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Creative community

Local makers & at-home art

Delicious downtown

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The Heart + Soul of Holly Springs and Fuquay-Varina

Hand-crafted by

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FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


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FUQUAY-VARINA ARTS CENTER

Arts Center Classes The Arts Center is alive with visual and performing arts classes for all ages. Adults can try their hands at sculpture, jewelry making, painting, script writing and more--some classes are offered for as little as $10! Kids have options as well--from drama class to dance class to themed week-long camps to single classes, we have something sure to get the creative juices flowing. Class size is limited; all participants and instructors are masked. For more information and to register, please visit FVArts.org, and click on 2021 Spring Classes at the top of the page.

Arts Center Presents The Fuquay-Varina Arts Center is pleased to present a series of local musicians in the Arts Center Presents series. The artists include many favorites from the Triangle and include a number of musicians presenting original music. These short concerts are presented via Facebook and are released on alternating Thursdays. Like the Arts Center’s Facebook page to make sure you see the latest offering from our local musicians.

The Friends of the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center The Friends help the Arts Center provide cultural opportunities to all members of our community by offering scholarships and class subsidies, engaging special events, and a compelling vision. You, too, can make a difference by joining this organization in their good work--annual memberships start as low as $25 and are tax deductible. Art is better with Friends--won’t you join us? artscenterfriendsfv.org

For more info, call the Arts Center at 919-567-3920 fvarts.org


It was just another Sunday morning, when suddenly ... ... you’re tired. Fatigued. You feel like you ate too much. You’re nauseous. Becoming more and more anxious. The pressure in your chest continues to intensify, making it difficult to breathe. You may have back pain, jaw pain or pain running down your arms. Fortunately, you have the presence of mind to call 911. Good choice. Learn more about yet another good choice at wakemed.org. After all, it is your heart.

Your heart. Your choice.


February/March 2021

CONTENTS

going to “ If I’m fight the battle, I’m going to fight on my own turf.

– Ben Harris, Fuquay-Varina sculptor

IN EVERY ISSUE 14 DIG IN & DRINK UP

Bold flavors fit the season.

40 THERE & BACK

FEATURES

50 40

36 AT-HOME ART

Virtual classes and to-go kits keep creativity flowing.

8 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

58 GROW & BLOOM

With garden pro L.A. Jackson.

Fuquay-Varina Memes knows of more art destinations than you do.

46 HISTORY REMEMBERED Teamwork, lots of research and a little bit of luck result in a new historic marker in Holly Springs.

38 MEMORABLE MOMENTS 50 OSHA THAI KITCHEN Local photographers captured the & SUSHI special events — big and small — of 2020.

Discover your new favorite restaurant in our dining guide.

60 FUN & MEMES

21 ART IS EVERYWHERE

Meet three area artists offering unique perspecitves and creative mediums.

54 RISE & DINE

Fresh, scratch-made food that is prepared with passion.

64 SEEN & HEARD

Community news and accolades

66 IN FOCUS Photos by Jonathan Fredin

22

Downtown Sanford melds public art and history into a great day’s adventure.


INTRODUCING THE

ALL-NEW

2021 CHEVROLET TAHOE

100 Auto Mall Drive Cary NC 27511 | 919-344-0456

HendrickChevrolet.com


reader

What virtual art have you enjoyed from home?

Letters

February/March 2021 • Volume 3, Number 1 EXECUTIVE

Bill Zadeits, Group Publisher Kris Schultz, Publisher

EDITORIAL

Emily Uhland, Senior Editor Amber Keister Sarah Rubenoff, Copy Editor

STREAM CAROLINA BALLET’S THE NUTCRACKER

CONTRIBUTORS

Fuquay-Varina Memes L.A. Jackson David McCreary

LORD HURON STREAMING CONCERT

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer PRODUCTION

“This cover is gorgeous! And wow, thank you so much for sharing my creations as part of the gift guide list. So honored to be among these other businesses!” KAYTEFRY, VIA INSTAGRAM

“Love it! Our cake looks awesome. You guys did a wonderful job.”

FERAWYNS, VIA INSTAGRAM

“Reading Oct/Nov edition of Main & Broad. You noted, “Thankful for strong coffee and stronger wifi.’ Well said Emily.”

Jennifer Casey, Senior Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer STREAMING HAMILTON

PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

CMA AWARDS DAN + SHAY AND JUSTIN BIEBER SINGING 10,000 HOURS TO AN EMPTY ARENA. WATCHED 10,000 TIMES.

Kristin Black, Accounting Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa White, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resources PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Ron Smith Main & Broad is published six times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year.

MATT AUCHTUNG, VIA LINKEDIN

MAIN & BROAD Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.mainandbroadmag.com

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF THE ISSUE?

Send letters to the editor by e-mailing editor@mainandbroadmag.com or find us on social media.

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

LET’S BE

! s d n e i r F

@Main & Broad

10 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

@mbmagazinenc

@mbmagazinenc

ON THE COVER: ORIGINAL ART BY TIM SAGUINSIN, THE PAPER CUT NINJA. READ TIM’S STORY ON PAGE 32. THANK YOU, TIM, FOR YOUR AMAZING WORK! PHOTO BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Main & Broad is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County: the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and Fuquay-Varina Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equalopportunity basis.


ometown H YO U R

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Editor’s

Letter

EMILY UHLAND SENIOR EDITOR

12 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

This issue BY THE

Numbers

16

Hours spent, by artist Tim Saguinsin, cutting out the paper layers to create the cover scene

12

Murals painted in downtown Sanford in the last five years

1

Download of Otocast, a free app that provides a self-guided tour of the Sanford murals. Highly recommend!

9

ideas for at-home art opportunities

1,289

followers on Instagram. Join us @mbmagazinenc.

Jonathan Fredin

When answering this month’s staff prompt on pg. 10 (What virtual art experiences have you enjoyed from home?), senior graphic designer Jennifer Casey answered, “Streaming ‘Hamilton.’” Until that moment, I had forgotten about “Hamilton” for about 10 days. Disney injected me with life when they brought the stage production of the smash-hit musical to our living rooms last summer. I’d already listened to the soundtrack about 100 times, often while writing for this very magazine, but seeing it on stage (with closed captioning even) creates a whole new appreciation for the amazing work. I’ve listened to the music countless times since then, even my children can sing along. Art, in all its forms, has a way of igniting passions like little else can — be it music, dance, fine art or theater. Art can provide an escape from reality, but also brings beauty to the everyday. Southern wake is fortunate to be home to many creative individuals. In this issue, we get to know three area artists, each with a unique perspective, each enriching the community with a one-of-a-kind passion. Since gatherings are still limited, we also compiled a list of ideas for art projects and virtual experiences that can be done from home (pg 36). Town staff and local businesses have worked hard to bring opportunities to the community while we can’t come to them. I’d like to express special, heartfelt thanks to Wake county’s own Paper Cut Ninja, Tim Saguinsin. I approached Tim with the idea to create a piece of custom art for the magazine cover, and despite a tight deadline on top of the holidays, Saguinsin enthusiastically agreed. His colorful style of intricate paper cutting and layering was the perfect way to bring to life our issue’s theme: “Art is Everywhere.” Thanks for reading,


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Dig in

Drink up

Phat Thor Stout

from Norse Brewing Company Written by Dave Tollefsen | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

STOUT SEASON: Winter is my favorite beer time of

the year! After all the wheat, fruit and pumpkin beers of the other seasons have passed, now is the time for the big, robust beers. Stout — bold, thick, and tasting of chocolate and coffee — is the perfect beer when it’s cold outside. Stouts are great all year, but winter begs for the richness of a robust beer. FLAVOR: Stout beers can be somewhat bitter from

the roasted malts, tending toward that dark chocolate/coffee flavor. Phat Thor Stout brewed at Norse Brewing in Wake Forest breaks that tradition with its wonderfully smooth but bold flavor. It comes in at a nice 5.9% abv; a little low for a stout, but that means you can enjoy more of it. PAIR ME: This stout is a great

candidate to pair up with food. There are many flavor variables that need to come together, but when they do, it’s palate euphoria. That’s the sensation of taking a bite of food and a sip of beer, swirling it around and letting the flavors melt in your mouth. Stouts are malt forward, and they really complement foods with a lot of umami or savoriness, such as Norse Brewing’s Viking Burger, a blended burger of bison, boar, wagyu beef and elk. NORSE BREWING COMPANY 203 BROOKS STREET, WAKE FOREST (919) 554-4555 NORSEBREWINGCO.COM

14 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

Dave Tollefsen is one of the NCBeerGuys – they have been promoting North Carolina craft beer and breweries on their website, ncbeerguys.com, since 2012. He is an avid homebrewer for more than 10 years and is also part of the North Carolina Craft Brewers Guild.


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Dig in

Drink up

Last Call & Quick Decisions from SideBar in Cary Recipe by Jeff Kinard Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

The cocktail was created by Jeff Kinard, who partnered with Matt and Catherine Bettinger to open SideBar in downtown Cary. “It has been part of our menu since we opened and is a favorite among guests and staff,” said Matt Bettinger.

LAST CALL & QUICK DECISIONS 1 1 1/2 1/4 3

ounce blended scotch ounce bonded bourbon ounce Montenegro ounce Drambuie drops Crude “Big Bear” Coffee & Cocoa Bitters*

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, and stir until diluted. Strain into a coupe or martini glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

SIDEBAR 215 EAST CHATHAM ST., CARY (919) 588-3063 | SIDEBARNC.COM *Crude Bitters & Sodas is located in Raleigh at 501 East Davie St., crudebitters.com.

16 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


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We often crave healthy vegetables for dinner, and a bowl is a great alternative to a basic salad. The roasted butternut squash, sauteed Swiss chard, quinoa, and warm, spiced chickpeas make this extra filling. Dinner bowls need a bold dressing, and this lemontahini dressing passes the test!

Roasted Butternut Squash & Quinoa Bowl with a Lemon-Tahini Dressing

INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

LEMON-TAHINI DRESSING: 2 Tbs fresh lemon juice (about 1 lemon) 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup tahini 1 clove garlic, minced 3 Tbs water (as needed to thin) Kosher salt Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Peel and cube the butternut squash into 3/4-inch pieces, about 4 cups of squash cubes. Peel and cut the onion in half vertically; then slice one of the halves horizontally, into semicircles. Place squash and onions on a rimmed half-sheet pan; drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil, and toss to coat. Spread across the pan in a single layer, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 25-35 minutes, or until the cubes are cooked through, and the edges begin to caramelize and turn brown. Remove and keep warm. Meanwhile, cook the quinoa. Bring the vegetable broth or salted water to a boil, add quinoa, cover and reduce the heat to a low simmer. Check after 15 minutes to see if all the liquid has been absorbed and the quinoa is tender. Cover to keep warm.

1/2

large butternut squash 1/2 large red onion 4 Tbs olive oil, divided 1 tsp kosher salt 1/2 tsp coarsely ground black pepper 1 cup quinoa 2 cups vegetable stock (or substitute water with 1/4 tsp salt) 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained 1 tsp cumin 1/2 tsp chili powder 1/4 tsp each turmeric, kosher salt, pepper 1 bunch Swiss chard, de-stemmed, stems sliced and leaves cut into bite-sized pieces 1 bunch cilantro leaves, chopped

While the quinoa and vegetables cook, prepare the spiced chickpeas. In a small bowl, mix the cumin, chili powder, turmeric, salt and pepper. In a saute pan, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the drained chickpeas, and toss to warm. Sprinkle with the spices, and cook, stirring continuously, until the chickpeas are slightly browned, about 10 minutes. Remove chickpeas from the pan. In the same saute pan, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil and saute the chard stems for 3-5 minutes or until tender. Add the leaves, and saute until just wilted. Salt and pepper to taste. Whisk the dressing ingredients until well combined. To assemble, divide squash and onion, quinoa, spiced chickpeas and sauteed chard between 4 bowls. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste. Serve with a side of dressing and a garnish of cilantro leaves. Makes 4 bowls Recipe by

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Dig in

Drink up Paltrinieri Piria Lambrusco di Sorbara DOC

Located in the Emilia-Romagna region of Central Italy, Achille Paltrinieri began making lambrusco in 1926 at Cantina Paltrinieri. Current owners Alberto Paltrinieri and his wife, Barbara, have run the winery since 1989. The wine has a ruby red color, displays fruity aromas (red fruits and violets), and is dry and fruity on the palate. The fine and persistent bubbles cut the bitterness of the swiss chard and pairs well with the earthiness of the squash and quinoa. The frothiness carries through and cleanses the palate for another taste. $18.99

Henri Dubois Brut NV

Located in Epernay, France, Henri Dubois Brut is made by the largest familyowned producer in Champagne with a history dating to the mid-1800s. This classic Champagne is a blend of pinot noir, chardonnay and pinot meunier grapes. Pale-yellow in color, with citrus and red currant fruit aromas and an exuberant froth. On the palate, the wine is crisp and lingers on the tongue with a long finish. The wine brings out, yet tempers, the spiciness of the chickpeas and brings out the lemon in the lemon-tahini dressing. The frothiness of the Champagne also lightens the heavier texture of the lemontahini dressing. $37.99

Written By Bill Allen Photographed By Jonathan Fredin

2018 De Stefani Venis

Located in Italy’s Trevenezie IGT, Valeriano De Stefani began cultivating wine over 150 years ago in 1866. Venis is a blend of sauvignon blanc and chardonnay. Venis has a straw yellow color and a citrusy, slightly grapefruit aroma. On the palate, crisp acidity of the sauvignon blanc is refreshing while the chardonnay lends body, structure, and finesse to the wine. The wine smooths the lemon and spice flavors of the salad and leaves a honey-like coating on the palate. It also pairs well with the earthiness of the butternut squash and onions. $24.99

utternut Squash sted B a bowls & Quino rfectly with pair pe

R oa

Bill Allen holds a first-level certification with the Court of Master Sommeliers and a Specialist of Wine certification from the Society of Wine Educators. He has worked as a wine educator with the Triangle Wine Company for five years.

19


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Everything around us is made by an artist. The less we have of artists in this world, the more boring the world is going to be.

– Tim Saguinsin, the Paper Cut Ninja

art is everywhere Life at home has offered a new appreciation for exploring the arts. Whether it’s virtual craft classes, public art exhibits or online concerts, those who seek shall find art all around. Starting right here.

ART BY BEN HARRIS

ART BY ANN MARIE AMICO

ART BY TIM SANGUISIN 21


scrap p that

Fuquay-Varina

Written by Emily Uhland Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

sculptor makes a statement with metal

B

Ben Harris has always gone against the grain. A sculptor of whimsical metal forms, he is a one-of-a-kind artist, but not by his own admission. Born and raised on a farm in Fuquay-Varina, Harris remembers even in his elementary years, as a student at the Fuquay-Varina Consolidated School, not being able to keep pace. “I wasn’t a real good student. I wasn’t learning fast enough and didn’t make the first grade,” he says. Harris fed the farm’s chickens and cows as a child and later worked his family’s tobacco fields on a mule. He still lives on that Fuquay farmland, now adorned with his large futuristic metal sculptures along the passing Piney Grove-Wilbon Road. With these rural North Carolina beginnings, Harris never expected to find himself living in Hollywood, selling sculptures to California art dealers.

22 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

A job in construction taught a teenage Harris how to weld, and he soon began to fashion life-sized objects out of the metal scraps. “If I wasn’t welding, I was making something. No one identified it as art. The only person to accept what I did was my mother,” he says. Harris moved to California as a young man and worked in a machine shop. During the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, Harris’s form of art began to take shape. “There was a contest to do a sculpture about the Olympics. I did a sculpture in the back of the shop where I worked,” he says. “All my work was made out of scrap.” A customer came into the shop and bought it immediately. “He said, ‘I’ll give you $500.’ That’s more than I would make in a week,” Harris recalls. continued on page 24


IN A WORKSHOP BEHIND HIS HOME, BEN HARRIS FUSES SCRAPYARD REMNANTS INTO LIFE-SIZED SCULPTURES

23


THE HEAD OF A DINOSAUR SCULPTURE.

THE DRESS OF THE “DANCING LADY” WAS MADE FROM A PROPANE TANK.

“LET THE METAL DO THE TALKING,” SHOWN HERE, IS AMONG HARRIS’ MOST RECENT WORK.

continued from page 22

After that, Harris caught the eye of an art dealer and started building more pieces to sell. “I didn’t believe I was doing it. I was supposed to be a nobody. I thought creativity came from a university. “I wanted to get a motorcycle, so I did sculptures to get the ball rolling,” he says with a chuckle. Initially constructing animals, Harris quickly transitioned into human forms. “I would go out to Venice Beach; there were all kinds of people there. ... They had all kinds of expressions. I started to see how people feel and how they act — you can put that in art.” Harris’ sculptures can take up to a year to complete. 24 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

“I can’t see what it is at the beginning. I build it; then it expresses itself,” he says. “It’s hard to put into words.” Eventually tiring of California culture — “Either I sell my soul to the art dealer or get out of Hollywood” — Harris made his way back to Fuquay-Varina. The sculptures on display in front of his house initially elicited choruses of, “What in the world is that?” “People hadn’t experienced anything like it,” Harris says. “Somebody has to show them.” From a workshop behind his home, Harris combines materials salvaged from nearby junkyards, old machinery and spare parts. “People come and give me scrap. One guy brought a propane tank and said, ‘I bet you can’t make anything out of this,’” says Harris.

Harris’ most recent work includes a series of figures including a priest (wearing a robe made out of the propane tank), preacher, police officer and an angel, entitled “Let the Metal Do the Talking.” The sculptures have hinged arms and heads that twist, so they can be moved to interact in different ways. “You don’t have to have a lot of materials if you have imagination,” he says. Harris’ sculpture, Ghost Farmer, stands within the Fuquay-Varina Museums Complex, paying homage to the area’s agricultural past. At the center sits a wheel, salvaged from bygone farm equipment. “I wish I knew what’s going on in his brain as he’s creating,” says Selina Williams, who claims Harris as her honorary continued on page 26


Better Together. A

t Windsor Point, we know everything’s better when you’re close to those you love. With new residents relocating to Southern Wake they want their family and friends to move close and enjoy all the area has to offer. Conveniently located in the heart of FuquayVarina, Windsor Point residents enjoy living close to shopping, recreational and cultural opportunities, as well as major medical centers. Our community is custom-made for its residents who choose from a selection of cottages and apartments, flexible dining plans and fitness options. Housekeeping, maintenance, and transportation worries become a thing of the past. Windsor Point is a Life Plan Community with Continuing Care providing Independent and Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing. Even if health needs keep couples apart, at Windsor Point our levels of care allow loved ones to remain close to one another. For more information about joining us, call our Marketing Department at 919-552-4580 or visit us online at windsorpoint.com.

1221 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina

25 919-552-4580 • windsorpoint.com


“SELINA,” NAMED FOR HARRIS’ HONORARY DAUGHTER.

continued from page 24

father. The pair met about four years ago and have been close ever since. “He didn’t have any children, and I didn’t have a father. I asked if he would be my dad,” Williams says. “I don’t know how he does what he does.” Williams is helping Harris brainstorm ways to make his sculptures mobile, and encouraging him to make tabletop versions for smaller collectors. At 75 years strong, Harris is still creating, albeit at a slower pace than in his younger years. “This is therapy for me,” he says. “I can pay for therapy, or I can weld.” “I don’t call myself an artist. The art reveals itself to you. The plan don’t come from the brain; the brain should follow the plan.” Harris’ sculptures can be viewed along Piney Grove-Wilbon Road between Academy Street and Wagstaff Road. 26 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

THE LARGEST GALLERY OF HARRIS’ WORK IS IN HIS FRONT YARD, OFF PINEY-GROVE WILBON ROAD IN FUQUAY. NEWER WORKS, SHOWN BELOW, ARE PAINTED WITH A PAINT SPRAYER.


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Mixed perspective Written by Emily Uhland Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

M

“Making is my motivation,” says Fuquay-Varina’s creative guru Ann Marie Amico. The process of creating forms the bridge that connects every aspect of Amico’s body of work, which includes mixed media artistry, brand design and community leadership. “I come from makers — everybody in my family got a different degree in college, but they’ve all come back to art as they’ve gotten older,” she says. Amico started her professional career as a special education teacher, before going back to school for commercial art and design when her two children were in elementary school. “As soon as I went, I just knew: Wow, this is for me,” she says. After graduating from Johnston County Community College (Wake Tech didn’t have a comparable art program at the time), Amico started her own graphic design business. While building that business, Amico continued to pursue fine arts education, taking a pivotal class in mixed media collage. “I moved from realism to abstraction then, and I haven’t really looked back.” Mixed media art combines a variety of materials — acrylic paint, paper, pastel, ink, natural stone, vintage objects — to create an image or form. “I love contrast and color, and I think that’s why I like mixed media so much,” Amico says. “And my family is my base, so I want 28 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

to do things that celebrate family and heritage and culture on the wall and on the body as well.” For example, Amico creates abstract portraits using found objects and keepsakes that represent elements from a person’s life. “When I (create a portrait) for the person, they know I’ve got these elements that are important to them that are worked into the piece.” Amico also crafts mixed media jewelry that pairs natural and semi-precious stones with vintage pieces into one-of-akind wearable art. “As an artist, you are trying to find how I can say this differently.” “Being an abstract expressionist in a really small town, like 1% of the population is gonna find what you do interesting,” Amico admits. “It’s not unusual for me to feel like I am climbing uphill a little bit.” continued on page 30


MIXED MEDIA ARTIST AND BRAND DESIGNER ANN MARIE AMICO, OF FUQUAY-VARINA

communities that support artists are vibrant and sustainable, because they are open to new ideas, and They celebrate people that are diverse. – Ann Marie Amico

” 29


MIXED MEDIA ART USES VARIED MATERIALS, SUCH AS PAINT, PAPER AND INK, TO CREATE THE FINISHED WORK.

continued from page 28

The early days of Amico’s design business felt similar. “I learned everything you shouldn’t do,” she says. “In a small town, people didn’t really know what to do with a graphic designer.” Professional development became vital to growing Amico Brand Design, and joining organizations like the Council for Entrepreneurial Development, the Women Business Owners Network in Cary, the Raleigh Professional Women’s Forum and the FuquayVarina Chamber of Commerce proved to be hugely valuable. “I loved my design life, because I met so many different people. No two days were the same.” On the board of the Fuquay-Varina Chamber of Commerce, Amico witnessed the connection between economic development and community building, which propelled her to work as a brand designer with municipal clients such as Angier, Roxboro and Harnett County. “I have an affinity for small towns and the work ethic in agricultural communities. I like ... helping people find their points of connection. I think that helping people talk to each other builds a stronger base that can move the community forward,” Amico says. “The thing that, for me, connects everything that I enjoy is problem solving. If you are a designer, either you’re figuring out how to create a symbol that reflects a company’s brand, or you are trying to fit 150 words into a three-inch box. You are always trying to figure out how to solve a problem. “With design of jewelry or art, I’m still trying for that. How I can say something with a clean look, or how I can reflect something of somebody’s personality with these stones or this piece of ephemera from their past?” While Amico’s artistic career has ebbed and flowed as her life as a business-owner, wife, mother, and now grandmother, has evolved, the artistic principles learned early on create a connection throughout all of her work. 30 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


“In design, line and form are really important, as are rhythm and contrast. All those kinds of things that you learn to be a designer are really important. And they show up in the same way you lead your eye around a painting or the same way you make a rhythm in a necklace, so it all hangs together,” she says. A resident of Fuquay-Varina for 33 years, Amico has experienced the ebbs and flows of the town’s growth as well.

Fostering the arts is vital for growing communities, like Fuquay-Varina, Amico says, not merely for the success of creative individuals, but for the health of the town as a whole. “Communities that support artists are vibrant and sustainable, because they are open to new ideas, and they celebrate people that are diverse. … The arts are a really effective way of AMICO COMBINES NATURAL STONES AND VINTAGE OBJECTS INTO ONE-OF-AKIND PIECES OF JEWELRY.

“The people that are involved in small town development are really interesting and hard working, so that’s where I got hooked on economic development. … We came to Fuquay when it was struggling back in 1987, and to watch all the effort that has been put into helping downtown thrive, and watching what it’s done for the whole community — that’s why you do it.”

having people of different backgrounds communicate with each other and find points of connection. “If you think of arts as a bigger thing than just music or dance or painting; if you think of it as a community of makers, you’ve created a place that people want to come and enjoy.” annmarieamico.com amicobranddesign.com

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THE PAPER CUT NINJA, TIM SAGUINSIN, NIMBLY TRANSITIONS BETWEEN HIS ROLES AS AN ARTIST, ATHLETE AND BUSINESS OWNER.

32 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


the art of

perseverance Meet the Paper Cut Ninja Written by Emily Uhland Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

T

The term “ninja” has many associations in present day vocabulary. There’s the stealthy Japanese warrior figure. Or a person with exceptional skills in a particular area, such as a culinary ninja. And an obstacle-surmounting, high-flying athlete, like those competing on “American Ninja Warrior.” Going back to the word’s origin, however, ninja signifies perseverance, which very aptly describes Tim Saguinsin, the Paper Cut Ninja, and his journey as an artist, small business owner and athlete. Exhibiting a strong affinity for the arts early on, Saguinsin attended an arts-focused high school and then the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, where he concentrated on painting and sculpture. “I was all set to become the greatest artist ever until I saw how expensive my tuition was, and I had to figure out how I was going to pay for everything,” Saguinsin says. “So I converted the knowledge and talents I had and started to learn how

to use a computer.” Pivot no. 1. Thus began his career as a computer graphic artist and animator, producing educational materials for children. “I turn really complex lessons into something that a kid can easily digest,” he says. Work that took him to London and back, eventually landing in Cary, after living eight years in Holly Springs, with his wife and two sons. Noticing the popularity of paper cutting machines like the Cricut — thanks, in part, to the family’s many crafty friends — Saguinsin experienced a light-bulb moment. “When I realized that I could use the files that I create on the computer in digital form and turn it into paper, that was it.

“It was like being back in art school again. I was exploring all kinds of different things with it. I started developing my voice,” he says. Pivot no. 2. That voice turned into a business called Paper Chop Shop, producing vibrant and punchy three-dimensional paper sculptures and wall art. Everything from silhouettes, city skylines, animals and illustrated characters, brought to life through layer upon layer of colorful paper and creative, intricate cuts. “There are layers of meaning, and as an continued on page 34

33


“COMING HOME TO HOLLY SPRINGS,” DEPICTS SAGUINSIN’S FAMILY EN ROUTE THROUGH MANY TOWN LANDMARKS.

continued from page 33

artist you have to decide how deep to go,” he says. Saguinsin is head chopper, a role he assumes on nights and weekends, after his day job as an animator is complete. Each project begins with an original illustration on the computer, and then is cut out on paper in careful detail. “Nothing takes less than five hours. Most of the projects take anywhere from eight to 10 hours,” Saguinsin says. One locally noteworthy piece, called “Coming Home to Holly Springs,” has recently been on display at Our Moments in Time in Holly Springs.

FAMILY EXPERIENCES, CULTURAL HISTORY AND NINJA PORTRAITS ALL FIND THEIR WAY INTO SAGUINSIN’S WORK.

34 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

The work features a playful map of various Holly Springs buildings, such as the cultural center and Bass Lake conference center, which Saguinsin created for an art festival as a board member of the Holly Springs Arts Council. “The Arts Council was all about trying to push the arts and make sure the arts were never going to be forgotten. I always want to identify with Holly Springs; give where you are from the notoriety that it deserves,” he says. Saguinsin’s work received a new level of notoriety when he debuted on the television show “American Ninja Warrior” as the Paper Cut Ninja, selected for a three-anda-half minute hometown highlight out of 70,000 initial applicants. “For my submission video, I talked about being the Paper Cut Ninja. I cut all the ninjas out that are on the show, and that was my schtick for getting on the show,” he says. Saguinsin’s episode aired during the summer of 2019, and since then he has received multiple commissions for portraits of other ninjas.

“I was incredibly honored and privileged to have something on the show,” he says. “I want to get back on (“American Ninja Warrior”), because I want to do better than I did last time. I only got to the second obstacle. The water was cold. I want to be able to do it so I don’t get wet.” Saguinsin fell in love with ninja training after completing a Spartan race with his wife and friends. “That was my turning point. This is what I want to be doing.” So, he jumped head first into promoting the sport by opening Warrior Tech training facilities in Morrisville and, later, North Raleigh. Pivot no. 3. “I realized there were no places to train for Spartan races, and I wanted to have a business where you could train for it.


It was like being back in art school again. I was exploring all kinds of different things with it. I started developing my voice.

– Tim Saguinsin, Paper Cut Ninja MB

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“Four days after I opened the gym, I tore my achilles tendon doing the warp wall. … Two years later on the exact day that I tore my achilles tendon, I stepped on the course of ‘Ninja Warrior’ and was allowed to run that course,” he says. Like I said: perseverance. “It’s all about supporting one another, fighting through whatever problems and obstacles are in front of you,” he says of ninja training. The Warrior Tech facilities have been hit hard by Covid-19, operating at low attendance for their usually popular trackout camps, group classes and birthday parties. Still, Saguinsin’s enthusiasm remains. “It’s one of the coolest communities you’ve ever been to. … I want the sport to grow, and want everyone to overcome each obstacle.” In the meantime, Saguinsin continues to develop his style of paper art, some of which can be seen at the Morrisville location of Warrior Tech OCR. “For me, I’m trying to find a way to get back to my roots of being an artist. I like doing commissions, it’s fun. But I really want to get back to being free to create whatever I want to create … work that speaks to me.” PAPER CHOP SHOP PAPERCHOPSHOP.COM

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At-Home

Art “Staying home” doesn’t have to mean “dull and boring.” Pick any of these virtual crafts, activities and concerts for a creative pick-me-up.

JONATHAN FREDIN

Compiled by Emily Uhland

CRAZY GLAZE CERAMICS AT HOME Kids and adults will enjoy the to-go creative kits from Crazy Glaze Ceramics & Art Studio in Fuquay-Varina. Pottery projects, such as the “Sweet Start,” with two coffee mugs, creamer and sugar bowl, come with glaze brushes and a color palette of five pre-selected colors. Canvas painting kits include a 12 by 12 canvas board with a pre-traced design and acrylic paints. Pick up in-studio or curbside. Delivery is available to select local areas. Crazyglaze.net

HOLLY SPRINGS PARKS AND RECREATION VIDEO ARCHIVES Parks and Rec staff and instructors created dozens of video tutorials throughout 2020, sharing easy crafts and fun recipes. The videos are available on the Holly Springs Parks and Recreation Facebook page. Fun, artistic options include: Weaving a Mini Tapestry, Anime Drawing and Creating a Paper Sunflower. There are also science experiments, sports drills and yoga videos. Virtual guided tours of the works of local artists Suzanne Dusterhoff and Kirsten Lohr are also available. Both artists had art on display at the Cultural Center when the facility closed last spring. facebook.com/hsparksandrec 36 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

FUQUAY-VARINA PRESENTS ONLINE PERFORMANCES Missing the Follow Me to Fuquay-Varina concert series? Instead, check out recordings of live performances from the FuquayVarina Arts Center stage. Archived concerts include Melissa Oliver, The McCray Brothers, 2Digh4 and more. fuquay-varina.org/1080/Fuquay-Varina-Presents

FUQUAY-VARINA ARTS CENTER VIRTUAL CONTENT The FV Arts Center has added an entire webpage featuring at-home arts activities. Learn stepby-step recreations of popular dances from Tik


Toks with Jordyn, or follow along instructor Shannon Lashley’s Watercolor Wildflowers class. There are many ways to feel a dash more creative without dashing out of the door. fuquay-varina.org/1013/Virtual-Content

PIEDMONT POTTERY GRAB & GO KITS

Mo’ Jazz and Route 55 Jazz Orchestra. Additional recordings are planned for 2021 until in-person performances return. Concert videos are available on the Town of Holly Springs’ YouTube Channel and the Holly Springs Cultural Center Facebook page. facebook.com/hsculturalcenter

Decorate hand-crafted pottery at home with kits from Fuquay-Varina’s Piedmont Pottery. Stoneware, glazes and paint brushes are included in each set. Painted pottery can be returned to the studio to be fired in the kiln. Kits include a snowflake, rose, angel and butterfly. piedmontpottery.com

THE SASSY COW DIY SIGNS Select from a variety of designs, with new projects added frequently. Sign packages include necessary wood, stain, colors, foam brush and stencils. For spring, consider the 12-inch by 24inch garden herbs sign, or the fourpack of coordinating square tiles for kids and adults to complete together. Togo party kits are also available in groups of four, six or eight for your next group gathering. thesassycownc.squarespace.com

TOWN OF HOLLY SPRINGS ONLINE JAZZ CONCERT SERIES During 2020, local jazz musicians filmed small ensemble concerts in the Holly Springs Cultural Center theater. Local favorites include The Will McBride Group,

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WOODWORKING WITH KEITH VERONESI Rescued Wood Rehab’s master craftsman Keith Veronesi shares his love of woodworking with a series of do-it-yourself and woodshop videos. Rescued Wood Rehab shares their favorites at rwrnc.com, and Veronesi’s entire library can be viewed on his YouTube channel, Keith’s Woodwork. rwrnc.com

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Meaningful Moments from 2020

Despite cancellation and postponement of many of last year’s special events, beautiful scenes of love and life remained. On these pages, local photographers showcase their favorites.

Having found safety and plenty of water in the spout of a watering can, this frog appears to smile at me, making it my most unfroggetable image of 2020. Jonathan Fredin, Main & Broad

Santa’s elves invaded Fuquay-Varina this past Christmas to bring a special mailbox for kids to write letters to Santa. Along the way, they stopped to dance and teach about other family-friendly safe alternatives available to celebrate the holidays in Fuquay-Varina. 2020 was different but it didn’t stop Fuquay-Varina from celebrating. Town of Fuquay-Varina, Susan Weis fuquay-varina.org

With 2020 being a year of many missed opportunities — many cancelled sessions of all kinds — getting to document the new lives of three tiny babies was spectacular. It was by far the highlight of the year for me and most definitely their parents. Sally Salerno, Sally Salerno Photography, Holly Springs @sallysalernophotography

38 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


This year was especially hard for the high school seniors who weren’t able to have a prom or an official graduation. Some of them have overcome so many obstacles in their journey to be able to finally graduate. In this case it all came to a head for Davis Teitelbaum. For his 18th birthday the community surprised him with a parade. Those in the parade included Davis’ friends from school, the Holly Springs Fire Department, members of the Holly Springs Run Club, council members and even Sal from the Holly Springs Salamanders. Tonya Palumbo, T&T Photography, Holly Springs tandtphotographync.com @TandTPhotographyNC

The 2020 Military Missions in Action Tee Off for the Troops was held on Veterans Day weekend at Bentwinds Country Club. Although it looked a little different from years past due to Covid restrictions, all players had a great time and raised money for the local Fuquay-Varina non profit that due to Covid events and donations were severely impacted. Tracy Watson, Mission First Realty gowatson.biz

The year 2020 was not friendly to the wedding industry. We were lucky to work with couples who still chose to get married despite the pandemic and were wiling to take the necessary precautions. We’re looking forward to seeing mask-free couples in the future, but this photo will also be representative of the year we experienced. LiveView Studios, liveviewstudios.com, Fuquay-Varina Leslie-Alford-Mims House & Mad Dash Weddings, raleighweddingvenue.com, Holly Springs

39


There

Written by Emily Uhland | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

Back

SPIN THE WHEEL ON THE “BRINGING THE ARTS TOGETHER” INTERACTIVE MURAL.

Downtown

sanford “SANFORD SPINNERS” HONORS THE LOCAL BASEBALL TEAM AND PITCHER HOWARD AUMAN, WHO LED THE TEAM TO THE TOBACCO STATE LEAUGE CHAMPIONSHIP IN 1946.

40 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


“FAIRVIEW DAIRY” ON THE SIDE OF YARBOROUGH’S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM & GRILL.

Public art transforms downtown Sanford into a larger-than-life history book, and your next day-trip adventure.

“SILENT WINGS” HONORS THREE GLIDER PILOTS WHO SERVED DURING WORLD WAR II.


“OFF TO WAR” IS A TRIBUTE TO AREA’S CURRENT AND FORMER ARMED FORCES MEMBERS.

It all started with ugly walls downtown.

Well, eliminating ugly walls downtown, that is. In 2015, Liz Whitmore, a historic preservation planner for the city of Sanford proposed ideas for a series of murals and public art projects that would “polish a lump of coal into a diamond.” The goal was to “recognize historical figures and events that may have been forgotten,” Whitmore says, and in the meantime turn those ugly brick walls into a dynamic destination. The first building-sized mural to be completed highlights the Sanford Spinners, a baseball team in the Tobacco State League, which played during the late 1940s. Pitcher Howard Auman led the Spinners to their first league championship in 1946 and is memorialized on the mural 42 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

pitching directly at onlookers. Completed in May of 2015 on the edge of downtown Sanford, this mural paved the path for two more to come that same year. In the next five years, 12 murals would be completed — all, except two, in the downtown area. The remaining are in nearby Jonesboro. More than $300,000 has been raised to fund the project, the majority through private donations and sponsors. “It’s a town of 30,000 people,” Whitmore says. “Never did I dream the project would be so well received.” “What sets us apart is all the murals tell the story in some way about the town or county. There is a historical foundation behind all of them,” says Kelli Laudate, executive director of Downtown Sanford Inc. “There is a lot of town pride and ownership here.”

The murals also serve as an educational opportunity to teach new residents and young people about the area’s history in a vibrant way. North Carolina muralists Chris Dalton and Scott Nurkin have been the artistic drivers of the murals, completing all 12 between the DRIVE TIME two of them. From Holly Springs: 30 minutes “So many From Fuquay-Varina: people stop and 35 minutes visit while I’m painting. They’ll bring me lemonade in the summer,” says Dalton. “It’s been an honor, honestly, to be a part of it, because everyone has been so supportive.”


THE AREA’S AGRICULTURAL HERITAGE IS REMEMBERED IN “TOBACCO HISTORY.”

it’s important for cities to have their histories told.

Many of Dalton’s concepts have three-dimensional elements incorporated into the design, like cow heads on the Fairview Dairy mural and a spinning wheel on “Bringing the Arts Together” interactive mural. “I like it when the kids go crazy,” Dalton, a 10-year resident of Sanford, says. “Whatever makes them happy and teaches them about art.” Before painting begins, the artist submits a scale replica to be approved by Sanford’s Appearance Commission, of which Whitmore is head. The replicas are then raffled off at the completed mural’s dedication ceremony as a keepsake for the community. “We have special dedication ceremonies,” says Whitmore, as one of the ways to boost excitement in the public. “We

had vintage planes fly over at the first one. It’s really wonderful. “There is so much more we want to do ... rich history that we haven’t even tapped,” says Whitmore. Visitors can access a special guided tour of the mural trail by downloading the free app, Otocast, which hosts a GPS-activated audio narration that details each mural’s history and contains behind-the-scenes progress photos and directions for locating the art. The Otocast tour includes all the city’s public art, including sculptures and interactive art. Two of the most popular attractions are located on Charlie Watson Lane, a pedestrian alley off of Steele Street. The “Before I Die” wall allows observers to chalk in their goals and dreams. Next to it, the vibrant “Wings” mural contains 15-foot high butterfly wings

– Chris Dalton, muralist

and three-dimensional mini butterflies, and has become an iconic spot for photos. Families can also participate in a train scavenger hunt to locate 12 miniature replicas of Sanford’s No. 12 Locomotive Engine, which is proudly displayed in Depot Park. Pick up a scavenger-hunt passport at the Visitor’s Center (or download a digital version) to record your findings, then turn in for a prize when completed. Also in Depot Park is the historic Railroad House Museum, a beautifullyrestored building, regarded as the oldest home in Sanford. The museum’s collection includes fossils and artifacts spanning millions of years of history. continued on page 44

43


OTHER DOWNTOWN HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE “WINGS” AND THE “BEFORE I DIE” INTERACTIVE ART IN CHARLIE WATSON LANE, AND THE RAILROAD HOUSE MUSEUM.

continued from page 43

All of these attractions are located in the downtown district, an easily walkable handful of blocks. As you meander the mural trail, be sure to pop into boutiques and dining destinations. Pizza at La Dolce Vita Pizzeria or barbecue at Smoke & Barrel might precede homemade ice cream at longtime Sanford favorite, Yarbourough’s Homemade Ice Cream & Grill. Or opt for sweets and sips on Wicker Street with donuts at Sandra’s Bakery and craft beer at nearby Hugger Mugger Brewing. Despite impressive progress, Whitmore isn’t yet finished adorning Sanford. Additional murals are planned, as well as more interactive art, namely street pianos painted by local artists for the public to play on. 44 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

Never did I dream the project would be so well received.

“I have a list of things we would like to have done. Many of them reflecting history and heritage — who we are and where we are go– Liz Whitmore, ing,” says Whitmore. City of Sanford In addition to the Otocast app tour, a printable map of the mural trail is also available to download from the city’s website.

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45


Jonathan Fredin

History Remembered Holly Springs commemorates beloved elementary school Written by Emily Uhland

THE HISTORICAL MARKER HONORING HOLLY SPRINGS ROSENWALD SCHOOL WAS ORCHESTRATED BY A PASSIONATE TEAM OF COMMUNITY MEMBERS, TOWN OFFICIALS AND FORMER STUDENTS. PICTURED ABOVE ARE: PASTOR JAHMAR COBB, MATT SCIALDONE, RANDY HARRINGTON, DORIS BATTLE, RENNIE THORPE, VICTORIA JUDD, CHRISTINE KELLY, GERALD D. GIVENS JR, MAYOR DICK SEARS, ANGIE STAHELI ANDRANDY HARRINGTON NOT PICTURED: ANN HUNT-SMITH, GERALD HINTON, GEORGE KIMBLE, REGINALD HINTON, TANYA DENNISM, FLORIANNA THOMPSON

46 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

Holly Springs recently installed a new signpost commemorating a historic elementary school that served the community for more than 50 years. This special event may not have occurred without an accidental mix up between two men named Randy Harrington. The Holly Springs Rosenwald School, later named Holly Springs Elementary School, stood on the site of the W. E. Hunt Recreation Center from the 1920s to the 1970s. Rosenwald schools were created to combat underfunding in education of African American children, a program developed by Booker T. Washington and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, resulting in about 5,000 schools in the segregated South. Originally a wooden plank schoolhouse, the Holly Springs structure was replaced by a brick building around 1950 and renamed Holly Springs Elementary School. Local historian Doris Battle attended the primary school before it closed in 1970, but never knew about the Rosenwald school that came before it. “I was looking in the book that Barbara Koblich had written (“Images of America: Holly Springs”) and oh my goodness, my


heart just jumped for joy, because I didn’t know that school was in Holly Springs, for one, and sitting on the same property as the elementary school, for two. I thought, ‘Why weren’t we taught this?” says Battle. “Then I thought it’s up to us to teach our own history.” A former teacher turned historian, Battle set out to establish a historic marker that would educate residents and visitors about the bygone school and stand as a testament to the wonderful teachers and school leaders that influenced so many in the community. This is where the two Randy Harringtons enter the story. Battle thought she was corresponding with Randy Harrington who had attended Apex Consolidated School, another former Rosenwald School, and who serves as president of that school’s alumni association. But in reality, she had texted Randy Harrington, town manager of Holly Springs. “I looked at my phone, and sure enough I was talking to Randy Harrington in Holly Springs. I’m talking to the wrong Randy Harrington,” says Battle. The mistake turned out to be serendipitous, because town manager Harrington connected Battle with the Holly Springs town council, and a committee was formed to plan the historic marker, which culminated last November at the unveiling ceremony. “It was dear to my heart,” says Victoria Judd of the outdoor ceremony that brought together town officials, former students and teachers and local residents. “I love to see the community getting together.” Judd attended the Holly Springs Rosenwald School her first grade year, which was the final year the original plank building was occupied. The ceremony’s keynote speaker was notable playwright and author Ann Hunt Smith, the daughter of William Earl Hunt, who was principal of Holly Springs Elementary School for more than

Scenes from the

Dedication Ceremony The dedication ceremony for the Holly Springs Elementary School historic marker took place on November 22. Keynote speaker Ann Hunt-Smith, center, is pictured with her family. Approximately 100 members of the community, including Mayor Dick Sears, town council members, former students and teachers attended the outdoor gathering. Singer, composer and former student Gerald Hinson performed, below.

Photos by Willie Miller Photography.

continued on page 48

47


DORIS BATTLE

continued from page 47

LEARN MORE:

Additional information and photographs of the Holly Springs Rosenwald School can be seen on a website created by Middle Creek High School (MCHS) students, under the guidance of teacher Matt Scialdone. “I knew we couldn’t get everything we wanted on the marker,” says Scialdone, an English teacher turned History instructor by sheer demand. “I taught an African American Literature class and noticed the kids were more interested in the historical context of the texts we were reading,” he says. Born from that interest, Scialdone began a course entitled Hard History and Civic Engagement, which started the website project. The MCHS Social Justice Club continues to add to the digital archive. Students are in the process of interviewing former staff and pupils, and cataloging the interviews for the website and a forthcoming documentary. Visit the site at: rosenwaldhse.wixsite.com/website

48 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

30 years — the man for which the W. E. Hunt Recreation Center is named. “This man was just remarkable,” Battle says. “He lived in Raleigh, but would come to Holly Springs and stay during the week. “During his beginning years, he would go to the farms and talk to the parents and owners to try to allow the black children to come to school.” “The Holly Springs Elementary School was such a big part of my life, and the people that went to school there,” says Battle. “It’s 50 years (in 2020) since the school closed down.” Town council member Christine Kelly, a 28-year resident of Holly Springs, served on the committee that coordinated the marker. “(Holly Springs) was a predominantly black town when I first moved here. Seeing how much the town has changed — we are losing the history and stories – Gerald Givens Jr, president, Raleigh-Apex NAACP of the people who lived here,” says Kelly. “This is a great example of the community respecting our past.” Angie Staheli has also been crucial to preserving Holly Springs’ stories. Staheli penned the stage production “Finding Patience,” about the history of town and plans to debut a historical musical in 2022. “There are stories that need to be told. I’m thankful for people like Doris who are working to find the heroes and bring them to the forefront,” Staheli says. Battle intends to pursue historical designations at other N.C. Rosenwald Schools. Next up — Fuquay-Varina Consolidated School. “There were something like 800 Rosenwald schools in North Carolina. North Carolina had the most Rosenwald schools of any other state. Overall, only 12% are left,” she says. MB

Today is an example of the community coming together to remember the past, honor the present and plant seeds for the future.


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Restaurant Profile

Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi Written By David McCreary | Photographed By Jonathan Fredin Since opening in 2019, Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi has steadily made downtown Holly Springs a destination dining spot. Perfectly situated in a corner parcel in the ever-growing downtown village district, Osha, which means “tasty” in Thai, is a modern, family-friendly restaurant. Its popularity extends throughout Western Wake, as Cary Magazine readers have honored the eatery with two  nods in recent Maggy Awards — runner-up for Best New Restaurant last year and the Best Asian category this year. “We have a lot of locals who come in often, and we are grateful,” says co-owner Surasit “Leo” Chotitaveesaksri, who hails from Thailand and runs Osha along with business partners Blake and Katie Zalcberg. “When we first opened, we were nervous and scared, but we have been pleased with how people have continued to support us.” Chotitaveesaksri’s wife, Wiyada “Tuk” Sorkeaw, serves as the restaurant’s 50 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

primary chef, meticulously making everything from scratch. Among the tempting starters are crispy eggplant with scallions, fried fish cake patties and moo ping, which comprises pork skewers marinated in coconut milk served alongside sticky rice and a spicy dipping sauce. “Moo ping is representative of authentic street food you would find in Thailand,” Chotitaveesaksri says. “It’s the type of food that is cooked from our passion.” When it comes to entrees, you can’t go wrong with any of seven stir-fry varieties with your choice of protein including chicken, pork, beef, shrimp, tofu or duck. House favorite sweet-and-sour stir fry contains fresh pineapple, bell peppers, onions, cucumbers, tomatoes and scallions nestled in a scrumptious red sauce.

Noodle and rice dishes abound. Try the traditional pad Thai crowned with an intricately woven fried egg, or the basil-tinged green curry fried rice. For something really unusual, order the hor mok talay, a shrimp, fish and mussels custard served in a banana leaf bowl with cabbage and basil. continued on page 51


BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL SWEETAND-SOUR STIR FRY, SHOWN WITH SHRIMP. OPPOSITE PAGE: TRADITIONAL PAD THAI COMES TO THE TABLE TOPPED WITH AN INTRICATE FRIED EGG NETTING. A HANGING ROPE SECTION OF THE DINING ROOM PAYS HOMAGE TO THE FLOATING MARKETS FOUND IN THAILAND

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Many of the items at Osha may be prepared gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian. Consider ordering family style, which many people do, so you can enjoy an array of different dishes. Japanese cuisine also is well represented. Choose a seaweed or octopus salad, geso karaage (deep fried squid legs) or any of the popular nigiri and sashimi selections. Among the ambitious signature sushi rolls, the Downtown Dynamic Dragon features tempura-battered shrimp, asparagus, avocado, eel sauce and baked salmon so fresh you’ll swear it was still swimming yesterday. Even more extraordinary is the Shogun, with king crab, seared wagyu beef, 18 karat gold flakes — yes, you read that right — and a spicy honey sesame sauce. Nearly a dozen specialty rolls appear on the menu. There’s also an abundant assortment of classic rolls like California Eel, Japanese Bagel and Spicy Seafood Tempura. “We only use fresh ingredients in our sushi,” Chotitaveesaksri says with a broad smile. “You will not find buy-one-get-onefree rolls here. We are committed to serving top quality for our guests.” Virtually every plate that emerges from the kitchen appears as a work of art. It’s not uncommon to see plates garnished with flowers or exquisitely carved fresh fruit. Even the dinnerware is purposefully stylish. Inventive craft cocktails pair well with the food and highlight Osha’s flair. The whimsical Holly Spring Fling comes with coconut water rum, sake, peach, lychee and passionfruit. For an interesting spin on a familiar classic, try the Old-Fashioned Handshake composed of  Japanese whisky, Okinawa Kokuto syrup, Trinity bitters and fire.  Additional libations include beer, wine, cold and hot sake, and a variety of liquors, including single malt and blended Japanese whiskies. 52 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

THE DOWNTOWN DYNAMIC DRAGON FEATURES TEMPURA-BATTERED SHRIMP, ASPARAGUS, AVOCADO, EEL SAUCE AND BAKED SALMON. SURASIT “LEO” CHOTITAVEESAKSRI

Don’t skip dessert. Best option: The palate-pleasing mango sticky rice with fresh fruit and coconut ice cream. The restaurant’s contemporary interior features bamboo-covered light fixtures, high ceilings and white tiled walls. A hanging rope section of the dining room pays homage to the floating markets found in Thailand, while a beautifully landscaped outdoor patio features an eye-catching fountain that’s illuminated at night. Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi is open six days a week for lunch and dinner (closed Mondays). Reservations are strongly recommended, especially since indoor seating is limited to allow for social distancing. Online ordering and curbside pickup are available if you prefer takeout.

OSHA THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI 242 SOUTH MAIN ST., SUITE 100, HOLLY SPRINGS (984) 538-6742 OSHATHAIKITCHENNC.COM


Art, history and science up close again. Many museums, historic sites and activities in Raleigh are now open for you and your family to enjoy again. As you ďŹ nd your way back to places you love, rest assured that local businesses and attractions are following Count On Me NC guidelines and taking the necessary steps to keep you safe.

visitRaleigh.com/wishfamily


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Dine Restaurant hours and service may be limited at this time. Check individual locations for most current information.

FUQUAY-VARINA Abbey Road Tavern and Grill “Signature Beatle burgers and live entertainment.” 711 N. Main St.; Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7731; abbeyroadnc.com Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 138 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2497; annaspizzeria.com Aviator Pizzeria & BeerShop “Brick oven pizza & craft beer.” 601 E. Broad St., Fuquay Varina (919) 346-8206; aviatorbrew.com Aviator SmokeHouse BBQ Restaurant “All of our food is made in-house.” 525 E. Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-7675; aviatorbrew.com Assaggio’s Pizzeria Ristorante “Top quality ingredients go into every dish.” 941 East Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-9505; assaggios-fuquay.com The Corner Biergarten “Bar & bottle shop.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 133, Fuquay-Varina (919) 246-6649; tcbiergarten.com

Cultivate Coffee Roasters “Modern industrial twist on a small town coffee shop.” 128 S. Fuquay Ave., Fuquay Varina (919) 285-4067; www.cultivate.coffee Daddy D’s BBQ “Slow cooked with love.” 1526 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6464; daddydsbbqnc.com Drive Bru “Drive thru coffee shop with N.Y. coffee & Carolina charm.” 1013 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @drivebru Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 1436 N Main St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-4463; eggsupgrill.com El Dorado “Enjoy the most delicious Mexican food amongst family.” 112 E Vance St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-0287; eldoradomexicanrestaurant.com FuQuay Brus “Quaint coffee cafe with New York coffee, baked goods, beer, wine and keto.” 400 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @fuquaybrus

MAC & CHEESE BURGER AT TOWN HALL BURGER & BEER.

Garibaldi Trattoria Pizza & Pasta “Authentic Italian cuisine and quality service.” 900 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-8868; garibalditrattoria.com The Healthy Spot “Meal replacement smoothies and energizing teas.” 961 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-5373; @healthyspotfuquay J&S New York Pizza “Family-owned and operated Italian restaurant.” 500 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-6921; jandsnypizza.com Johnny’s Pizza “An amazing array of different NY-style pizzas.” 722 N Judd Parkway N, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6322; johnnyspizzacary.com Joyce & Family Restaurant “Home cooked Southern favorites.” 129 N Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-1717; @joyceandfamily Juicehaus “Made-to-order fresh, raw juice.” 509 North Broad St, Fuquay Varina (919) 396-5588; juicehaus.org Laurel Wine Bar at Cellar 55 “Mediterranean-inspired small plates with wine pairings.” 1351 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 446-1156; cellar55.com Little Portugal NC “Market and eatery celebrating traditional Portuguese dishes.” 736 N. Main Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 586-7144; littleportugalnc.com

The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 305 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-5555; themasonjartavern.com

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Photos by Jonathan Fredin

Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 401 Wake Chapel Road, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-3957; lostresmagueyes.com


The Mill “Coffee. Beer. Wine. Community.” 146 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2123; themillfuquay.com Nil’s Cafe “Family-oriented Mediterranean cafe.” 513 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-0887; nilscafe-weebly.com Pints Ice Cream & Beer “Homemade ice cream and craft beers.” 512 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina @pintsicecream Stick Boy Bread Co. “Handcrafted baked goods from scratch … all natural ingredients.” 127 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2237; stickboyfuquay.com Triple Barrel Tavern “Restaurant, sports bar & billiards.” 2221 N Grassland Drive, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0940; @triplebarreltavernfuquayvarina Tsuru Sweets & Coffee “Elegant-yet-sassy gourmet confectionery.” 411 Broad St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2646; tsurusweets.com Vicious Fishes Tap & Kitchen “Eclectic twists on comfortable bar food.” 132 South Fuquay Ave., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7876; viciousfishes.com/fuquay-nc Wingin’ It Bar and Grille “Family-friendly neighborhood pub.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 109, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0962; winginitbarandgrille.com

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Bestow Baked Goods “Life is too short for grocery store desserts.” 4208 Lassiter Road, Holly Springs (919) 473-9225; bestowbakedgoods.com

Dine Zaxby’s “Indescribably good.” 1341 N Main St, Fuquay Varina (919) 552-3981; zaxbys.com

Blaze Pizza “Fast fire’d, perfectly crisp perfection.” 316 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 261-5950; blazepizza.com The Blind Pelican “Creative seafood and boat drinks.” 120 Bass Lake Road; Holly Springs (984) 225-2471; blindpelicanseafood.com

HOLLY SPRINGS Acme Pizza Co. “Chicago-style deep dish pizza.” 204 Village Walk Dr, Holly Springs (919) 552-8800; acmepizzaco.com Ashley’s Harvest Moon Bakery – Cafe “Breakfast and lunch cafe with scratch-made bakery and locally roasted coffee.” 128 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 586-7005; harvestmoonbakerycafe.com Bass Lake Draft House “34 beers on tap.” 124 Bass Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 567-3251; basslakedrafthouse.com

The Butcher’s Market “Premium meats and specialty grocery.” 4200 Lassiter Rd, Holly Springs (919) 267-919); thebutchersmarkets.com Cristo’s Bistro “Hand tossed NY style pizza.” 5217 Sunset Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 363-8852, cristosbistro.com Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 4216 Lassiter Road, Holly Springs (919) 495-4530; eggsupgrill.com

KICKIN’ CHICKEN

Zeera Indian Restaurant “Authentic goodness in traditional Indian food.” 1311 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-6215; zeeranc.com

TONGUE TORCH® • RANCH • TEXAS TOAST FUQUAY-VARINA 1341 N. MAIN ST.

FB: @ZaxbysFuquayVarina IG/Twitter: @zaxbysfuquaync GARNER 4150 FAYETTEVILLE RD.

FB: @ZaxbysGarner IG/Twitter: @Zaxbys401Garner CULTIVATE COFFEE ROASTERS IN FUQUAY-VARINA

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Greek Basma “Greek food that is fresh, healthy and delicious.” 7272 GB Alford Hwy, Holly Springs ((919) 285-080; greekbasma.com Hickory Tavern “Something for every appetite.” 401 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 557-2064; thehickorytavern.com Fera’wyn’s Chocolate Cafe “Forget love, I’d rather fall in chocolate.” 652 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (415) 758-3296; ferawyns.com

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Dine Fiesta Mexicana Restaurante Mexicano “Authentic. Hot. Fresh.” 428 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 346-1330; fiestamexicananc-hollysprings.com Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers “Great food without a long wait.” 221 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 557-3475; freddysusa.com Homegrown Pizza “Pizza, calzones and sandwiches.” 4928 Linksland Drive, ​Holly Springs (​919) 577-5575; homegrownpizza.com Kobe HIbachi and Sushi 515 North Main Street, Holly Springs (919) 557-1437; kobehollyspringsnc.com

FRESH-PRESSED JUICES FROM JUICEHAUS CONTAIN TWO POUNDS OF PRODUCE.

Los Tres Magueyes “A Mexican Treat.” 120 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 552-6272; lostresmagueyes.com

Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream “A unique spin on a timeless dessert.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 762-7808; mamabirdsicecream.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 114 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 964-5060; themasonjartavern.com MediTerra Grill “Delicious ingredients. Old world recipes.” 108 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 762-7851; mediterranc.com Mi Cancun Mexican Restaurant 324 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 552-9979; micancunmx.com Michelangelos Pizza “Pizza buffet for lunch and dinner.” 7280 GB Alford HWY, Holly Springs (919) 557-4992; michelangelospizza.com My Way Tavern “Freshly made all-American foods.” 301 W. Center St., Holly Springs (919) 285-2412; mywaytavern.com Niche Wine Lounge “Tranquility by the glass.” 109 Main St., Holly Springs (919) 552-2300; nichewinelounge.com

From our family to yours.

The Nutrition Fix “Healthy fast food alternatives.” 424 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 341-5554; @thenutritionfixnc The Original N.Y. Pizza “Bringing a taste of New York to North Carolina.” 634 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 567-0505; theoriginalnypizza.com Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi “Authentic Thai cuisine: well-balanced dishes bursting with flavor.” 242 S Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 538-6742; oshathaikitchennc.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Chicken “The best dang biscuits.” 169 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 586-7343; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Sir Walter Coffee + Kitchen “Creative cafe by day. Full restaurant at night.” 242 S Main St. Suite 118, Holly Springs (919) 390-2150; sirwaltercoffeekitchen.com

9 0 0 N . M a i n S t r e e t | F u q u a y Va r i n a , N C | 9 1 9 - 5 5 2 - 8 8 6 8 | g a r i b a l d i t r a t t o r i a . c o m

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Skrimp Shack “Casual seafood cuisine.” 7244 Alford Hwy, Holly Springs (919) 335-3924; theskrimpshack.com Sweetberry Bowls “Beautiful and delicious bowls, wraps and salads.” 150 West Holly Springs Rd, Holly Springs (984) 225-2656; sweetberrybowls.com Sweet Southern SnoBalls “Shaved ice and Hershey’s Ice Cream.” 527 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 291-3355; @sweetsouthsnoballs Thai Thai Cuisine “Home cooked Thai food.” 108 Osterville Drive, Holly Springs (919) 303-5700; thaithaicuisinenc.com Thanks A Latte “Coffee and gift boutique.” 1118 Kentworth Drive, Holly Springs (919) 577-0070; thanksalattegiftsnc.com Town Hall Burger & Beer “Neighborhood beer and burger joint.” 301 Matthews Dr, Holly Springs (919) 335-5388; Townhallburgerandbeer.com Vieni Ristobar “The newest Italian restaurant from the Cinelli family.” 242 South Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 225-1134; vieniristobar.com

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Dine Duck Donuts “Warm, delicious and just the way you like them.” 100 Wrenn Drive #10, Cary (919) 468-8722; duckdonuts.com/location/cary-nc Gonza Tacos y Tequila “Award-winning Colombian-Mexican cuisine.” 525-105 New Waverly Place, Cary (919) 653-7310; cary.gonzatacosytequila.com La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” 4248 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; 220 W. Chatham St., Cary; 5055 Arco Street, Cary (919) 657-0657; lafarmbakery.com Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen “Exceptional renderings of classic Southern dishes.” 7307 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 233-1632; lucky32.com/cary

Lugano Ristorante “Italian dining in a comfortable and casual atmosphere.” 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229; luganocary.com Mellow Mushroom “Beer, calzones and creative stone-baked pizzas.” 4300 NW Cary Parkway, Cary (919) 463-7779; mellowmushroom.com Pizzeria Faulisi “Simple foods from a simple way of cooking: a wood-burning oven.” 215 E. Chatham St., Suite 101, Cary pizzeriafaulisi.com Pro’s Epicurean Market & Café “Gourmet market, café and wine bar.” 211 East Chatham Street, Cary; (919) 377-1788; prosepicurean.com Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” 8111-208 Tryon Woods Drive, Cary (919) 851-3999; 2025 Renaissance Park Place, Cary (919) 677-3999; ruckuspizza.com

Zaxby’s “Indescribably good.” 101 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 762-0432; zaxbys.com

CARY Chanticleer Café & Bakery “Family-owned restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and specialty coffees.” 6490 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 781-4810; chanticleercafe.com Chef’s Palette “Creative flair and originality in every aspect of our service.” 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary (919) 267-6011; chefspalette.net Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar “Good old-fashioned burgers and bottled soda.” 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary (919) 466-0055; corbettsburgers.com

BEERS ON TAP The best selection of German and craft beer in the area!

Large

COLLECTION

Craft Bottles

Check our Facebook page for weekly events @TCBiergarten 1625 N. Main St. #133 Fuquay-Varina 919.246.6649 | tcbiergarten.com

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Dogs are Welcome! 57


Grow

Written and Photographed by L.A. Jackson

Bloom

A Tale of Two Pretties In the wide, wide world of plant selection appellations, rare is the occasion when two names are not only the same but are also tagged to top-tier introductions quite capable of adding dependable, elegant interest to any garden setting.

So, sit back and let me tell you the tale of “Amethyst Falls” and the two pretties linked by name, with both having the pleasing potential of being eye-catching additions to your garden this spring.

“AMETHYST FALLS” WISTERIA

“AMETHYST FALLS” OREGANO

Wisteria gets a bad rap for being invasive. True, this botanical brute of a vine can quickly cover trees, houses, cars or even the family cat if he isn’t fast enough, but such aggressiveness comes from two imports, Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) and Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis). There is, however, another kinder, gentler wisteria: Wisteria frutescens, which is actually native to the Southeast. Commonly called American wisteria, it can stretch to lengths of 15 feet plus, but this is still modest compared to the apocalyptic swaths the oriental imports are capable of. Plant breeders, realizing the potential of a restrained wisteria, began to introduce improved selections from the species, and the popular “Amethyst Falls” was one of the results. Dripping with light purple, slightly fragrant racemes up to 12 inches long in late spring, “Amethyst Falls” is a deer-resistant, drought-tolerant, sun-loving beauty that can add grace to a clunky fence or bare trellis. In addition, it is sterile, meaning no weedy seedlings will invade your landscape. And, no, it won’t be hard to find—I have spotted it at many local nurseries.

To many gardeners, when it comes to eye candy, oregano is generally considered a cute herb but not necessarily pretty. However, a new breed tagged “ornamental oregano” has made its fancy way into gardens with the selection “Amethyst Falls” leading the charge. This iteration of “Amethyst Falls” kicks oregano’s visual show up a few notches in the late spring with flowing sweeps of small purple flowers contrasted by unusual, hop-like bracts. Its leaves are typically oregano-scented, meaning they can be used in the kitchen, and although we like the smell, deer don’t, so they won’t bother this herb. “Amethyst Falls” is a tough plant that will take all the sunlight you can give it. However, good drainage is essential, but this can be provided in a container or raised garden setting, where its cascading blooms can be displayed to full effect. You might have to call around L.A. Jackson to locate “Amethyst is the former Falls” oregano localeditor of Carolina Gardener ly—I got mine from Magazine. Big Bloomers in Sanford — but it is an easy find online.

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in

February

Before the spring rush to plant, plant, plant, use this quiet time in the garden to tend to your hardscape features. Reset loose stones or bricks on steps and pathways, level leaning birdbaths and statuaries, straighten sagging bed borders, clear off dead annual vines on fences and trellises, repaint faded birdhouses, oil that creaky gate — basically, find any excuse to get your inner handyman outside, and enjoy the crisp air of the fading winter. Dormant bare-root roses, which can be planted in the late winter, will start showing up at local garden centers and online nurseries this month. Ideally, plant such roses as soon as possible, but give the roots a beneficial hydration session in a bucket of water for about half a day before settling them into well-draining, sunny sites.

in

March

FLOWERING QUINCE

Timely Tip

To prune or not to prune? At this time of year in the garden, that is the question. For woody ornamental such as clethera, vitex, beautyberry, pomegranate, crepe myrtle, abelia, rose of Sharon and buddleia that flower in the late spring and summer on new branches formed in the current growing season, prune at the beginning of this month. Early blooming woodies such as camelia (Camelia japonica), weigelia, mock orange, kerria, witch hazel, forsythia, flowering quince, deciduous magnolia, viburnum, spirea and Carolina jessamine blossom on established branches, so wait until their fancy flower shows are finished before snipping them into shape or down to a desired size.

Mint is a versatile culinary herb that you should think twice about before adding to your spring beds, because it can easily crawl away and overwhelm planting areas. Containment makes for behaved mint — grow it in pots instead.

Before garden chores get into full spring swing, start doing a moderate amount of stretching exercises to be limbered up for all the pushing, pulling, bending and stooping to come.

Row, row, rowing your veggies again this year? For more efficient use of growing space, consider converting from rows to rectangular growing beds. To make them easier to reach into, don’t construct the beds over four feet wide.

Migratory garden friends on the wing should be returning now, so give them a great big welcome by cleaning up bird houses and washing the bird bath.

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fun

memes

Beyond The Fuquay ARTS Center

Artwork In the Area That You Didn’t Know Existed

Written by the Author of Fuquay-Varina Memes Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

2021 has us all turning off the news and watching murder documentaries to relax, but now that springtime is around the corner, Ted Bundy can wait. Exploring the area’s art scene is a great way to get out of the house, breathe in some fresh air, and low-key brag about your adventurous spirit by posting some heavily edited pictures on Instagram. Here are seven lesser-known artsy-fartsy places that will put the fake pine tree cell phone tower in Cary to shame! (Did I mention they’re all free to visit?) THE FREE EXPRESSION TUNNEL

FUQUAY-VARINA MEMES (also known as FVM) is a freelance writer, meme guru and an anonymous resident of Fuquay-Varina. She is the creator and manager of the FuquayVarina Memes Facebook page and has a talent for making people laugh and always taking the joke too far. Check out her blog at fvmwrites.com. fuquaymemes thefvmemes

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If you’re a student or an alumni of NC State, this probably isn’t news to you, so keep scrolling. For WE LOVE OUR MURALS DOWN IN SOUTHERN WAKE, BUT IT’S everyone else, listen up. According TIME TO ADD SOME VARIETY TO YOUR INSTA-FEED. to Wikipedia, where I get all of my hard-hitting information, the Free Expression Tunnel is the “longest, widest and most heavily used pedestrian tun- DOWNTOWN RALEIGH MURALS Grab some artisanal coffee, throw on a fashnel under the railroad tracks at North Carolina State University.” The tunnel, which goes under ion scarf and hit the streets of downtown RaYarbrough Drive, is also a free-for-all for graf- leigh on foot. Raleigh is currently exploding with fiti artists. Literally ANYONE can bust out a Insta-worthy murals that are just begging to be can of neon spray paint and set their inner tag- explored, whether you’re into abstract, local, or ger free on the ceiling, walls, floor or anything social justice themed art. Some are large-scale you can reach. If you’re looking for a colorful and commissions, but many beautiful pieces have oredgy backdrop for a photo op, this is it. Tip: Flag ganically and unexpectedly popped up on boarddown a student to find out exactly where to go ed-up windows and doors. Don’t worry about (it can be tricky to find if you’re unfamiliar with where to find them, because they are scattered the campus). UNC and Duke fans: Tread with around every corner. Tip: Kick your journey off by parking near Moore Square. caution. You may or may not burst into flames.


BROOKS R. BARBEE A neighbor, someone you know, someone

OLD CARBONTON DAM

If you’re up for a little drive, Sanford is sitting on one of the coolest graffiti treasures you’ve probably never seen. I found this not-so-little jewel while I was on an urban exploration kick during 2020 (judge not, lest you be judged), and it was SO worth the trip. Sitting just off of Carbonton Road on the banks of the Deep River, the old, tall powerhouse of the torn-down Carbonton Dam still stands. The surrounding area has been turned into a public park. Visitors are free to climb the iron steps into the heart of the powerhouse, decorated with colorful graffiti and boasting sweeping riverside views. Tip: Watch your step when climbing up the tower, and bring a can of spray paint if you’re feeling expressive.

you can trust and respect. Call today and speak with a real person who cares about your family’s protection and security.

“Where Satisfied Customers Refer Their Friends”

512 WEST WILLIAMS STREET | APEX 919-362-8310 INFO@ROGERSINC.NET

ST. AGNES HOSPITAL

The ruins of St. Agnes Hospital on the Saint Augustine College campus in downtown Raleigh are architecturally beautiful. You can see the structure from the road, but I managed to get up-closeand-personal by asking the campus guard for permission to drive in (she said that was fine, provided I wore a mask). Brush up on your history before venturing out. This site, founded in 1896, was the only hospital and training school for African Americans in the southeast for nearly half a century and was declared a Raleigh Historic Landmark in 1979. TIP: Bring bug spray, and watch out for poison ivy — this place is no joke.

The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community? Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.809.0220 or visit our website, www.nnws.org.

THE POPE HOUSE MUSEUM

It’s not a place for graffiti, but The Pope House puts the “art” in artifacts! In addition to being one of the oldest standing buildings on Wilmington Street, the Pope House is the only African American house museum in the state of North Carolina. Admission continued on page 62

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER | ANGIER WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND

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REACH “NEW HEIGHTS” WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONNECTIONS THEME AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS MAGNET ELEMENTARY

Raleigh is currently exploding with Instaworthy murals that are just begging to be explored, whether you’re into abstract, local or social justice themed art.

continued from page 61

to the house is free and includes the original furnishings and artwork that belonged to Dr. Manassa Thomas Pope, the “only African-American man to run for mayor of a Southern capital in the midst of the Jim Crow Era,” as per the museum’s website. DUKE’S FREE EXPRESSION BRIDGE

Come GROW with us where we: • Boast several outdoor learning environments that spark our students’ love of learning • Cultivate students’ curiosity through daily environmental expedition electives • Involve the whole family in environmentally-themed activities To learn more about us, please visit www.wcpss.net/lincolnheightses Lincoln Heights Environmental Connections Magnet Elementary School 307 Bridge Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526 (919) 557-2587

62 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

Similar to NC State, Duke also has an outlet for artistic spontaneity, but in the form of a bridge. The paintings on the bridge are mostly done by students. If you are interested in painting in and around the bridge, check out the rules listed on Duke University’s Student Affairs page. TIP: Opposing team fans beware, and bring a rosary and holy water. SELF-GUIDED CHAPEL HILL MURAL TOUR

Chapel Hill has over 150 works of indoor and outdoor art for the public to enjoy via a self-guided walking tour. Check out the town of Chapel Hill’s website for a handy-dandy map and specific information about each and every public mural, complete with important walking and biking tips — I know, it’s so bougie. Chapel Hill never disappoints! For MORE tips about the local art scene, don’t come to me. Seriously, this is all I’ve got. MB


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Seen

Heard The Fuquay-Varina Garden Club announced the dates for their spring Garden Tour. Eight unique gardens will be open for tours on May 15 and 16.

Matt Poling is the new engineering

director with the Town of Fuquay-Varina. Formerly the assistant engineering director, Poling holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from North Carolina A&T and has been with the town for six years.

A new mural has been installed in Fuquay-Varina along

the wall at the corner of S. Main and W. Vance Streets. The mural reflects the many beloved community events in FuquayVarina. The original art of artist Vickie Wilson has been digitally reproduced on 14 panels measuring 59 feet by 9 feet.

Tracy Watson and Melissa Jones

Real estate agents , are opening a new brokerage, Mission First Realty. Mission First Realty will continue to serve clients Triangle-wide with a commitment to a high level of service. “I’ve respected Melissa as a person and agent for many years. I’m excited for this new venture together,” says Tracy Watson.

64 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Waite

Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class from Fuquay Varina, cuts line aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. USS John Finn, part of the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group, has approximatly 50-70 ships and submarines, 140 aircraft, and 20,000 sailors.

Dylan McDonald,

Crescent Communities

plans to develop 14 acres of land on Petty Farm Road in Cary into a luxury multifamily community called NOVEL Cary. The community’s design offers elevated culinary amenities such as wi-fi enabled smart ranges and ample storage space in pantry and cabinets. The community spaces will also be designed around the joys of culinary creation. An industrial grade cooking kitchen will be the focal point of the main amenity space, with a cocktail lounge, coffee and hospitality bar. Exterior amenities include shared planting beds for community gardening, outdoor kitchen and dining pavilions, and a heated saltwater pool and star gazing terrace.


Seen

Heard The Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce welcomes new board members for 2021. Beth Martinez de Andino, Our Moments in Time, board chair Chris Goins, Bobbitt Construction Diane Kinlaw, GoPrime Mortgage, Inc. Nicole Meggerson de Martinez, Silver Lake Construction Co. Ryan Monteleone, Edward Jones Tonya Palumbo, T&T Photography

Coastal Credit Union has been rec-

ognized by Global Finance magazine as being among the 2020 Outstanding Crisis Leadership honorees. Coastal’s recognition came in the Community category. The magazine cited the Coastal Credit Union Foundation’s support of local nonprofits who have been assisting people through the economic fallout of the pandemic. The foundation made more than $1 million in grants in 2020, the most in any year since its inception. Notable grants included $100,000 to each the North Carolina Restaurant Relief Fund and the United Way of the Greater Triangle’s Rapid Response Fund.

Congratulations to Arts Inspired Dance Academy for winning the Holiday Door Decorating Contest host-

ed by Fuquay Varina Downtown. Owner Michelle Hankins, her staff and students created a gingerbread house that welcomed guests and provided holiday cheer for the community as they passed by. AIDA also hosted a holiday dessert drive for the Fuquay-Varina Emergency Food Pantry, donating 316 dessert kits and $145.

Sleep in Heavenly Peace,

a national nonprofit organization that builds and provides high-quality beds for children in local communities through donations and sponsorships, recently established a chapter in Fuquay-Varina. The beds are built by local volunteers and delivered to those within the community who are in need.

Carolina

Sales are underway at , a new active adult neighborhood located in Fuquay-Varina. The first homes are expected to be completed in April in this resortstyle community built by Del Webb.

Gardens

Serenity, a 550-acre, master-planned residential community, broke ground in November. Public officials and company executives attended to celebrate an expected economic impact of $300 million for Harnett County and the surrounding areas.

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Share business news, upcoming events and town gossip with editor@mainandbroadmag.com 65


In Focus

Wonder mom By Jonathan Fredin Taking care of three kids is hard enough, but Holly Spring mom Keri Ryser works in a run and a chat on her cell while pushing a threeseater carrying Finleigh, 5, Rhett, 3, and Barry, 5.

66 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021


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