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On February 15, the legislature’s Appropriations Commit­ tee met to consider immediate action to relieve basic health and safety problems at Augusta Mental Health Institute. The committee was convened to consider recommendations of the Human Resources Committee. Funding for 81 positions will be included in the supplementary appropriations bill enacted on an emergency basis take effect immediately on the signature of the Governor. Previously, on February 14, MSEA held a meeting with AMHI workers to discuss immediate needs. Commissioner Susan Parker had recommended 48 temporary positions ending June 17 of this year. The unanimous position taken by the workers at that meeting was that it made no sense and could be counterproductive to fill these positions on a short term basis. After review of the specific recommendations of the Commissioner, employees spelled out minimum meastxss needed to address health and safety problems at the institute. Among concerns expressed was the need for new custodial workers to help maintain the institute on weekends; for more direct care personnel such as nurses, mental health

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„workers, and therapists; and for ward clerks to relieve the paperwork burden for direct care personnel. The Human Resources Committee met under the leadership of Senator Paul Gauvreau and Representative Peter Manning. Members of the committee who had been made aware of workers feelings expressed serious misgivings with the plan for 48 temporary positions. It became apparent quickly that there was broad consensus that whatever positions that were funded must be full time. The committee recommended 90 new positions. The Appropriations Committee then met to decide on funding on February 15. The Governor had visited AMHI earlier in the day and supported 74 new positions. Final agreement was reached on a, total of 81. This week’s action marks only the first inning in a long game. For beleaguered AMHI personnel who have been bearing the burden of ,»,nrk snd qhoukterinn much of the criticism, the actions of these two important committees and the Governor’s willingness to become personally involved are both very favorable signs.

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M e n ta l H e a l th W o r k e r s ....... ...........3 1 N u r s e s .............................................. ...........1 3 P h y s i c i a n s & S t a f f .................... .............. 7 C le r ic a l S t a f f ................................ ....* ...1 1 C u s t o d i a l ......................................... .............. 4 F o o d S e r v i c e .............................. ......... 4 . 5

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I n s i d e Legislative A g e n d a ........................ .............................. P-3 Legislative G u id e ........................... .......................p p .4 - 7 B argaining S ta r ts ........................... .................p p .1 0 -1 1 S c h o larsh ip A pplication..................

George Burgoyne (right) was elected by MSEA delegates at the January 28 special convention to be the new Retirement System trustee representing active employees. President Jim Webster with him at the council meeting.


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The folbwing letter was sent as a guest editorial to the Kennebec Journal by MSEA Executive Director Phil Merrill on February 10. Society owes a debt to those who criticize. We learn from their observations; we are forced to reevaluate the way we do things. For the last few weeks, we have all been exposed to a massive airing of criticism of Augusta Mental Health Institute. Now it is time to act as your February 10 editorial suggests. One of the most frustrating things about the discussions of the last few weeks for people who work at A.M.H.I. is the view expressed by so many state officials that this whole problem is sure a surprise. This makes the employees angry because they have been telling this story for the last several years. Most officials choose not to listen and many who heard evidently chose not to believe. We have held public demonstrations, filed class action grievances, held public forums, and spread this problem all over our union newspaper, the Maine Stater, a publication which all legislators and top state officials receive every month. Last June, for example, well before the incidents that have lead to the current hearings, we published interviews with employees at A.M.H.I. One worker said, “Our Mental Health Workers are overwhelmed. My own priority is to keep the peace, give minimal, custodial care.” Another worker: “When I came in last Friday, I accepted, the floor under protest, because I could not assure the safety of patients.” Similar comments were made by all employees interviewed. So when state officials say they were surprised by the events of July and August, we have to assume they gave no weight to the views of the people who work for them. When the Legislature considered this issue in Special Session last fall, the Department of Mental Health said it needed 65 positions. In behalf of employees, MSEA presented a detailed request for 129 positions. The legislature listened to the Department. While that is understandable, not taking the time to make an independent determination of who was right does not leave them blameless. And it leaves the employees angry. We live in an age when no one seems to give any weight to the views of the people who do the work, and worse yet, workers are often blamed for all shortcomings. This last week, the newspapers of this state have been full of stories quoting those who blame employees for the very conditions that employees have been screaming to get fixed. We’ve even heard from people who say the answer is to close the Institution. Maybe this brings us to the heart of the A.M.H.I. problem. This is ultimately a political problem, building for a long time. The problem has come down to this: those legislators who

T H E M A IN E S T A T E R Phil Merrill, Editor Don Matson, Managing Editor (USPS 709-700) is published monthly for $1.80 per year by the Maine State Employees Association, 65 S ta te S tre e t, A ugusta, ME 04330. Second-class postage paid at Augusta, Maine and ad­ ditional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Maine Stater. MSEA, 65 State Street, Augus­ ta. ME 04330.

care most about mental health and human concerns have become the most hostile to institutions. In this frame of mind, they have been reluctant to dedicate funds to keeping the institutions in good shape. Meanwhile, those who wish to spend less money on mental health push community-based alternatives as ways to save money. Governor Jim Longley wanted the state to completely eliminate one of its hospitals, and he put this forward as part of his cost savings plan. No one should be misled. If the patients are to receive comparable treatment outside institutions, it will cost more money to do it. The legislators who care about mental health know this, but they are reluctant to say so, because they know such frank truth would lose them allies for their own deinstitutionalization agenda. So the problems at our institutions become insufferable, while no one ever faces all the issues surrounding community-based care. If we are to make real progress, we must face the complete reality of our situation. We must accept our institutions as the resource we have right now and act to make them healthy and helpful places again. At the same time we need to begin hard analysis of what has been spent to date on community treatment: what it has cost per patient, and the level of care the patient actually received. Then we must determine what it would cost to do the job right for people now being treated in the community, and what it would cost to provide care to more patients at various levels of treatment. Then decision-makers must decide what we can afford to do. What is feasible? It is time for these realities to enter this debate. After the administration and the legislature ignored what the workers said was needed, and after the Commissioner’s plan was in effect, last month A.M.H.I. workers worked a record 5200 hours of overtime. They didn’t want to do it. They know it doesn’t provide for the best treatment to have overtired, stressed workers on the wards for up to 60 hours a

OFFICERS PRESIDENT JimWebster 52 Glen Ave. Augusta. ME 04330 VICE PRESIDENT Mary Anne Turowski P. O. Box 819 Bangor, ME 04401 SECRETARY Karen Bossie RR 6, Box 609A Augusta, ME 04330 TREASURER Brad Ronco RFD#1, Box 460 HaBowell, ME 0434;

W a n te d : W rite rs a n d P h o to g ra p h e rs fo r S ta te r We are seeking MSEA members who would like to contribute photo stories or articles to the Stater about public employees and their jobs —on a one-time basis or more regularly. Contact Don Matson at MSEA, 1-800-452-8794 or 622-3151, or to a member of out now Communications Committee: Work Telephone Bruce Hodsdon 289-2150 Ed Wheaton 289-5790 Delmar Dorr 799-7303 Debbie Matson 947-0511 1-800-322-4011 Dan Glidden 289-2047 Barry Cote 795-4476 Wayne Hollingworth If you’ve got a story to tell, or someone you’d like to see in the Stater, let us know!

DIRECTORS

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Phil Merrill ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS Stephen L. Leech, Collective Bargaining Carl Leinonen, John Lemieux DIRECTOR, FIELD SERVICES DIRECTOR, FINANCE ^ADMINISTRATION Joan C. Towle ATTORNEYS FIELD John McCurry REPRESENTATIVES Eric Nelson Ron Ahlquist Roberta deAraujo Roger Dunning ASS’T. NEGOTIATOR John Graham Chuck Hillier Sandy Dionne TimWooten COMMUNICATIONS Carol Webb Don Matson Robert McLaughlin DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS SUPPORT STAFF John Marvin RESEARCH Carol Wilson Steven Butterfield Debbie Roy Cheryl Stoddard RECLASSIFICA­ Crystal Hodsdon TION ANALYST Andrew Wing Pamela Morin Donna Davis K athy Weymouth INSURANCE Missy Fellows COORDINATOR Andy Birch Ethetyn Purdy Beth Jackson ACCOUNT CLERK , Norman Benoit Carmen Gardner

Da:i Glidden Box 351 Ashland, ME 04732 George Burgoyne 228 Center St. Bangor 04401 Cathleen Cotton RFD#1, Box 785 Readfield 04355 Carol Fleury RFD#2, Box 8340 Winthrop 04364

John Hinkley Box 5 Farmington Falls 04940 Fred Chase Box 606 Bradford 04410

AREA II

Barry Cote 26 Taylor St. Augusta, ME 04330 Muffle Sevigny R.R. 1, Box 2030 Windsor 04363

AREA III Ray Dzialo Wayne Hollingworth R.R. #3, Box 230G RFD#3, Box 15 Biddeford, ME 04005 Freeport 04032 Kathy Kadi Charles Knapp 10 Howard St. 175 Weymouth Rd. Portland 04101 Gray 04039 RETIREE DIRECTOR AJixCaldwell Lee Street Wiscasset 04578

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week. But there were just not enough people to do the job. So, they risked their own safety and health and put in the extra hours. While they were doing this thankless work, they were being criticized by others who would not roll up their sleeves and help these sick people. Yes, we need the critics — the advocates, the commissioners, the legislators — but they must keep in mind that they need those few people who care enough to do this job. If this truth is not faced very soon, the critics are going to look around and see no one to care for the patients at A.M.H.I.

65 State Street Augusta, Maine 04330 Tel. (207) 622-3151 1-800452-8794

Affiliated With the Service Employees International Union AFL-CIO, CLC


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Bargaining for sixteen new contracts for our 10,000 active MSEA members may be on center stage for 1989, but the union is pursuing a number of important goals in the 114th Legislature as well. Though the first session of the Biennium has been slow in getting under way, public hearings on many bills will be in full swing during the rest of February and March. MSEA has submitted eight bills this year. Several directly complement the bargaining process. Our primary focus is to protect our members’ rights — or recapture them, as in the instance of our proposal seeking to return Department of Environment Protection positions to classified service — while maintaining the quality of Maine public services. MSEA legislation is outlined below. Our bills for the most part have not yet been assigned L.D. numbers, but sponsors have been listed. The union is grateful for their leadership and support! Updates on key bills will be provided to MSEA leaders and other members seeking further information. To assist those who wish to get involved in the legislative process, our 1989 Legislative Guide has been included in this Stater.

M S E A L e g is la tio n • An Act to Protect the Integrity of the Civil Service System and Set Standards for the Contracting of Service to the State. Sponsors: Sen. Beverly Bustin, Sen. Charles Webster, Rep. Omar Norton, Rep. Ruth Joseph. “Privatizing” public services — putting them out to bid to contractors — is a growing concern MSEA is addressing head-on this year in the political process and in contract talks. Protecting members’ jobs is a top priority and ensuring that public services are effectively and reliably performed for Maine citizens is equally our goal. This bill establishes comprehensive standards which must be met by State Government before it contracts for services outside the Civil Service System. Notice of intent to contract out must be provided to employee representatives, and to the legislature’s Appropriation Committee. The Commis­ sioner of Administration may hold hearings on contracting-out proposals when requested to do so. • An Act to Return Certain Positions Within the Department of Environmental Protection to the Classified Service Under the Civil Service Law. Sponsors: Sen. Muriel Holloway, Rep. Harriet Ketover, Rep. Jim Oliver, Rep. Paul Jacques. This bill repeals the amendment to the 1988 appropriations bill which declassified six division director positions in the Department of Environmental Protection. The amendment made these positions subject to political appointment. No other department has division directors who are subject to political appointment. Because they are regulatory and enforcement positions, they should be free from political pressure, and the most qualified candidates hired under Civil Service Law. • An Act to Clarify the Definition of State Employee under the State Employee Labor Relations Act. Sponsors: Sen. Stephen Esty, Rep. Richard Ruhlin, Rep. Edward McHenry, Rep. Omar Norton. This bill would remove the phrase "substantially partici­ pates in the formulation and effectuation of policy in a department or agency” from present law (26 M.R.S.A., Section 979-A). This language has been relied on to try to remove hundreds of state positions from collective bargaining through petitions to the Maine Labor Relations Board. The statute already excludes major policy-influencing positions from state bargaining units, as well as confidential positions with major roles in collective bargaining and contract administration. Excluding these other positions from collec­ tive bargaining serves no governmental purpose, increases patronage, and substantially curtails career ladders within bargaining unit job series.

• An Act to Promote Recruitment and Retention of State Educational Personnel. Sponsors: Sen. Barbara Gill, Sen. Stephen Bost, Rep. James Handy, Rep. Wendy Ault. This bill would amend the Education Reform Act to provide that a bargaining representative for state teachers and related job classifications may seek to bargain over salaries if state legislation affecting teachers salaries in local schools is passed. Our bill would ensure that state teachers be able to seek parity with other teachers. • An Act to Equalize State Retiree Health Benefits. Sponsors: Sen. Nancy Clark, Sen. Tom Perkins, Rep. Donnell Carroll, Rep. John Lisnik. An increasing number of state retirees have been required to enroll under Medicare in recent years, resulting in less coverage for those retirees than for retirees covered under the state health insurance plan. This bill provides that the state reimburse retirees required to enroll in Medicare for the cost of monthly Medicare Part B premiums. The state would also provide supplemental insurance which would equalize deductibles and coverages so retirees enrolled under Medicare would have the same health coverage as retirees under the state plan. • An Act to Improve the Pension Cost-of-Living Adjustment Under the Maine State Retirement System. Sponsors: Sen. Joseph Brannigan, Sen. Pamela Cahill, Rep. Dan Hickey, Rep. Barbara Strout. This bill would remove the 4% cap from all future pension cost-of-living-adjustments under the Maine State Retirement System. The cap has resulted in substantial loss to inflation for retirees, many of whom rely on these pension benefits as their sole or primary source of income. Cost-of-living adjustments under Social Security are not capped. This bill bases future cost-of-living adjustments on the Consumer Price Index. • An Act to Fund and implement Heclassifications with Maine Maritime Academy Employees in Collective Bargaining Agreements Represented by MSEA. Sponsors: Sen. Michael Pearson, Sen. Tom Perkins, Rep. Donald Carter, Rep. Ruth Foster. This bill would fund a study of job classifications at Maine Maritime Academy and establish an account to find job reclassifications expected as a result of the study. • An Act to Fund and implement Changes in Health Insurance Benefits in Collective Bargaining Agreements with Maine Maritime Academy Employees Represented by MSEA. Sponsors: Sen. Michael Pearson, Rep. Donald Carter, Rep. Ruth Foster, Rep. Richard Gould. This bill would fund dependent health insurance coverage negotiated for MMA Employees. • An Act Relating to Licensing of State Social Workers. Chief Sponsor: Sen. Beverly Bustin. This bill would extend the date for licensing of social workers employed by the State by one year, and mandates that the State provide the supervision required by law for all social workers who must be licensed to perform their job duties. P r o p o s a ls to W a tc h There are some areas where MSEA expects to see legislation affecting members which bears close scrutiny. • Disability retirement. The Maine State Retirement System is proposing changes to its disability retirement program which have the potential for both positive and negative results. Rehabilitation of disabled workers would be encouraged by a proposal to have the State pay for rehabilitation programs, but the Retirement System would also change the rule to determine a disabled employee’s ability to do his or her job by reducing the time determination allowed from five years to two years. Also proposed is a change in the rule concerning outside income disabled

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L o b b y i s t Carl Leinonen has joined MSEA’s staff as our new Legislative Director, replacing John Lemieux, who has taken the position of MSEA Chief Counsel. A native of Waldoboro, Leinonen has an undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College and a Master’s degree in Economic;* from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Before coming to MSEA, he served as Executive Director of the American Federation of Teachers in Maine, where he was involved in a variety of union activities including lobbying, organizing, and negotiating teacher, healthcare, and municipal employee contracts. He also worked for the AFT in Connecticut as a field representative. "i hope to be up to speed as soon as possible representing MSEA members in the Legislature,” Leinonen said. “I’m focusing particularly on the issue of contracting out of state services. We have a major piece of legislation in to protect MSEA members’ jobs and the quality of State services they provide to Maine people.” Leinonen is a member of the Commission to Study the State of Nursing and Healthcare Professions in Maine, which will soon make recommendations to the Legislature about the problem of personnel shortages in the health care field. He lives in Augusta with his wife Mary and two children.

workers may earn without affecting disability income —from a maximum of $10,000 per year to one-third of average final compensation. Discussions on these proposed changes, which include representative of public sector unions, are still going on. • Vocational-Technical Institutes. There may be legisla­ tion proposed affecting the operation of the VTI’s. MSEA will be closely monitoring any developments.

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At least one piece of legislation will be proposed to outlaw mail-order drug plans in Maine. MSEA members active and retired have saved millions of dollars through use of the mail-order prescription plan established in 1987 by the Labor-Management Committee on Employee Health. Any legislation proposed in this area we consider an attempt to place restrictions on marketplace competition which may be unconstitu­ tional. H loss of this valuable program would adversely affect you or your family, please contact Donna Davis or Norman Benoit at MSEA (622-3151 or 1-800-4528794) so that MSEA can be sure your story is told to legislators.


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Bureau of Human Resources Training Program “ W h a t Y o u

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Anita Dubois works daily in a crowded comer office located in Lewiston City Hall where she shares desk and interview space with three other city workers. Traffic is constantly coming and going: Lewiston citizens seeking assistance wait on benches just outside the office door for appointments with these employees of the Department of General Assistance. Dubois has been a caseworker for the department for four years, serving as a resource for people in need. A former veteran’s counselor for the Red Cross, she’s done this kind of work before. “I love this job,” she said, in an afternoon interview with the Stater, “but I’m able to do it and leave it at the door.” Laughing, she described her earlier counselling job as a time when “I was firmly convinced that the only time veterans ever got assistance was when they came to us.” Her work in the Department of Assistance is steady, but not overwhelming. “When I first came here, we were seeing an average of a hundred people a day. It’s about thirty or forty now,” she said. “Unemployment was higher then.” Dubois provided a thumbnail description of her job as having many “social worker-type” duties. “We provide people with shelter and funds for food and rent. We get people into a system — whether it’s AFDC, Social Security, or Vocational Rehabilitation — and try to enable them to help themselves. There are now more resources for people with marginal skills than in the past.” Elected as Local 5’s President this January, Dubois spoke enthusiastically about upcoming contract talks for Lewiston city and school employees. “We have some specific issues we’re after,” she noted. “Holidays — Martin Luther King day and the Friday after Thanksgiving. It seems almost all other public workers have those holidays.” She ticked off other Local 5 concerns: reclassifications, job safety (friable asbestos in some of Lewiston’s school buildings is a problem, and pay. “There’s got to be some kind of increase,” she added.

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This program is intended for supervisors, managers and personnel staff who are often the best source of information for employees. Focus is on the functions and procedures of health and dental insurance and a comprehensive overview of the Blue Cross/Blue Shield plan, Delta Dental policy, including completion of required forms and major roles and responsibilities. Sign-up Location Date Deadline Augusta 3/16 3/9 FEE: $10 (ask your department head about paying the cost)

S te w a rd M a rc h

Anita Dubois “Our bargaining committee has met, made nominations for the team,” Dubois said. “I’m certainly on it. We’ve started planning strategy.” People were waiting to see her. She said she’d been an MSEA steward for two years and is now a chief steward. She recently attended MSEA’s leadership conference in Augusta. “The training has been good,” she said. “I’d like to see more Saturday workshops like the recent one. The best part of being a steward has been that we’ve been able to handle many problems right here, with the personnel director. It makes it a lot easier.”

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MSEA’s Annual Steward Conference will be held at the Atrium hotel in Brunswick on March 31 -April 1, 1989. All stewards and chief stewards have been invited and are encouraged to come. The agenda for the two-day meeting will include workshops on using the contract in each bargaining unit led by MSEA field staff; rights of stewards, grievance handling, and a full review of the grievance procedure. Other sessions will cover the union’s new workplace health and safety program; bargaining, legislative, and affiliation updates; direct-action problem solving for stewards; and the reclassification process.

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The Maine Stater welcomes letters from MSEA members on issues of general concern to the mem­ bership! Start Coming to Chapter M eetings

Highway worker Gordon Smith of Augusta hoses down a DOT vehicle at the Winthrop lot before the crew heads out for another day of winter work.

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To the Editor: The last issue of the Stater sang the praises of MSEA’s tentative affiliation with SEIU and of big unionism. As chapter president prior to and just after the delegate vote to affiliate, I was (and am) in a position to hear much opposition regarding affiliation. Perhaps if membership had been fully aware of how far beyond their mandate the Affiliation Committee went and had been aware of that sooner, the vote at the Convention would have been different. Perhaps not. During and after the Convention I heard from a lot of people who said they weren’t represented there. Asignificant number of members have written letters of resignation, disgusted, mainly because they didn’t get to vote (individually) on such an important issue. Quitting at this point, however, doesn’t do anybody any good. Members should convert their disgust into action and involvement. Remember, the agreement with SEIU is tentative. What that means is that members can start coming to chapter meetings and/or at least let their sentiments be known to leadership. It also means that members should elect delegates to the Convention who will truly represent the views of the body. Randy Brown Past President Probation-Parole Chapter


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Charles Pray (D-Millinocket) Senate President

John Martin (D-Eagle Lake) Speaker 1 1 4 th

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Dennis Dutremble (D-York) Ass’t. Majority Leader

Nancy Clark (D-Cumberland) Majority Leader

Dan Gwadosky (D-Fairfield) Majority Leader

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Joseph Mayo (D-Thomaston) Ass’t. Majority Leader

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Charles Webster (R-Farmington) Minority Leader

Mary Ciark Webster (R-Cape Elizabeth) Minority Leader *

Pamela Cahill (R-Wiscasset) Ass’t. Minority Leader

Francis Marsano (R-Belfast) Ass’t. Minority Leader

C o m m itte e s

AGING, RETIREMENT AND VETERANS Senators: Bonnie L. Titcomb (D-Cumberland), Chair Nancy Randall Clark (D-Cumberland) Pamela Lee Cahill (R-Sagadahoc) Representatives: Daniel B. Hickey (D-Augusta), Chair John McSweeney (D-Old Orchard Beach) Alexander Richard (D-Madison) John Jalbert (D-Lisbon) Lucien A. Dutremble (D-Biddeford) Arnold Brewer, Jr. (D-Boothbay Harbor) Jean T. Dellert (R-Gardiner) Madeline D. Stevenson (R-Unity) Wendy L. Ault (R-Wayne) Kathryn D. Merrill (R-Dover-Foxcroft)

HUMAN RESOURCES Senators: N. Paul Gauvreau (D-Androscoggin), Chair Bonnie L. Titcomb (D-Cumberland) Edwin C. Randall (R-Washington) Representatives: Peter J. Manning (D-Portland), Chair Neil Rolde (D-York) Bradford E. Boutilier (D-Lewiston) Margaret Pruitt Clark (D-Brunswick) Christine F. Burke (D-Vassalboro) Mary R. Cathcart (D-Orono) Everett O. Pederson (D-Bangor) Jean T. Dellert (R-Gardiner) Michael F. Hepburn (R-Skowhegan) Peggy A. Pendleton (R-Scarborough)

TAXATION Senators: Thomas H. Andrews (D-Cumberland), Chair John E. Baldaeci (D-Penobscot) Jerome A. Emerson (R-Penobscot) Representatives: John A. Cashman (D-Old Town), Chair E. Michael Swazey (D-Bucksport) Guy R. Nadeau (D-Saco) Thomas A. Duffy (D-Bangor) Susan E. Dore (D-Aubum) Robert J. Tardy (D-Palmyra) Santo DiPietro (D-South Portland) Philip C. Jackson (R-Harrison) H. Stedman Seavey, Jr. (R-Kennebunkport) Walter E. Whitcomb (R-Waldo)

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCIAL AFFAIRS Senators: Michael D. Pearson (D-Penobscot), Chair Joseph C. Brannigan (D-Cumberland) Thomas R. Perkins (R-Hancock) Representatives: Donald V. Carter (D-Winsbw), Chair Lorraine N. Chonko (D-Topsham) John Lisnik (D-Presque Isle) Patrick K. McGowan (D-Canaan) Vinton T. Ridley (D-Shapleigh) Roger M. Pouliot (D-Lewiston) Donnell P. Carroll (D-Gray) Linwood M. Higgins (R-Scarborough) Ruth S. Foster (R-Ellsworth) Judith C. Foss (R-Yarmouth)

LABOR Senators: Donald E. Esty, Jr. (D-Cumberland), Chair Zachary E. Matthews (D-Kennebec) R. Peter Whitmore (R-Androscoggin) Representatives: Edward A. McHenry (D-Madawaska), Chair Tony J. Tammaro (D-Baileyville) Richard P. Ruhlin (D-Brewer) Anne M. Rand (D-Portland) M. Ida Luther (D-Mexico) Elden McKeen (D-Windham) Edward L. Pineau (D-Jay) Gary W. Reed (R-Falmouth) Jeffrey H. Butland (R-Cumberland) John S. McCormick, Jr. (R-Rockport)

JOINT SELECT COMMITTEE ON CORRECTIONS Senators Beverly Miner Bustin (D-Kennebec), Chair Zachary E. Matthews (D-Kennebec) Thomas R. Perkins (R-Hancock) Representatives: Rita B. Melendy (D-Rockland), Chair Peter J. Manning (D-Portland) Joseph W. Mayo (D-Thomaston) Cushman D. Anthny (D-South Portland) Carl B. Smith (D-lsland Falls) Susan E. Dore (D-Aubum) Ernest C. Greenlaw (R^Standish) Michael F. Hepburn (R-Skowhegan) Barbara E. Strout (R-Windham) Jack L. Libby (R-Kennebunk)

AUDIT AND PROGRAM REVIEW Senators: Beverly Miner Bustin (D-Kennebec), Chair Georgette B. Berube (D-Androscoggin) Linda Curtis Brawn (R-Knox) Representatives: Neil Rolde (D-York), Chair Phyllis R. Erwin (D-Rumford) Harriet A. Ketover (D-Portland) Beverly C. Daggett (D-Augusta) Harold M. Macomber (D-South Portland) John A. Aliberti (D-Lewiston) George A. Townsend (D-Eastport) Eleanor M. Murphy (R-Berwick) Catharine Koch Lebowitz (R-Bangor) Wesley Famum (R-South Berwick)

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT Senators: Georgette B. Berube (D-Androscoggin), Chair Donald E. Esty, Jr. (D-Cumberland) David L. Carpenter (R-York) Representatives: Ruth Joseph (D-Waterville), Chair Dorothy A. Rotondi (D-Athens) Beverly C. Daggett (D-Augusta) Thomas A. Cahill (D-Mattawamkeag) Conrad Heeschen (D-Wilton) Anne M. Larrivee (D-Gorham) Alberta M. Wentworth (R-Wells) Jeanne F. Begley (R-Waldoboro) Dana C. Hanley (R-Paris) John S. McCormick, Jr. (R-Rockport)

TO CONTACT A STATE SENATOR Write: State Senator Senate of Maine State House Station #3 Augusta, Maine 04333 289-1540 TO CONTACT A STATE REPRESENTATIVE Write: State Representative House of Representatives State House Station #2 Augusta, Maine 04333 , 289-1400


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District 1 MarkW.Lawrence (D) 7APleasant St., Kittery03904. 439-6408 District 2 Neil Roide (D)P. O. Box304, York03909. 363-2843 District 3 Ortanda McPherson (R) 142 State Rd., Biot 03903. 439-1990 District 4 WesleyFamum(R) 42 UnionSt., South Berwick03908. 384-2670 District 5 Beanor M. Murphy (R) 40 Rochester St., P. O. Box 345, Berwick 03901. 698-1355 District 6 AtoertaM.Wentworth(R) R1, Box276, Wells 04090. 646-3295 District 7 Jack L Libby(R) Box 147, Kennebunk04043. 985-3620 District 8 H. Stedman Seavey (R) 1299 Wildes Dist. Rd., Kennebunkport 04046. 967-5991 District 9 VintonT. Ridley(D) RR#1, Box3040, Shapleigh04076. 636-2386 District 10 MonaWaker Hale (D) P. O. Box960, Sanford 04073. 324-3946 District 11 NormanR. Paul (D) 23 MiltonAve„ Sanford04073. 324-5887 District 12 Cart F. Sheltra (D) 249 Granite St., Biddeford04005. 282-9267 District 13 LucienA. Dutremble (D)30 Green St., Biddeford04005. 283-3058 District 14 Charles C. Plourde (D) P. O. BoxBA, Biddeford04005. 283-1547 District 15 W*s A.Lord(R) Box 14, NorthWaterboro04061. 247-5331 District 18 HarveyC. Donald(R) RD2, Box44, West Buxton04093. 727-3700 District 17 John McSweeney (D)40 Miles Ave., OldOrchard Beach 04064. 934-5219 District 18 GuyR. Nadeau (D) 52 ClevelandSt., Saco 04072. 284-7976 District 19 PeggyA.Pendleton (R) 110 Holmes Rd., Scarborough 04074. 883-5414 District 20 LinwoodM.Higgins (R) P. O. Box 1008, Scarborough 04074. 883-6673 District 21 MaryClarkWebster (R) 10 Surfside Rd., Cape Elizabeth04107. 799-2626 District 22 SantoDiPietro(D) 26 Chase St., South Portland 04106. 799-1377 District 23 Cushman D. Anthony(D) 165 Margaret St., South Portland 04106. 767-2419 District 24 HaroldM.Macomber (D) 29 KelseySt., South Portland04106. 799-0073 District 25 ArmeM.Rand (D) 61 MelbourneSt., Portland 04101. 772-7704 District 26 James V.Oliver (D)321 SpringSt., Portland 04102. 772-0951 District 27 Herbert C. Adams (D) 65 Sherman St„ Portland 04101. 772-2565 District 28 GerardP. Conley, Jr. (D) 143 Pine St., Apt. 6, Portland04102. 774-0776 District 29 Peter J. Manning(D) 99 FalmouthSt., Portland 04103. 774-4711 District 30 Hamet Ketover (D) 49 Wingate Dr., Portland04102. 773-2375 District 31 Christopher S. Gurney(D) 266 Maine Ave., Portland 04103. 797-2689 District 32 Annette M.Hoglund (D) 56 Lane Ave., Portland 04103. 797-8898 District 33 WBamB. O'Gara (D) 29 Cardinal St., Westbrook04092. 774-9467 District 34 Phip E. Curran(R) 222 DuckPond Rd„ Westbrook04092. 797-2455 District 35 Bden McKeen (D) 17 MontgomeryRd., Windham04062. 892-8017 District 36 AnneM.Lanrivee (D) RR5, Box 16, Gorham04038. 839-4707 District 37 BartraraE. Strout (R) 339 WindhamCenter Rd., Windham04062. 892-4873 District 38 JeffreyH. Butland(R) P. O. Box431, Cumberland 04021. 829-5357 District 39 GayW.Reed (R) 14 HamlinRd., Falmouth 04105. 797-4809 District 40 Ju#h C. Foss (R) RR1, Box310, Cousins Is., Yarmouth 04096. 846-5246 District 41 James MitcheS(D) RR1, Box54, Freeport 04032. 865-6516 District 42 Charlene B. RydeK(D) 3 Baribeau Dr., Brunswick04011.725-5803 District 43 Charles FLPriest (D)9 Bowker 3t„ Brunswick04011. 725-5439 District 44 DonnedP. Carrofl (D) P. O. Box 1320, Gray04039. 657-4028 District 45 P. KeBeySimpson(D) RFD1, Box 141, Casco 04015. 627-4544 District 46 PhSpC. Jackson (R) 12 SmithSt., Harrison 04040. 583-4503 District 47 Ernest C. Greenlaw(R) P. O. Box331, Sebago Lake 04075. 642-4862 District 48 PeterG- Hastings (R) 71AMainSt., Fryeburg 04037. 935-2004 District 49 JeffaryN. MBs (D) RFD#1, Box 1647, Bethel 04217. 824-3290 District 50 Joseph G. Walker (D) RustfieldVi #2, Apt. 7, Norway04268. 743-9561 District 51 DanaC. Hanley(R) 17 MainSt., South Paris 04281. 743-8989 District 52 M.idaLuther (D) 160 GraniteSt„ Mexico 04257. 364-7650 District 53 Phyfc FLErwin(D) 633 WashingtonSt., Rumford04276. 364-4768 District 54 ConradHeeschen (D)Star Route, Dryden04225. 645-2155 District 55 EdwardL Dexter (R) Box470, Riverside St., Kingfield04947. 265-4571 District 56 RonaldC. Bailey(R) RFD2, Box2208, Farmington 04938. 778-3234 District 57 EdwardL Pineau (D) 12 PineauSt., Jay 04239. 897-5570 District 58 RfchardH. C. Tracy(D) Box1410, Norridgewock04957. 397-4171 District 59 John M.Nutting(D) Box3410, Leeds 04263. 524-3941 District SO Resale H. Aikman(R) HCRBox420, Poland04273. 998-4976 District 61 Jo AnneD. Lapointe (D) 935 Turner St., Auburn04210. 783-8143 District 52 Constance D. Cote (D)68 HighlandAve., Auburn04210. 783-2162 District 63 SusanE. Dore (D) 44 GoodrichAve., Auburn04210. 784-3100 District 64 JohnTeiow(R) 825 MainSt., Lewiston 04240. 783-8166 District 65 JohnA. Alberti ID) 204 MontelloSt., Lewiston 04240. 784-8080 District 66 Bradford E. BoutiSer (D) P. O. Box3046, Lewiston 04240. 786-4108 District 67 GregoryG. Nadeau (D) 1 Hall St., Lewistop04240. 784-0545 District 68 James R. Handy(D) 9 Maplewood Rd., RR#3, Lewiston04240. 784-5595

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District 69 Roger M.Pouliot (D) 70 IrwinSt., Lewiston04240. 784-6805 District 70 Margaret Pruitt Clark(D) 5 QuarryRd., Brunswick04011. 729-4378 District 71 JohnJalbert (D) P. O. Box77, Lisbon04250. 353-8882 District 72 Albert G. Stevens (R) 23 ElmSt., Sabattus 04280. 375-6632 District 73 Lorraine N. Chonko(D) NewLewiston Rd., Pejepscot 04067. 725-8993 District 74 MariaGlenHolt (D) 115 HighSt., Bath04530. 443-3588 District 75 MaryE. Small (R) 175 OakSt„ Bath 04530. 443-2220 District 76 James Reed Coles (D) Rte. 2, Box59, South Harpswell 04079. 729-9020 District 77 ArnoldBrewer, Jr. (D) HCR34, Box20, Boothbay Harbor 04538. 633-2230 District 78 Marge L. Kilkelly(D) West AinaRd., Wiscasset 04578. 882-5410 District 79 Jeanne F. Begley(R) RFD1, Box29, Waldoboro04572. 832-5892 District 80 Joseph W.Mayo(D) 17 BGleason St., Thomaston04861. 354-8291 District 81 James G. Skoglund (D)St. George 04857. 372-8893 District 82 RitaB. Melendy (D) 59 Acadia Dr., Rockland 04841. 594-8254 District 83 John S. McCormick, Jr. (R) Mt. Pleasant St., West Rockport 04865. 236-4815 District 84 Carol M.Allen(D) RFD1, Box 1980, Liberty04949. 845-2704 District 85 Paul Parent (R) 48 AlbionRd., Benton 04901.453-2274 District 86 DonaldV.Carter (D) P. O. Box544, Winslow04901. 872-7583 - District 87 Christine F. Burke (D) RFD3, Box2470, Waterville 04901. 873-0923 District 88 BeverlyC. Daggett (D) 10 PineSt., Augusta 04330. 622-9053 District 89 PatrickE. Paradis (D) 18 Laurel St., Augusta 04330. 623-9482 District 90 Daniel B. Hickey(D) 118 Sewall St., Augusta 04330. 622-1055 District 91 Susan Farnsworth (D) 19AWinthropSt., Hallowell 04347. 626-0330 District 92 Jean T. Dellert (R) P. O. Box67, Gardiner 04345. 582-3765 District 93 John F. Marsh(R) RR5, Bog Hill, West Gardiner 04345. 582-2579 District 94 Wendy L. Ault (R) RR1, Box24, Wayne 04284. 685-9649 District 95 Omar P. Norton (R) Narrows Pond Rd., Winthrop04364. 377-8122 District 96 BertramMarston (D) P. 0. Box338, Oakland 04963. 465-9586 District 97 Paul F9.8Jacques (D) 41 OaklandSt., Waterville 04901. 873-3570 District RuthJoseph (D) 7 AubreySt., Waterville 04901. 873-1220 District 99 DanA. Gwadosky(D) RFD2, Box6630, Fairfield04937. 453-9939 District 100 Michael F. Hepburn (R) 66 E. Leavitt St., Skowhegan 04976. 474-6034 District 101 PatrickK. McGowan (D) Rte. 2, Box57, Canaan 04924. 474-3977 District 102 Alexander Richard (D) 210 MainSt., Madison 04950. 696-3049 District 103 DorothyA. Rotondi (D) RFD1, Box4560, Athens 04912. 654-2891 District 104 Richard A. Gould(D) HCRBox260, Greenville 04441. 695-2791 District 105 Robert E. Hussey, Jr. (D) 25 ParkSt., Milo04463. 943-7413 District 106 Kathryn D. Merrill (R) RFD1, Box52, Dover-Foxcroft 04426. 564-2508 District 107 Weston R. Sherburne (R) RFD3, Box3480, Dexter 04930. 924-6460 District 108 Robert J. Tardy(D) P. O. Box336, Newport 04953. 938-2308 District 109 Madeline D.Stevenson (R) Rte. 202, Box 1940, Unity04988. 948-2515 District 110 Walter E. Whitcomb (R) RFD2, Box601, Belfast 04915. 342-5135 District 111 Francis C. Marsano (R) 11 Congress St., Belfast 04915. 338-2156 District 112 Nathaniel J. Crowley, Sr. (D) RFD1, Box924, Stockton Spgs. 04981. 567-3629 District 113 John H. Richards (R) 93 Hopkins Rd., Hampden 04444. 862-2211 District 114 DonaldA. Strout (R) Box 167, East Corinth04427. 285-7757 District 115 Catharine Koch Lebowitz (R) 116 Silver Rd., Bangor 04401. 942-5933 District 116 Thomas A. Duffy(D) 33 James St., Bangor 04401. 945-6756 District 117 Patricia M.Stevens (D) 251 Nowell Rd., Bangor 04401. 942-5894 District 118 . Joseph A.Garland (R) P. O. Box2069, Bangor 04401. 947-7318 District 119 Everett 0. Pederson (D) 187 14thSt., Bangor 04401. 942-7565 District 120 Richard P. Ruhlin(D) 115 ElmSt., Brewer 04412. 989-7333 District 121 Helen M.Tupper (R) RFD2, Box2, Orrington 04474. 825-4060 District 122 E. Michael Swazey (D) RFD1, Box737, Bucksport 04416. 469-2454 District 123 Sherman H. Hutchins (R) Rte 1, Box2, Penobscot 04476. 326-8545 District 124 John H. Carroll (R) P. O. Box 1101, Southwest Harbor 04679. 244-3322 District 125 VirginiaConstantine (D) RFD1, Box3560, Bar Harbor 04609. 288-3617 District 126 FrankH. Farren. Jr. (R) P. O. Box224, Cherryfield04622. 546-7555 District 127 RuthS. Foster (R) 95 MainSt., Ellsworth04605. 667-2593 District 128 Eugene J. Paradis (R) P. O. Box273, Stillwater 04489 827-4120 District 129 MaryR. Cathcart (D) 120 MainSt., Orono04473. 866-3054 District 130 John O'Dea (D) P. O. Box 108, Orono04473. 866-4034 District 131 John A.Cashman (D) 135 Prentiss St., OldTown04468 827-7460 District 132 Clyde A. Hichbom(R) P. O. Box39. LaGrange 04453. 732-4067 District 133 Thomas A.Cahill (D) HCR75, Box273, Mattawamkeag04459. 736-3211 District 134 Michael H. Michaud (D) 111 MainSt., East Millinocket 04430. 746-9069 District 135 Herbert E. Clark(D) 180 BowdoinSt.. Millinocket 04462. 723-5746

District 136 Theone F. Look(R) P. O. Box40, Jonesboro 04648. 434-2861 District 137 George A.Townsend (D) 13 Snyder Rd., Eastport 04631. 853-2734 District 138 AntonioJ. Tammaro (D) P. O. Box 196, Woodland 04694. 427-3479 District 139 FredWMoholiand(D) P. O. Box98, Princeton 04668. 796-2258 District 140 Carl B. Smith(D) P. O. Box39, Island Falls 04747. 463-2192 District 141 Nason S. Graham(D) 4 WashburnSt., Houlton04730. 532-7790 District 142 MaryH. MacBride (R) 63 HillsideSt., Presque Isle04769. 769-0421 District 143 John Lisnik(D) 197 Parkhurst SidingRd., Presque Isle04769. 764-0827 District 144 B. CarolyneT. Mahany(D) RFD1, Box 159, Easton 04740. 488-2741 District 145 Susan J. Pines (R) 22 LongRd., Umestone 04750. 325-4821 District 146 WilfredJ. Bell (D) 8 Herschel Lane, Caribou04736. 496-8071 District 147 Malachi Anderson (R) Rte. 1, Box 166, Caribou 04736. 492-1771 District 148 HildaC. Martin(D) 20 Poplar St., VanBuren04785. 868-2802 District 149 EdwardA. McHenry(D) 6 Winter St., Madawaska 04756. 728-4365 District 150 JudyParadis (D) RFD1, Box 1009, Madawaska 04756. 728-4854 District 151 John L. Martin(D)P. O. Box250, Eagle Lake 04739. 444-5556

M A IN E

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District 1 RaynoldTheriault (D) 1First St., Fort Kent 04743. 834-3082 District 2 DonaldF. Collins (R), 4 Dorcas Ave., Caribou 04736. 498-8579 District 3 Margaret G. Ludwig(R), 3 Rogers Rd., Houlton04730. 532-2715 District 4 Charles M.Webster (R), 11 PerhamSt., Farmington04938. 778-6929 District 5 Charles P. Pray(D), 101 Morgan Lane, Millinocket 04462. 723-8880 District 6 Michael D. Parson (D), Box51, Enfield04433. 732-4800 District 7 EdwinC. Randall (R), P. 0. Box26, East Machias 04630. 255-4086 District 8 Edgar E. Erwin(D), 633 Washington St., Rumford04276. 364-4768 District 9 Jerome A. Emerson (R), P. O. BoxE, Corinna04928. 278-2232 District 10 John E. Baldacci (D)V9 PalmSt., Bangor 04401. 947-6088 District 11 Stephen M.Bost (D), 11 Femwood St., Orono 04473. 866-7083 District 12 Thomas R. Perkins (R), 15 MainSt., Blue Hill 04614. 374-5321 District 13 ZacharyE. Matthews (D), P. O. Box8048, Winslow04901. 873-6523 District 14 Robert R. Gould(R), RFD3, Box464, Belfast 04915. 338-3907 District 15 R. DonaldTwitched (D), 1Pikes Ave., Norway04268. 743-2419 District 16 Georgette B. Berube (D), 195 Webster St., Lewiston04240. 782-2272 District 17 JudyC. Kany(D), 18 West St., Waterville 04901. 872-2631 District 18 Norman E. Weymouth (R), RFD 3, Box 2890, West Gardiner 04345. 724-3750 District 19 BevertyM.3ustin (D), 10 MiddleSt., Hallowell 04347. 622-6903 District 20 Muriel D. Holloway (R), Shore Rd., Box 560, No. Edgecomb 04556. 882-6879 District 21 Linda Brawn(R), RFDBox4952, Camden04843. 236-4766 District 22 R. Peter Whitmore(R), 99 Cedarwood Rd., Auburn 04210. 783-8374 District 23 N. Paul Gauvreau (D), 56 TampaSt., Lewiston 04240. 783-9527 District 24 PamelaL Cahill (R), RFD3, Box796, Wiscasset 04578. 443-4429 District 25 Bonnie L Titcomb(D), RFD2, Box861, Casco 04015. 655-7647 District 26 NancyRandall Clark(D), RR2, Box37, Freeport 04032. 865-3363 District 27 Robert G. DWenback(R), 197 Tuttle Rd., Cumberland 04021.829-5572 District 28 DonaldEsty, Jr. (D), 22 UnionSt., Westbrook04092. 854-2790 District 29 Joseph C. Brannigan(D), 168 Concord St., Portland 04103. 772-8047 District 30 Thomas H. Andrews (D), 58 GraySt., Portland04102. 774-6734 District 31 BarryJ. Hobbins (D), 22 GlenhavenCircle, Saco 04072. 282-7101 District 32 BarbaraA.Gal (R), 268 Westbrook, Unit 4, So. Portland 04106. 773-4984 District 33 DavidL Carpenter (R), 80 Cottage St., Sanford04073. 324-4665 District 34 Dennis L Dutremble (D). 3 HaleyCircle, Biddeford 04005. 282-6729 District 35 StephenC. Estes (D), P. O. Box4, KitteryPoint 03905. 439-3479


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A Abbot —Piscataquis Acton —York Addison —Washington Albion —Kennebec Alexander —Washington Alfred —York Allagash —Aroostook Aina —Lincoln Alton —Penobscot Amherst —Hancock Amity —Aroostook Andover —Oxford Anson —Somerset Appleton —Knox Arrowsic —Sagada. Ashland —Aroostook Arundel —York Athens —Somerset Atkinson —Piscataquis Auburn —Androscoggin Augusta —Kennebec Aurora —Hancock Avon —Franklin B Baileyville —Washington Baldwin —Cumberland Bancroft —Aroostook Bangor —Penobscot Bar Harbor —Hancock Baring Pit. —Washington Bath —Sagadahoc Beals —Washington Beaver Cove —Piscataquis Beddington —Washington Belfast —Waldo Belgrade — Kennebec Belmont —Waldo Benedicta —Aroostook Benton —Kennebec Berwick —York Bethel —Oxford Biddeford —York Bingham —Somerset Blaine —Aroostook Blanchard Pit. —Piscataquis Blue Hill —Hancock Boothbay —Lincoln Boothbay Harbor —Lincoln Bowdoin —Sagadahoc Bowdoinham —Sagadahoc Bowerbank —Piscataquis Bradford —Penobscot Bradley —Penobscot Bremen —Lincoln Brewer —Penobscot Bridgewater —Aroostook Bridgton —Cumberland Brighton Pit. —Somerset Bristol —Lincoln Brooklin —Hancock Brooks —Waldo Brooksville — Hancock Brownfield —Oxford Brownville — Piscataquis Brunswick —Cumberland Buckfield —Oxford Bucksport —Hancock Burlington —Penobscot Burnham —Waldo Buxton —York Byron —Oxford c Calais —Washington Cambridge —Somerset Camden —Knox Canaan —Somerset Canton —Oxford Cape Elizabeth —Cumberland Caratunk —Somerset Caribou —Aroostook Carmel —Penobscot Carrabasset Valley —Franklin Carroll Pit. —Penobscot Carthage —Franklin Cary Pit. —Aroostook Casco —Cumberland Castine —Hancock Castle Hill —Aroostook Caswell Pit. —Aroostook

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Senate District 5 25 7 13 7 25 2 20 6 12 3 8 4 21 24 2 34 4 5 22 19 12 8 7 25 3 10 12 7 24 7 5 7 14 17 21 3 13 33 8 34 4 3 5 12 20 20 24 24 5 6 11 20 11 3 15 4 20 12 14 12 •• 15 5 26 15 14 6 14 28 8 7 9 21 9 8 32 4 2 9 4 6 8 3 25 14 2 1

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House District 104 9 126 85 138 9 151 78 128 128 140 53 103 84 74 151 8 103 106 59,61,62,63,70 88,89,90 128 43 138 47 139 115 thru 119 125 138 74 &75 136 104 139 111 58 110 134 85 5 49 12,13,14 103 142 104 127 77 77 72 73 &74 105 105 128 79 120 &121 142 46 103 79 123 110 123 48 105 42,43,&70 51 122 132 109 16 49 138 104 83 101 57 21 103 146 &1 114 55 132 54 140 45 123 151 148

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Senate District Caswell Connor Dist. —Aroostook 1 Centerville —Washington 7 Chapman —Aroostook 2 Charleston —Penobscot 6 Charlotte —Washington 7 Chelsea —Kennebec 19 Cherryfieid —Washington 7 Chester —Penobscot 5 Chesterville —Franklin 4 China —Kennebec 19 Clifton —Penobfecot 11 Clinton —Kennebec 13 Codyville Pit. —Washington 3 Columbia —Washington 7 Columbia Falls —Washington 7 Cooper —Washington 7 Coplin Pit. —Franklin 4 Corinna —Penobscot 9 6 Corinth —Penobscot Cornish —York 25 Comville —Somerset 9 Cranberry Isles —Hancock 12 Crawford —Washington 7 3 Crystal —Aroostook 27 Cumberland —Cumberland 20 Cushing —Knox Cutler —Washington 7 1 Cyr Pit. —Aroostook D Dallas Pit. — Franklin Damariscotta —Lincoln Danforth —Washington Dayton —York Deblois —Washington Dedham —Hancock Deer Isle —Hancock Denmark —Oxford Dennistown Pit. —Somerset Dennysvilie —Washington Detroit —Somerset Dexter —Penobscot Dixfield —Oxford Dixmont —Penobscot Dover-Foxcroft —Piscataquis Dresden —Lincoln Drew Pit. —Penobscot Durham —Androscoggin Dyer Brook —Aroostook E Eagle Lake —Aroostook Eastbrook —Hancock East Machias —Washington East Millinocket —Penobscot Easton —Aroostook Eastport —Washington Eddington —Penobscot Edgecomb —Lincoln Edinburg —Penobscot Eliot —York Ellsworth — Hancock Embden —Somerset Enfield —Penobscot E. Pit. —Aroostook Etna —Penobscot Eustis —Franklin Exeter —Penobscot F Fairfield —Somerset Falmouth —Cumberland Famingdale —Kennebec Farmington —Franklin Fayette —Kennebec Fort Fairfield —Aroostook Fort Kent —Aroostook Frankfort —Waldo Franklin —Hancock Freedom —Waldo Freeport —Cumberland Frenchboro —Hancock Frenchville —Aroostook Friendship —Knox Fryeburg —Oxford G Gardiner —Kennebec Garfield Pit. —Aroostook Garland —Penobscot Georgetown —Sagadahoc Gilead —Oxford

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House District 148 146 151 105 139 91 126 134 58 85 129 109 139 136 136 139 55 107 114 15 101 124 139 140 38 &3 81 137 148

8 20 3 31 7 12 12 15 4 7 9 9 8 9 5 20 3 26 3

55 78 139 14 139 122 123 48 103 139 108 107 54 113 106 74 133 70 140

2 12 7 5 3 7 11 20 6 35 12 4 6 3 9 4 6

151 28 136 134 144 137 129 77 132 3 127 55 132 142 108 55 114

13 27 18 4 17 3 1 14 12 14 26 12 1 20 15

99 39 93 56 95 144 150 112 126 109 41 124 150 80 48

18 3 6 24 8

92 151 106 76 49

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Glenbum —Penobscot Glenwood Pit. —Aroostook Gorham —Cumberland Gouldsboro — Hancock Grand Isle —Aroostook Grand Lake Stream Pit. —Washington Gray —Cumberland Great Pond —Hancock Greenbush —Penobscot Greene —Androscoggin Greenfield —Penobscot Greenville —Piscataquis Greenwood —Oxford Guilford —Piscataquis H Hallowell —Kennebec Hamlin —Aroostook Hammond —Aroostook Hampden —Penobscot Hancock —Hancock Hanover —Oxford Harmony —Somerset Harpswell —Cumberland Harrington —Washington Harrison —Cumberland Hartford —Oxford Hartland —Somerset Haynesville —Aroostook Hebron —Oxford Hermon —Penobscot Hersey —Aroostook Highland Pit. —Somerset Hiram —Oxford Hodgdon —Aroostook Holden —Penobscot Hollis —York Hope —Knox Houiton —Aroostook Howland —Penobscot Hudson —Penobscot | 1 Indian Island Voting District —Penobscot Indian Township Voting District —Washington Industry —Franklin Islesboro —Waldo Isle au Haut —Knox Island Falls —Aroostook J| Jackman —Somerset Jackman, Rockwood Strip —Somerset Jackson —Waldo Jay —Franklin Jefferson —Lincoln Jonesboro —Washington Jonesport —Washington K Kenduskeag —Penobscot Kennebunk —York Kennebunkport —York Kingsbury Pit. —Piscataquis Kingfieid — Franklin Kittery —York Knox —Waldo 1 L Lagrange —Penobscot Lake View Pit. —Piscataquis Lakeville —Penobscot Lamoine —Hancock Lebanon —York Lee —Penobscot Leeds —Androscoggin Levant —Penobscot Lewiston —Androscoggin Liberty —Waldo Limerick —York Limestone —Aroostook Limington —York Lincoln —Penobscot Lincoln Pit. —Oxford Lincolnville —Waldo Linneus —Aroostook Lisbon —Androscoggin Litchfield —Kennebec

Senate District 6 3 28 12 1

House District 115 140 35&36 125 149

3 27 12 6 16 11 5 15 5

139 44 128 132 64 128 104 50 106

19 1 3 9 12 8 9 24 7 15 15 9 3 15 9 3 4 15 3 11 25 21 3 6 6

91 148 140 113 126 49 104 76 126 46 52 101 139 51 115 140 103 46 140 121 14&16 84 141 132 105

6

131

3 4 . 14 12 3.

139 55 110 123 140

4

103

4 14 8 20 7 7

103 109 57 84 136 136

6 34 34 5 4 35 14

114 7 8 104 55 1,2 110

6 5 6 12 33 6 16 6 16&23 21 25 1 25 6 8 21 3 16 16

132 105 132 124 5 132 59 114 64 thru 69 84 15 145 15 133 49 110 140 70< 93s


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Senate District 3 Littleton —Aroostook 16 Livermore —Androscoggin 17 Livermore Falls —Androscoggin 15 Lovell —Oxford 6 Lowell —Penobscot 7 Lubec —Washington 3 Ludlow —Aroostook 25 Lyman —York M 7 Machias —Washington 7 Machiasport —Washington 3 Macwahoc Pit. —Aroostook 1 Madawaska —Aroostook Madison —Somerset 4 4 Madrid —Franklin 8 Magalloway Pit. —Oxford 18 Manchester —Kennebec 2 Mapleton —Aroostook 12 Mariaville —Hancock 7 Marshfield —Washington 3 Mars Hill —Aroostook 3 Masardis —Aroostook 21 Matinicus Isle Pit. —Knox 3 Mattawamkeag —Penobscot 5 Maxfield —Penobscot 22 Mechanic Falls —Androscoggin 7 Meddybemps —Washington 5 Medford —Piscataquis 5 Medway —Penobscot 4 Mercer —Somerset 3 Merrill —Aroostook 8 Mexico —Oxford 7 Milbridge —Washington 11 Milford —Penobscot 5 MiUinocket —Penobscot 5 Milo —Piscataquis 16 Minot —Androscoggin 20 Monhegan Ptt. —Lincoln 18 Monmouth — Kennebec 14 Monroe —Waldo 5 Monson —Piscataquis Monticello —Aroostook 3 21 Montville —Waldo 4 Moose River —Somerset 3 More Pit. —Aroostook 21 Morrill —Waldo 4 Moscow —Somerset 5 Mount Chase —Penobscot 12 Mount Desert —Hancock 17 Mount Vernon —Kennebec N 25 Naples —Cumberland 2 Nashville Pit. —Aroostook 9 Newburgh —Penobscot 1 New Canada —Aroostook 20 Newcastle —Lincoln 25 Newfield —York 22 New Gloucester —Cumberland 3 New Limerick —Aroostook 9 Newport —Penobscot 4 New Portland —Somerset 8 Newry —Oxford 4 New Sharon —Franklin 1 New Sweden —Aroostook 4 New Vineyard —Franklin 20 Nobleboro —Lincoln 4 Norridgewock —Somerset 33 North Berwick —York 7 Northfield —Washington 21 North Haven —Knox 14 Northport —Waldo 27 North Yarmouth —Cumberland 15 Norway —Oxford 7 No. 14 Pit. —Washington 0 Oakfield —Aroostook Oakland —Kennebec Ogunquit —York Old Orchard Beach —York Old Town —Penobscot Orient —Aroostook Ortand —Hancock Orono —Penobscot Orrington — Penobscot Osborn —Hancock Otis —Hancock Otisfield —Oxford Owls Head —Knox Oxbow Ptt. —Aroostook Oxford —Oxford

3 17 35 31 6 3 14 11 11 12 12 15 21 3 15

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T o w n s House District 141 59 58 49 132 137 140 8 136 137 133 149 102 55 49 95 143 128 137 144 151 81 133 134 60 138 105 134 102 140 52 126 128 135 105 60 81 94 109 104 142 110 103 140 110 103 134 124 95 45 151 113 151 78 48 44 140 108 55 49 56 148 55 79 102 4 139 81 111 40 50 139 140 96 6 17 128&131 139 122 129&130 121 128 128 45 81 151 50

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S e n a te Senate District

P Palermo —Waldo Palmyra —Somerset Paris —Oxford Parkman — Piscataquis Parsonsfield —York Passadumkeag —Penobscot Patten —Penobscot Pembroke —Washington Penobscot —Hancock Perham —Aroostook Perry —Washington Peru —Oxford Phillips —Franklin Phippsburg —Sagadahoc Pittsfield —Somerset Pittston —Kennebec Pleasant Point Voting District —Washington Pleasant Ridge Pit. —Somerset Plymouth —Penobscot Poland —Androscoggin • Portage Lake —Aroostook Porter —Oxford Portland —Cumberland Pownal —Cumberland Prentiss Pit. —Penobscot Prentiss, Kingman District —Penobscot Presque Isle —Aroostook Princeton —Washington Prospect —Waldo R Randolph —Kennebec Rangeley —Franklin Rangeley Pit. —Franklin Raymond —Cumberland Readfield —Kennebec Reed Pit. —Aroostook Richmond —Sagadahoc Ripley —Somerset Robbinston —Washington Rockland —Knox Rockport —Knox Rome —Kennebec Roque Bluffs —Washington Roxbury —Oxford Rumford —Oxford S Sabattus —Androscoggin Saco —York Saint Agatha —Aroostook Saint Agatha, Sinclair T17 R4 —Aroostook St. Albans —Somerset St. Francis —Aroostook St. George —Knox St. John Pit. —Aroostook Sandy River Pit. —Franklin Sanford —York Sangerville —Piscataquis Scarborough —Cumberland Searsmont —Waldo Searsport —Waldo Sebago —Cumberland Sebec —Piscataquis Seboeis Pit. —Penobscot Sedgwick —Hancock Shapleigh —York Sherman —Aroostook Shirley —Piscataquis Sidney —Kennebec Skowheagan —Somerset Smithfield —Somerset Smyrna —Aroostook Solon —Somerset Somerville —Lincoln Sorrento —Hancock South Berwick —York South Bristol —Lincoln Southport —Lincoln South Portland —Cumberland South Thomaston —Knox Southwest Harbor —Hancock Springfield —Penobscot Stacyville —Penobscot Standish —Cumberland Starks —Somerset Stetson —Penobscot Steuben —Washington

D is tric ts House District

21 9 15 5 25 6 5 7 14 2 7 15 4 24 13 18

84 108 51 104 48 132 134 139 123 149 139 57 55 76 101 91

7 4 9 22 2 25 29&30 26 3

137 103 108 60 151 48 25 thru 33 41 133

3 2 7 14

133 142&14 139 112

18 8 8 27 18 3 24 9 7 21 21 4 7 8 8

92&93 49 49 45 95 139 72 104 139 80&82 83 58 136 52 52&53

16 31 1

72 17, 18 150

2 9 2 21 2 8 33 5 31 21 14 25 5 5 12 25 3 5 17 13 4 3 4 20 12 .33 20 20 32 21 12 6 5 25 4 9 7

149 107 151 81 151 49 9,-fo 104 19&20 110 112 46 106 134 123 9 140 104 87 99&100 99 140 103 84 126 4 77 77 22,23 81 124 132 134 47 102 114 125

( c o n t d .)

Stockholm —Aroostook Stockton Springs —Waldo Stoneham —Oxford Stonington —Hancock Stow —Oxford Strong —Franklin Sullivan —Hancock Sumner —Oxford Surry —Hancock Swan’s Island —Hancock Swanville —Waldo Sweden —Oxford T Talmadge —Washington Temple —Franklin The Forks Pit. —Somerset Thomaston —Knox Thorndike —Waldo Topsfield —Washington Topsham, Sagadahoc Tremont —Hancock Trenton —Hancock Troy —Waldo Turner —Androscoggin u Union —Knox Unity —Waldo Upton —Oxford V Van Buren —Aroostook Vanceboro —Washington Vassalboro —Kennebec Veazie —Penobscot Verona —Hancock Vienna —Kennebec Vmalhaven —Knox w Wade —Aroostook Waite —Washington Waldo - Waldo Waldoboro —Lincoln Wales —Androscoggin Wallagrass Pit. —Aroostook Waltham —Hancock Warren —Knox Washburn —Aroostook Washington —Knox Waterboro —York Waterford —Oxford Waterville —Kennebec Wayne —Kennebec Webster Pit. —Penobscot Weld —Franklin Wellington —Piscataquis Wells - York Wesley —Washington West Bath —Sagadahoc Westbrook —Cumberland Westfield —Aroostook West Forks Pit. —Somerset West Gardiner —Kennebec Westmanland —Aroostook Weston —Aroostook West Paris —Oxford Westport —Lincoln Whitefield —Lincoln Whiting —Washington Whitneyville —Washington Willimantic —Piscataquis Wilton —Franklin Windham —Cumberland Windsor —Kennebec Winn —Penobscot Winslow —Kennebec Winter Harbor —Hancock Winterport —Waido Winterville Ptt. —Aroostook Winthrop —Kennebec Wiscasset —Lincoln Woodland —Aroostook Woodstock —Oxford Woodville —Penobscot Woolwich —Sagadahoc Y Yarmouth —Cumberland York —York

Senate District 1 14 15 12 15 4 12 15 12 12 14 15

House District 148 112 48 123 48 55 126 52 127 124 110 46

3 8 4 21 14 3 24 12 12 14 16

139 54 103 80 109 139 73 124 124 108 59

20 14 8

84 109 49

1 3 19 11 14 17 21

148 139 87 129 122 58 81

2 3 14 20 16 1 12 20 2 20 25 15 17 18 6 8 5 35 7 24 28 3 4 18 2 3 15 20 18 7 7 5 8 27 20 6 13 12 14 2 18 20 1 15 5 24

149 139 110 79 64 151 128 80 147 84 15 49 96,97&98 94 133 49 104 4,6&7 139 76 33,34&35 142 103 93 149 139 51 77 78 137 136 105 54 35,37&38 87 133 85&86 125 112 151 94&95 78 147 52 134 74

26 35

38&40 2&3


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MSEA’s Retirees Steering Committee was visited in January by SEIU retiree representative Bill Dodds who provided information on the activities of the National Council of Senior Citizens (NCSC). Following affiliation, MSEA retirees have now automatically become members of the NCSC, which offers benefits to retirees and lobbies in their behalf on Capitol Hill. Dodds discussed the problem of the high cost of health care coverage and the need for organized informed lobbying of Congress by retirees on recently-passed catastrophic care arid soon-to-be considered long term care legislation. Above, left to right: Retiree Jackie Bilodeau, Bill Dodds, Retirees Connie Sapiro and Margaret Anderson.

Left to right: Retiree Jackie Bilodeau, Bill Dodds, Retirees Connie Sapiro and Margaret Anderson.

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The Service Employees International Union recently surveyed a nationwide sample of their retired members on a variety of topics, receiving a 50% response. The sample included retired service workers and public employees in many occupations and provided SEIU with a valuable profile of their activities, needs, and wishes after a lifetime of work.

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Dr. William Deering of Bangor testified before the Legislature’s Aging, Retirement and Veterans Committee in Augusta on February 2 before being sworn in to a three-year term as retiree representative on the Maine State Retirement System’s Board of Trustees. Deering, an MSEA retiree and former member of the Retirees Steering Committee, has served one year as a trustee to complete retiring trustee Fred Kenney’s unexpired term. Testifying in support of his nomination by Governor John McKeman were MSEA President Jim Webster, Rep. Willis Lord (R-North Waterboro), and State Treasurer Sam Shapiro (seated behind Deering in the photo above).

40% had high blood pressure: 25% had vision problems; and 25% had general mobility problems. —96% were covered by Medicare; 70% of those also had private insurance. 96% felt that enactment of a national healthcare plan was “important or very important.” —Only 1% continued to work full-time, 6% part-time. 11 % were interested in working again at a paying job. Some highlights: —Most thought pre-retirement planning was important, but —Most (39%) worked in the occupation they retired from 93% had not attended such a program. for 15 to 24 years, but 19% worked 35 years or more. —50% were unfamiliar with most services in their —51 % missed their former co-workers a lot. community, such as home healthcare, counseling, legal —80% receive a pension, but 65% of those responding services, and cultural activities. were able to save “little or nothing.” —70% answered “yes” to the question "things are better —85% describe their health as fair to excellent. Even still, than we thought as we grow older.”

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Maine’s continuing nurse shortage has meant serious recruitment and retention problems for the State’s Mental Health and Mental Retardation and Corrections Institutions. It has also created an environment allowing a second negotiated pay increase for nurses represented by MSEA at these facilities. The new agreement calls for a $1.00 per hour base pay increase for registered nurse classifications (RN’s), and a $.50 per hour base pay increase for licensed practical nurses (LPN’s). LPN’s will also get an increase in shift differentials. The agreement has been ratified and is effective retroactive to January 2, 1989.

H e a lth

DOUBLE DUTY: Rev. James E. Blanchette, minister of the Capehart Community Church of Bangor, opens the eleventh day of the Legislature on February 2 with a prayer. Next to him is Senate President Charles Pray. Rev. Blanchette also is a full time Window Clerk at the Bangor Registry of Motor Vehicles.

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MSEA negotiator Chuck Hillier worked with a team of nurses to gain the pay raise. “We’re especially pleased that we were able to get management to recognize that the pay increase was necessary for both RN’s and for LPN’s,” Hillier said. Both areas have a recruitment problem. Nurse team members: Robert Plouffe (an LPN at Pineland Center); Linda Purlngton (an RN at Pineland); Vera Gillis (RN at AMHI); Eileen Lorenz (RN at Maine State Prison); Paul Caron (RN at BMHI), Sandra St. Germain (RN at BMHI); Marlene Donahue (LPN at BMHI); and Joan Spruce (LPN at Maine State Prison).

In s u ra n c e

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H a s N ew A d d re s s The Maine State Employees Health Insurance Program has a new address after February 3,1989 219 Capitol Street in Augusta. Formerly located in the State Office Building, the Program will have the same toll-free number (1-800-4224503) but a new local number. 289-6780.


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Chief Negotiator Stephen Leech caucused with Statewide Bargaining Teams on February 1.

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Peter McCarthy, Loren Ulmer, and Brenda Kaler listen to caucus discussion.

The Team then met with Governor McKeman’s team . . .

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. . . led by management negotiator Bob Moore (fourth from left).

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MSEA has launched a broad-based campaign to negotiate sixteen contracts covering all our active union members in 1989! Following a (nevertheless) busy year, without significant bargaining, the time has come to return to the table and address the needs of Maine’s public employee workforce. Bargaining committees for each unit have been formed by volunteer members; Bargaining Teams have been elected or soon will be; surveys have been sent out and specific contract proposals developed. This year, MSEA will be making a special effort to keep members informed about the progress of contract talks in each bargaining unit. Our campaign also aims to provide as much information as possible about public employee concerns and contract bargaining to Maine citizens, whose support we seek and need. Bargaining for our five executive branch units officially began February 1. Other units — Local 5 in Lewiston, Maine Court employees VTI employees — win be at the bargaining table shortly. Maine Turnpike Employees will be negotiating later in the Spring. 1989 promises to be a year for hard work and hard bargaining! Support from afl our members is crucial. Each contract settled and signed is your contract; help us get what you want!

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MSEA President Jim Webster made the following remarks at his February press conference in Augusta announcing the start of 1989 bargaining: We are here today to announce a campaign for Maine, a campaign for “Public Service: A Resource Worth Preserving.” In behalf of all sixteen bargaining units we represent, MSEA is now at the beginning of an important round of contract talks with seven Maine public employers: The Maine Judicial System; The Maine Turnpike Authority; The City of Lewiston, The Maine Maritime Academy; The Vocational-Technical Institutes of Maine; and the Executive Branch of Maine State Government. We enter negotiations at a time when we have generally constructive and cooperative relationships with each of these public employers, but also a time when the^ needs of employees are very real and the ability of these

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government employers to continue to attract and keep good employees is seriously in doubt. These needs cannot be ignored. They can’t be solved without serious commitment of the employers’ part. Even with goodwill on both sides of the bargaining table, these issues cannot be addressed without public understand­ ing and support. Solving these problems must include restoration of public employee earning power, catching up with changes in the private sector. But the issue is not just base pay. • Plowing and maintaining our roads in Southern Maine is made difficult because we cannot attract workers. • We have difficulty bringing quality teachers to Maine Maritime Academy and to state institutions.

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• Attracting and retaining quality clerical personnel to keep the paperwork moving affects all our public employers. We can’t keep health care personnel at AMHI, BMHI, and Pineland to assure the well-being of our sick and handicapped population. • Work is contracted out at great public expense because draftsman, engineers, and others can’t be attracted to do this work. Getting the public’s work done depends on giving us the right tools to do the job, improve our skills, and advance and improve ourselves. Now is a time that Maine public employers are uniquely able to address these problems. We submit that Maine must have no higher priority.

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Law Enforcement members reviewed their priorities at a January Bargaining Committee Meeting in Lewiston on January 21.

Team Leader Carol Fleury spoke about Administrative Services Unit Proposals.

OMS Committee members discussing a bargaining proposal. (Left to right): Jo Ledoux, Dana Graham, Judy Green, Robert Williams, Claustin Lawrence.


A P P L I C A T I O N

F O R

The 1989 MSEA Scholarship Committee, chaired by Paul McTigue of Bangor, is accepting applications for twelve annual scholarships and three scholarships for part-time educational programs. APPLICATIONS WITH ALL REQUIRED MATERIALS MUST BE RECEIVED BY APRIL 15,1989. Applications for the twelve annual scholarships wili be considered only from sons and daughters of MSEA members who are entering full-time post-high school educational or vocational programs for the first time or MSEA members who are in or have been accepted into a degree program. Nine scholarships will be apportioned so that three will be awarded for each MSEA area. The Dr. Howard L. Bowen will be awarded for $1,000, the Murray L. Brown for $500 and the George A. Davala for $500. One $300 scholarship in each area wiH be awarded to a student attending a Vocational Technical Institute, provided there is an applicant. If there is no applicant from an area, that scholarship may be awarded to a qualified applicant from another area. The VTI applicants will first be considered along with the other applicants for the nine scholarships mentioned above; if not selected to receive one of those scholarships, they will then be considered for the VTI scholarships. Each of the above scholarships will be payable one-half during the first semester or partial year, and I ■ I I

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one-half during the second semester of the recipient’s first year in post secondary school. All awards will be made payable to the treasurer or bursar of the school in which the recipient becomes enrolled. The members of the Scholarship Committee from each area will screen applications from other areas.

Basis for awarding these scholarships will be: 1. Character 2. Leadership Qualities 3. Service to Others 4. Financial Need . 5. Scholastic Ability and Initiative Each item will receive a numerical rating; the total of these ratings determines the success of the application. Personal interviews may be required by the Committee if needed. THREE PART-TIME EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIPS MSEA is also offering scholarships to MSEA members enrolled in part-time educational programs. Three scholar­ ships, one for each geographical area, in the amount of $250

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REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL SCHOLARSHIPS (1) A transcript of your high school record; (2) a statement or personal letter indicating reasons for making application; (3) an itemized statement of your and, if you are a dependent, your parents’ or guardians’ financial resources and outstanding obligations AND Page 1 of their 1989 Federal Income Tax statement (all to be held in strict confidence); (4) a description of your extracurricular activities; and (5) references as noted on your application. Items 4 and 5 should contain information on character, leadership, and service to others and any other information which indicates why this applicant should be considered. It will be the responsibility of the applicant to be sure all of the references required (one scholastic and one non-scholas­ tic, non-relative) are received by April 15,1989. Applications must be mailed to Maine State Employees Association, 65 State Street, Augusta, Maine 04330, so that they will be received by April 15, 1989. Additional applications are available from MSEA Headquarters.

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each will be awarded. The selection process will be handled in the same manner and at the same time as the scholarships offered to sons and daughters of MSEA members who are in degree programs.

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THIS APPLICATION FORM MAY A LSO BE USED FO R THE THREE PART-TIME EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM SC H O L A R SH IPS AND THE THREE VTI SC H O L A R SH IPS FULL N A M E____________________________________________________________________________________________ __ MAIUNG A D D R E S S ___________

DATE O F BIRTH.

LEGAL AD DRESS (if differen t from a b o v e ) I

*FATHER'S/GUAROIAN’S NAME

* M OTHER’S/GUARDIAN’S NAME ADDRESS OCCUPATION I YEARLY INCOME FROM ALL S O U R C E S I NAMES, AG ES AND RELATIONSHIP O F DEPEN D EN TS (if different from F a th e r’s) I I I ■ *lf n o t a d e p e n d e n t, u s e a b o v e s p a c e s for o w n a n d s p o u s e ’s inform ation. INCOME FROM ALL S O U R C E S (if additional to p a re n ts) I I

TO WHICH M SEA C H A PTER DO YOU O R YOUR PARENT(S) B E L O N G _ HAVE YOU BEEN A C C EPTED FO R P O S T — HIGH S C H O O L EDUCATION. DATE O F A C C E P T A N C E ___________ NAME O F S C H O O L ________________ ADDRESS O F S C H O O L __________________________________________________ WHAT C O U R S E DO YOU PLAN TO T A K E __________________________________________________________________________________________ LENGTH O F THIS C O U R S E (y e a rs, m o n th s, e t c . ) ____________________________________________________________ _______________________

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NAME O F HIGH S C H O O L FROM W HICH YOU ARE TO BE O R HAVE GRADUATED O R P O S T SEC O N D A RY S C H O O L LAST ATTENDED____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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NAME O F GUIDANCE DIRECTOR O R ADVISOR AND A D D R E S S _____________________________________________________________________ REQUIRED R E FE R E N C E S: O n e s c h o la s tic a n d o n e n o n -sc h o la stic (a non-relative). No A pplication will b e c o n s id e re d u n le s s re q u ire m e n ts 1 th ro u g h 4 a re m et. A pplicants n o t m ee tin g req u ire m e n t 5 will still b e c o n s id e re d , h o w e v e r, their final rating m ay b e a ffe c te d . (N ote

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additional re q u ire m e n ts) PL E A SE NOTE: Ht will b e n e c e s s a r y fo r y o u to a s k e a c h of y o u r r e f e r e n c e s to s e n d h is /h e r le tte r of r e c o m m e n d a tio n to t h e C h a ir p e r s o n o f t h e M SEA S c h o la r s h ip C o m m itte e . A pplication a n d a c c o m p a n y in g d a ta sh o u ld a lso b e m ailed to

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th e C h a irp e rso n of th e M SEA S c h o la rsh ip C o m m ittee, 6 5 S ta te S tre e t, A u g u sta, M aine 0 4 3 3 0 .

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Profile for Maine State Library

Maine Stater : February 1989  

Maine Stater : February 1989