hamburgers-on-the-grill and Frito pies will be available for $5. Listen to live music as you check out the aisles for your dream deals. Come out, support our Senior Center, and don’t miss this day of fun, food, music, and bargain shopping! The location for the Flea

Market will be inside and outside the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center, 109 E. La Plata St., in Farmington, outside by the Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave., and inside the new Senior Activity Center. For information call 505.599.1390.

Museum groundbreaking

Farmington City Councilors Gayla McCulloch and Dan Darnell join Mayor Tommy Roberts and museum board officials for the May 8 groundbreaking of the Farmington Museum Energy Wing. The new wing will include a 7,500 square foot exhibit hall with 3,000 square feet of humidity controlled storage space at a cost of $2.5 million. It should be completed this winter. – Photo by Josh Bishop

KC graduation with students when they are freshman. “We’re creating a really solid plan so when students enter Kirtland Central High School they know what is expected of them,” she said. “Being a Bronco comes with success in college and success in careers.” “With the GEAR-UP funding, we’ve been able to hire a college success teacher – Darah Tabrum. She has been rallying behind college scholarships, (college) entrance letters, and really getting our kids to think beyond high school,” she added. Teamwork within the school and the community, and with parents, played a huge role, Assistant Principal Mike Walker said. “We worked together with the students in mind to help them be successful,” he said. “The best thing they can ever do for themselves is to graduate from high school – and we instill that in them. The teamwork we have to not let these kids slip through the cracks is real important.” Assistant Principal Vanessa

Sarna added, “Our teachers and counselors became really focused on the seniors and noticing any red flags and getting them reported right away – so we could apply interventions if we needed to. There’s been a multitude of factors, and it all came together. We’ve been seeing the results. I’m really proud.” A second Central Consolidated School District school also exceeded the state average, as well as Farmington, Aztec, and Bloomfield high’s graduation rates: Newcomb High School had a graduation rate of 74.6 percent. “Newcomb High has a terrific core of teachers,” CCSD Superintendent Don Levinski said. “At Kirtland Central High, because the graduation rate was the highest ever, it should be obvious what an outstanding job Shawna Becenti did as a first year principal. She has some programs in place that are definitely working.” Kirtland Central High School Principal Shawna Becenti says her school begins working on graduation with students their freshman year.


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EMS, 9-1-1 cuts?

Committee takes proactive approach to GRT shortfall LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Ambulance and 9-1-1 services could be cut if the Emergency Gross Receipts Tax doesn’t bring in enough money to foot the bill, and San Juan County officials said they may be faced with this crisis in the future. The county and the cities of Aztec, Bloomfield and Farmington all contribute to the fund as well, but each city is facing its own budget crisis in FY2014. The gross receipts tax, GRT, is collected on every penny spent by consumers in San Juan County, and sales are down throughout region. This means there is a $2.4 million gap in funding

Emergency Medical Services Oversight Committee members discuss the Emergency Medical Services FY2014 operating budget at Farmington City Hall. – Josh Bishop photo

for Emergency Medical Services/Ambulance Services, and the San Juan County Consolidated 9-1-1 Dispatch Center. “Between those two enti-

ties they are expecting to spend $2.4 million more in estimated revenue,” said Marcella Brashear, chief financial officer for San Juan County. Brashear explained in a

May 6 meeting of the Emergency Medical Services Oversight Committee that the shortfall might need to be made up with county cash reserves. “History has shown

Officials: Data skewed Farmington DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Farmington has been ranked the 59th most dangerous city in the United States on a list created by the Wall Street Journal. It moved up from the 86th most dangerous ranking last year. The Journal developed the ranking by using crimes statistics from the FBI. It

compared the number of crimes with the city’s actual population of 45,256 residents to develop the placement on a list of 1 to 100. There was a total of 2,132 crimes in Farmington in 2012. Of those crimes, 504 were violent in nature and 1,628 were property crimes. Those numbers could be from “skewed” data, according to Farmington Police

Captain Keith McPheeters, who also attributed the ranking to an inebriate population within the city. “The number of crimes committed on the street inebriate population – the assaults that occur as a result of that lifestyle – greatly skew the numbers, so your average citizen here really is quite safe and has never had the police department come

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those two entities don’t always spend 100 percent of their budget, so we haven’t had to dip into those cash reserves when looking into actual expenditures,” she explained. The FY2013 budget for Emergency Medical Services is $3.6 million, while the Consolidated 9-1-1 Dispatch Center’s budget is $4.9 million, Brashear said. The GRT is expected to bring in $6.7 million in FY2014, and that is 5 percent below what it generated for FY2013, Brashear said. “We want to be cognizant about where we are going with all of this and so that is why we need to take a very close look,” County CEO Kim Carpenter.

Linda Thompson, deputy county CEO, said due to the $2.4 million gap, Emergency Medical Services and the 9-1-1 Dispatch Center officials must show an effort in cutting and reducing expenditures. “We have had a conversation with both entities and telling them they will have to manage, and at that point we will expect them to reduce expenditures. It is up to each of the entities on how much to reduce.” She added that if the two entities are reducing expenditures, the County Commission will work with them. “If at some point they will be dipping into their reserve fund then it will be up to the Commission on how long they allow that for.”

is 59 on dangerous cities list

to their business or their residence. There is a certain population of people that deal with the police department often,” McPheeters told the Farmington City Council during a May 7 work session, where Councilor Mary Fischer mentioned the report. Fischer wanted to know if the report was accurate. “It’s a little alarming if that is the case,” she said. The numbers show that in 2012 there were 67 crimes per square mile in Farmington, and of those 244 were burglaries, 1,291 were thefts, and 93 were motor vehicle thefts. There are approximately 36 property crimes committed for every 1,000 residents. Personal safety numbers were higher, showing that 11 out of every 1,000 residents were victims of violent crimes in 2012. Those crimes included two murders, 73 rapes, 40 robberies and 389 assaults. “I would imagine that those numbers are based upon convoluted data. The arrests and the crimes that we do investigate are not concurrent with our residential population, so those numbers would be skewed,” McPheeters said. Those being victims of assaults and other personal crimes are members of the street inebriate population, according to McPheeters, who said those numbers would not factor into the city’s population. Mike Renaud, regional director of Presbyterian Medical Services, addressed the street inebriate issue with the Council, during the budget discussion, saying a cut to his budget for Totah Behavioral Health Services could be counterproductive. “This is terrible timing because I have been working with the Farmington Police Department on reducing the costs with partnerships out of Totah for Farmington’s

top 25 street inebriate offenders,” Renaud said. “It is the first time we have looked at some data and, as you can imagine, the jail has not provided us any. All of the wonderful folks out there are reluctant to provide us the data.” Council Jason Sandel offered to make an official request on behalf of the city to get Renaud what he needed. “That is absolutely ludicrous that we have publically funded institutions that are refusing to give you data,” he said. The county was not refusing to give Renaud any information, as was discovered in April 25 emails between Renaud and San Juan County Detention Center Administrator Tom Havel. “The jail is a partner of the community, and all he has to do is ask for it,” Havel said, of the request made by Renaud. In an April 25 email to San Juan County officials, Renaud requested “the full names and date of birth of your top 25 most frequent users of services for 2012.” He wanted the top 25 users in the areas of patient medical stays, emergency room visits, arrests and or contacts, jail intakes and detox admissions. “This is a preliminary data collection – to cross system check individuals. This information will only be used in an attempt to create a master list of San Juan County’s most frequent users of services,” Renaud wrote. Havel responded to the request the same day, saying he would be able to gather it by late May or early June, because the county is reconfiguring the jail management system. He also explained that under HIPAA he would not be able to provide medical data without a release signed by the individual. “I’ll see what I can get

together and how we accommodate your request,” Havel wrote. “I’m happy to assist with this project, it’s just going to get a little challenging and a certain amount of patience will be helpful.” Renaud responded saying he understood the challenges of a conversion; “as soon as you can get me the list is fine. I do not need medical data from you at this point, I just need your top 25 frequent flyers,” he wrote. Renaud said the compilation of a list might allow law enforcement and social service agencies to be “more proactive” with the inebriate population, and that he said could lead to cutting costs. Would it, however, make Farmington a safer community? Not necessarily, according to the criminal data put together in the Wall Street Journal report. Farmington needs to earn 88 percentage points on a 100 percentile scale to be ranked as a safe community. It received 11 percent in 2012, and was the only New Mexico city that made the list and it is the only city in the Four Corners’ states to be included on the list. Phoenix, Denver, Albuquerque and Salt Lake City did not make the list. Farmington business owner and realtor Sam Todd said he believes the ranking to be opinion-based. “I’m a local guy running a local independent business. I have a family. I went to school here. I feel as safe as ever living in the community, and I enjoy helping people move into the area,” Todd said. He continues to receive interest from people wanting to relocate to Farmington. “I think that is the thing I enjoy most about living here is that I feel safe. You do feel like you can go out at night,” Todd said. “For us to be mentioned in something like that is frivolous.”


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calendar ONGOING EVENTS LIVE HORSE RACING SunRay Park & Casino brings live horse racing to Farmington each week through June 23rd. Races are held on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Tuesdays. Simulcast horse racing year-round. SunRay Park & Casino is located off Hwy. 64 between Farmington and Bloomfield. Information: 505.566.1200 or www.sunraygaming.com AROUND THE PARKS IN 8 SATURDAYS WALKING PROGRAM The City of Farmington Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs invites walkers to participate in this free program over 8 Saturdays between May 4th and June 22nd from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. During the program we will visit 8 of the parks listed in the “Farmington Trails and Walking Guide.” Everyone is welcome to participate at any time during the program. Come walk the designated park with family, friends and pets. Register online at www.fmtn.org. Information: 505.599.1484 BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org/museum

FRI MAY 17 ASTROFRIDAY “Path of Totality” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. A stargaze follows, weather permitting, at 8:30 p.m. The Planetarium reser ves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or www.sanjuancollege.edu /Planetarium/index.htm

FRI MAY 17 SAT MAY 18 FRI MAY 24 SUN MAY 26 GOD OF CARNAGE Theatre Ensemble Arts presents “God of Carnage” at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Little Theatre. God of Carnage (originally Le Dieu du carnage) is a play by Yasmina Reza. It is about two pairs of parents, one of whose child has hur t the other at a public park, who meet to discuss the matter in a civilized manner. However, as the evening goes on, the parents become increasingly childish, resulting

in the evening devolving into chaos. Information: 505.326.2839

SAT MAY 18 DUTCH OVEN BAKING For a real treat during camping or backyard cooking, try baking in a cast iron Dutch oven. If this is a new type of cooking for you, come to a demonstration and get some hands-on experience, recipes and tips from an expert at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center. Donna Thatcher will be demonstrating several recipes from start to tasting during a twohour outdoor session at 9 a.m. Bring a lawn chair and dress to spend the time outdoors around the fire in the sun and breezes of spring. Registration is required for this pioneer skill. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI MAY 24 SUN MAY 26 RIVERFEST Area rivers are celebrated with a festival of music, food, entertainment, a 10K and 5K run & walk, riverside trail walks and river raft rides. Festival takes place at the River Reach Terrace, corner of Scott Ave. and San Juan Blvd., and at Animas Park, just off of Browning Parkway in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1140 or www.riverreachfoundation .com

SAT MAY 25 RIVERFEST 10K & 5K RUNS AND 2-MILE WALK Register in advance at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Rd., or online at www.fmtn.org/prca, for this annual Fun Run and Walk. This beautiful course weaves throughout Animas and Berg Parks during Riverfest. There will be no race day registration, register by Friday, May 24th at 2 p.m. Information: 505.599.1184

THURS MAY 30 SUN JUNE 2 AZTEC FIESTA DAYS Celebrate the arrival of summer in Aztec with the Hot Spot Car Show, a parade, live music, vendors, food, the Bennett’s Amusements Carnival (May 31-June 3) and the Burning of Old Man Gloom. Call for specifics! Information: 505-334-7646 or www.aztecchamber.com RACHAEL CARSON: THE WOMEN OF NATURE BY ANN BEYKE Rachael Carson was a marine biologist when few women dared to tread water. Her life-long love of nature and science led to her research on how uncontrolled chemical use devastated wildlife and food sources. Her bestselling book, Silent Spring, detailed this devastation and led to the eventual ban on DDT in the United States. Ann Beyke has performed in local the-

ater, film, television for nearly 25 years. She is pleased to bring to life one of the most influential women in modern history at the San Juan College Little Theatre at 7 p.m. This free event is part of the Chautauqua Learning Series. Information: 505-3349325.

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7– 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. May 18 – Ramblin’ Fever May 25 – NO DANCE – MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Info: 505.599.1380 HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Info: 505.599.1380 JUNKIN’ WITH JUDI IN DURANGO Depart at 7:30 a.m. Friday, May 17 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Bring money for shopping and a bag to carry all your treasures home. We will stop at a few yard sales and continue on to visit thrift stores in Durango, Colo. Buy your own lunch in Durango. Cost is $5 and you must be 60+ years of age. Info: 505.599.1390 FOOT CARE AND DIABETES 10 – 11 a.m. Wednesday, May 22 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This class will help you learn about proper nail care, proper footwear, and how to prevent or delay problems with your feet. Class is taught by Basin Home Health. Info: 505.566.2287 ACTING 101 – NEW CLASS! 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, May 28 through July 23 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Or do

you want to be one? Join us Tuesdays for excitement and creativity at Acting 101. This is a beginner class for 50+ wanting to learn and create through acting. The basics of acting will be taught through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have lots of fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. We will also attend the Sandstone Theater Production of “Grease” on Thursday, July 11. The class will put on a performance during the final session, showcasing scenes worked on throughout the course. Come expand your mind and create with us! This is an Encore Class brought to you by San Juan Community College and taught by Melissa Souers. For information and registration, call 505.566.3121. SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX On-going Classes 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: .50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 50. 599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Information: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays (NEW DAY!) and Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208

N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288

SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday

FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information

MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Th ursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise you’ll tighten and tone in just 60 minutes with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music. This is your hour. Come try it out –1st class is free! For more information call 505.320.5364 or 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com RIVERFEST 10K, 5K, & 2-MILE WALK Race starts at 8 a.m. sharp Saturday, May 25 Join us for our annual Riverfest 10K, 5K, & 2-Mile Walk on Memorial Day weekend. Both runs and walk will start and finish at the Animas Park parking lot area and run along the scenic river trails. The 10K & 5K races will use electronic chip timing! All entries receive a T-shirt and there will be age group awards, both male and female, for the 10K and 5K. Register online at webtrac.fmtn.org or in person at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road. Registration ends Friday, May 24 at 1 p.m. There is no race day registration! Entry fee is $20 for runs and $12 for walk. Information: 505.599.1184. LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday. Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30-minute lessons are $20 or eight 30minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday

MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday

CROSS POOL* 11:15 am – noon p.m. Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Ave. For more information call 505.599.1167 EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. For more information call 505.566.2480 DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels that can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies! Please call us with any questions at 505.566.2480. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS Want to help a “Little”? Sycamore Park Community Center is partnering with Big Brothers Big Sisters. Find out more by calling 505.566.2481 SENIOR FITNESS 9 – 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Information: 505.566.2481 COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 – 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy learning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Information: 505.566-2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Information: 505.566.2480 -8111 or 505.566.2480


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calendar VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m.; presentation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, May 23 Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions, please contact coordinator Carol Kohler at 505.334.8111 or 505.566.2480 FARMINGTON MUSEUM 3041 E. Main St. Call 505.599.1174 for more information www.farmingtonmuseum.org FARMINGTON MUSEUM EXHIBIT TOURS By appointment Let an experienced docent at the Farmington Museum be your host for guided tours of the permanent and visiting exhibits. Tours are FREE and available to the public by appointment. Any size group is welcome! Call 505.599.1169 for more information about the Museum’s current exhibits or to schedule a guided tour. HISTORY HIKE – HUBBELL TRADING POST NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Meet us at the Farmington Museum for History Hikes on the second Saturday of the month, May thru September. Enjoy a fun and informative hike that explores

the cultural and natural history of the Four Corners region. In May, participants will have the opportunity to explore the national historic site of the Hubbell Trading Post in Ganado, Ariz. Space is limited. Registration is required and can be completed by registering online at webtrac.fmtn.org or by coming into the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St. The cost is $10 per person and includes transpor tation and lunch. This is an adults-only program. Info: 505.599.1169 DUTCH OVEN BAKING 9 – 11 a.m. Saturday, May 18 Come to the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., for a real treat during your summer camping or backyard cooking, to try baking in a cast-iron Dutch oven. If this is a new type of cooking for you, come to a demonstration, and get some handson experience, recipes, and tips from an expert. Donna Thatcher, Riverside Nature Center Educator, will be demonstrating several recipes from start to tasting during a two-hour outdoor session. Space is limited, so please call and pre-register. Bring a lawn chair, and dress to spend the time outdoors around the fire in sun and breezes as we revive this pioneer skill. Information and registration, call

505.599.1422. RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER In Animas Park off Browning Parkway Call 505.599.1422 for more information Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday 1 – 4 p.m. Please note that Tuesday Birders begin at 9 a.m., October through March. BIRD WATCHING 8 – 10 a.m. Tuesdays Join Donna Thatcher, Education Specialist, and other birders for bird watching from the Riverside Nature Center and a leisurely walk of 1 to 2 miles in Animas and Berg Parks. Information: 505.599.1422 BROWN BAG BIRDING Noon – 1 p.m. Thursdays Bring your lunch and join Riverside Nature Center staff and volunteers in the obser vation room to watch wildlife as we eat. Information: 505.599.1422 SCIENCE FAIR WINNERS AT THE NATURE CENTER Science Fair projects selected by a committee of judges from the Friends of the Nature Center will be on display at the Nature Center through May. Be sure to come in and see what kind of research

students are doing. Memberships in the Friends are awarded to winning students and their sponsors, as well as cash awards to science fair winners in fields related to natural history and the environment. CHACO CANYON MIGRATORY BIRD COUNT 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday, May 20 Join volunteers from the Four Corners Bird Club and the Nature Center in making a census of the birds at Chaco Canyon National Monument. Participants should be experienced birders and able to hike in backcountry areas. For more information, call the Nature Center, 505.599.1422. HERBS & XERISCAPE GARDEN 10 – 11 a.m. & 3 – 4 p.m. Saturday, May 25 While you are enjoying Animas and Berg parks during Riverfest, come to the Xeriscape Gardens at Riverside Nature Center to learn about the many native and non-native plants which grow with very little water, are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies, and have many household uses. Learn traditional lore, and tasty recipes. This is a good time to get ideas for your own home landscaping as we tour the Xeriscape Demonstration Gardens. Information:

505.599.1422 FARMINGTON INDIAN CENTER 100 W Elm St Call (505) 327-6296 for more information FARMINGTON INDIAN CENTER RESTAURANT Breakfast – 8 – 10:15 a.m. Lunch – 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Open Tuesday – Thursday Enjoy Navajo cuisine, meet new and old friends, and enjoy hot, fresh, meals. See our website for monthly menus! www.fmtn.org Info: 505.327.6296 PIÑON HILLS GOLF COURSE 2101 Sunrise Parkway 505.326.6066 for more information INTRODUCING PINON HILLS 2013 GOLF SEASON: Piñon Hills Golf Tournament Series Saturday, May 25 - Couples Info: 505.326.6066 or www.pinonhillsgolf.com TUESDAY TWILIGHT LEAGUE NOW through September 5:30 shotgun start May 14 & 28, June 11 & 25, July 9 & 28, August 6 & 20, September 3 & 17 Piñon Hills Golf Course, 2101 Sunrise Parkway, will host this bi-monthly event. Play

is open to anyone —regardless of handicap! This will be a fun, quick, 9-hole, early evening event with a payout each play day. Some weeks we will play the front nine, others the back nine. Entry fee is only $10 – and the special Twilight League rate is only $15 – and that includes your green fee and cart! Pass-holders pay a $10 cart fee to play. All you need to do is visit or call the Pro Shop and register by 5 p.m. on the Monday prior to play day. Information: 505.326.6066 or www.pinonhillsgolf.com GET GOLF READY Adult Introductory Lessons 5:30 – 7 p.m. Tuesday – Friday: May 21 – May 24 Come to the Piñon Hills Golf Course, 2101 Sunrise Parkway for a span of four classes will introduce the game of golf in a whole new way. Instruction will begin on the practice range, move to the putting green, and finish on the golf course. The student will be introduced to both Civitan and Piñon Hills Golf Courses. This program is targeted towards new players, but could be a great refresher course for anyone looking to get more out of the game of Golf. Info: pinonhillsgolf.com or 505.326.6066

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IN KIRTLAND ON HIGHWAY 64 ACROSS FROM SUBWAY

505-516-1234


8

SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, May 17, 2013

NO CREDIT

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Tribulation DURABLEND® Espresso 86” Dual Reclining Sofa YOU SAVE ASHLEY $ DIRECT PRICE $11199

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SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Some pieces and fabric prints may vary by region. Selection may vary by store. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Prices valid for a limited time only. Participation times may vary. Picture may not represent item exactly as shown, advertised items may not be on display at all locations. A deposit equal to 10% and an amount equal to Sales Tax and delivery charges is required for all financed purchases and is not eligible for this credit promotion. HomeStores are independently owned and operated. ©2013 Ashley HomeStores, Ltd.

5200 E. Main Street | Farmington, NM 87402 | 505.516.1030 STORE HOURS: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm | Sun 12pm-6pm

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Tri City Tribune 5/17/2013