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Coastal Cuisine no trip required

classic cars

Golf & more

& Youtube stars pinehurst for a day

The Heart + Soul of Holly Springs and Fuquay-Varina

The Heart + Soul of Holly Springs and Fuquay-Varina

Mountain biking at

Harris Lake County park

Your gUide to gettiNg

ouTside

BiKeHike

APRIL/MAY 2021

PAddle & a Pl Y


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April/May 2021

CONTENTS 48

n it “wasHadgoingwetoknow get as

big as it did, we would have probably bought nicer cars.

– John Hiester, owner, Hiester Automotive Group

IN EVERY ISSUE 10 SEE & DO

Trade winter’s chill for warmweather fun.

12 MEET & GREET Danielle Castelli Strader, owner of

Torrenti Cycles, keeps Fuquay on two wheels.

14 DIG IN & DRINK UP

22 FEATURES A goodwill contest to keep mechanics employed turns into a nationwide viral sensation.

22 OUTDOOR ADVENTURES Where to bike, hike, paddle and play this spring. Plus, delicious trail snacks to pack for the ride.

36 BARK IN THE PARK

Man’s best friend can frolic and play in Holly Springs’ new dog park.

44 THERE & BACK

Known for world-class golf, there’s more to love in Pinehurst.

52 RISE & DINE

Discover your new favorite restaurant in our dining guide.

36

56 GROW & BLOOM

39 GETAWAY N.C.

60 FUN & MEMES

Special section: Destinations that deliver for your next road trip.

48 COASTAL CUISINE

Eclectic and nautically-inspired, The Blind Pelican offers fresh catch to the Triangle.

Spring gardening special with garden pro L.A. Jackson.

A school year in review — commemorating the anniversary of remote learning.

64 SEEN & HEARD

Community news and accolades

66 IN FOCUS 4 APRIL/MAY 2021

Photos by Jonathan Fredin

18 CLASSIC CARS & YOUTUBE STARS

Vicious Fishes pilsner and recipes for Derby day.


ometown H YO U R

R E A LTO R ®

L I V I N G

A N D

W O R K I N G

I N

F U Q U A Y - V A R I N A

Veteran & Female Owned

Tracy Watson, Broker/Realtor

®

From breaking ground to closing day, every step of the way Commission rebate for teachers, nurses, active duty & prior military, and police & firefighters when buying, selling, or building. 919-761-0405 | tracy@missionfirstrealty.com | missionfirstrealty.com


reader

What’s your Favorite North Carolina Getaway?

Letters because I didn’t heart just jumped for joy, Holly Springs, for know that school was in same property as one, and sitting on the two. I thought, the elementary school, for this?” says Battle. ‘Why weren’t we taught to us to teach our “Then I thought it’s up

the Scenes from Dedication Ceremony

Jonathan Fredin

History Remembered

Holly Springs commemorates beloved elementary school Written by Emily Uhland

ROSENWALD SCHOOL HONORING HOLLY SPRINGS OF COMMUNITY MEMBERS, THE HISTORICAL MARKER BY A PASSIONATE TEAM PASTOR WAS ORCHESTRATED PICTURED ABOVE ARE: FORMER STUDENTS. DORIS BATTLE, RENNIE TOWN OFFICIALS AND SCIALDONE, RANDY HARRINGTON, D. GIVENS JR, MAYOR JAHMAR COBB, MATT CHRISTINE KELLY, GERALD ANDRANDY HARRINGTON THORPE, VICTORIA JUDD, DICK SEARS, ANGIE STAHELI HINTON, GEORGE KIMBLE, HUNT-SMITH, GERALD THOMPSON NOT PICTURED: ANN DENNISM, FLORIANNA REGINALD HINTON, TANYA

a new signpost commemoHolly Springs recently installed for school that served the community rating a historic elementary more than 50 years. an accinot have occurred without This special event may men named Randy Harrington. dental mix up between two School, later named Holly Rosenwald The Holly Springs W. E. Hunt stood on the site of the Springs Elementary School, Rosenwald 1970s. the 1920s to the Recreation Center from education of combat underfunding in schools were created to Booker T. a program developed by African American children, in Julius Rosenwald, resulting Washington and philanthropist segregated South. about 5,000 schools in the Springs schoolhouse, the Holly Originally a wooden plank around 1950 and rebuilding brick a by structure was replaced Doris School. Local historian named Holly Springs Elementary but 1970, in school before it closed Battle attended the primary it. school that came before never knew about the Rosenwald written that Barbara Koblich had “I was looking in the book my Springs”) and oh my goodness, (“Images of America: Holly

the community. Randy HarThis is where the two Battle thought she ringtons enter the story. Randy Harrington was corresponding with Consolidated who had attended Apex School, School, another former Rosenwald of that school’s and who serves as president in reality, she had alumni association. But town manager texted Randy Harrington, of Holly Springs. and sure “I looked at my phone, Randy Harrington enough I was talking to to the wrong in Holly Springs. I’m talking Battle. Randy Harrington,” says to be serThe mistake turned out manager Harendipitous, because town with the Holly rington connected Battle and a committee Springs town council, historic marker, was formed to plan the November at the which culminated last unveiling ceremony. says Victoria “It was dear to my heart,” that brought Judd of the outdoor ceremony former students together town officials, “I love to and teachers and local residents. together.” see the community getting Springs RosJudd attended the Holly grade year, which enwald School her first plank buildoriginal the was the final year ing was occupied. speaker The ceremony’s keynote and author Ann was notable playwright of William Hunt Smith, the daughter of Holly Earl Hunt, who was principal for more than Springs Elementary School

The dedication ceremony for the Holly Springs Elementary School historic marker took place on November 22. Keynote speaker Ann Hunt-Smith, center, is pictured with her family.

own history.” historian, A former teacher turned a historic marker Battle set out to establish and visitors that would educate residents and stand as a about the bygone school teachers and testament to the wonderful so many in school leaders that influenced

Approximately 100 members of the community, including Mayor Dick Sears, town council members, former students and teachers attended the outdoor gathering. Singer, composer and former student Gerald Hinson performed, below.

EXECUTIVE

Bill Zadeits, Group Publisher Kris Schultz, Publisher

BLOWING ROCK GREAT PLACES TO EAT, SHOP, HAVE FUN AND ENJOY ALL SEASONS

DORIS TAYLOR BATTLE

“Thank you for including me in this month’s arts issue of Main & Broad. The story and photos are lovely. ( Jonathan and Emily) made it so comfortable — thank you! And, I want to compliment you both on the art you provide the readers each month. Working artists like you sometimes go unsung!”

Emily Uhland, Senior Editor Amber Keister Daryl Lubinsky Sarah Rubenoff

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer

A DAY TRIP TO SOUTHPORT

“Thank you so much very much for this article. It is a Black History Month treasure. The Rosenward Schools have contributed so much to our learning. We are looking forward to researching Fuquay school and Apex school next. The team thanks you for sharing this rich history.”

BALD HEAD ISLAND

CONTRIBUTORS

47

46 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021

EDITORIAL

Fuquay-Varina Memes L.A. Jackson David McCreary

TOPSAIL ISLAND WE GO EVERY YEAR — 2021 WILL BE YEAR 11.

Photos by Willie Miller Photography.

continued on page 48

April/May 2021 • Volume 3, Number 2

PRODUCTION

Jennifer Casey, Senior Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer PLUMTREE A SMALL, MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY IN AVERY COUNTY THAT FEATURES THE TOW RIVER, HIKING TRAILS AND TVR CHRISTIAN CAMP

SLIDING ROCK IN PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST

PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

Kristin Black, Accounting Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa White, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resources PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Ron Smith Main & Broad is published six times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year.

ANN MARIE AMICO

MAIN & BROAD Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.mainandbroadmag.com

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF THE ISSUE?

Send letters to the editor by e-mailing editor@mainandbroadmag.com or find us on social media.

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

LET’S BE

! s d n e i r F

@mbmagazinenc

6 APRIL/MAY 2021

@mbmagazinenc

ON THE COVER: MOUNTAIN BIKING AT HARRIS LAKE COUNTY PARK OFFERS A PICTURESQUE LAKE, WINDING TRAILS AND A VARIETY OF TERRAIN CHALLENGES.

@mbmagazinenc

SPECIAL THANKS TO PARK TECHNICIAN ASHLEY SUBAT FOR SERVING AS OUR TRAIL GUIDE AND MODEL. PHOTO BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Main & Broad is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County: the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and Fuquay-Varina Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equalopportunity basis.


Editor’s

Letter

This issue BY THE

Numbers

4

Jonathan Fredin

Ideas & events to try at Harris Lake County Park, including the biking skills zone, pictured left.

I have two wonderful daughters. I think this last year has been hardest on the older one, a third grader. She misses her friends and extracurriculars severely, and has frequently been overwhelmed by too much togetherness with her younger sister. There was a warm, sunny day recently when my oldest girl was full of joy, smiling at every turn, without a cross word for any of us (this is unusual). I asked her about the cause of her happiness, and she simply said, “I played outside almost the whole day.” Yes. Yes. Yes. May we all experience that natural joy. I can’t wait to share our Outdoor Adventures feature with you. It’s full of ideas for discovering ways to spend time outside (page 22). Tops on my list is trying out SUP Yoga for the first time. Instructor Jennifer German says it’s perfectly common to fall in the water, so here goes (page 32). After outlasting 2020, plus a dreary winter, I feel like I’m about to play a “Get Out of Jail Free” Monopoly card, and this new season could not be more welcome. Cheers to the hope in the air — or is that pollen? — either way, I say bring it on.

EMILY UHLAND SENIOR EDITOR

8 APRIL/MAY 2021

4

Million views on the Hiester Automotive restoration challenge video introduction on YouTube. Turn to page 18 to learn more.

$43,000

Raised for Military Missions in Action in the Hiester Automotive car restoration challenge

15

students from Holly Grove Middle School won

$15,000

for the school in the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest


FUQUAY-VARINA ARTS CENTER

Arts Center Classes The Arts Center is alive with visual and performing arts classes for all ages. Adults can try their hands at sculpture, jewelry making, painting, script writing and more--some classes are offered for as little as $10! Kids have options as well--from drama class to dance class to themed week-long camps to single classes, we have something sure to get the creative juices flowing. Class size is limited; all participants and instructors are masked. For more information and to register, please visit FVArts.org, and click on 2021 Spring Classes at the top of the page.

Arts Center Camps Spark your student’s imagination with a safe, creative camp experience at the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center! The Fuquay Varina Arts Center is a spacious, safe venue located in downtown Fuquay-Varina, ideally situated to provide creative opportunities for all members of your family. For the latest information and to register, visit FVArts.org, and click on Classes tab; you’ll find Camps and Track Outs listed on the left hand menu. You are welcome to call the Arts Center as well—919-567-3920.

The Friends of the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center The Friends help the Arts Center provide cultural opportunities to all members of our community by offering scholarships and class subsidies, engaging special events, and a compelling vision. You, too, can make a difference by joining this organization in their good work--annual memberships start as low as $25 and are tax deductible. Art is better with Friends--won’t you join us? artscenterfriendsfv.org

For more info, call the Arts Center at 919-567-3920 fvarts.org


See Do Jonathan Fredin

A mix of virtual and in-person events keeps us connected.

Visit La Farm Bakery’s Pop Up ONGOING – MID-MAY 1900 BROAD ST., FUQUAY-VARINA 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Pick up European artisan breads by master baker Lionel Vatinet at La Farm Bakery’s temporary pop up location on Broad Street. Customer favorites such as sourdough, white chocolate baguettes, scones, pastries and togo sandwiches will be available, as well as a full Counter Culture Coffee service. “One of the silver linings of the pandemic has been serving communities closer to their home through our neighborhood bread truck program, and this pop up has come as a natural extension of this,” says coowner Missy Vatinet in a press release.

Fuquay-Varina Garden Tour MAY 15, 10:00 A.M. - 5 P.M. MAY 16, 1:00 P.M. - 5 P.M. PRIVATE RESIDENCES IN FUQUAY-VARINA

The Fuquay-Varina Garden Club presents nine colorful gardens for a self-guided tour that will inspire new garden ideas, offer tips from the homeowners and provide a peaceful stroll through lovely surroundings. Shop local vendor booths set up at various gardens. Tickets can be purchased online or at The Garden Hut or Shoppes on Main. Proceeds go toward scholarships for high school students and community projects.

Jonathan Fredin

Wild Wednesdays at Harris Lake

Shop the Holly Springs Farmers Market

APRIL 3, 17 AND EVERY SATURDAY IN MAY W. BALLENTINE STREET, OUTSIDE THE CULTURAL CENTER 8:00 A.M. - NOON

This bustling hometown market resumes its weekly spring/summer season hours in May. Support local farmers and food producers, offering fresh produce, pasture-raised meats, free-range eggs and local artisanal foods. 10 APRIL/MAY 2021

APRIL 14, 28, MAY 26 VIRTUAL VIA ZOOM

Themed, interactive, virtual nature programs from Harris Lake County Park staff include games, stories, activities and, often, live specimens. Programs are free, but online registration is required. UPCOMING TOPICS INCLUDE: Beaks, Tweets, Feathers and Feet, April 14, 11–11:30 A.M. Raptor Powers! Birds of Prey, April 28, 2–2:30 P.M. Longleaf Forest Friends*, May 26, 2–2:30 P.M. *part of the park’s annual Longleaf Festival which will take place virtually this year.

Play Pickleball

DATES & TIMES VARY TING PARK

New from Holly Springs Parks and Recreation — beginner and intermediate pickleball clinics teach fundamental skills, techniques and strategies of the popular sport, led by pros Adam Stone and Corrine Carr. Both instructors are among the top pickleball players in the nation and currently compete on the pro tour. Register at www.recconnect.us. Additional details listed in the Hurrahs Program Guide.


Battle of the Chambers Golf Invitational MAY 24 DEVILS RIDGE GOLF CLUB, HOLLY SPRINGS 9:00 A.M.

The Fuquay-Varina and Holly Springs Chambers of Commerce face off in a friendly 18-hole golf competition. Play as an individual or a team and enjoy provided breakfast, lunch and beverages. Compete for prizes such as longest drive, closest to the pin and hole-in-one.

People often ask...

How much is a direct “simple” cremation in our area?

Some Other Local Funeral Homes

Golden Mummies of Egypt

ONGOING - JULY 11 NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART, RALEIGH 10 A.M. - 4 P.M.

This highly anticipated new exhibit presents eight stunningly preserved mummies and explores beliefs about the afterlife during the era when Egypt was under the influence of Greek and Roman culture (circa 300 B.C.E.–200 C.E.). The exhibition showcases the collections of the Manchester Museum in England. The practices of preservation and decoration of the body, and the transformation of the deceased into a god, are spectacularly shown by the mummies on display. Timed tickets are required for this exhibit.

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11


Jonathan Fredin

Meet

Greet

TORRENTI CYCLES OWNER, DANIELLE CASTELLI STRADER, FREQUENTLY BRINGS THE MOBILE REPAIR VAN TO CHARITY RIDES AND EVENTS FOR LAST MINUTE, ON-SITE TUNE UPS.

12 APRIL/MAY 2021


Danielle Castelli Strader Owner of Torrenti Cycles

Torrenti Cycles owners, Danielle Castelli Strader and husband Phill, have been repairing bikes for more than eight years, and they opened a retail location on N. Main Street in FuquayVarina last March one day before the pandemic shut down temporarily closed the business. BACKGROUND: Born and raised in Fuquay-Varina. I worked at Elliotts Pharmacy

and graduated from Fuquay-Varina High School.

FIRST BIKING MEMORY: My parents handed me down a really crusty bike from

my sister and wouldn’t buy me a new one until I learned to ride. I learned really quickly. FAVORITE RIDES: Hilltop Needmore Town Park & Preserve, Harris Lake

mountain bike trails, Raven Rock State Park and there are so many possibilities on rural roads just a couple miles out of town. Biking is an easy getaway to see many cool things. ALWAYS LEARNING: In college, I found a bike on the side of the road and started

trying to get it to work. I wanted a bike to get to campus. Then I started working at a bike shop near N.C. State and buried myself in the shop. I must have been annoying to the mechanic there; I badgered him with questions constantly.

MOBILE REPAIRS: We had the van from the first minute. Every weekend we were

at a charity ride or event. It generated a lot of community interest. Now, there is a 4-6 week waitlist for mobile. We make house calls throughout Wake County.

You end up with a bike for everything. The number of bikes you need is always n+1 — the number you have plus one more.

– Danielle Castelli Strader, owner, Torrenti Cycles

QUALITY: We will work on any kind of bike, but the quality lends to a better

experience on the bike. If you don’t start off well, you are not going to fall in love with it. We want people to start off on the right foot. ON COVID-19: Bikes have become a refuge. Repairs are through the roof. Many

bikes are in short supply. We’re trying to keep people on wheels.

TRENDING: Ebikes get people into (riding) or get back into it. They can go farther,

faster. (Ebikes) eliminate physical limitations to riding. It’s the great equalizer.

ALL ARE WELCOME: There is a type of riding for everyone. We want to create

a space where everyone feels comfortable. Everybody is different, with different resources. We want to be a shop for all of those people. TORRENTI CYCLES 1311 N. MAIN STREET, FUQUAY-VARINA (919) 306-8573 TORRENTICYCLES.COM

READY TO RIDE?

Turn to page 24 for suggestions for your next local trek. 13


Dig in

Drink up

Octo Pils Pilsner

from Vicious Fishes Brewery

Written by Dave Tollefsen | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

SO NOBLE: Have you ever experienced a beer of nobility?

Doesn’t it sound awesome? Unfortunately varieties of hops known as “noble hops,” aren’t regal or aristocratic. The label came from a 1980s marketing reference for select hops grown in continental Europe. Noble hops are low in bitterness and offer light, spicy, floral aromas and are typically used when brewing pilsnerstyle beers.

Dave Tollefsen is one of the NCBeerGuys — they have been promoting North Carolina craft beer and breweries on their website, ncbeerguys.com, since 2012. He is an avid homebrewer for more than 10 years and is also part of the North Carolina Craft Brewers Guild.

SO TASTY: Vicious Fishes Brewery

has quite a tasty pilsner with its Octo Pils. Refreshingly clean and crisp, this Bohemian pilsner has a light malt character that is slightly sweet and robust in flavor — as any noble beer should. SO VICIOUS: This style of beer

pairs really well with seafood and shellfish. The Vicious Fish and Chips at Vicious Fishes Tap & Kitchen features a batter made with the pilsner. This is a great example of a beer that complements the food — a light beer with the light flavors of the fish. The two balance each other and are a win-win for your palate!

Jonathan Fredin

VICIOUS FISHES 132 S. FUQUAY AVE, FUQUAY-VARINA 2237 OLD US 1, APEX NC 219 FISH DRIVE, ANGIER (919) 762-7876 VICIOUSFISHES.COM

14 APRIL/MAY 2021


Watch the 147th Kentucky Derby on May 1, and enjoy these creative recipes, straight from Churchill Downs.

Derby Day

Dig in

Drink up

Delights

Bold flavors and Southern ingredients set the scene for the fanciest two minutes in sports — and your next Kentucky Derby-themed soiree.

Bourbon Pickled Peaches By Churchill Downs Executive Chef David Danielson

INGREDIENTS

Southern-Style Pimento Mac and Cheese By Churchill Downs Executive Chef David Danielson

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds fresh sliced peaches 1 pound granulated sugar 1 cup apple cider vinegar 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 tsp kosher salt 1 cinnamon stick 4 whole cloves 1/2 cup water 1 cup orange juice 1/2 tsp vanilla 1/4 cup bourbon

6 tbsp of butter, cut into cubes 6 tbsp all-purpose flour 6 oz heavy cream 1 pound elbow macaroni 16 oz shredded sharp cheddar cheese 1/4 cup finely diced onion 7 oz jar of diced pimiento, drained 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 tsp favorite hot sauce 1/2 tsp ground black pepper 1 1/2 cup chopped pretzels 2 tsp olive oil

PREPARATION

PREPARATION

In a medium-sized sauce pot combine all ingredients and bring mixture to a boil. Turn heat down to a medium simmer and cook for 4-5 minutes to allow the peaches to cook. Place the mixture in a mixing bowl and wrap with plastic for a tight seal. Place in refrigeration overnight or up to 7 days. The flavor gets better each day.

Cook macaroni in salted water until tender. Toss cooked pasta with olive oil and place on baking pan, store in cooler until needed. In small sauce pan melt butter and add flour to make a roux. Add cream and bring to a simmer. Fold in cheddar cheese, onion, lemon juice, pimientos, hot sauce, and black pepper. Add cooked pasta to cheese sauce. Top with chopped pretzels and serve. 15


Dig in

Drink up

Oregon Blue Cheese and Caramelized Onion Tart From KentuckyDerby.com

INGREDIENTS:

Crust 4 cups all-purpose flour 1 pound butter, cut into small pieces and chilled 2 eggs 1 cup grated parmesan cheese 2 tsp salt 1 tsp pepper Filling 4 cups caramelized onions 4 cups crumbled Oregon blue cheese 2 cups grated Swiss cheese 1/4 cup chopped fresh thyme Custard 2 cups half and half 2 whole eggs 2 egg yolks 1 1/2 tsp salt 3/4 tsp ground black pepper 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

PREPARATION Place the flour, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper in the work bowl of a food processor. Pulse until combined. Add the chilled butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Add the eggs and pulse until mixture starts to form a dough. Remove from the work bowl and gently knead on a lightly floured work surface. Form into a ball and flatten into a disc. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for about 1 hour or overnight. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Roll the chilled dough on a lightly floured surface to fit a 13" x 18" jelly roll pan or half sheet pan. Line the pan with the dough, making sure there are no cracks. Chill the dough for 30 minutes. Line the dough with foil and fill with baking weights or beans. Place in the oven and bake for 1215 minutes, or until the edges just begin to brown and the dough is set. Gently remove the foil and beans. Put the pan back in the oven, and cook until the dough is almost cooked, about 10 more minutes.

16 APRIL/MAY 2021

Remove from the oven; sprinkle the caramelized onions, chopped thyme, Swiss cheese and blue cheese evenly over the partially baked shell. Whisk together the custard ingredients and then drizzle the custard evenly over the crust until it is just barely filled. Return to the oven and bake until the custard is set and the tart lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Remove and cool before cutting into squares. Makes about 80 squares. *To caramelize onion, thinly julienne 6 large yellow onions. Heat a heavy bottomed, large saute pan over medium high heat, add 2 tbs olive oil and add one third of the onions.Saute until they are completely softened and browned to a caramel color, adjust the heat as needed. Remove from the pan and repeat until all the onions are cooked. You may need to wash the pan between batches if there is excessive browning.

16


Dig in

Drink up

Bacon Bourbon Caramel Popcorn From KentuckyDerby.com

INGREDIENTS

5 quarts plain popped corn (freshly air-popped recommended) 1/2-1 lb thick cut bacon, chopped, fried to just about crispy and well drained 1 cup butter 2 cups brown sugar 1/2 cup light corn syrup or 1/2 cup maple syrup 1 tsp sea salt 1/2 tsp baking soda 3 oz bourbon

PREPARATION Preheat your oven to 250 degrees. Melt 1 cup of butter over medium heat. Mix in brown sugar, corn syrup and sea salt and then stir until boiling at the edges. Lower the heat slightly and let boil until the caramel is 250 degrees. Remove from heat and add the baking soda and bourbon. Once fully incorporated, stir in the bacon. Divide the popcorn into two very lightly greased roasting pans and coat with the caramel. Mix well and then put the popcorn into the preheated oven for about 45 minutes to an hour, mixing every 10-15 minutes so the kernels of popped corn are coated in bourbon bacon coating. Once done, pour onto either parchment paper or wax paper to cool and break into pieces.

Blue Moon Julep From KentuckyDerby.com

*To swap Blue Moon for a similar, local option, try Aviator’s MadBeach Orange Wheat or Bombshell’s Hipster Handshake Wheat Ale

INGREDIENTS

6 oz Blue Moon® Belgian White Belgian-Style Wheat Ale* 1 1/2 oz Woodford Reserve® bourbon 1/4 oz fresh lime juice 1/4 oz simple syrup 4 muddled raspberries Ice Mint springs, fresh raspberries for garnish

PREPARATION Muddle raspberries with bourbon, lime juice and simple syrup in julep glass. Fill glass with ice. Short shake and strain into Collins glass over ice. Top with Blue Moon® Belgian White and stir gently. Add mint and raspberry garnish. Serves 1. Recipes and photos courtesy of kentuckyderby.com. Visit the website for additional recipes, party ideas and event details.

17


BRANDON WRIGHT

Written by Emily Uhland

REPRESENTATIVES FROM HIESTER AUTOMOTIVE GROUP PRESENT MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION WITH A DONATION FROM THE SALE OF A ’69 PLYMOUTH ROADRUNNER, WINNING CAR IN A 14-VEHICLE RESTORATION CHALLENGE.

Classic Cars Restored for Charity John Hiester has always loved old cars.

With car dealerships in Fuquay-Varina, Lillington and Sanford, selling cars and trucks to area residents for 35 years, he likely loves all cars. But old cars generate a special, unique kind of excitement. So last Spring, when the pandemic shutdown forced people to stay home and businesses to close, Hiester decided to purchase 14 classic cars for the mechanics and technicians at his dealerships to restore while business was slow. “We were wondering what to do when the work runs out, and I didn’t have a good answer. We don’t want to lay anybody off. We don’t want to harm anybody’s family,” recalls Hiester. So the idea for a contest took root. The mechanics throughout Hiester Automotive 18 APRIL/MAY 2021

dealerships would form fourteen teams, each with one car to restore. A fan vote would determine the winning vehicle — which car or truck had undergone the most impressive transformation — and that car would be auctioned off with proceeds going to charity. The winning team would get to select which charity to support. Vehicles in the mix included a ’74 Dodge Dart, ’88 Dodge Ramcharger, ’78 Jeep CJ, ’75 Chevy Camaro and many more, each with its own set of challenges and needs. “It was the most frustrating, yet rewarding experience,” says Reilly O’Meara, a technician in Fuquay-Varina. “It was a huge learning experience.” O’Meara, who worked on a ’72 Chevy Monte Carlo — “the best one” — says he learned a lot working with the “old-timers” in the service department.

“It was a great opportunity for the young guys to get to have a newfound respect for the older guys in the shop,” says Hiester. “They didn’t realize how much they knew. It was good from a team-building perspective.” Along the way, one of Hiester’s colleagues at Ally Bank heard about the challenge and connected Hiester with celebrity mechanic Danny “Count” Koker for a 21-episode YouTube series highlighting the undertaking. Koker owns a customization and restoration mechanic shop in Las Vegas and stars in the History Channel series “Counting Cars.” His YouTube channel, Count’s Kustoms Network, has over 110,000 subscribers and is widely known among classic car enthusiasts. In the new series, called Count’s Kulture, presented by Ally, the local mechanic continued on page 20


COURTESY OF ALLY

It was the most frustrating, yet rewarding experience.

– Reilly O’Meara, mechanic, John Hiester Chevrolet of Fuquay-Varina

DEALERSHIP OWNER JOHN HIESTER PURCHASED 14 CLASSIC CARS TO BE RESTORED BY TECHNICIANS IN HIS DEALERSHIPS, SPURRING A CONTEST, YOUTUBE SERIES AND MORE THAN $43,000 RAISED FOR CHARITY.

19


CONTEST WINNER

JOHN HIESTER

BRANDON WRIGHT

’69 PLYMOUTH ROADRUNNER AT THE GREENSBORO AUTO AUCTION

JONATHAN FREDIN

TECHNICIANS IN FUQUAYVARINA, SANFORD AND LILLINGTON PARTICPATED IN THE CONTEST.

teams had the chance to ask questions and get advice from Koker, and present the cars for the final reveal before the fan vote. Most episodes acquired thousands, and sometimes millions of views. “Danny was a really humble, sincere guy,” says Hiester. “It was cool to be a part of.” Calvin Moody, a technician who worked on a ’70 Chevy C10 truck, said seeing the series and sharing it with friends and family was one of the highlights of the experience. “I’ll watch it over again,” says Moody. About halfway through the project, business started to pick up again, and available time to work on the cars took a backseat to customer repairs. “It was really hard, but the commitment of some of our people — they stayed late, came in after hours — to try and complete the project,” says Hiester. “They were completely invested in it.” 20 APRIL/MAY 2021

Through an online vote, viewers and fans selected a ’69 Plymouth Roadrunner repaired by a team at John Hiester Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram of Sanford as the winning vehicle. “They did a super job. … There were several cars, (the teams) really made a difference on,” Hiester says. “(The Roadrunner) was a cool car anyway, but it came in pieces when we bought it. There was a ton of work to do.” During the Roadrunner’s final reveal episode, Koker commented, “I love how visually you guys went with a whole factory vibe, but underneath you added a whole bunch more fun to it. … That’s a winner right there!”

You could definitely see the lift in the shop when we started doing it. Everybody was downtrodden from watching the news. Then they all got excited and got to be a part of something.

– John Hiester, owner, Hiester Automotive dealerships

JONATHAN FREDIN

continued from page 18


REACH “NEW HEIGHTS” WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONNECTIONS THEME AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS MAGNET ELEMENTARY

CELEBRITY MECHANIC DANNY “COUNT” KOKER HOSTED A 21-EPISODE SERIES ABOUT THE RESTORATION CHALLENGE ON HIS YOUTUBE CHANNEL.

All of the restored cars were auctioned in February at the Greensboro Auto Auction Classic Cars Auction. The Roadrunner earned $43,000, to be donated to Fuquay-Varina’s Military Missions in Action. Despite nationwide interest and thousands of viewers, Hiester sees the challenge as “one-and-done.” “It was fun, but it’s not really our area of expertise. All of our equipment is for newer technology, not for classic cars. “It did what it was meant to do, it kept everybody working. You could definitely see the lift in the shop when we started doing it. Everybody was downtrodden from watching the news. Then they all got excited and got to be a part of something. It was a great experience.” CATCH UP ON THE SERIES ON COUNT’S KUSTOMS NETWORK www.youtube.com/c/CountsKustomsofficial

Come GROW with us where we: • Boast several outdoor learning environments that spark our students’ love of learning • Cultivate students’ curiosity through daily environmental expedition electives • Involve the whole family in environmentally-themed activities To learn more about us, please visit www.wcpss.net/lincolnheightses Lincoln Heights Environmental Connections Magnet Elementary School 307 Bridge Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526 (919) 557-2587

21


OOutd COUNTLESS MILES OF GREENWAYS CONNECT TRIANGLE-AREA TOWNS. WHERE WILL YOU EXPLORE THIS SPRING?

Adven 22 APRIL/MAY 2021


door Life in southern Wake County provides convenient access to plentiful natural entertainment through many nearby parks, lakes and greenways. With spring in full swing, now is the time to bust out of the house and explore new recreation, leisure and athletic adventures in the great outdoors. From a family stroll to a 30-mile bike trip, options abound for every age or skill level.

A local guide to bike, hike, paddle & play Written by Emily Uhland | Photography by Jonathan Fredin

ntures 23


bike time to

BiKeHike PAddle & a Pl Y

Hog Run Mountain Bike Trails at Harris Lake

NEW TO BIKING?

Consider these tips for safe riding. Wear a helmet. While only required by law for riders under the age of 16, it’s the single best way to ride safely for all ages. Be light and bright. A necessity for commuters, front and rear lights significantly increase visibility and safety on roads. Wear bright or reflective clothing. Ride in the direction of traffic, on the right. When passing, announce yourself with “on your left,” or use a bell. Make way for all trail users. Biking trails are often open for hikers, joggers and sometimes horseback riders. Obey all traffic signs. Stop for red lights and stop signs, for example. Consider buying a basket to bike, instead of drive, to quick errands or trips to the grocery store. 24 APRIL/MAY 2021

Harris Lake County Park’s mountain biking trails offer a series of courses designed for varying skill levels. Beginner, intermediate and advanced loops are indicated by colored trail blazes and progress from flat terrain to log jumps and wooden ramps. With a dedicated skills zone, riders can practice intermediate and advanced techniques before embarking on the full loop. “Mountain biking allows you to take a break from what you are doing and really be out in nature,” says Ashley Subat, park technician at Harris Lake. “Theres a sense of a challenge to conquer the trail.” In 2018, a flow trail was added as a portion of the advanced trail. This unique element consists of a variety of natural rollers, berms and tabletop dirt jumps, which are designed to limit the need to pedal or brake. Rather, riders can enjoy the ebbs and flows of the landscape. In cases of rain or extremely high lake levels, the mountain biking trails may close temporarily. Verify trail status at trianglemtb.com or contact the park office before heading out. BEGIN AT: Cypress Trail parking lot for the beginner loop. Gravel lot on County Park Drive for intermediate and advanced trails. HARRIS LAKE COUNTY PARK 2112 COUNTY PARK DRIVE, NEW HILL (919) 387-4342 WAKEGOV.COM


We have great scenery with the lake in the backdrop.

– Ashley Subat, park technician, Harris Lake County Park

PARK TECHNICIAN AND FUQUAY RESIDENT, ASHLEY SUBAT, RIDES LAKESIDE AT HARRIS LAKE COUNTY PARK.

HARRIS LAKE MOUNTAIN BIKING TRAIL MARKERS: Beginner: Blue Intermediate: Yellow Advanced: Red

25


WHITE OAK CREEK GREENWAY, CARY

Let’s Go Ride a Bike 2020 saw a surge in bicycling rates across all demographics. Ten percent of American adults engaged with bicycling in a new way during the COVID-19 pandemic. Bicycle sales surged and availability of bikes and parts became limited.

bike

Share of U.S. Adult Population that Rode a Bicycle During COVID-19 20%

BEGIN AT: Fred G. Bond Metro Park, Bond Park Greenway Trailhead, 801 High House Rd., Cary Greenway parking is also available on Davis Drive.

What’s your favorite outdoor adventure?

Join the conversation online @mbmagazinenc #getoutside #mbmagazinenc 26 APRIL/MAY 2021

6% 4%

70%

White Oak Creek Greenway Starting at Fred G. Bond Metro Park, the White Oak Creek Greenway traverses winding boardwalks, abundant greenery and a beautiful wetland area (near Green Level Church Road) in west Cary. Best of all, it’s mostly flat and suitable for riders of all abilities. This seven-mile greenway section connects to the American Tobacco Trail going west or to Lake Crabtree going northeast creating a continuous stretch of more than 30 miles.

New riders Tried riding in a different way Started or re-started riding Existing riders Did not ride a bike

Top Motivators For Riding Bicycles During COVID-19 NEW RIDERS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Stress relief/mental health Exercise/health Socializing with friends and family Relaxation Being outside Thrill of the ride, sense of freedom Active lifestyle

EXISTING RIDERS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Exercise/health Being outside Active lifestyle Stress relief/mental health Sense of freedom, thrill of the ride, protecting the environment 6. Spending time alone Source: 2020 COVID Participation Survey, PeopleForBikes.org


idwifery • Rejuvenation M • y h p a mogr D Mam 3 • yn Ob/G

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Hike

CARROLL HOWARD JOHNSON ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PARK, FUQUAY-VARINA

Carroll Howard Johnson Environmental Education Park The looping, natural trails through Carroll Howard Johnson Environmental Education Park uncover beautiful overlooks, bridges and wooded pathways. Just south of downtown Fuquay, this 28-acre park focuses on environmental education, with plaques along the trails identifying trees and natural features. The Creekside Trail allows access to — surprise! — the banks of a creek where two-and four-legged hikers can wade and splash. TIP: A map of the trails is depicted on a sign near the parking area. Take a photo of the sign so you can reference it as you explore the park. CARROLL HOWARD JOHNSON ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PARK 301 WAGSTAFF ROAD, FUQUAY-VARINA FUQUAY-VARINA.ORG

28 APRIL/MAY 2021

Also in Fuquay

There’s a dash more greenway now open in Fuquay. The Park Depot Greenway Trail connects Old Honeycutt Road Park to South Lakes subdivision and features a boardwalk over picturesque wetlands. Access the trail from the Old Honeycutt Road Park walking trail or from the trailhead parking lot on Hwy. 55 near the John Deere plant.


Crowder County Park

TRY AN OATMEAL CREAM PIE, SWEET POTATO DONUT OR BACON CHEDDAR SCONE FROM BESTOW BAKED GOODS TO FUEL THE DAY’S EXCURSIONS.

Wander the park’s Outer Loop Trail and pass themed gardens, such as Bird, Butterfly and Prairie Gardens, and enjoy the Story Walk — pages of a children’s book displayed at intervals along the path to be read along the way. This paved trail is less than a mile and connects to the scenic Pond Loop Trail containing a boardwalk and observation deck over Crowder Pond. Another branch, the short Cooper’s Hawk Trail, is an interpretive nature trail spotlighting native trees. Self-guided nature lessons, called discovery boxes, are available to check out from the park office. Boxes contain hands-on activities, equipment and story books. Topics What is an include Crowder’s Critters, Bugs and interpretive trail? ABC Hike, best suited for preschoolers According to the National Parks Service, interpretive and young elementary-aged children. CROWDER COUNTY PARK 4709 TEN TEN ROAD, APEX (919) 662-2850 WAKEGOV.COM

trails tell a story, often about the setting’s plants, animals or history. Informative signs typically mark the path.

But First, Breakfast Before embarking on these high-energy adventures, fill up with delicious baked goods from Holly Springs’ Bestow Baked Goods. Grab a to-go box full of made-fromscratch breakfast offerings, such as sweet or savory scones, Chunky Monkey muffins and the universally popular Sweet Potato Donut. Owner Heather Sutton began baking as a hobby, developing her own recipes and giving away her creations to friends. Her grandmother’s sweet potato pie provided inspiration for some of Sutton’s signature offerings. “Her recipe was ‘a little of this, a little of that,’ and when I tried to duplicate it, it turned out to be like magic,” Sutton says, resulting in Bestow’s Sweet Potato Cupcake — their most popular wedding cake flavor. “I grew up in North Carolina and we have access to sweet potatoes year round. Whether it’s a savory or sweet recipe, they are fabulous all the time,” says Sutton.

BOARDWALKS MEANDER ABOVE THE LAKE AT CROWDER COUNTY PARK IN APEX, OFFERING VIEWS OF LOCAL WILDLIFE.

In addition to breakfast pastries, Bestow Baked Goods offers decadent desserts — Nutella-stuffed Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies, Oatmeal Cream Pies and the Sea Salt Brookie to name a tasty few. Everything is made fresh daily. Online ordering is available. BESTOW BAKED GOODS 4208 LASSITER ROAD, HOLLY SPRINGS (919) 473-9225 BESTOWBAKEDGOODS.COM

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Paddle BASS LAKE, HOLLY SPRINGS

Bass Lake Park A popular spot for hiking and biking, Bass Lake Park also provides a peaceful escape on the water in your choice of a canoe, row boat or Gheenoe boat, available to rent through the boathouse for as little as $5 an hour. Boats are rented daily from Memorial Day through Labor Day, and on weekends into the fall. The 54-acre lake is regularly stocked with catfish through the N.C. Community Fishing Lake Program, so licensed fishermen and women are welcome. The facility runs a tackle loaner program for visitors without personal fishing equipment. Bait can be purchased at the concession stand. Private watercraft is not allowed. 900 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 557-2496; hollyspringsnc.us 30 APRIL/MAY 2021


Lake Benson Park

Your LOCAL Real Estate Professionals

A short, but worthwhile, trip east toward Garner brings adventurers to Lake Benson Park, complete with walking trails, playgrounds, a dog park and the Garner Veterans Memorial. Canoes, kayaks and Jon boats can be rented from the Lake Benson Boathouse on weekends from March through October. Covering 650 acres, Lake Benson provides ample space to explore the 10 miles of wooded shoreline. Visitors might glimpse a number of native birds, such as the great blue heron, blue grosbeak or acadian flycatcher. Fishing in the lake is welcome, but swimming and private watercraft are not allowed.

Announcing

TIP: For a full day’s outing, check out the nearby White Deer Park & Nature Center which connects to Lake Benson Park via a greenway across Buffaloe Road. LAKE BENSON BOATHOUSE 975 BUFFALOE ROAD, GARNER (919) 662.5703 GARNERNC.GOV

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paddle

Try a New Adventure:

sup yoga

SUP YOGA INSTRUCTOR JENNIFER GERMAN

I immediately fell in love with SUP yoga. … It’s so much fun.

– Jennifer German, owner, Soul Honey Yoga

32 APRIL/MAY 2021

It was natural for Jennifer German to combine two of her passions — yoga and spending time on the water. “Being out in nature is so relaxing and peaceful,” says German, owner of Soul Honey Yoga & SUP, who teaches stand up paddleboard yoga classes on Harris Lake during the summer months. “It’s really nice on the water,” says German, who lives in Fuquay-Varina. “The classes are a slow, gentle type of yoga.” German provides the equipment — inflatable boards, paddles, safety gear and anchors — and begins each 90-minute session with basic paddle-boarding instructions. Then the group, which is intimate, usually 4 or fewer participants, begins to paddle along the lake shoreline to a quiet cove where they anchor and start the yoga practice. “About half the time is paddling, half is yoga,” says German. There are no headstands or complex yoga poses in German’s class. “It can be challenging to stand on the board for a lot of people.” So her classes progress slowly, beginning with breathing and mindfulness and ending with all-important savasana. Beginners to paddle boarding and yoga are welcome, though a certain level of physical fitness is necessary to balance and stand on the board for an extended period of time. “I wanted to create something that was accessible to most people,” she says. German cautions: “It’s not a matter of if you’ll fall in, but when.” However, a dip in the cool lake waters isn’t entirely unwelcome in the N.C. summer sun. “Yoga has helped me so much, I wanted to share it with others,” German says. “I immediately fell in love with SUP yoga. … It’s so much fun.” Visit soulhoneyyoga.com for more information and to sign up for classes.

PHOTOS BY JEBB GRAFF

HARRIS LAKE PROVIDES A PICTURESQUE SCENE FOR PEACEFUL STAND UP PADDLE BOARD YOGA.


Need to refuel?

FUQUAY BRUS SWEETS ARE SCRATCH-MADE WITH NEW YORK FLAIR.

After a day of exploring, you’ve earned a tasty pick-me-up. Stop into Fuquay Brus for coffee, sweet treats or an adult libation to celebrate conquering those trails. Owner Tracy Gower didn’t intend for Fuquay Brus to be a bakery, but popular demand led to a bakery case full of delicious, unique baked goods. “We try to do things other bakeries don’t have,” Gower says, such as sky high cream puffs, ganache-filled bundts and keto-friendly treats.

The Broad Street cafe was open a mere seven days before stay-at-home orders went into effect last March. Offering the bakery treats helped Fuquay Brus weather the closure. Gower says a second location of Fuquay Brus is opening soon in the former Chocolate Fix location on Main Street. An expanded breakfast and lunch menu will be offered. FUQUAY BRUS 400 BROAD STREET, FUQUAY-VARINA (919) 285-3005 @FUQUAYBRUS

Independendent Living - Cottages & Apartments • Assisted Living • Memory Care • Skilled Nursing

A Life Plan Community with Continuing Care

Welcome Back!

It’s been a rough year for us all, but things are looking up and now that we are more comfortable being around one another, we are celebrating every chance we get! Whether we’re enjoying the pool or exercise classes, having fun line dancing, visiting our neighbors, or getting back in the dining room to enjoy food we love, we invite you to join us and take a look around.

You’ll soon see why we love calling Windsor Point home!

1221 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina, NC

919-552-4580 • windsorpoint.com 33


Play

Fleming Loop Park Freshly renovated Fleming Loop Park beckons the young and young-at-heart to its multi-purpose fields, walking trails, picnic shelter and playground. A paved path encircles the expansive fields, great for scooters or pushing a stroller. As the weather heats up, coveted shade sails shelter sections of the brand-new play equipment, outfitted with slides, creative climbing structures and a spherical spider web-esque climbing net, pictured here. FLEMING LOOP PARK 503 FLEMING LOOP ROAD FUQUAY-VARINA.ORG

FLEMING LOOP PARK, FUQUAY-VARINA

34 APRIL/MAY 2021


Jones Park Behind Holly Springs Elementary School, Jones Park packs a lot into 24 acres. Disc golf, a sports field, greenway access and a fishing pond accompany colorful playgrounds for big and little kids. A turf surface ensures the play area is clean and green in any weather. A giant shade sail covers the picnic tables, offering respite for spectators and snack breaks. There is even a little free library stationed at the parking area. A paved greenway trail connects Jones Park to nearby Veterans Park, which features the Holly Springs War on Terror Memorial and another playground to explore. JONES PARK 405 SCHOOL DAYS LANE, HOLLY SPRINGS (919) 557-9600 HOLLYSPRINGSNC.US

JONES PARK IN HOLLY SPRINGS IS TUCKED BEHIND HOLLY SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

35


GRAND G OPENIN

Bark in the Park Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

The town of Holly Springs celebrated the opening of the town’s first dog park with a leash cutting and “paw-ty” on March 13. Dozens of town residents, and their humans, attended the event to enjoy the sights and smells of the new facility. With an acre to run and play, the offleash dog park at Sugg Farm is a great spot for pups to exercise and socialize. There is no fee to use the dog park. Designated large (over 30 pounds) and small breed areas keep the park safe for all four-legged friends. Additional details and park regulations can be found at hollyspringsnc.us.

36 APRIL/MAY 2021


VISIT THE DOG PARK AT SUGG FARM 2401 Grigsby Avenue, Holly Springs Parks is open from 8:00 A.M. until one hour before Bass Lake closes (typically sunset).

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S

! E T A D E H T E V A

Kinston-Lenoir County Chamber of Commerce

MAY 7 & 8, 2021

KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA THE LARGEST WHOLE HOG COOK-OFF IN THE WORLD! Due to COVID 19 The 2021 BBQFON will limit the number of cook teams and vendors.

KINSTONBBQ.COM


Warm weather got you itching to get out of town? Whatever is on your vacation agenda — enjoying a dockside dinner, hunting for fleamarket finds, traversing backwoods trails or lounging on the beach — there are amazing destinations and new adventures waiting just a few hours’ drive away.

get away

nc SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

39


Simply Corolla, NC Far and Away, Only Closer

Find yourself here With spring upon us, many wise families are making their plans now to simply hit the road and find their way here. It is good to know that awe-inspiring remote beaches, the legendary Corolla Wild Horses and storied historical sites await you, less than a day’s drive away, in Corolla, NC.

Call 877.287.7488 for information or your free visitor’s guide

Corolla • Carova • The Mainland

Visit us online at CorollaNC.com


Currituck OUTER Tucked away on the northernmost slice of coastal North Carolina you’ll find the Currituck Outer Banks, a 24-mile salty strip of windswept remote beaches; and home to legendary wild horses, iconic historical sites, rich wildlife, fresh coastal cuisine and the finest family-friendly accommodations. The Currituck Outer Banks and mainland truly has something for everyone. TO DO Where the road ends in Corolla, wild Spanish mustangs have roamed the shores for centuries. Many visitors set out to explore these remote beaches by taking a guided four-wheel drive tour. Seeing these creatures in their natural habitat can be an unforgettable experience. Also, climb the 220-step Currituck Beach Lighthouse for an unbeatable 360-degree view of the area, and enjoy a tour of Whalehead, a 1920s-era mansion.

local wineries and breweries, shop for treasures at eclectic boutiques, enjoy mouth-watering North Carolina barbecue and freshly caught seafood from a local restaurant, or enjoy an awe-inspiring sunset over the Currituck Sound. WHERE TO STAY Whether your vacation plans are for a week or a weekend, there are accommodations to meet your needs on the Currituck Outer Banks. Vacation rental homes offer amenities including swimming pools, hot tubs, in-home theaters, gourmet kitchens and pet-friendly options. Corolla also boasts an oceanfront hotel, a pair of inns and a luxurious bed and breakfast. HIT THE ROAD On your way to Corolla, or when it’s time to take a break from the beach, enjoy what mainland Currituck County has to offer. Explore the many unique shops and farm markets along US-158, as well as H2OBX Waterpark, a family-friendly attraction featuring more than 30 exhilarating rides and slides. For more information and to request a free Currituck Outer Banks visitor’s guide, call (877) 287-7488, or explore CorollaNC.com.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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RELAX The Currituck Outer Banks beaches are some of the most tranquil on the East Coast and provide the perfect backdrop to enjoy a good book, listen to the waves or simply close your eyes and breathe in the salty air. Spend a relaxing afternoon sampling award-winning wine and beer from our

BANKS


wilson

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NORTH CAROLINA WE INVITE YOU TO EXPLORE OUR VIBRANT COMMUNITY. Historic Downtown Wilson has brought the creativity of art to life with the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park, a public park home to thirty large whirligigs created by folk artist Vollis Simpson. These kinetic, wind-powered sculptures are North Carolina’s Official Folk Art. The Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park also hosts the Wilson Artisan and Farmers Market on the weekends. Following your visit to the park, find out more about the artist at the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Museum, located just across the street. The newly opened museum offers educational tours, displays of smaller whirligigs, facts about Simpson and how he created his art, a gift shop, and additional information about the ongoing conservation efforts to protect this important artistic legacy. Visit www.wilsonwhirligigpark.org for more information. Surrounding the park, numerous museums, art galleries, gift and antique shops, and locally owned boutiques showcase the history of the area and celebrate the growth and diversity of the Downtown Arts and Culture scene. Highlights include the Selkie, Artisan Leaf, the Barnes Corner Gallery “Art Ventures,” the

Gallery Shop, the Imagination Station Science & History Museum, the Freeman Roundhouse Museum, the Wilson Arts Center, Iconstar Art Studio and the Edna Boykin Cultural Center. And you won’t want to miss the internationally acclaimed photography of Jerome De Perlinghi, who established the Eyes of Main Festival. Historic Downtown Wilson is also the home of the North Carolina Whirligig Festival, a celebration in the fall with more than 200 vendors. Locally owned breweries, cafes and bakeries are also conveniently located in Historic Downtown Wilson to satisfy all your cravings! For more information on Historic Downtown Wilson, visit www.historicdowntownwilson.org Come spend the day with us and enjoy the galleries, shops, delicious food and drink, and the whirligigs that make a visit to Wilson a unique experience!


Kinston NORTH CAROLINA COME EXPERIENCE SOUTHERN WITH A KICK. As warmer weather brings life back to the Carolinas, you’re probably itching to get outdoors. You’ve had months to binge watch all your favorite shows. Your closets are immaculate. It’s time for something new, something different. It’s time for Kinston. This little town in Eastern North Carolina takes pride in being Southern with a kick. Here, chefs aren’t afraid to create giant hushpuppies filled with a quarter pound

of hand-chopped whole hog barbecue laid under a mess of sweet coleslaw. Here, artists transform metal and glass into works of art for your home or garden. Here, history shares tales about civil war battles and a boat scuttled in a shallow river and inspire with the stories of music legends like Ray Charles, Chubby Checker and James Brown. If this sounds like a place you’d like to visit, you are cordially invited to leave your house. Here are a few tour ideas to get things started:

BEST OF SHOPPING TOUR Kinston is not the typical small town, so don’t expect the typical kind of shopping. This tour highlights some of the best and most unique stores in our area. You’ll shop

Scan to visit

TASTE OF KINSTON TOUR From pasture and farm-to-table, Kinston has some of the best dishes Scan to visit to offer. That’s why thousands of people follow the rumblings in their stomach to Kinston each year. From farm-to-table freshness to otherworldly barbecue, prepare to expand your palate and put your bathroom scale away. It’s time for a Taste of Kinston. VisitKinston.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BEST OF KINSTON TOUR Kinston is in the middle of a renaissance. Over the Scan to last decade this little town has visit claimed a place in the hearts of foodies, art lovers and history lovers. If you find yourself headed our way, here is a quick list of attractions, shops, restaurants, and experiences guaranteed to give you a kick of Southern as only Kinston can.

vintage goods and antiques. You’ll browse through pottery, jewelry, and stained glass in artist studios where creation is happening as you shop. You’ll find handmade quilts for your bed and all types of art to hang on your walls. What you won’t find is something you could’ve found anywhere else.


THE CAROLINA HOTEL

DRIVE TIME From Holly Springs:

60 minutes

From Fuquay-Varina:

70 minutes

44 APRIL/MAY 2021


There

Back FINE DINING AT THE CAROLINA DINING ROOM, INSIDE THE CAROLINA HOTEL

pinehurst this Road trip Leads to More Than

Golf

Written by Jack Frederick | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

It’s no secret that the quaint village of Pinehurst built its

reputation upon one thing — golf. Located an hour southwest of Holly Springs, the “Cradle of American Golf ” is a bucket list destination for fans of the game, boasting 10 courses nestled into the scenic landscape of the Sandhills. It is well worth the trip just to experience the 1907 Donald Ross masterpiece, Pinehurst No. 2, a course that few others in the world can rival.  “Everybody who is somebody has played Pinehurst,” says Ben Bridgers, director of golf and Pinehurst Country Club manager. “We get to walk around where all the greats have played and major championships (held), so it feels a little bit like you’re back in time.”  The trek down U.S. 1 to Pinehurst leads to plenty of top-notch golf, but folks in the Triangle looking to get away for the weekend will find more than tee times and putting greens. A trip to Pinehurst is an adventure fueled by relaxation, fun activities and good food.  “It’s a nice way to get away from the traffic, the hustle and bustle, and SHOPPING IN THE VILLAGE OF PINEHURST come back to a quaint little village that puts you in a good mood,” Bridgers says.  continued on page 46

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continued from page 45

Boston entrepreneur James Walker Tufts began turning dreams of a New England-style resort community into reality after purchasing nearly 6,000 acres of land in 1895. More than 125 years later, Pinehurst Resort remains in touch with this history, sticking to the original framework and purpose of the land. As you approach the Carolina Hotel, tall, captivating longleaf pines create a sense of tranquility that builds excitement for what the trip could hold. The largest of five lodging accommodations at the resort, the hotel is wrapped by long porches with rocking chairs that look out onto manicured grounds.  Inside, the comfort of cozy rooms, walls of historical photos and the fine dining of the Carolina Dining Room makes it tempting to remain tethered to the hotel, but there is much more to explore, starting with the Spa at Pinehurst right next door. The full-service spa is open daily for massage therapy, facials and body treatments to help you unwind. The Resort Clubhouse, a hub for all golf needs, is the heart of the resort encircled by lush green grass and golf courses that have been sculpted and perfected over generations. The clubhouse is also home to The Deuce, a soup and sandwich restaurant with a picturesque view of the sprawling landscape overlooking the 18th green of Pinehurst No. 2. While you are munching on a house-made pastrami sandwich, an occasional stray ball may fly into the outdoor seating area.  When it’s time for a change of scenery, retail therapy awaits at the Village of Pinehurst, a walkable district located in the resort’s original buildings. Two blocks of cottage-style storefronts include restaurants, art galleries, boutiques and a cupcake shop.  The village is also a good place to meet locals who can share the best aspects of living in Pinehurst.  46 APRIL/MAY 2021

PINEHURST BREWING COMPANY

DRIVING RANGE KNOWN AS MANIAC HILL

THE SPA AT PINEHURST


“I’m not a golfer and I think it’s special,” says Ann Carter, a resident since 1946. “Everyone is very friendly, and the town is very green.” Carter has seen Pinehurst transform into the bustling tourism destination it is today. Even with recent travel restrictions, golf in Pinehurst remains a popular draw. Just a few blocks from the village, the Pinehurst Brewing Company has added to the area’s appeal since opening in 2018. Housed in the historic steam plant that once provided power to the Village of Pinehurst, the brewery is a relaxing place to linger, sitting inside or out. The creations of head brewer Eric Mitchell pair well with barbecue, pizza and other American classics from the kitchen.  The resort boasts a number of dining options, from Southern cooking to upscale pub fare. For a formal dinner, the 1895 Grille and the Carolina Dining Room strut high-class experiences. “We want to make sure the guests are entertained, surprised and well fed, of course, during their stay,” says Thierry Debailleul, executive chef at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club. Whether you’re in search of leisure or sport, a road trip to Pinehurst is the perfect escape from the Triangle, and a journey that will send you home relaxed and refreshed.  Learn more about Pinehurst Resort at pinehurst.com. 

If you go:

Play The Cradle A full day of golf isn’t for everyone — The Cradle, a par-three course, is the perfect compromise to enjoy golf when time is precious. Added in 2018, the course is a fan-favorite, accommodating new players and the experienced.  “It’s a little nine-hole course, 789 yards. It’s just so much fun,” says Ben Bridgers, director of golf. The course can be completed in an hour, leaving plenty of time to explore the rest of what the resort offers. At a costeffective $50 per player, replay rounds are free all day if you have the time.

Rescued WOOD Rehab Your local shop for all things WOOD! We specialize in custom woodworking of all shapes and sizes. Our team can provide DIY Support and Custom Ideas for FUN one-of-a-kind projects. Check out our unique creations, live-edge slabs, barnwood, lumber, reclaimed wood, and hand-crafted items by local woodworkers. Follow us on social media for ideas, classes, specials, and seasonal items.

Rescued WOOD Rehab “Guaranteed Imperfect” 718 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 285–2653 www.rwrnc.com Be Safe – Keep Building – Stay Positive 47


SOURCED FROM THE EAST COAST, THE BLIND PELICAN’S SEAFOOD IS DELIVERED FRESH DAILY. THIS PAGE: MARYLANDSTYLE CRAB CAKES. OPPOSITE: LOBSTER AND SCALLOP PASTA.

Restaurant Spotlight:

The Blind Pelican Written by David McCreary | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

You don’t have to drive to the coast to find quality fresh seafood. Instead, simply visit The Blind Pelican in Holly Springs to enjoy first-rate fish, shrimp, lobster, crab, oysters and other ocean-centric delights. Founded in 2019 by Andrew and Nikki Stafford, proprietors of the popular My Way Tavern downtown eateries in Holly Springs and Raleigh, The Blind Pelican showcases the creative culinary talents of executive chef and operating partner Michael Flood. “Fresh seafood is delivered daily, and it’s mostly sourced from the east coast,” says Nikki. “We want people to feel like they are escaping to the beach without leaving town.” Provisions are served up in a casual and accessible nautically themed dining space. There’s an eye-catching lobster shell wall near the front entrance along with a suspended metal pelican donated by a local artist. Rustic lobster traps serve as casings for light fixtures perched over comfy banquettes. The restaurant’s focal point is a stunning community table fashioned from 48 APRIL/MAY 2021

reclaimed wood. Hovering above the table are pieces of driftwood with hanging Edison lights. “The wood for the table came from two piers taken down during Hurricane Michael (in 2018),” Nikki explains, “one from Kitty Hawk and another from Currituck.” When it comes to the food, start your dining experience with some creamy, hot crab dip, gator bites or crispy conch fritters. You also can’t go wrong with a bowl of she crab soup or hearty seafood chowder. As for standout entrees, consider the Maryland-style crab cakes, Low-Country shrimp & grits with andouille sausage and lobster & scallop pasta involving tomatoes, roasted corn and artichokes served atop a bed of angel hair pasta in a light cream sauce. “Everything is made from scratch, including salad dressings and sauces,” Nikki says, adding that other well-regarded items

include a blackened grouper sandwich with remoulade and her personal favorite: buttermilk-marinated fried shrimp. Like oysters? Choose from raw, steamed and baked options, the latter of which come in four inventive varieties. One dollar oysters are offered on Sundays. Lobster rolls with house-baked splittop buns are presented in Connecticut and Maine styles, which are served cold and hot, respectively. Don’t ignore the enticing daily food specials like all-you-can-eat crab legs on


Monday, fresh lobster on Wednesday and sushi nachos with ahi tuna, shrimp, crab and avocado Thursday through Saturday from 4 p.m. to close. Save room for rewarding dessert selections such as Key lime pie, cinnamon-infused bread pudding and decadent chocolate Ho Ho cake with cream cheese frosting. In a nod to a song written by musician Jimmy Buffett, the restaurant’s “Boat Drinks” menu features a wide continued on page 50

We want people to feel like they are escaping to the beach without leaving town.

METAL CRAFTER STEWART WEBB MCRAE, OF APEX, CRAFTED THE DINING ROOM’S METAL PELICAN.

– Nikki Stafford, co-owner, The Blind Pelican

49


SALVAGED, NAUTICAL ELEMENTS COMPLETE THE DECOR. FUN COCKTAILS AND INDULGENT DESSERTS TURN DINNER AT THE BLIND PELICAN INTO A SPECIAL OCCASION.

continued from page 49

array of craft cocktails, beer and wine. Check the website for daily drink specials. “Our most popular cocktail is not even on the drink menu, but it’s a smoked old fashioned with an orange peel and maraschino cherries that are soaked in bourbon for 30 days,” Nikki says. For a splurge-worthy after-dinner beverage, try a Snickerdoodle or Butterfinger martini. Service at The Blink Pelican is friendly, accommodating and notably experienced. “Our staff members are the backbone of the restaurant,” Nikki says with a smile. “We don’t want them to be order takers but rather to have fun and bring an upbeat energy to the table so our guests can have a really positive experience.” The Blind Pelican is open seven days a week. Reservations are not accepted but there is a call-ahead waitlist option. Outdoor seating is offered and fills up fast. In addition to dine-in service, takeout, curbside pickup and delivery are available. THE BLIND PELICAN 120 BASS LAKE ROAD (HOLLY SPRINGS CROSSING), HOLLY SPRINGS (984) 225-2471 BLINDPELICANSEAFOOD.COM 50 APRIL/MAY 2021


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Dine Restaurant hours and service may be limited at this time. Check individual locations for most current information.

FUQUAY-VARINA Abbey Road Tavern and Grill “Signature Beatle burgers and live entertainment.” 711 N. Main St.; Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7731; abbeyroadnc.com Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 138 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2497; annaspizzeria.com Aviator Pizzeria & BeerShop “Brick oven pizza & craft beer.” 601 E. Broad St., Fuquay Varina (919) 346-8206; aviatorbrew.com Aviator SmokeHouse BBQ Restaurant “All of our food is made in-house.” 525 E. Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-7675; aviatorbrew.com Assaggio’s Pizzeria Ristorante “Top quality ingredients go into every dish.” 941 East Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-9505; assaggios-fuquay.com The Corner Biergarten “Bar & bottle shop.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 133, Fuquay-Varina (919) 246-6649; tcbiergarten.com

Cultivate Coffee Roasters “Modern industrial twist on a small town coffee shop.” 128 S. Fuquay Ave., Fuquay Varina (919) 285-4067; www.cultivate.coffee Daddy D’s BBQ “Slow cooked with love.” 1526 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6464; daddydsbbqnc.com Drive Bru “Drive thru coffee shop with N.Y. coffee & Carolina charm.” 1013 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @drivebru Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 1436 N Main St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-4463; eggsupgrill.com El Dorado “Enjoy the most delicious Mexican food amongst family.” 112 E Vance St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-0287; eldoradomexicanrestaurant.com FuQuay Brus “Quaint coffee cafe with New York coffee, baked goods, beer, wine and keto.” 400 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @fuquaybrus

BRUSCHETTA BASILICA FROM GARIBALDI TRATTORIA IN FUQUAY-VARINA.

Garibaldi Trattoria Pizza & Pasta “Authentic Italian cuisine and quality service.” 900 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-8868; garibalditrattoria.com The Healthy Spot “Meal replacement smoothies and energizing teas.” 961 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-5373; @healthyspotfuquay J&S New York Pizza “Family-owned and operated Italian restaurant.” 500 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-6921; jandsnypizza.com Johnny’s Pizza “An amazing array of different NY-style pizzas.” 722 N Judd Parkway N, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6322; johnnyspizzacary.com Joyce & Family Restaurant “Home cooked Southern favorites.” 129 N Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-1717; @joyceandfamily Juicehaus “Made-to-order fresh, raw juice.” 509 North Broad St, Fuquay Varina (919) 396-5588; juicehaus.org Laurel Wine Bar at Cellar 55 “Mediterranean-inspired small plates with wine pairings.” 1351 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 446-1156; cellar55.com Little Portugal NC “Market and eatery celebrating traditional Portuguese dishes.” 736 N. Main Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 586-7144; littleportugalnc.com

The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 305 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-5555; themasonjartavern.com

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Photos by Jonathan Fredin

Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 401 Wake Chapel Road, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-3957; lostresmagueyes.com


The Mill “Coffee. Beer. Wine. Community.” 146 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2123; themillfuquay.com Nil’s Cafe “Family-oriented Mediterranean cafe.” 513 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-0887; nilscafe-weebly.com Pints Ice Cream & Beer “Homemade ice cream and craft beers.” 512 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina @pintsicecream Stick Boy Bread Co. “Handcrafted baked goods from scratch … all natural ingredients.” 127 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2237; stickboyfuquay.com Triple Barrel Tavern “Restaurant, sports bar & billiards.” 2221 N Grassland Drive, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0940; @triplebarreltavernfuquayvarina Tsuru Sweets & Coffee “Elegant-yet-sassy gourmet confectionery.” 411 Broad St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2646; tsurusweets.com

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Dine Zeera Indian Restaurant “Authentic goodness in traditional Indian food.” 1311 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-6215; zeeranc.com Zaxby’s “Indescribably good.” 1341 N Main St, Fuquay Varina (919) 552-3981; zaxbys.com

HOLLY SPRINGS Acme Pizza Co. “Chicago-style deep dish pizza.” 204 Village Walk Dr, Holly Springs (919) 552-8800; acmepizzaco.com Ashley’s Harvest Moon Bakery – Cafe “Breakfast and lunch cafe with scratch-made bakery and locally roasted coffee.” 128 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 586-7005; harvestmoonbakerycafe.com

Bass Lake Draft House “34 beers on tap.” 124 Bass Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 567-3251; basslakedrafthouse.com Bestow Baked Goods “Life is too short for grocery store desserts.” 4208 Lassiter Road, Holly Springs (919) 473-9225; bestowbakedgoods.com Blaze Pizza “Fast fire’d, perfectly crisp perfection.” 316 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 261-5950; blazepizza.com The Blind Pelican “Creative seafood and boat drinks.” 120 Bass Lake Road; Holly Springs (984) 225-2471; blindpelicanseafood.com The Butcher’s Market “Premium meats and specialty grocery.” 4200 Lassiter Rd, Holly Springs (919) 267-919); thebutchersmarkets.com Cristo’s Bistro “Hand tossed NY style pizza.” 5217 Sunset Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 363-8852, cristosbistro.com

Vicious Fishes Tap & Kitchen “Eclectic twists on comfortable bar food.” 132 South Fuquay Ave., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7876; viciousfishes.com/fuquay-nc Wingin’ It Bar and Grille “Family-friendly neighborhood pub.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 109, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0962; winginitbarandgrille.com

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Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 4216 Lassiter Road, Holly Springs (919) 495-4530; eggsupgrill.com Greek Basma “Greek food that is fresh, healthy and delicious.” 7272 GB Alford Hwy, Holly Springs ((919) 285-080; greekbasma.com

Dine Homegrown Pizza “Pizza, calzones and sandwiches.” 4928 Linksland Drive, ​Holly Springs (​919) 577-5575; homegrownpizza.com

Hickory Tavern “Something for every appetite.” 401 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 557-2064; thehickorytavern.com

Kobe HIbachi and Sushi 515 North Main Street, Holly Springs (919) 557-1437; kobehollyspringsnc.com

Fera’wyn’s Chocolate Cafe “Forget love, I’d rather fall in chocolate.” 652 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (415) 758-3296; ferawyns.com

Los Tres Magueyes “A Mexican Treat.” 120 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 552-6272; lostresmagueyes.com

Fiesta Mexicana Restaurante Mexicano “Authentic. Hot. Fresh.” 428 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 346-1330; fiestamexicananc-hollysprings.com

Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream “A unique spin on a timeless dessert.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 762-7808; mamabirdsicecream.com

Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers “Great food without a long wait.” 221 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 557-3475; freddysusa.com

The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 114 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 964-5060; themasonjartavern.com

MediTerra Grill “Delicious ingredients. Old world recipes.” 108 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 762-7851; mediterranc.com Mi Cancun Mexican Restaurant 324 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 552-9979; micancunmx.com Michelangelos Pizza “Pizza buffet for lunch and dinner.” 7280 GB Alford HWY, Holly Springs (919) 557-4992; michelangelospizza.com My Way Tavern “Freshly made all-American foods.” 301 W. Center St., Holly Springs (919) 285-2412; mywaytavern.com Niche Wine Lounge “Tranquility by the glass.” 109 Main St., Holly Springs (919) 552-2300; nichewinelounge.com The Nutrition Fix “Healthy fast food alternatives.” 424 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 341-5554; @thenutritionfixnc The Original N.Y. Pizza “Bringing a taste of New York to North Carolina.” 634 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 567-0505; theoriginalnypizza.com Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi “Authentic Thai cuisine: well-balanced dishes bursting with flavor.” 242 S Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 538-6742; oshathaikitchennc.com

BEERS ON TAP The best selection of German and craft beer in the area!

Pimento Tea Room “Not your mama’s tea room.” 200 North Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 225-4213, pimientotearoom.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Chicken “The best dang biscuits.” 169 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 586-7343; risebiscuitsdonuts.com

Large

COLLECTION

Craft Bottles

Check our Facebook page for weekly events @TCBiergarten 1625 N. Main St. #133 Fuquay-Varina 919.246.6649 | tcbiergarten.com

54 APRIL/MAY 2021

Dogs are Welcome! DENOTES ADVERTISER

ARTISAN TRUFFLES AT FERA’WYN’S CHOCOLATE CAFE


Sir Walter Coffee + Kitchen “Creative cafe by day. Full restaurant at night.” 242 S Main St. Suite 118, Holly Springs (919) 390-2150; sirwaltercoffeekitchen.com Skrimp Shack “Casual seafood cuisine.” 7244 Alford Hwy, Holly Springs (919) 335-3924; theskrimpshack.com Sweetberry Bowls “Beautiful and delicious bowls, wraps and salads.” 150 West Holly Springs Rd, Holly Springs (984) 225-2656; sweetberrybowls.com Sweet Southern SnoBalls “Shaved ice and Hershey’s Ice Cream.” 527 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 291-3355; @sweetsouthsnoballs Thai Thai Cuisine “Home cooked Thai food.” 108 Osterville Drive, Holly Springs (919) 303-5700; thaithaicuisinenc.com Thanks A Latte “Coffee and gift boutique.” 1118 Kentworth Drive, Holly Springs (919) 577-0070; thanksalattegiftsnc.com Town Hall Burger & Beer “Neighborhood beer and burger joint.” 301 Matthews Dr, Holly Springs (919) 335-5388; Townhallburgerandbeer.com Vieni Ristobar “The newest Italian restaurant from the Cinelli family.” 242 South Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 225-1134; vieniristobar.com

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Dine

Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen “Exceptional renderings of classic Southern dishes.” 7307 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 233-1632; lucky32.com/cary

Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar “Good old-fashioned burgers and bottled soda.” 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary (919) 466-0055; corbettsburgers.com

Lugano Ristorante “Italian dining in a comfortable and casual atmosphere.” 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229; luganocary.com

Duck Donuts “Warm, delicious and just the way you like them.” 100 Wrenn Drive #10, Cary (919) 468-8722; duckdonuts.com/location/cary-nc

Mellow Mushroom “Beer, calzones and creative stone-baked pizzas.” 4300 NW Cary Parkway, Cary (919) 463-7779; mellowmushroom.com

Gonza Tacos y Tequila “Award-winning Colombian-Mexican cuisine.” 525-105 New Waverly Place, Cary (919) 653-7310; cary.gonzatacosytequila.com La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” 4248 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; 220 W. Chatham St., Cary; 5055 Arco Street, Cary (919) 657-0657; lafarmbakery.com

Pizzeria Faulisi “Simple foods from a simple way of cooking: a wood-burning oven.” 215 E. Chatham St., Suite 101, Cary pizzeriafaulisi.com Pro’s Epicurean Market & Café “Gourmet market, café and wine bar.” 211 East Chatham Street, Cary; (919) 377-1788; prosepicurean.com

From our family to yours.

Zaxby’s “Indescribably good.” 101 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 762-0432; zaxbys.com

CARY Chanticleer Café & Bakery “Family-owned restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and specialty coffees.” 6490 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 781-4810; chanticleercafe.com Chef’s Palette “Creative flair and originality in every aspect of our service.” 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary (919) 267-6011; chefspalette.net 9 0 0 N . M a i n S t r e e t | F u q u a y Va r i n a , N C | 9 1 9 - 5 5 2 - 8 8 6 8 | g a r i b a l d i t r a t t o r i a . c o m

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Grow

Written by L.A. Jackson

Bloom

big little gardens

Space-saving tips for vegetable and herb growers Last April, as the COVID crud was completely crimping everyday lifestyles, I read an article in the Wall Street Journal expounding the therapeutic vibes of starting a vegetable garden. But I wasn’t too surprised in September when the WSJ ran another story about many homebound, newbie gardeners throwing in the trowel because results fell far short of their springtime hopes. I suspect much of this disappointment came from backyard growers creating large gardens with little experience to maintain them through the long growing season. And then there were those who wanted to try their hand at growing edibles but didn’t have much room, so they just didn’t try. Well, would anyone like to give ’er another rip or start a veggie garden for the first time this spring? I’ll let you in on a secret: Size matters — starting small is an easier path to success. Allow me to share a few words of semi-wisdom for those of you who have little gardening experience or limited growing space.

56 APRIL/MAY 2021

Going to Pot

Even though I have over two acres of land at Casa Jackson to grow edibles, I’ve become a bit of a “pot head” because I like the portability. As long as I keep planters relatively small — 2- to 5-gallon containers is a good range in sizes — I can move heat-seeking edibles like peppers, chives, basil, mint and thyme into the sun when shade invades their growing space during the day. I can also slip such cool-season crops as lettuce, spinach and radishes to shadier spots during the heat of the afternoon to extend their harvest nearly into the early summer. Buy ornate or colorful planters for visual aesthetics, if it fits your fancy, but old buckets, small office trash cans, wooden crates — anything that can hold dirt through at least one growing season will do. Just drill or cut plenty of holes in the bottoms for drainage. TIP: Use quality commercial potting soil for growing plants in containers. Cheap bags of common garden dirt will usually result in a mucky, unproductive mess. TIP: Want an even bigger potted garden? Although they won’t be very portable when full of dirt, small, plastic kiddie pools (with a heap of holes in the bottom) make great contained mini-gardens.


BEDtime Story

Typical gardens for edibles are arranged in rows, which, while looking orderly with lines reminiscent of a West Point parade, waste space that could be used for more plants. To maximize garden areas — no matter how limited — create beds instead. This simple step turns many walking paths between rows into usable growing ground. What makes a garden bed work more efficiently is the trick of only using spacing recommendations per plant and forgetting about suggested distances between rows. This scrunches plants closer together, but not enough to create competition for ground nutrients and lower production potential. Traditional colonial rectangles probably come to mind when garden beds for vegetables or herbs are mentioned, but, hey, this is the 21st century, and anything goes. This means 90-degree angles can be replaced by imaginative curves, swerves, bends or bows to fit better into a landscape layout, if necessary. TIP: Create beds as long as Texas, if you want, but for easy access, don’t make them over four feet wide. This user-friendly width will ease your reach into beds, preventing foot traffic from compacting the soil as well as minimizing embarrassing face-plants in the dirt.

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Small World

The physics of spatial constraints dictate that the size of many popular vegetable plants will easily overwhelm any planter or limited-space garden. However, vegetable plant breeders, aware of this problem, have been busy developing smaller versions of standard plants that still have plenty of spunk to crank out decent crops. Probably the best example of a little plant yielding big results is the tomato. There are many Munchkin ’maters tagged with the operative adjective “Patio” that are long on production but short in stature. “Early Wonder,” “Tiny Tim,” “Red Rocket” and “New Big Dwarf ” are some of the more popular cultivars. Keep in mind that most patio tomatoes are determinate, meaning they will produce all their crop over a stretch of a few weeks, rather than through TIP: Even compact the entire growing season. versions of typically rangy, viny veggies such as Some small okra selections also degreen beans, cucumbers, liver big. Productive cultivars like “Baby pumpkins, watermelons, squash and cantaloupes Bubba,” “Jambalaya” and “Lee” that can be easily found. Look reach around half the height of standard for the word “Bush” in okra varieties are perfect petite plants cultivar descriptions. for large containers or little gardens.

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Hang ‘Em High

Another way to maximize production in small spaces is to grow up. In other words, don’t let such standard-sized vine plants as cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins and squash sprawl across the garden. Instead, cage or trellis them, so the vines will grow up, not out. Have a fence? You also have a perfect support for vining veggies. While training cucumbers and squash vines up supports is nothing new, suspending large watermelons and pumpkins does seem problematic. However, there are watermelon cultivars — often called “icebox” varieties — such as “Sweet Beauty’ and “Sugar Baby” that produce mini-melons only averaging about eight pounds apiece. Pumpkins can also be found in petite forms (around seven pounds each) with selections like “Sugar Pie”, “Spookie” and “Jack O’ Lantern”. Although they are smaller, miniature pumpkins and watermelons will still put strain on their vines if they are trained up a support. This problem can be solved by hanging cloth or nylon slings off the supports and cradling the yummies-to-be as they mature. TIP: Don’t be surprised if your vines in the sky look particularly healthy. Lifting these plants off the ground will increase air circulation through the foliage, which reduces problems with soil-borne diseases and viruses.

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58 APRIL/MAY 2021

Who says vegetables and herbs have to be restricted to a culinary garden? One of my well-worn mantras is that many growable edibles are very pretty plants. To save space, why not break out of this classic confine, and start showing them off in flower beds and perennial borders? If you want colorful competition for zinnias, coleuses, petunias, lantanas and such, try okra (especially the handsome cultivar “Red Burgundy”), crimson-tinted loose-leaf lettuce (“Red Sails” or “Lollo Rossa”, for example), Swiss chard (in particular, flashy selections such as “Bright Lights” and “Ruby”) or any of the many dazzling hot peppers. Herbs can also step up when you need more eye-catching plants in ornamental beds. Bronze fennel with its delicate, feathery, smoky foliage; the dramatic dark leaves of purple basil; creeping thyme’s low, colorful flow; the visual sass of “Tricolor” sage; the impressive spiky presence of rosemary — these are just a few of the pretty herbal L.A. Jackson is the former helpers for gardeners to play with in editor of Carolina limited landscapes. Gardener TIP: Be safe when mixing edibles with ornamentals. If you use pesticides in flower beds, make sure they are cleared for use on vegetables and herbs too.

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fun

memes

the 2020-2021 school year: a recap Written by the Author of Fuquay-Varina Memes Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

FUQUAY-VARINA MEMES (also known as FVM) is a freelance writer, meme guru and an anonymous resident of Fuquay-Varina. She is the creator and manager of the FuquayVarina Memes Facebook page and has a talent for making people laugh and always taking the joke too far. Check out her blog at fvmwrites.com. fuquaymemes thefvmemes

60 APRIL/MAY 2021

Guys, it’s almost over. Maybe. Honestly who knows, but at the time I’m writing this (February 2021), we’re creeping back to normal-ish. It’s going slower than my brain buffering basic math, but it’s happening. Possibly. Or not. The last time we got hopeful about flattening the curve, we entered a never-ending loop of “unprecedented times” a la “Groundhog Day,” minus Bill Murray and the quirky, roSCHOOL BREEZEWAYS WON’T BE EMPTY FOR LONG. RIGHT?? mantic resolution. This whole FOR THE LOVE — PLEASE LET IT BE SO. thing has gone on longer than the line outside of Fuquay Guns and Gold, but now that North Carolina teachers have been moved to the front of the vaccination line, sending our children to a large, germ-infested THERE IS HOPE of finally getting your kid out building, in the middle of a pandemic, on a fullof the house. time basis just didn’t feel right. With the support Regardless of whether you’ve been protest- of many, Wake County decided on a virtual-only ing school closures or opting for virtual school start to the year, and we marked the occasion year-round, I think we can all agree that teach- with an onslaught of “back-to-school” photos ing is hard and having kids in your house 24/7 is featuring our kids awkwardly holding a commore painful than a 40-year-old man on TikTok. puter in the living room. Good times. Sure, virtual school has done wonders in Remember when we all had quaint, inpreventing teen pregnancy (they don’t call it home workspaces and offices set up for remote PLAN B for nothing), but it hasn’t been with- learning? That was cute. The parents who optout its ups and downs. Now that the end is in ed for Plan B figured they only had to hold on sight, let’s reflect on the ’20-’21 school year. You for a month or two before they could safely aren’t ready? I don’t really care, it’s for posterity. deposit their bundles of joy on a school bus, In the beginning, most of us were on board bless their hearts. with a temporary, virtual school situation. The The experience of virtual school was like furthest we’d gone during the summer was the being trapped in a WCPSS escape room; everykiddie pool in the backyard, so the thought of one was stuck together, with varying degrees of


Remember when we all had quaint, in-home workspaces and offices set up for remote learning? That was cute.

intelligence, and we were all desperately trying to figure a way out. THE CLOCK WAS TICKING. As it turns out, it took longer than we expected. Like, a lot longer. I actually had to figure out how to access the “parent portal” on Powerschool, and I was really hoping it wouldn’t come to that. I was getting messages from the school on Remind, Talking Points, Google Classroom, Canvas, pieces of toast — you get the idea. My email account was a disaster (it was before virtual school, but still). I was receiving countless “family” messages from WCPSS about COVID reports, food distribution, cohort information, health screenings, etc. Principals were trying their best to communicate via email, automated phone calls, texts, voice messages, smoke signals, ravens, astrological signs and more. By the end of the first quarter, I had accidentally shown up in the background of my child’s Google meet at least a dozen times in varying stages of undress. Assignments were rolling in and I was putting my hope in God that my kids were getting it, because my school smarts tapped out in 4th grade. But hey, relief was on the horizon! Plan B kids were going back to school by

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the end of Thanksgiving … except they didn’t. Thanksgiving set the COVID clock back a few months so November started to look a lot like January. It wasn’t until mid-February that middle and high school students in Wake County actually walked into a building to learn in “cohorts,” which is fancy WCPSS speak for “groups.” One week in, two weeks off. Tiny groups of kids staring at computers in the presence of a teacher teaching on a computer. Vigorous cleaning. Temperature checks. Athletics with more temperature checks and wrist bands. Football in the spring — can you imagine!? Lunchrooms so quiet students could hear themselves chew. School buses back on the road and filled to the brim carrying at least five to six kids. As sad as this might have sounded to us back in 2019, this bizarre half in/half out reality is a step back in the direction of normal. Yes, our standards have fallen lower than the Target parking lot a few years back, but the sight of carpool lines gives us hope that the 2021/2022 school year might actually look a little, dare I say, normal. Regardless of whether your kids have been at home year-round or back at school in little chunks, I think we can all


THIS, CHILDREN, IS A SCHOOL IN ITS NATURAL HABITAT. SEE HOW IT WAITS PATIENTLY FOR ITS PUPILS TO ARRIVE.

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agree that the teachers and staff have been nothing short of heroic over the past year. Seriously, they deserve all the monogrammed tumblers money can buy! If I show up to a Zoom meeting dressed from the waist up, I consider that a win. Teachers, on the other hand, have been finessing this remote-learning thing since last summer. As the back-to-school debate raged on, they were busy relearning everything they knew about teaching, creating never-before-seen lesson plans, and struggling to motivate kids who were quite literally still in bed. As schools reopened, they literally pulled a Chuck Norris and risked their lives in their commitment to educate our children. They should be walking on red carpets and kissing babies! The 20202021 school year needs to be recapped, not just for posterity, but also as a massive THANK YOU to educators everywhere. Also, I’d like to use this opportunity to personally apologize to my kids’ teachers for the wildly inappropriate coffee mug I was holding in the background of my kid’s Google meet on the morning of October 20, 2020. That is all.

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63


Seen

Heard The long-awaited memoir by Dr. George T. Grigsby and Lucius Blanchard, “Black,

White and Carolina Blue”

was released in February, telling the story of the two men’s time in Chapel Hill in the 1960s. Grigsby grew up in Holly Springs and attended the Fuquay-Varina Consolidated School.

Mike Dunphy

In response to community needs, Mama’s House of Thrift (MHOT) recently debuted a new location and programs, including expanded shopping departments, updated food assistance, onsite mental health services, veterinary services, and free beauty products for women. The MHOT food bank will transition to a new service called Food Benefits 21st Century, in which money is given to families to shop with volunteers for the exact food their family needs, ensuring freshness and eliminating waste. “Since providing food supplies to thousands of people, awareness has come that there are so many different diets, allergies and needs. We want to make this better for (our clients). It’s felt as if we were having to limit them to the supplies and category of food that we could provide because of storage and refrigeration limitations,” says founder Janette Rod via Facebook.

UNC Health Rex Holly Springs Hospital is scheduled to open in September. The seven-story, $170 million facility will include a 24-hour emergency department, labor and delivery, three operating rooms, radiology, laboratory and pharmacy. The hospital will employ approximately 350 people and contain public green space and walking trails on its campus.

64 APRIL/MAY 2021

Luncie McNeil,

longtime director of Public Works in Holly Springs, retired after 31 years of service to the town. Under his tenure, Holly Springs grew from a town of 1,000 to more than 40,000 residents. The Public Works department grew from a staff of three to 60.

has been named athletic director at Willow Spring High School, which is slated to open to students in the fall for the 2021-2022 school year. Dunphy previously served as athletic director at Cary High School and teaches science. Dunphy was named the 2017 N.C. Soccer Coaches Association Athletic Director of the Year, and was named the HighSchoolOT Honors Athletic Director of the Year in 2020.

The Fuquay-Varina police department has acquired two electronic bicycles to be implemented in patrolling downtown areas, parks and commercial areas. E-bikes increase officer safety in a multitude of ways, including lessening fatigue upon arrival to calls, allowing for a stealth approach and providing faster back-up in high-traffic areas. The bikes also assist in reducing officer injuries by providing less stress on the body, while being easier to ride when wearing officer safety gear.


Seen

Heard Holly Grove Middle School students compete for national prize, again

COURTESY OF BAXTER MILLER

For the second time in three years, students from Holly Grove Middle School are vying for more than $100,000 in prize money in the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest. The group of 15 students, in grades six through eight, have been selected as one of 75 nationwide semifinalists in this year’s contest, earning their school a $15,000 prize package from Samsung.

Sam Jones BBQ

opened in Raleigh in February. Owner Sam Jones, a third-generation pitmaster, was a 2018 James Beard Award Semifinalist for Best Chef: Southeast and honed his craft at his family’s acclaimed barbecue mecca, Skylight Inn in Ayden, N.C. Celebrating eastern-style ’cue, Sam Jones BBQ serves chopped pork from whole hogs smoked over Carolina oak. Other menu highlights include Southern staples, such as Catfish Bites, Pork Skins & Pimento Cheese and Loaded Baked Potatoes. The restaurant is located at 502 Lenoir Street in downtown Raleigh. Sam Jones BBQ Raleigh features a full bar inside, serving up a variety of classic beers, wines, and hand-crafted cocktails. The beverage menu also offers a robust selection of Raleigh- and North Carolina-based beers.

THE SAMSUNG SOLVE TEAM MEETS VIRTUALLY TO DESIGN A FACE MASK TO HELP FELLOW STUDENTS WITH RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS OR ANXIETY.

The Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest challenges public school teachers and students to use science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subjects to impact their communities. “The students started by thinking about their peers with asthma, respiratory problems, and anxiety. Wearing a mask can be difficult in these cases and forces some students to stay home,” says Debra Schelin, a science teacher and supervisor of the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow team. The Holly Grove students designed

an eco-friendly face mask, using a CAD program and 3D printer, which would push air through filtered tubes that catch and absorb viral particles from the air. “The tubes are open ended, so the filtered air can enter and exit without the extra effort of pushing the air through sheets of cloth, making the masks easier to breathe in. “The goal is to alleviate anxiety of wearing a mask, so the wearer can breathe freely,” says Schelin. Since much of the WCPSS school year has been remote, the Holly Grove students have largely worked virtually, with students split between Virtual Academy and Plan B learning options. The next round of the contest requires a video submission from the team, outlining the project and the ways it will impact the community. Ten national finalists will be selected, and those teams will travel to New York to pitch their inventions in person. Two years ago, Holly Grove won the contest’s grand prize with their design for a proximity-activated bus stop sign that alerts drivers when a school bus is arriving. Two students from the winning group are on the team this year.

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In Focus

when nature calls By Jonathan Fredin The new dog park at Sugg Farm in Holly Springs has all the amenities popular with dogs.

66 APRIL/MAY 2021


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