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over the river

pittsboro awaits

how to help

local nonprofits

dinner is done great take out

The Heart + Soul of Holly Springs and Fuquay-Varina

ce n a n Fi made

Fun outh

Y S for

FACT

It's all

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


2019 North Carolina

Builder of the Year

Now Selling in Two Fuquay-Varina Neighborhoods

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From the $300s | Local Custom Builder | Master Suites Ranch & Two-Story Floor Plans | HOA Yard Maintenance Available

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Dr. Todd Bovenizer Dr. Chris Baker

VOTED BEST ORTHODONTIST 2020 BY CARY MAG Two Doctors One Location

Corner of Green Level West Rd, Hwy 55, High House Rd

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Relax. Chill.

Fuquay-Varina

URGENT CARE

919-235-6560 • 231 North Judd Parkway

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919-235-6410 • 231 North Judd Parkway

SURGERY

919-350-9355 • 601 Attain Street, Suite 101

HEART & VASCULAR

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You’ve got this. If you live in Fuquay-Varina or Holly Springs, you’ve got primary care. Urgent care. Cardiovascular care. General surgery. Breast and colorectal surgery. Bariatric surgery. Medical weight loss. Women’s care for every life stage. And, for everything and anything else, WakeMed Cary Hospital is close by and as full-service and sophisticated as it gets. Granted, life in The ‘Quay and Holly Springs is pretty chill as is. But a little extra convenience can do wonders for your inner peace. Visit us at wakemed.org.

Holly Springs

OB-GYN

919-235-6456 • 101 Cotten Lane

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Download our All Access App today.


October/November 2020

CONTENTS 24

just miss “ IFebru ary.

– Jason Wunsch, Today in the Quay

IN EVERY ISSUE 14 SEE & DO

In-person or virtual, local events explore our new normal.

16 MEET & GREET

It’s a double header with Holly Springs’s Wanda Holloway and Marty Woodward of Rescued Wood Rehab.

20 DIG IN & DRINK UP

Experts’ picks to sip and savor.

46 THERE & BACK

40

To Pittsboro, the epicenter of groovy.

56 RISE & DINE

Discover your new favorite restaurant in our dining guide.

FEATURES

60 GROW & BLOOM

A Holly Springs native crusades for financial literacy.

52

30 FOR GOOD

Local nonprofits adapt to challenging times — but your help is still needed.

36 IT’S ALL GOOD NEWS

Fuquay’s “Today in the Quay” keeps it positive.

6 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

40 FASHION WITH HEART Local entrepreneurs pursue meaningful style.

52 GREAT TAKE OUT

Tasty options for ordering in.

With garden pro L.A. Jackson.

62 FUN & MEMES Thanksgiving looks different in 2020.

65 SEEN & HEARD

Community news and accolades

66 IN FOCUS

Photos by Jonathan Fredin

24 MONEY MATTERS


INTRODUCING THE

ALL-NEW

2021 CHEVROLET TAHOE

100 Auto Mall Drive Cary NC 27511 | 919-344-0456

HendrickChevrolet.com


“ ”

reader

Letters

I am grateful for ... AIRPODS, YOU JUST POINT AT THEM AND PEOPLE WON’T TALK TO YOU.

October/November 2020 • Volume 2, Number 5 EXECUTIVE

Bill Zadeits, Group Publisher Kris Schultz, Publisher EDITORIAL

Emily Uhland, Senior Editor Amber Keister Sarah Rubenoff, Copy Editor CONTRIBUTORS

STRONG COFFEE & STRONGER WIFI

Alexandra Blazevich Fuquay-Varina Memes L.A. Jackson David McCreary PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer

“The rap sessions are great. Such a great community resource.”

A WRITING GIG WITH MAIN & BROAD!

TRACY WATSON, GO WATSON REALTY VIA INSTAGRAM

PRODUCTION

Jennifer Casey, Senior Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer PUBLIC RELATIONS

“Thank you so much for your magazine and taking the time to highlight what’s going on in southern Wake county. With the disappearance of local news, I was really excited when your magazine came out, because it’s another way for people to be able to share and be proud of what they’ve got here.” JASON WUNSCH, TODAY IN THE QUAY

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

Kristin Black, Accounting Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa White, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resources PUBLISHER EMERITUS

THE LOVE AND SUPPORT OF MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS.

Ron Smith Main & Broad is published six times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year.

MAIN & BROAD Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.mainandbroadmag.com

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF THE ISSUE?

Send letters to the editor by e-mailing editor@mainandbroadmag.com or find us on social media.

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

LET’S BE

! s d n e i r F

@Main & Broad

8 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

@mbmagazinenc

ON THE COVER: DEDICATED NONPROFITS, PASSIONATE PUBLIC SERVANTS AND INSPIRED ENTREPRENEURS CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY.

@mbmagazinenc

Main & Broad is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County: the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and Fuquay-Varina Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equalopportunity basis.


ometown H YO U R

R E A LTO R ÂŽ

L I V I N G

A N D

W O R K I N G

I N

F U Q U A Y - V A R I N A

Tracy Watson, Broker/Realtor

ÂŽ

From breaking ground to closing day, every step of the way Commission rebate for teachers, nurses, active duty & retired military, and police & firefighters when buying, selling, or building. 919 -761- 0 4 0 5 | t r a c y @ gow at s o n . b iz | gow at s o n . b iz


Editor’s

Letter BEHIND-THE-SCENES WORK FOR FASHION WITH HEART, PG. 40.

This issue BY THE

EMILY UHLAND SENIOR EDITOR

10 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

2

Meet & Greet columns — I can’t get enough of these short-andsweet features

9

local nonprofits showcased

9

instances of the word “good”

10

Thanksgiving Day suggestions from Fuquay-Varina Memes

41

longest inseam, in inches, available at Rhonda Lynette clothing designs Jonathan Fredin

It’s almost trite to say that 2020 has been one tough curveball. Kind of redundant at this point, isn’t it? Among the hardest hit by the pandemic have been nonprofit organizations, many of which rely on fundraising events, silent auctions and donations to support their operating expenses, and on gatherings of volunteers to complete outreach programs, building projects and food drives — all of which abruptly ceased in March. The community’s need for support only grew, and many of these dedicated volunteer groups rallied to make necessary adjustments to continue to serve. The Holly Springs Food Cupboard now offers drive through food distribution. Supplies for Military Missions in Action can be dropped off contact-free. Wake Enterprises hosts daily online classes in their new Wake E Live program. However, many organizations are still struggling. As we approach the season of giving, if you are able, consider donating your time or resources to groups based right here in southern Wake. You can learn more about them beginning on page 30. It’s incredibly fitting that last year at this time we penciled in plans for this “Doing Good” issue — focusing on people, business and groups with big hearts for serving this community. It’s an honor to share these stories.

Numbers


YOU BRING THE INSPIRATION. WE’LL BRING IT TO LIFE.

Collaborate one-on-one with the design experts at The Studio by Ashton Woods and bring your personal home vision to life at Lochridge. Homes from the $400s in Holly Springs | Private Community Pool and Clubhouse SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT TO TOUR OUR MODEL HOMES TODAY. 919.328.2945

 ashtonwoods.com/VisitLochridge

Monday-Saturday: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM | Sunday: 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM © 2020 Ashton Woods Homes. Ashton Woods Homes reserves the right to change plans, specifications and pricing without notice in its sole discretion. Square footage is approximate and floorplans shown are representative of actual floorplans. Window, floor and ceiling elevations are approximate, subject to change without prior notice or obligation, may not be updated on the website, and may vary by plan elevation and/ or community. Special wall and window treatments, upgraded flooring, fireplace surrounds, landscape and other features in and around the model homes are designer suggestions and not included in the sales price. All renderings, color schemes, floorplans, maps and displays are artists’ conceptions and are not intended to be an actual depiction of the home or its surroundings. Basement options are available subject to site conditions. Homesite premiums may apply. While we endeavor to display current and accurate information, we make no representations or warranties regarding the information set forth herein and, without limiting the foregoing, are not responsible for any information being out of date or inaccurate, or for any typographical errors. Please see Sales Representative for additional information, including current floorplans. This is not an offer to sell real estate, or solicitation to buy real estate, in any jurisdiction where prohibited by law or in any jurisdiction where prior registration is required, including New York and New Jersey. Division office address is 5711 Six Forks Rd., Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27609. Division office phone number is 919.232.0039. 3.20


McClaugherty & Associates An Ameriprise Private Wealth Advisory Practice

When it comes to what’s truly important in your life, you deserve advice you can trust from advisors who know and understand you. Our mission is to help you reach your financial goals through a personal relationship based on knowledgeable advice. Working together, we’ll help you plan for your goals, track your progress, and work diligently to understand all parts of your financial life. Together, we’ll build a personalized plan that can help you achieve the financial confidence you need to pursue your passions.

“What exactly does a financial advisor do?” “An Ameriprise advisor is here to help you achieve your financial goals, no matter how long your list is. We help you maintain a long-term perspective through market swings or other events without losing sight of the bigger picture. Some people don’t have time to manage their investments. Others like to do some research themselves but want an advisor to help them feel more confident about their decisions. Wherever you are on your financial journey, we’ll take the time to understand what’s truly important to you and provide personalized financial advice to help you achieve it.” – Pat O’Connell, Executive Vice President of the Ameriprise Advisor Group and Ameriprise Financial Institutions Group 46

APRIL 2020


Why Clients Choose McClaugherty & Associates Excellence Our team is dedicated to going above and beyond for our clients. Our job is to help you reach your financial goals and make decisions based upon what is most important for you. Ultimately, we strive to consistently present excellent choices for you and your money.

Service We care about the difference great service makes in a client’s experience. From our twenty-five plus years of experience working in the financial services industry, we’ve come to prioritize timely and accurate communication, and a level of service that makes our clients proud to have us work with them.

Commitment Not only are we committed to outreach in our community aand to maintaining our relationships with our clients – at our core we’re committed to helping you reach your financial goals, however broad or specific they may be. At the end of the day, you’ll know you are well taken care of by professionals who strongly value where our advice leads you and your finances.

Our Unique Approach What matters most to you in life? It’s a big question. And it’s one of many questions we’ll ask to better understand you, your goals and your dreams. We ask questions that other financial advisors won’t. Why? Because your vision of the future is unique, and we’re committed to helping you achieve it.

Our Areas of Focus • • • • •

Retirement Planning Strategies Wealth Preservation Strategies Tax Planning Strategies Estate Planning Strategies Insurance Strategies

Jeffrey B. McClaugherty, CRPC

Private Wealth Advisor Jason S. Curfman, APMA® Financial Advisor

• • • • •

Investment Management Intergenerational Planning Retirement Income Strategies Cash Flow Management Strategies Saving for Education

919.670.260 0 2501 Blue Ridge Rd, Suite 490 Raleigh, NC 27607 Jeffrey.b.mcclaugherty@ampf.com Jason.curfman@ampf.com Ameriprise.com/team/mcclaugherty-associates

McClaugherty & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, LLC

Ameriprise Financial cannot guarantee future financial results. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, LLC, a registered investment adviser. © 2020 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. SPONSORED CONTENT


See Do Jonathan Fredin

A mix of virtual and in-person events keeps us connected.

WCPSS Family Academy Workshops SELECT THURSDAYS IN OCTOBER & NOVEMBER VIA FACEBOOK LIVE 5:30–6:30 P.M.

Wake County Public School System’s Family Academy has gone virtual, offering their informative workshops through Facebook Live. Sessions cover timely topics that provide tools and strategies to support successful learning. FALL SCHEDULE INCLUDES:

October 15 - Identifying Cyber Bullying October 29 - Learn How to Motivate Your Child to Thrive in School November 12 - Today’s Elementary Math: “I didn’t learn math like that!” November 19 - Building a Positive Relationship with Your Elementary School Child

DIY Wood Sign Kits — To Go ANYTIME THE SASSY COW, FUQUAY-VARINA

Satisfy your craving for crafting with curated do-it-yourself wood projects from The Sassy Cow. Each kit includes necessary wood materials and decorations to assemble at home. Browse seasonal designs, home decor and games at thesassycownc.squarespace. com. Curbside materials pickup available.

Chalk Festival OCTOBER 10 TING STADIUM 10:00 A.M.–4:00 P.M.

Reserve a spot in the Ting Stadium concourse to show off your chalkart abilities. A winner will be chosen via Facebook in three age groups: 6-12, 13-17, and 18 and older. Chalk will be provided.

Holly Springs Haunted Trail OCTOBER 24 SUGG FARM PARK 2:00–11:00 P.M.

A seasonal favorite returns in a safe and socially-distanced format. Costumes encouraged for the whole family. Frightful surprises increase as the afternoon turns to night.

Spooky Drive-In Movie OCTOBER 30 TING STADIUM 7:00 P.M.

The night before Halloween, watch the cult-classic film, “Hocus Pocus,” from your car. Tickets are available through Holly Springs Parks and Recreation.

14 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Shop the Community Marketplace SATURDAYS IN OCTOBER NOON–5:00 P.M. HEALING GREEN FARMS, 2728 NC 42 HWY, WILLOW SPRING

Saturday markets feature local produce, garden-ready plants, herbs, local honey, locally produced CBD and personal care products, eco-friendly and reusable products, kid’s clothing, jewelry and accessories, plus yummy food trucks.


Jean Guevarra You, DDS Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

Now Accepting New Patients Trick or Treat Scavenger Hunt

OCTOBER 23–NOVEMBER 2 DOWNTOWN FUQUAY-VARINA

A Halloween-themed scavenger hunt makes a spooky trail through the Fuquay and Varina downtown districts. First, pick up a scavenger hunt card at the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center. Then you’re off to locate the SPOOKY words. Share your costumes and masks with #fvdowntown for a special prize. Find more info on facebook @fuquayvarinadowntown.

Early Morning, Late Afternoon & Friday Appointments Available In-Network with Most Insurance Carriers In-House Membership Plan Available Video Games, T.V.s, Photo Booth, Wi-Fi, Phone Charging Station, Coffee Bar & More

Browse the Window Gallery ANYTIME FUQUAY-VARINA ARTS CENTER

Lumberton artist Burritt Benson has seven colorful prints on display in the South Fuquay Street windows of the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center. Benson’s gallery show was postponed due to the center’s closure this spring, but his colorful, detailed artwork can still be viewed from the sidewalk.

“...Dr. You was amazing. She was so kind, patient and down-to-earth, and that not only put my son at ease, but me as well. We’re thrilled to have found such a warm, welcoming practice and we look forward to being patients for many years to come!” -Brendan S. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ “Dr. You is so knowledgeable, kind and patient... Highly recommend!” -Ayub A. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I can not say enough good things about Dr. Jean You! She and her staff were extremely welcoming to my son and me at our recent visit. Dr. Jean was amazing with my son – very calm and comforting. She explained everything she was gong to do before doing anything. You can tell that Dr. Jean has a true passion for this profession and loves what she does. We had an awesome experience at Little Tooth Co. and are so appreciative of the care that we received. If you are looking for a wonderful dentist to take your child to, you definitely need to become a patient of this practice!” -Erin D. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Tel 919-303-2873 www.littletoothco.com info@littletoothco.com 504 W. Williams St., Apex 27502

loved by kids. trusted by parents. 15


Greet

Wanda Holloway 2019 Holly Springs Citizen of the Year

Town of Holly Springs Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Volunteer

Holly Springs Food Cupboard Board Member and Distribution Coordinator HOMETOWN: Alexis, North Carolina CAREER: I worked for the North Carolina state

government as an accountant and retired after 30 years. My last position was at N.C. State University. Go Wolfpack! ON VOLUNTEERING: As a member of the Town of Holly

Springs Parks and Recreation Advisory Board for 13 years, I had the opportunity to serve on the steering committee for Sugg Farm and The Mims House. I’ve enjoyed being a part of the decision-making process to help develop parks and greenspaces for our growing town. I know parks and greenways are an integral part of sustaining a healthy life. Parks are places you can find tranquility and peace. Being in nature, around the trees and birds are all good ways to alleviate stress and help with emotional and mental wellness. Volunteering at the Food Cupboard for 10 years has been a very touching experience for me. It is a place where I never get tired, because I know my gift in life is to help others in need, and I feel that I’m doing good works there. ON PURPOSE: When I see stress being lifted and replaced

with a smile for families in need of food, or if I go to a park and people are enjoying themselves or exercising, children are playing, dogs are being walked — then I know that my small works are helping humanity and making real differences in the lives of others. CITIZEN OF THE YEAR: I had no idea it was coming. My

heart blossomed. I never would have imagined that I would receive that award. Volunteering is in my DNA. IN HER BACKYARD GARDEN, WANDA HOLLOWAY, 2019 HOLLY SPRINGS CITIZEN OF THE YEAR, FINDS PEACE AND TRANQUILITY.

16 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Holloway is also a professional gospel singer. Read more about her new album on page 65.

Jonathan Fredin

Meet


The youngest minds deserve the greatest attention. A child’s natural curiosity is boundless. By nurturing that with a thoughtful balance of play and structure, we spark lightbulb moments every day. Learn how our approach inspires a lifelong love of discovery.

Primrose School at West Lake 4501 West Lake Road Apex, NC 27539 919.662.1322 | PrimroseWestLake.com

Bring in this ad for 50% off on registration. Each Primrose school is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools is a registered trademark of Primrose School Franchising SPE, LLC. Š2020 Primrose School Franchising SPE, LLC. All rights reserved.


Meet

Greet

MARTY WOODWARD Owner/Sawdust Maker, Rescued Wood Rehab

BACKGROUND: A year ago, I jumped off the corporate ship.

RESCUED WOOD REHAB IS A HAVEN FOR WOODWORKERS, OFFERING CUSTOM-MADE ITEMS AND WOOD FOR DO-IT-YOURSELFERS.

Woodworking has always been my passion, so I decided to make the leap. I’ve developed relationships with folks in rescuing wood that otherwise would end up in the landfill. I work with people who take down barns, folks who get slabs from sawmills and others who randomly provide wood. It’s a fun process. MISSION: Our business is based on three things: doing custom

woodwork for people, providing wood for do-it-yourselfers and having items in the store that are made by myself and other local woodworkers. WOOD TYPES: We deal primarily with domestic wood like walnut,

oak, cedar, poplar, cherry, maple and barnwood — but also have some mesquite from New Mexico. ETHOS: I have a saying that represents my approach to doing

business: ‘Be safe! Keep building! Stay positive!’

WARMTH: The shop has become a bit of a hangout. I joke with

people and tell them that if they hang around too long, I’m going to put them to work sanding something. It’s been great to build relationships with regulars. ON GROWTH: We have four employees and thankfully have been

able to grow ever since we opened. Bud, our rescue dog, comes to the shop and works two or three days a week. He’s employee of the week every week. CRAFTSMANSHIP: We do a lot of custom work like fireplace

mantles, barnwood-style tables, desks, shelves and benches. We also make small items like cutting boards and wine racks. GIVING SPIRIT: It’s nice to offer options like our woodworker

Wednesdays and small workshops. We’ve provided free project wood to children and contributed toward the Pine Acres Community Center. It’s all part of connecting with people. RESCUED WOOD REHAB 718 North Main Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2653 rwrnc.com

Compiled by David McCreary | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin 18 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


BUD, THE SHOP DOG, IS RESCUED WOOD REHAB’S PERPETUAL EMPLOYEE OF THE WEEK. OWNER MARTY WOODWARD HELPS SOME TOO. 19


Dig in

Drink up

Harvest Time Pumpkin Ale from Big Boss Brewing Company Written by Dave Tollefsen | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

FLAVOR: Big Boss Brewing offers Harvest Time Pumpkin Ale to

welcome you to the fall season. Brewed with real pumpkin and their proprietary blend of spices, this beer offers a nice balance between the two. Believe it or not, there are pumpkin beers that contain only spices, but Harvest Time includes the real thing. There’s a nice dose of cinnamon and nutmeg that stand out among the other spices. It’s not liquid pumpkin pie, and it really shouldn’t be, because then it would be labeled as a “dessert beer.” The malt flavor is still present to remind you that it is a beer, and it finishes crisp and clean. I’LL TAKE S’MORE: This is an easy drinking beer to enjoy as you relax

in the backyard, while a fire crackles in a fire pit, and the leaves gently descend all around you. BIG BOSS BREWING 1249 Wicker Drive, Raleigh (919) 834-0045 bigbossbrewing.com

Pumpkin is the state fruit — yep, it’s a fruit — of New Hampshire.

20 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Dave Tollefsen is one of the NCBeerGuys – they have been promoting North Carolina craft beer and breweries on their website, ncbeerguys.com, since 2012. He is an avid homebrewer for more than 10 years and is also part of the North Carolina Craft Brewers Guild.


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Does your on-screen image reflect a vibrant and refreshed you? Thanks to Zoom, we now know exactly how we look when expressing ourselves professionally and socially. From wrinkles between our eyebrows, to thin lips, frown lines and a downturned mouth, the best lighting or angles can’t seem to erase those subtle signs of aging that now haunt us daily. Tannan Plastic Surgery offers cosmetic surgery procedures and products for the face, from a targeted skincare routine to microcorrections using Filler, Botox or Sclerotherapy. As a female boardcertified plastic surgeon, Dr. Shruti Tannan and her nurse Kristie Foushee, help women maintain their body confidence and ultimately their self-confidence. Our certified on-site operating room and allfemale team are ready to provide you with the finest care. When you look your best, you also feel your best.

Come see us at Tannan Plastic Surgery!

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LIPOSUCTION LABIAPLASTY BREAST LIFT


Dig in

WHISK 316 Colonades Way, Cary Mon. – Sun. 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.* *subject to change (919) 322-2458 whiskcarolina.com

Drink up

Keftedes with Tzatziki Sauce These Keftedes, or Greek-style meatballs, are tender, juicy and full of fabulous flavors! Pair these meatballs with fresh, dilly tzatziki (cucumber yogurt) sauce. Serve the hot meatballs with a side dip of tzatziki sauce and a side salad. Or, place a few meatballs in a pita pocket and add fresh greens, and generously drizzle with tzatziki sauce. Alternatively, an orzo pilaf would be a great complement to the meatballs and sauce.

Recipe by

The Triangle’s award-winning destination for cooks, foodies, chefs and gadget lovers.

15,000+

tools for cooking and entertaining

35 cooking classes each month Private parties and company team-building 25 talented instructors from 15 countries

Family Owned

and staffed by a diverse group of culinary experts 22 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

INGREDIENTS: 1 onion, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced 2 tablespoons fresh mint, minced 2 slices dry, white bread, crusts removed 1/2 cup milk 1 pound ground beef 1 pound ground lamb 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 large egg, beaten 1 lemon, zested and juiced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup flour Olive oil for pan frying

DIRECTIONS:

1. Using a knife or small food processor, prep the onion, garlic, parsley and mint. Set aside. 2. Dip the slices of dry bread into the milk. Wring out any extra milk. Crumble the soaked bread into a large bowl. 3. Add the ground beef, ground lamb, onion, garlic, minced herbs, oregano, egg, lemon juice and lemon zest, salt and pepper. Mix with clean hands until the mixture is evenly combined. 4. Using a cookie scoop or hands, roll meat mixture into 1-inch balls. Roll each meatball in a dusting of flour, then place on a parchment-lined baking pan. (Extra meatballs may be frozen at this stage and cooked later.)

5. In a large skillet, add a thin layer of olive oil and heat. Once hot, and working in batches, add a few meatballs to the pan. Roll the meatballs around until nicely browned on all sides. Place the cooked meatballs in a covered dish while cooking the remaining meatballs. Serve hot.

Makes about 50 meatballs

Tzatziki Sauce INGREDIENTS:

1 English cucumber, coarsely grated 1 cup whole milk, plain Greek yogurt 1 tablespoon fresh dill, minced 1 clove garlic, grated or crushed 1 lemon, juiced  Kosher salt and pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:

1. Prepare the cucumber by peeling, removing the seeds, and grating with a coarse grater. Place the grated cucumber in cheesecloth, and squeeze out any extra liquid. Lightly salt the cucumber, and let drain for at least two hours or overnight in the refrigerator. 2. Mince the dill, grate or crush the garlic, and juice the lemon. 3. Mix all the ingredients together. Salt and pepper to taste.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups


Dig in

Drink up 2019 Orealios Gaea “R” Robola of Cephalonia PDO

The Robola Cooperative of Cephalonia was founded in 1982, and today it consists of over 300 members who individually tend their vineyards. Robola is an indigenous grape to Greece. This Robola is a light color wine with aromas of white flowers, citrus, lime zest and tea leaves. The palate displays notes of tea leaves, citrus flavors, whitefleshed fruits with fresh acidity — and a long aftertaste. The wine brings out the mint and parsley in the meatballs and smooths out the tartness and acidity of the tzatziki sauce. $14.99

2019 Dio Fili XinomavroMoschomavro Rose

Founded in 2007, Dio Fili Estate is the result of years of friendship between John Polyzou and winemaker Yiannis Boutaris. The wine is a blend of Xinomavro and Moschomavro, both indigenous Greek grapes. This rose has aromas of rich, ripe red berries, crisp stone fruit and hints of white pepper. Floral and spicy, the palate is medium- to full-bodied, with flavors of ripe raspberries and wild strawberries, and a point of sweetness. The rose tones down the onion and the lemon in the meatballs but notably brings out the mint and oregano. It tones down the bitterness of the cucumber and the tartness in the tzatziki sauce. $14.99

Written By Bill Allen Photographed By Jonathan Fredin

2019 Mitravelas Agiorgitiko Red on Black Nemea

Founded in 1913, Mitravelas Estate is the oldest modern winery in Nemea, the largest red wine appellation in Greece. The Red on Black is made from 100% Agiorgitiko, a grape indigenous to Greece. Containing aromas of plum, ripe blackberry, cherry and fresh herbs, on the palate, the wine is bright, vibrant and filled with fruits such as blueberry, with a long finish. The protein and fat in the meatball and the yogurt in the tzatziki sauce subdue the astringency of the tannins in the wine. The wine smooths out the pronounced edges of the tzatziki sauce and softly brings out the mint and oregano undertones in the meatballs. $14.99

Meatballs Greek ctly with perfe pair

Bill Allen holds a first-level certification with the Court of Master Sommeliers and a Specialist of Wine certification from the Society of Wine Educators. He has worked as a wine educator with the Triangle Wine Company for five years.

23


We’re going to talk about

money. Written by Emily Uhland | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

24 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


Wait, don’t skip this story —

you are going to want to read about this determined Holly Springs native who is working passionately to make the subject of money less intimidating and more fun.

Meet Jasmine Brown.

She’s the oldest of five siblings, graduate of Holly Springs High School (HSHS) and N.C. State University, and current award-winning coach of the men’s and women’s swim teams at her alma mater, HSHS. continued on page 26


continued from page 25

She’s also the founder of FACTS for Youth,

a nonprofit committed to increasing financial literacy in teenagers, a passion she has spent her twenty-something odd years developing. Brown grew up in a household where the subjects of money and economics were commonly discussed thanks to her father’s career as a financial adviser. “I’ve always been around … the topic of money,” Brown says. “(My dad) used to quiz me on stock symbols when I was younger. I could tell you what the market being bearish or bullish meant.” Once Brown entered NC State, to eventually earn her degree in business administration (finance concentraJASMINE BROWN WROTE A NOVEL, WORKBOOK AND DAILY PLANNER FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO tion, accounting minor), she started to understand that faREINFORCE THE FINANCIAL LITERACY CONCEPTS SHE TEACHES IN HER WORKSHOPS. miliarity with financial concepts wasn’t so commonplace after all. “My first year of college was when I realized that I had a different upbringing than some people when it comes to those topics. My first roommate didn’t know much about credit. I started teaching people, ‘No, don’t get free credit cards in the brickyard,’” says Brown. Several years later, working as a swim coach, Brown’s enthusiasm for financial literacy became something more. “One of my swimmers didn’t know how to fill out a check,” THE BROWN FAMILY, FROM LEFT: SIBLINGS RODNEY JR, REAGAN, JASMINE Brown recalls. “He had both parAND JALEN (NOT PICTURED: RAVEN), AND PARENTS JULIE AND RODNEY SR. ents in the home. He was a white 26 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


tles — you’d be surprised how much teenagers love Skittles. “When you think of personal finance at that age, you think of an old white man talking completely over your head. My idea is to bring it down to their level, so the students understand it and enjoy learning about it. After all, it’s money, and kids love money.” Topics covered during the presentation include investing, budgeting, credit and — of course — how to write a check. “These kids are only hearing from me for an hour and a half. They might go home and find that the conversation — and knowledge — just stops,” Brown says. Her solution was to write “The Money Club,” a book about a high-school teacher who witnesses a student’s explosive outburst and becomes inspired to change the way financial education is taught. “The idea with “The Money Club” was to take the conversation home and be able to talk about it at the dinner table or ask questions and read and learn together. Now ... we are breaking the generational curse by educating the parents as well,” Brown says. “The Money Club” workbook and a Courtesy of Jasmine Brown

student. I knew (personal finance) wasn’t often discussed in minority communities, but I always assumed that it was in other homes. “And that one thing kind of snowballed into everything I’m doing now,” she said. In the fall of 2018, Brown founded FACTS for Youth, (which stands for Finance Athletic Career Training Services), aimed at teaching financial literacy concepts to teens and helping them prepare for post-high school life. “Initially I just wanted to focus on student athletes. The athletes that I was targeting were predominantly black, from underserved communities. They looked at athletics as a way out of their situations. I was trying to explain that you might not be the one in your community that makes it out, so you have to start talking about other things.” It didn’t take long for Brown to realize that lack of financial education was a much larger problem. “There were students that wanted to be lawyers, engineers, doctors; so that’s when I realized this is a problem for everyone,” she says. Brown developed a presentation called “Show Me the Money,” and began delivering it in schools in communities in North Carolina with high unemployment and low household income. “Show Me the Money” was a hit — the students were interested and receptive, she says, thanks in part to Brown’s penchant for teaching through games. “Every time I go into a presentation, I try to bring at least one or two games. Even if a kid doesn’t remember a word-for-word definition, they are going to understand a concept, because of the game we played,” she says. “I do a budgeting game with Skit-

2020-2021 student planner followed, piggybacking on the concepts in the novel, but designed to be hands-on, with spaces to practice writing checks, tracking expenses and setting budgets and goals. “There are a lot of different types of learners. For some people it’s better to learn if you are actually doing it,” says Brown. In-person presentations abruptly ended in March at the onset of the pandemic, so Brown transitioned her teaching online, holding Zoom sessions and Instagram Live Q&A’s. continued on page 28

My idea is to bring (personal finance) down to their level, so the students understand it and enjoy learning about it.

– Jasmine Brown

BROWN SPOKE WITH STUDENTS FROM SOUTH GARNER HIGH SCHOOL ABOUT FINANCIAL EDUCATION AND “THE MONEY CLUB.”

27


Tonya Jibben

Passion Projects

As a high schooler, Brown swam on the women’s swim team at Holly Springs High. Now, as the men’s and women’s team coach, she’s the first alumna to return to the school as a head coach. Approaching her fourth season with HSHS, Brown has already made a mark, earning Coach of the Year for men’s and women’s swimming in 2018, then repeating for men’s swimming in 2019. Brown also received the Homer Thompson’s Memorial 8 Who Make A Difference Award for the 2019-2020 year. “It’s been so much fun. Coaching has been one thing that I’ve completely thrived at,” Brown says. She describes her coaching style as “disciplinarian.” “The kids know when they come to practice, we’re going to get it in. ... They know that they are getting better, and they can see their times dropping. But also, I’m not that old — I’m relatable. I talk to them; I still have siblings that are their age.”

Courtesy of Jasmine Brown

SWIM COACH AT HOLLY SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL

“It’s in my nature to be on and keep up with a very hectic schedule,” says FACTS founder Jasmine Brown. “There’s always something that can be done for the betterment of everyone else.”

AUTHOR MODEL Jasmine Brown started modeling in her early twenties, an age considered “old” in the fashion industry. Still, her love of walking the runway led her three times to New York Fashion Week. “Latin American designers love me because of the hair and the hips,” she says with a laugh. “It’s fun, but it’s an industry that is tough,” Brown says. Brown learned grace and fluidity as a dancer growing up, which made her a natural for the purposeful, confident walk showcased on a runway. “It’s a vibe, and I love it,” she says. Brown has modeled in beauty, fashion and bridal campaigns locally and across the country.

28 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Confession time. “I hated writing the book. … I’m a finance person. I like numbers; I don’t like words,” says Jasmine Brown, author of “The Money Club.” Understanding the importance of “The Money Club” as a tool for teaching financial literacy helped Brown persevere. “I set a goal, and it seemed like a small goal,” she says. “I had to write down 25 words every day. Some days that was very easy, and I would write 100 or 150. Other days it was really, really hard.” Surprisingly, a family health emergency propelled Brown to complete the book. “I had to put my energy somewhere, or I would have lost it,” she says.

We’re after healthy relationships with money from a young age.

– Jasmine Brown

continued from page 27

“I feel like I’m actually reaching more people. I can have up to 100 kids on a Zoom call, versus going into a classroom that only has 30 people,” she says. There have been challenges, especially in reformatting her hands-on games to work virtually. (Sadly, no Skittles in a Zoom meeting.) However, many schools have been quick to promote Brown’s nocost presentation. “Because it is virtual, (schools) are jumping more at the opportunity versus having a guest come in. It helps me a little bit more to do it this way.” In the future, look for an annual fundraising gala and a youth jobs conference to join the FACTS lineup of programs. “Our biggest need is funding, because (“The Money Club”) is $17.95, the workbook is $8.99 and the planner is $24.99. I want to get to a point where I can give away these books and not have kids buy them,” Brown says. She also hopes to grow FACTS by expanding her board of directors with “members of the community that will back me and are as passionate as I am for this project,” she says. “We’re after healthy relationships with money from a young age. Talking about it now can change the scope of someone’s life.” FACTS FOR YOUTH Factsforyouth.com @factsforyouthnc Purchase “The Money Club”, workbook and student planner at factsforyouth.com, Amazon or Barnes & Noble.


Rescued WOOD Rehab Your local shop for all things WOOD! We specialize in custom woodworking of all shapes and sizes. Our team can provide DIY Support and Custom Ideas for FUN one-of-a-kind projects. Check out our unique creations, live-edge slabs, barnwood, lumber, reclaimed wood, and hand-crafted items by local woodworkers. Follow us on social media for ideas, classes, specials, and seasonal items.

Rescued WOOD Rehab “Guaranteed Imperfect” 718 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 285–2653 www.rwrnc.com Be Safe – Keep Building – Stay Positive

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For

Compiled by Emily Uhland

/

Good *Responses have been edited for clarity and length.

30 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

FUQUAY-VARINA EMERGENCY FOOD PANTRY

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Founded in 2001, when several local churches combined their individual efforts to form a central food pantry for Fuquay and surrounding areas.

MISSION STATEMENT: To bring glory to our Lord through feeding and strengthening people in need. To find those in need and be sure they are fed, removing the handicap of hunger for as many families as possible. SERVICES: Distribution of a balanced nutritional supply of fresh produce, breads, canned goods, meat and dairy, as well as hygiene items such as soap and toilet paper to those in need. Provide special needs items when possible, such as heaters, firewood and fans.

Serves

500

families per month

Provide turkeys and trimmings at Thanksgiving and a special Christmas bag to help with treats during the holidays.

HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? We have seen a 25% increase in clients and experienced an inability to purchase some products on the open market.

Jonathan Fredin

Throughout the hardships of 2020, dedicated local nonprofits have continued to work hard serving southern Wake and beyond. In the following pages, hear inspiring stories from the directors and founders of these organizations and what we can do to help.

FOOD PANTRY VOLUNTEER PETER CZECH UNLOADS PRODUCE DONATED BY FOOD LION.

BIGGEST NEEDS: Many seasonal food drives have been cancelled or made virtual, so neighborhood food drives, individual food donations and sponsors are sorely needed. WAYS TO HELP: Drop off donations during open hours, or sponsor a turkey dinner for a family. Dinners are $25.00 and can be sponsored by donating online at fvfoodpantry. com or mailing a check. We like to include an enclosure card with each dinner that lists the sponsor’s first names. Email information to fvfoodpantry@gmail.com. Fuquay-Varina Emergency Food Pantry Physical: 216 West Academy Street, Fuquay-Varina Mail: P.O. Box 1463, Fuquay Varina (919) 552-7720 fvfoodpantry.com


FACES

(FAMILY AND COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT SERVICES)

Jonathan Fredin

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GARDEN CLUB VOLUNTEERS MAINTAIN HOLLY SPRINGS FOOD CUPBOARD’S COMMUNITY GARDEN, WHICH GROWS PRODUCE THAT IS DISTRIBUTED TO CLIENTS

Founded in 1964 as the Family Aid Council of Fuquay-Varina by the Fuquay-Varina Ministerial Alliance to centralize financial crisis support for neighbors in FuquayVarina and Willow Spring. MISSION: Provide emergency financial assistance, information and referral in the communities of Fuquay-Varina and Willow Spring, for those experiencing crisis situations related to shelter, utilities and other basic needs. As a Christian ministry, FACES has operated for 57 years on donations from local churches and businesses, individuals and the town of Fuquay-Varina. HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? Like the entire country, our service area has been severely hit by COVID-19. Our office is closed, but we have adapted to the times. Intake forms are available under the assistance tab on our website. Voicemails are retrieved on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Direct inquiries can be sent to exec@faces-cares.org. BIGGEST NEEDS: Financial donations. WAYS TO HELP: Checks lovingly donated in the amount of stimulus checks, accompanied by personal notes acknowledging neighbors who may be hurting are amazing blessings. Desires of the heart like this keeps FACES in the fight. No one could have ever predicted how much we would all need each other. FACES 605 Bridge St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-8100 faces-cares.org

“Local people

helping local people.”

HOLLY SPRINGS FOOD CUPBOARD

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Founded in 2010 MISSION: To provide supplemental food and referral assistance to those in need in the Holly Springs community.

SERVICES: Our food distribution includes track-out bags with kid-friendly snacks and foods to families with school-age children. Healthy, fresh produce grown in our garden joins nonperishable foods donated by community members. These foods are supplemented with protein and dairy products that we purchase and with food donated by local businesses. Drive-through food distribution is every Thursday, 2-5 p.m. Deliveries are available to senior citizens and persons with compromised health or without transportation. HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? The number of families we serve has increased significantly due to Covid-19. From January through July this year, we’ve served an average of 209 families per month, a 24% increase from this same period last year. Distribution of track-out bags for school-age children is up by 253%. We’ve distributed 940 bags so far this year. We want to make sure children who don’t have access to school meals have food during the pandemic.

pounds of food donations received

Covid-19 has changed the way we distribute food, which is now a drive-through operation. Food deliveries are made to vulnerable populations.

pounds of produce from our garden

BIGGEST NEED: Due to the increased number of clients, our greatest need is nonperishable food donations. We typically rely on food drives by community organizations, but many of these groups are unable to meet due to the pandemic. WAYS TO HELP: Food collections are essential to keeping our doors open and our shelves stocked. Even the smallest donations make a difference. The Cupboard can receive donated food on Mondays, 9 a.m.-11 a.m. (our preferred time) and on Thursdays, noon-5 p.m. If you want to do more, please consider organizing a food drive. HOLLY SPRINGS FOOD CUPBOARD 621 W Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 577-2210 www.hsfoodcupboard.org

181,324 1,225

100%

volunteer staff

204

Thanksgiving meals provided

431

Student lunch kits for track-out and summer break *2019 statistics

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MAMA’S HOUSE

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Founded on August 1, 2018

SERVICES:

In an attempt to keep families out of homeless situations, Mama’s House provides food, toiletries, baby items, clothing and household goods to families in need in Wake, Johnston and Harnett counties.

JANETTE ROD, FOUNDER OF MAMA’S HOUSE

MAMA’S HOUSE OF THRIFT

Deliveries of food are made to those that cannot leave their home due to illness, disability or lack of transportation. Special events for back-to-school and the holidays collect clothing, food and toys. HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? Sales at Mama’s House of Thrift — a 1940s, two-story home converted to a thrift store — provide proceeds used to purchase food for our clients. The thrift store was forced to close due to Covid-19, resulting in a significant decrease in resources. Our enrollment numbers grew to over 2,400 in less than 30 days. A GoFundMe campaign helped us survive and continue to make thousands of food deliveries, and the food bank did not stop operations at any time. As of August 1, Mama’s House is in full operation, and our thrift store, donation area and food bank are open. BIGGEST NEEDS: Volunteers and donations are always welcome and needed. We accept all household items, including toys, clothing, shoes, toiletries, pet supplies, linens, books, magazines, newspaper, office supplies, school supplies and more. Canned/dried/non-perishable/non-expired/unopened food and pet-food items are also accepted. WAYS TO HELP: Shop the thousands of beautiful, low-cost items at Mama’s House of Thrift. Every dollar spent at the thrift store buys two cans of food for a family in need. Volunteers are needed to help sort clothing donations, staff the thrift store and make deliveries. Financial, tax-deductible donations are accepted online at mamashouseofthrift.org. MAMA’S HOUSE 1501 North Main Street, Fuquay-Varina (984) 225-2386 mamashouseofthrift.com

32 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Lil’ Mama’s House A second thrift shop location offers a “no shaming” shopping experience. Lil Mama’s House in Willow Springs was created in order for clients to pick out their clothing as if they were shopping. The only difference is that when clients check out at the register, they never have to pay.

Photos by Jonathan Fredin

MISSION: To help feed, clothe and provide necessary household items to impoverished or struggling families in need locally, whether short- or long-term situations. We welcome all in need with open arms regardless of their sex, religion, race or beliefs.


MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION (MMIA)

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Founded in 2008, by Michael Dorman, a retired Coast Guard member MISSION: To assist veterans with disabilities, armed forces and their families. PROGRAMS: Fill The Footlocker is a three-part program that ships care packages to active duty service members and K9 units who are deployed; supplies homeless veterans in North Carolina with hygiene, clothing and comfort items; and provides assistance during the holiday season through gift cards to grocery and department stores and unwrapped gifts and toys to military and veteran families.

SHOP SAFE. SHOP LOCAL.

Homes for Healing provides furniture and household goods to formerly homeless veterans. Operation Building Hope provides necessary home modification services and wheelchair ramps to ensure veterans or military children with disabilities are able to live independently in their homes. HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? Fundraising events have been cancelled, and volunteers are unable to come together in large groups, resulting in a 75% decrease in funding.

• Shop in-store • Curbside Delivery • Phone Orders • Online Shopping

MMIA is creating new programs to serve the active duty and veteran populations, such as “Taking it to the Streets,” which supports homeless veterans throughout the state. No contact donation drop offs are available. Supporters are encouraged to donate to our Fill the Footlocker care package program through online ordering and shipping directly to our packaging or office locations. BIGGEST NEEDS: With donations down by over $400,000, financial support is our number-one need. We also need volunteers and partners to help with projects like bathroom modifications, wheelchair ramp builds, and picking up and delivering furniture to our previously homeless veterans.

15,000+ tools for cooking and entertaining

WAYS TO HELP: MMIA PROVIDES WHEELCHAIR RAMPS AND HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR VETERANS.

Increase awareness by inviting MMIA to speak at your small groups and club meetings. You can support MMIA financially with donations of stocks, property and vehicles; through a one-time or recurring monetary contribution or sponsoring a care package directly through militarymissionsinaction.org.

COOKING CLASSES Technique classes, date nights, ethnic and regional cuisines, and so much more!

100% LOCAL AND FAMILY OWNED Courtesy of MMIA

Organize a collection for a care-package drive. Get a group together to help with a ramp build, warehouse work or delivery of furniture.

WE SHARPEN KNIVES! 316 Colonades Way, Cary, NC Open Every Day of the Week! www.whiskcarolina.com (919) 322-2458

MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION 411-B N Judd Pkwy, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-1603 Militarymissionsinaction.org

33


WAKE

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Founded in 1979

MISSION: Wake Enterprises serves adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including cerebral palsy, autism and traumatic brain injuries, and helps them achieve their maximum level of independence.

ENTERPRISES

Not only are we committed to serving adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but we also serve local businesses and the community. Wake Enterprises is about more than work. We are about all members of the community having a place. PROGRAMS: Wake Enterprises enables adults with disabilities through vocational training, job placement and community inclusion activities to contribute their work, attitudes, opinions and insights for the benefit of the community. These services help participants become more self-sufficient by addressing barriers, which have historically kept them from employment.

Safer-at-Home order and are not able to attend programs in person. We have shifted much of our programming to remote learning through Wake E Live!

We host live, 45-minute online classes each day, during which participants interact with our trainers and their peers. Classes include nutrition, safety, health, art, self-advocacy and exercise. WAYS TO HELP: Financial donations are vital to allow us to continue assisting a population that cannot afford for us to discontinue services. No donation is too small.

Using a tiered approach, Wake Enterprises provides job training and employment first through internal contract work, then through community employment. We provide support and training; our participants provide the hard work and dependability.

Financial donations are accepted online at www.wake-enterprises. org. Donations of cleaning supplies, personal protective equipment or arts and crafts supplies are also appreciated.

HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? We have had to lay off approximately 60% of our staff and have experienced a 40% decrease in funding since March. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, many of our participants are under the

WAKE ENTERPRISES 3333 Air Park Road, Fuquay-Varina (919) 714-6100 wake-enterprises.org

ZACH’S TOY CHEST

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Founded in 2009

MISSION: To bring joy, hope and normalcy to patients and their families during stressful and often traumatic medical situations. Our goal is to provide an environment of healing that inspires an overall higher quality of cancer care. PROGRAMS: We supply new toys, blankets, gift cards and other essential items, as requested, all year long to local N.C. hospitals, primarily serving Duke Children’s, UNC Children’s, James & Connie Maynard Children’s and WakeMed Children’s Hospital, along with all outlying WakeMed Emergency Departments across Wake County.

Courage Cards are homemade cards and notes with encouraging messages given to children who are in the hospital. Volunteers of all ages can

participate in this program from home. 2020 has provided over 2,400 cards from 300 volunteers as of August! Special events usually include a golf tournament and annual Toy Chest Mingle. We also host a very special event for pediatric cancer survivors and their families each July called A Summer’s Night with Santa. This free event is a wonderful day of fun to let kids be kids and have a good time. 34 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Staggering Statistics

People with disabilities between ages 18-64 are less likely to be employed, creating subsequent gaps in income, health care and transportation, according to the 2000 N.O.D./Harris Survey of Americans with Disabilities. In the United States, the unemployment rate for people with disabilities is approximately

70%.

The goal of Wake Enterprises is to combat these statistics.

HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? Toy donations have slowed significantly. No new toy drives have been held to produce toys for the fall season, and the hospitals’ needs have been great. Mass deliveries to hospitals at the beginning of the pandemic have cut down on our inventory of toys. Our special events and fundraisers for this year have been cancelled. BIGGEST NEEDS: New toy donations for kids of all ages, blankets and monetary donations. When toy donations start coming back in, volunteers will be needed to help sort, organize and pack toys for hospital deliveries. WAYS TO HELP: Hold a toy drive, in person or virtually, within your community, work, church or sports club. Or make a purchase from our Amazon wish list that can be shipped directly to us. If you are able to, new video games for XBox and PlayStation 4 units are needed for teens. Gift cards are always welcome, as they are used for older kids and for expenses families incur each time they travel to appointments. ZACH’S TOY CHEST PO Box 1013 Holly Springs (702) 439-9394

Zachstoychest.org


MEG’S SMILE FOUNDATION

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REACH “NEW HEIGHTS” WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONNECTIONS THEME AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS MAGNET ELEMENTARY

Founded in March 2011. First “smile” completed in May 2011. MISSION: To bring smiles to the faces of children and young adults affected by serious illnesses and their families.

Through gifts and fun days, we endeavor to help them forget, maybe for just one moment, what they are going through. PROGRAMS: We create special days and give gifts to children, teenagers and young adults battling serious and lifethreatening health issues. Past “smiles” have included trips, concert tickets, room makeovers, gifts of technology and accessible recreation equipment to help children with physical disabilities. HOW HAS THE ORGANIZATION BEEN AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC? We have not been able to do our major fundraisers, including our annual silent auction and golf tournament. We can’t send people on trips right now, but we have been able to purchase lots of gifts. Two recent examples are a go-cart and a dirt bike. BIGGEST NEEDS: We would love donation items for our silent auction and always appreciate volunteers for our events. We are 100% volunteer, so all the money raised goes right to the kids. WAYS TO HELP: Stay tuned for when we are able to resume our events and fundraisers. In the meantime, donations and referrals are accepted on the website. MEG’S SMILE FOUNDATION 105 Hickory Glen Lane, Holly Springs (919) 434-5050 megsmile.org

Come GROW with us where we: • Boast several outdoor learning environments that spark our students’ love of learning • Cultivate students’ curiosity through daily environmental expedition electives • Involve the whole family in environmentally-themed activities To learn more about us, please visit www.wcpss.net/lincolnheightses Lincoln Heights Environmental Connections Magnet Elementary School 307 Bridge Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526 (919) 557-2587

35


TODAY IN THE QUAY FOUNDER AND ADMINISTRATOR JASON WUNSCH REPORTS ONLY GOOD NEWS STORIES.

S

ome days, it feels like good news is hard to come by. Going as far back as 2013, Fuquay-Varina resident Jason Wunsch noticed a lack of positive news coverage in southern Wake County. Community newspapers like The Fuquay-Varina Independent and the Southwest Wake News started to downsize and shut down, so Wunsch, who is an attorney and a Fuquay-Varina commissioner, decided to launch the Today in the Quay Facebook page. 36 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

“One of the things I saw that was missing, that I could really give back to the community as a public servant, was that the local newspaper had left right prior to my starting as a commissioner,” Wunsch says. “That was the evolution of Today in the Quay, with the spin that I was going to report on only positive news. Commissioners bring all sorts of things to the table — I saw that as my personal contribution.” In March of 2014, Wunsch crafted

his first post on Today in the Quay. The page’s content focused on happenings around town, sharing local information and taking uplifting news submissions from readers. “At first I thought it was going to be a little page, one more opportunity to hear about things that were going on in the community. Maybe I would have 1,000 followers if I was lucky. “I would go out looking for stories, and I would share things that were going


Written by Emily Uhland Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

The

I’ve noticed that social media has been a whole lot more negative, which made it even more important for Today in the Quay to continue to put out positive things.

– Jason Wunsch, Today in the Quay

Good News

on with the town board. It enabled me to get plugged into the community,” he says. For the first year, the page maintained around 600 followers. Then, like the town of Fuquay-Varina itself, Today in the Quay experienced a period of explosive growth. “There were a few key stories that really just blew up the page,” Wunsch says. “One was the announcement of the splash pad in Fuquay-Varina. Another one was when I started covering youth sports. … Then I started getting more into what’s coming to

Fuquay-Varina, and people started sharing their plans with me. “Before I knew it, I was a full-fledged daily paper, and then the page really started to grow.” By 2017, three years after it’s inception, Today in the Quay had 10,000 followers (the town’s population at this time is around 29,000), and Wunsch was posting multiple times a day. “It’s very time consuming, but it’s a great service for the community,” he says.

Positive Vibes Only on Today in the Quay

Along the way, students from Southern Wake Academy, college interns and even the Bob Barker Company have lent assistance to the page, but Wunsch has always remained the primary driver. Wunsch credits other popular local pages, such as the Fuquay-Varina Police Department and Fuquay-Varina Memes as inspiration. “What a great job Fuquay-Varina is doing, making you laugh and getting incontinued on page 38

37


AS A FUQUAY-VARINA COMMISSIONER, JASON WUNSCH FOUNDED TODAY IN THE QUAY AS A SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY.

continued from page 37

formation out to you through government pages, and so I said, ‘This is something I am going to keep doing.” Wunsch’s earliest inspiration came from his mother, who wrote a positive news column for the Asheville Citizen, in which she “caught” people being nice in the retail sector and shared these heartwarming experiences in her articles. “(Today in the Quay) is a reflection of the life that I’ve tried to live — trying to focus and stay on the positive,” he says. Positivity is natural for Wunsch, but that’s not the case for all of his followers. “The last few months have been very tough. There’s been a lot of negativity online. JASON WUNSCH’S QUICK PICKS: “I try to deSUNRISE or SUNSET // BEER or WINE // NBA or NFL lete bad language, CHOCOLATE or VANILLA // DOGS or CATS // CAKE or PIE and look for people BEACH or MOUNTAINS // BURGERS or TACOS // SPRING or FALL WUNSCH WITH POLICE CHIEF who are insulting. LAURA FAHNESTOCK SWEET TEA or LEMONADE // BRUNCH or HAPPY HOUR … There are other pages you can go to online where you can get into argumenare doing a phenomenal job as a town, it given me the opportunity to work as a team tative discussions, but not on this page,” is hard to be an objective reporter when to make a dramatic impact in the commuhe says. you are one of the board members making nity,” he says. Another conflict Wunsch faces is be- those decisions. Today in the Quay currently has cause of his service on the town board — a “When people would come on the 19,100 followers and has been awarded position he loves. page and criticize the town, I’d often take “Best Blog in the Triangle” by INDY Week “A lot of times people will say, ‘It’s hard it personally.” two years in a row. for you to be objective when you are on the Wunsch’s term on the town board ex“At the end of the day, I want everyone board … and you are always painting the pires next year. He’s considering running to know how wonderful we are in the town town in a positive light.’ And I would agree again, for what would be his third term. of Fuquay-Varina. Not just the government, that is a conflict. Even though I think we “I’ve enjoyed it so much. I feel like it’s but the people. It’s a neat town.” MB 38 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


FUQUAY-VARINA ARTS CENTER

Arts Center Presents Join us for concerts by many of our local musicians in the Arts Center Presents series. This curated series offers a wide variety of talent, from Gospel to country, from pop to original. The series features many favorites including Derek Chase and Alice Osborn, and faces new to the stage, such as the McCray Brothers. Concerts are released and can be found on the Arts Center’s Facebook page.

Studio Time! Whether it’s the painting studio, the dance studio, or the art studio— it’s time to get back to classes! Classes in painting, art journaling, tapestry, and weaving are currently being offered, as are a variety of dance classes. Some classes are offered with very limited in-person instruction, others are offered via Zoom, and others are offered in an outdoor setting. It’s time to get creative--for more information and to register, click on the Classes tab at FVArts.org.

Sidewalk Gallery We’ve turned our Gallery inside-out—stroll by the Arts Center on South Fuquay Avenue and enjoy artwork by local and regional artists. Self-taught Lumberton artist Burritt Benson III is currently featured.

For more info, call the Arts Center at 919-567-3920 fvarts.org


Coming soon to LolaSpirit: Personalize this “old-school style” tee with artwork on the shoulders.

These are the most comfortable shoes you will ever wear. They will be your favorite shoes.

- Anny Sanchez

Two piece sporty set, $60 each

FASHION with Heart Passion and style converge in three Triangle-based fashion brands Written by Emily Uhland | Photographed by Jonathan Fredin 40 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


LolaSpirit FOUNDER: ANNY SANCHEZ

Anny Sanchez created her lifestyle brand, LolaSpirit, to be more than a collection of colorful, artistic clothes, shoes and gifts. “I wanted to make a brand that helps women to respect each other. Wearing some Lola is part of a movement of women supporting other women,” said Sanchez, a Cary resident. Positive messages and personal affirmations frequently appear on LolaSpirit T-shirts and social-media posts, encouraging women to feel powerful and to bring out the best in others. Growing up in Merida, Venezuela, Sanchez’s mother had a children’s clothing store. “All my life I wanted to have a store,” she said. Now her shop reaches customers worldwide. In celebration of the one-year anniversary of LolaSpirit this August, Sanchez designed a diamond-themed collection, acknowledging that the best results often come from the hardest challenges. “In this difficult world, under pressure, we can become diamonds,” she said. “I want Lola to be a vibe, not just a cool T-shirt.” Bestselling painted sneakers are the shop’s headliners. Each pair is printed on demand, so customers have the ability to personalize their design. “Getting to know the customers and their stories and why they want custom shoes is my favorite part,” Sanchez said. Many LolaSpirit offerings feature artwork, phrases and motifs that reference Sanchez’s native country. “When you are far away, it’s nice to feel a little bit of home.” lolaspirit.com @lolaspiritshop

Snakeskin cutout jumpsuit, $65, Swoon Boutique

Phone cases, $15–$20 each

Signature sneakers, $82.50

Venezuelan-inspired coffee mug, $19.99 41


I’ll be overlooked if I try to cater to everyone, but how many brands are catering to tall women specifically? - Rhonda Mapp

t seller! Be s

Puffed-sleeve, one-arm jumpsuit, $160*

Safari high-waisted pants, $120* Puffed-sleeve crop top, $80*

Growing up I was tomboyish; I wasn’t into fashion. It wasn’t until the end of middle school that I got into more fashion. Every day I would plan my outfits out and have shoes to match. - Rhonda Mapp

” High-waisted flounce pants, $95

42 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


Rhonda Lynette FOUNDER: RHONDA LYNETTE MAPP

Balloon-sleeve jumpsuit, $152

Raleigh-based fashion brand Rhonda Lynette, caters to “the tall, chic woman that’s on the go, who loves to dress up and dress down,” said founder and designer Rhonda Lynette Mapp. Mapp herself is 5 feet, 10 inches tall, and understands how challenging it can be for women to find stylish, properly fitting clothing outside of the average sizes. “My business mission is to allow women to feel beautiful, confident and independent in the clothing that they wear,” Mapp said. “I want them to know that there is a brand out there that is catered specifically for them, and to let them know that they are beautiful in the tall bodies they are in.” Mapp’s sophisticated-casual designs include allowances in the waist, torso and inseam to accommodate longer lengths. Her typical customer can range from 5 feet, 10 inches to over 6 feet, 4 inches tall. Mapp’s designs were featured in 2019 New York Fashion Week and Los Angeles Fashion Week earlier this year, experiences she describes as “very emotional.” “I was happy; I was all the emotions mixed together,” she said. “Being a small business, it can get overwhelming, but the reward is so much better. Those two events made it feel like I’m really getting there.”

Safari off-the-shoulder dress, $100*

rhondalynette.com @rhondalynettedesigns (704) 951-7149

*Coming fall 2020. Estimated retail price.

Cape sleeve dress, $120*

43


Maria Maria Mexican Trends FOUNDER: ANA RAMIREZ

In and around Puebla, Mexico, the hometown of Apex resident Ana Ramirez, there are many skilled artisans creating vibrant jewelry and accessories. Hailing from remote villages, these artists often trek hours to reach a market and sell their wares. “I always loved to wear Mexican jewelry and accessories,” said Ramirez, who moved to the Cary area 15 years ago. Ramirez founded Maria Maria Mexican Trends to support the artists from her native country and showcase their beautiful work to U.S. customers. Hand-painted tote bags, beads and key chains, intricately embroidered necklaces and fluffy pom pom bag charms are some of the colorful accessories offered on the Maria Maria Etsy shop. “I wanted to select some unique things with great quality and great design,” said Ramirez. “I always try to bring different items. It’s not repetitive. If I bring a necklace, that’s the only necklace (like it) I bring.” Through her shop, Ramirez is able to support Mexican artisans, both in their craft and financially. “My main goal is to continue helping more and more artisans so they can provide Everything is a better income to their family. Every purhandmade or chase made with Maria makes a difference in hand-painted. someone’s life in Mexico.”

etsy.com/shop/MariaMariaTrends

Set of hand-painted bag charms, $15 44 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

- Ana Ramirez

Charm bracelet set, $49

Embroidered necklace, $65 Black midi dress, $49, from Swoon Boutique

Hand-painted clutch, $49


Founder Ana Ramirez travels to Mexico multiple times a year to discover new products and meet with native artisans.

Free Pickup & Delivery Dry Cleaning & Laundry

SIGN UP

PICKUP Embroidered heart necklace, $49

CLEAN UP Swarovski Worry Doll bracelet set, $33

Pom pom bag charms, $15

Clothing on pg. 6: Smocked waistband dress, $52.99, from Bless Your Heart Hand-painted tote bag, $89 Embroidered necklace, $65

SUIT UP Serving Fuquay-Varina • Holly Springs • Raleigh Cary • Apex • Angier • Willow Springs

Special thanks to: BLESS YOUR HEART BOUTIQUE 242 S. Main St., Suite 106, Holly Springs (919) 586-7943 blessyourheartnc.com SWOON BOUTIQUE 2112 Werrington Dr., Holly Springs (919) 586-7003 heartswoon.com

919-552-8381 goodwinsglamorama.com

45


There

Back

Pittsboro Written by Alexandra Blazevich Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

Take a scenic drive across Jordan Lake on US-64, and you’ll find yourself in the heart of Pittsboro, known for its beverage game, music scene and small-town feel. The Chatham County town of 5,000 boasts a Food Lion, one charming city block of downtown shops and restaurants and a growing art presence. “It’s a wacky and wonderful place to live,” said Chatham Arts Council member Catherine Hobbs, who has lived in Pittsboro since 2006, when her family built a house on land her husband inherited from his great-grandfather. The nonprofit’s mission is to invest in the arts and to educate children through the arts. Thanks to the council, murals have been painted on empty walls downtown, and there’s been an increase in creative classes for all ages in and around Pittsboro. Hobbs’ focus at the Chatham Arts Council is community outreach — something that comes easy to her in Pittsboro. “I love going into the library and knowing the librarians and the people who are working at the post office and the grocery store,” she said. “Living in a place where people know you and care about you has really been remarkable.” continued on page 48

46 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

N.C. SPIRITS, BEER, WINE AND CIDER CAN ALL BE SAMPLED AT FAIR GAME BEVERAGE TASTING ROOM.


Pittsboro is a bit of An escape, and yet, so close to home.

– Maria Parker-Lewis, president of Main Street Pittsboro

“DISTRESSED INDUSTRIAL CHIC” ART INSTALLATIONS ARE ON DISPLAY AT PITTSBORO’S UNIQUE BEVERAGE AND DINING DESTINAION, THE PLANT.

47


MAKE A DAY OF IT! MORNING: Chatham Mills Farmers Market for a grab-and-go breakfast. Open on Saturday mornings. 480 Hillsboro St. chathammillsfarmersmarket.com MID-MORNING: Take a kayak or canoe ride down the Haw River via the Robeson Creek Boat Ramp. Rent through hawrivercanoe.com or bring your own. Hanks Chapel Road

S&T’S SODA SHOPPE BOASTS 32 FLAVORS OF ICE CREAM AND OLD-FASHIONED FLOATS, PHIZZIES AND SODAS.

continued from page 46

Whether it’s taking her kids to S&T’s Soda Shoppe for an oldfashioned malted milkshake or grabbing a beer and oysters at Postal Fish Company, these experiences have helped her make a home in the close-knit community. “We have a lot of transplants and a lot of people who have lived here their whole lives, and that creates a dynamic and interesting place to live,” Hobbs said. Maria Parker-Lewis moved to Chatham County from Cary 13 years ago DRIVE TIME seeking a slower pace of life. She and her From Holly Springs: husband owned the Pittsboro Roadhouse 30 minutes from 2012 until earlier this year, and they From Fuquay-Varina: plan to open The Sycamore, a high-end 40 minutes steak house later this year. “Even though (Pittsboro) is so close to Raleigh, Chapel Hill, Cary and Apex, you feel like you’re somewhere else,” she said. “You will certainly experience local and small — because that’s what we are.” Parker-Lewis is also president of Main Street Pittsboro, which promotes economic development downtown while preserving its deep-rooted history. The initiative began in 1980 to attract consumers back to local mom-and-pop shops after big-box stores opened in the area. Lately, the nonprofit organization has broadened its focus, backing a new welcome center downtown, where visitors are encouraged to explore all of Pittsboro. “There is so much to this small town that you’re not going to see just on our main street,” Parker-Lewis said. “Our district is so small; we don’t want you being deceived into thinking that’s all there is to Pittsboro.” The Plant is one hidden gem not found downtown. Home of the Chatham Beverage District, a restaurant, art walk and even a hemp boutique — this place is not to be missed for its unique Pittsboro flavor. continued on page 50

48 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

LUNCH: Enjoy American classics and local favorites at S&T’s Soda Shoppe, but be sure to save room for dessert! 85 Hillsboro St. sandtsodashoppe.com AFTERNOON: Browse downtown shops and murals, such as Deep River Mercantile or Liquidambar Gallery & Gifts, or visit idyllic Fearrington Village. 115 Hillsboro St. deeprivermerc.com 80 Hillsboro St. liquidambar studio.com —

or —

Tour the Carolina Tiger Rescue for a glimpse of exotic cats such as tigers, servals and ocelots. Advance registration required. 1940 Hanks Chapel Road, carolinatigerrescue.org DINNER: Have a meal on the patio at Postal Fish Company. 75 W. Salisbury St. postalfishcompany.com EVENING: After-dinner libations and a stroll through the art installations at The Plant. 220 Lorax Lane theplantnc.com


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Interior | Exterior | Residential | Commercial Each CertaPro Painters® business is independently owned and operated.

49


THE PLANT IS HOME TO THE CHATHAM BEVERAGE DISTRICT, WHICH INCLUDES CHATHAM CIDERWORKS, FAIR GAME BEVERAGE CO., STARRLIGHT MEAD AND COPELAND SPRINGS FARM & KITCHEN.

continued from page 48

I would challenge anyone to come here and not fall in love.

The destination got its name from the Piedmont Biofuels plant, which aimed to create affordable, sustainable biodiesel until it’s closure in 2013. The original building still sits on the 17-acre property, thus coining “The Plant.” Lyle Estill moved to the Pittsboro area 30 years ago to work for Piedmont Biofuels. Now he owns The Plant, a beverage district and art destination serving up mead, spirits, and cider — made daily on the property. – Catherine Hobbs, “It used to be forklifts and totes full of acid, and big, Chatham Arts Council boring pumps and 18-wheelers buying our product,” CAROLINA HEMP TOURS, LOCATED AT THE PLANT, PROVIDES VISITORS Estill said. “Then the Fair Game Beverage Company WITH A GUIDED INTRODUCTION TO THE HEMP AND CBD INDUSTRY. popped up across the street, and they rapidly changed our consumer experience at The Plant. We kind of went from everyone wearing steel-toed boots and uniforms; Whether you come for the art, a tasting or a picnic in the next thing you know, we’re a beverage district. “We’re a place where people go and taste, and we’re a place fields, The Plant offers plenty of options that allow for social distancing — so your visit doesn’t have to wait. where people go and buy bottles and hang out.” “I heard [Pittsboro] referred to as the ‘epicenter of groovy’ in Guests can also grab their beverage of choice and walk the property, strolling around roughly 30 art installations that 2005,” Hobbs said. “My wish is that in 2045, we can still confiEstill describes as “distressed industrial chic.” These pieces dently refer to it as the epicenter of groovy. People come here, and were made by artists worldwide, from South America to Es- whether it’s to live or enjoy for a day, they still find all of these enchanting components in place.” MB till’s own backyard.

50 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


A Life Plan Community with Continuing Care

You Belong Here. No matter what you enjoy, where you come from or how you feel, there's a place for you at Windsor Point!

Independendent Living - Cottages & Apartments • Assisted Living • Memory Care • Skilled Nursing For more information on finding out how you belong at Windsor Point, contact the marketing department at 919-552-4580.

1221 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina

919-552-4580 • windsorpoint.com 51


ALICIA STATEN DOLES OUT DRIVETHRU CONVENINECE AND HOME-COOKED COMFORT AT DADDY D’S BBQ PICK-UP WINDOW.

Great Take Out

No cooking, minimal clean up and supporting No cooking, minimal clean up restaurants local and Written supporting local restaurants by Emily Uhland — carry-out—meals carry-out meals areFredin a win-win-win in our book. Photographed by Jonathan are a win-win-win in our book.

52 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


TEXAS-STYLE BEEF BRISKET AND BANANA PUDDING (BELOW) ARE CUSTOMER FAVORITES AT DADDY D’S BBQ.

Daddy D’s BBQ

Daddy D’s offers discounts up to 25% to military service members, veterans and uniformed first responders. “The simple fact that they put their lives ... on the line on a daily basis to help protect us ... is pretty awesome. Offering a discount or buying their meals is a drop in the bucket compared to what they are constantly doing for us,” says owner Ed Disena. Give Back and Spirit nights are also hosted regularly to support local groups and schools.

“We’re a smokehouse. Everything here is about the meat,” says Ed Disena, owner of Daddy D’s BBQ in Fuquay-Varina. The ‘cue joint’s smoked turkey legs, chopped barbecue and Texas-style brisket — while impressive — are just the beginning. Classic side dishes like baked beans, Brunswick stew, collard greens and green beans get a flavor punch from savory, meaty additions like bacon and ham hocks. Disena got his start as a “backyard pitmaster,” first cooking for friends, then serving larger groups, like the Fuquay-Varina Fire Department with his church. When he and his wife, Rachel, were both ready for career changes, Daddy D’s BBQ was born. North Carolina tends to be a barbecue battleground, but Disena crafted the menu to have broad appeal, since 90% of his customers are not native North Carolinians, he says. “I pulled recipes from all over the country and modified them,” he says. “Everyone, no matter where you are from, will find something they are going to like.” This includes sauces made from scratch and a one-of-a-kind deconstructed banana pudding. “When Covid-19 hit, we got twice as busy,” Disena says. “Support from the community has been a big boost.” Online ordering, family dinner packs and a convenient drive-thru window make ordering take out a breeze. Daddy D’s BBQ 1526 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6464 daddydsbbqnc.com Dine in and outdoor seating are available. continued on page 54

53


TAKE HOME HEALTHY AND QUICK MEDITERRANEAN CLASSICS, LIKE THIS CHICKEN SKEWER WITH FATTOUSH, HUMMUS, CUCUMBER SAUCE AND PITA.

MediTerra Grill MediTerra Grill may have been the first Mediterranean restaurant in Holly Springs, but it wasn’t the first eatery for owner Aaziz Eljarjoum. Previously the owner of Baba Ganoush in Cary, Eljarjoum sold that location to join the Holly Springs community in 2016 at the bustling Holly Springs Towne Center. MediTerra Grill’s menu combines the flavors of Greece and Lebanon in fresh, scratch-made kabobs, salads, dips and gyros. Healthful choices abound, along with abundant options for vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free diners. Feeding a family? Try the Sultan Kabob Dinner, which combines the traditional Mediterranean favorites: pita, hummus, fattoush (marinated tomato, cucumber and bell pepper salad), falafel, cucumber sauce and rice, with your choice of four protein skewers. Restaurant closures hit MediTerra Grill hard, Eljarjoum says, though business has started to come back in large part due to online and pick-up orders. MediTerra launched a new online ordering platform that is easy to use (and offers 10% off online orders) and has a dedicated table for quick order pick up inside. MEDITERRA GRILL 108 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs Additional location in Durham (919) 762-7851 mediterranc.com Dine-in and patio seating is available. 54 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

MEDITERRA’S MOST POPULAR ORDER — GYRO WITH FRIES.


Dad makes the (wing) sauces. He’s very picky about his sauces.

HEED THE ADVICE OF OWNER PHIL CAMMARATA, AND ENJOY AT LEAST ONE SLICE A DAY! PHIL RECOMMENDS THE GARBAGE PIZZA — SAUSAGE, PEPPERONI, ONIONS, GREEN PEPPERS AND MUSHROOMS.

– Ven Cammarata, J&S New York Pizza

J&S New York Pizza When it comes to take out, there’s no doubt pizza is a crowdpleaser. At Fuquay’s J&S New York Pizza, there’s so much more, including a full menu of house-made favorites, tried and true recipes direct from Sicily and a multi-generational family of owners dedicated to serving Italian favorites to Triangle residents. Open since 2007, the downtown Varina eatery is the second of three J&S locations in the western part of Wake county. Siblings Phil Cammarata, Lori Shaver and Ven Cammarata, children of founder Silvio Cammarata, now manage the operations. “We use the same recipes that our father used for 45 years,” says Phil. “Everything is made fresh per order.” Lasagna, garlic knots, chicken wings and, of course pizza are among the most popular to-go orders. Mouth-watering pasta entrees, sub sandwiches, salads and seafood dishes make great choices, too.

“The pizza is dad’s secret recipe: crispy thin crust, melty cheese. It took forever to make it taste the same as in New York, because of the different minerals in the water,” says Ven. Take-out orders have been a staple for J&S, even before the pandemic shutdown. “We have a good following. The town and residents have been very supportive,” says Ven. J&S New York Pizza will deliver within six miles of the restaurant, and sometimes even a little farther for their regular customers who are homebound. J&S NEW YORK PIZZA 500 Broad St, Fuquay-Varina Additional locations in Apex and Cary (919) 557-6921 jandsnypizza.com Dine-in and patio seating are available. 55


rise

Dine Restaurant hours and service may be limited at this time. Check individual locations for most current information.

FUQUAY-VARINA Abbey Road Tavern and Grill “Signature Beatle burgers and live entertainment.” 711 N. Main St.; Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7731; abbeyroadnc.com Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 138 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2497; annaspizzeria.com Aviator Pizzeria & BeerShop “Brick oven pizza & craft beer.” 601 E. Broad St., Fuquay Varina (919) 346-8206; aviatorbrew.com Aviator SmokeHouse BBQ Restaurant “All of our food is made in-house.” 525 E. Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-7675; aviatorbrew.com Assaggio’s Pizzeria Ristorante “Top quality ingredients go into every dish.” 941 East Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-9505; assaggios-fuquay.com Chocolate Fix “Let us be the sweet spot in your day.” 135 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-1233; facebook.com/chocolatefixfv

The Corner Biergarten “Bar & bottle shop.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 133, Fuquay-Varina (919) 246-6649; tcbiergarten.com Cultivate Coffee Roasters “Modern industrial twist on a small town coffee shop.” 128 S. Fuquay Ave., Fuquay Varina (919) 285-4067; www.cultivate.coffee Daddy D’s BBQ “Slow cooked with love.” 1526 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-6464; daddydsbbqnc.com Drive Bru “Drive thru coffee shop with N.Y. coffee & Carolina charm.” 1013 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @drivebru Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 1436 N Main St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-4463; eggsupgrill.com El Dorado “Enjoy the most delicious Mexican food amongst family.” 112 E Vance St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-0287; eldoradomexicanrestaurant.com

FuQuay Brus “Quaint coffee cafe with New York coffee, baked goods, beer, wine and keto.” 400 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (607) 745-2512; @fuquaybrus Garibaldi Trattoria Pizza & Pasta “Authentic Italian cuisine and quality service.” 900 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-8868; garibalditrattoria.com The Healthy Spot “Meal replacement smoothies and energizing teas.” 961 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-5373; @healthyspotfuquay J&S New York Pizza “Family-owned and operated Italian restaurant.” 500 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-6921; jandsnypizza.com Joyce & Family Restaurant “Home cooked Southern favorites.” 129 N Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-1717; @joyceandfamily Juicehaus “Made-to-order fresh, raw juice.” 509 North Broad St, Fuquay Varina (919) 396-5588; juicehaus.org Laurel Wine Bar at Cellar 55 “Mediterranean-inspired small plates with wine pairings.” 1351 East Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 446-1156; cellar55.com

MAC & CHEESE BURGER AT TOWN HALL BURGER & BEER.

Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 401 Wake Chapel Road, Fuquay-Varina (919) 552-3957; lostresmagueyes.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 305 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-5555; themasonjartavern.com 56 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

DENOTES ADVERTISER

Photos by Jonathan Fredin

Little Portugal NC “Market and eatery celebrating traditional Portuguese dishes.” 736 N. Main Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 586-7144; littleportugalnc.com


The Mill “Coffee. Beer. Wine. Community.” 146 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2123; themillfuquay.com Nil’s Cafe “Family-oriented Mediterranean cafe.” 513 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina (919) 567-0887; nilscafe-weebly.com Pints Ice Cream & Beer 512 Broad Street, Fuquay-Varina @pintsicecream

CHOOSE FROM MORE THAN 20 WING SAUCES AT WINGIN’ IT TAPHOUSE AND GRILLE IN FUQUAY-VARINA

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Dine Stick Boy Bread Co. “Handcrafted baked goods from scratch … all natural ingredients.” 127 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-2237; stickboyfuquay.com Triple Barrel Tavern “Restaurant, sports bar & billiards.” 2221 N Grassland Drive, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0940; @triplebarreltavernfuquayvarina Tsuru Sweets & Coffee “Elegant-yet-sassy gourmet confectionery.” 411 Broad St, Fuquay-Varina (919) 285-2646; tsurusweets.com Vicious Fishes Tap & Kitchen “Eclectic twists on comfortable bar food.” 132 South Fuquay Ave., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-7876; viciousfishes.com/fuquay-nc Wingin’ It Bar and Grille “Family-friendly neighborhood pub.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 109, Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-0962; winginitbarandgrille.com

Zeera Indian Restaurant “Authentic goodness in traditional Indian food.” 1311 E Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 762-6215; zeeranc.com

HOLLY SPRINGS Acme Pizza Co. “Chicago-style deep dish pizza.” 204 Village Walk Dr, Holly Springs (919) 552-8800; acmepizzaco.com Bass Lake Draft House “34 beers on tap.” 124 Bass Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 567-3251; basslakedrafthouse.com Blaze Pizza “Fast fire’d, perfectly crisp perfection.” 316 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 261-5950; blazepizza.com The Blind Pelican “Creative seafood and boat drinks.” 120 Bass Lake Road; Holly Springs (984) 225-2471; blindpelicanseafood.com

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DENOTES ADVERTISER

57


The Butcher’s Market “Premium meats and specialty grocery.” 4200 Lassiter Rd, Holly Springs (919) 267-919); thebutchersmarkets.com

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Dine

Cristo’s Bistro “Hand tossed NY style pizza.” 5217 Sunset Lake Rd, Holly Springs (919) 363-8852, cristosbistro.com

Greek Basma “Greek food that is fresh, healthy and delicious.” 7272 GB Alford Hwy, Holly Springs ((919) 285-080; greekbasma.com

Eggs Up Grill “Breakfast favorites served all day.” 4216 Lassiter Road, Holly Springs (919) 495-4530; eggsupgrill.com

Healthy But Good “Fast food for smart people.” 424 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 341-5554; @healthybutgoodhollysprings Hickory Tavern “Something for every appetite.” 401 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 557-2064; thehickorytavern.com Fera’wyn’s Chocolate Cafe “Forget love, I’d rather fall in chocolate.” 652 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (415) 758-3296; ferawyns.com

FRESH-PRESSED JUICES FROM JUICEHAUS CONTAIN TWO POUNDS OF PRODUCE.

Fiesta Mexicana Restaurante Mexicano “Authentic. Hot. Fresh.” 428 Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs (919) 346-1330; fiestamexicananc-hollysprings.com

From our family to yours.

Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers “Great food without a long wait.” 221 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 557-3475; freddysusa.com Harvest Moon Bakery – Cafe “Breakfast and lunch cafe with scratch-made bakery and locally roasted coffee.” 128 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 586-7005; harvestmoonbakerycafe.com Homegrown Pizza “Pizza, calzones and sandwiches.” 4928 Linksland Drive, ​Holly Springs (​919) 577-5575; homegrownpizza.com Kobe HIbachi and Sushi 515 North Main Street, Holly Springs (919) 557-1437; kobehollyspringsnc.com Los Tres Magueyes “A Mexican Treat.” 120 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs (919) 552-6272; lostresmagueyes.com Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream “A unique spin on a timeless dessert.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 762-7808; mamabirdsicecream.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 114 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 964-5060; themasonjartavern.com MediTerra Grill “Delicious ingredients. Old world recipes.” 108 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 762-7851; mediterranc.com Mi Cancun Mexican Restaurant 324 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 552-9979; micancunmx.com Michelangelos Pizza “Pizza buffet for lunch and dinner.” 7280 GB Alford HWY, Holly Springs (919) 557-4992; michelangelospizza.com My Way Tavern “Freshly made all-American foods.” 301 W. Center St., Holly Springs (919) 285-2412; mywaytavern.com Niche Wine Lounge “Tranquility by the glass.” 109 Main St., Holly Springs (919) 552-2300; nichewinelounge.com

9 0 0 N . M a i n S t r e e t | F u q u a y Va r i n a , N C | 9 1 9 - 5 5 2 - 8 8 6 8 | g a r i b a l d i t r a t t o r i a . c o m

58 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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The Original N.Y. Pizza “Bringing a taste of New York to North Carolina.” 634 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 567-0505; theoriginalnypizza.com Osha Thai Kitchen & Sushi “Authentic Thai cuisine: well-balanced dishes bursting with flavor.” 242 S Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 538-6742; oshathaikitchennc.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Chicken “The best dang biscuits.” 169 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs (919) 586-7343; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Sir Walter Coffee + Kitchen “Creative cafe by day. Full restaurant at night.” 242 S Main St. Suite 118, Holly Springs (919) 390-2150; sirwaltercoffeekitchen.com Skrimp Shack “Casual seafood cuisine.” 7244 Alford Hwy, Holly Springs (919) 335-3924; theskrimpshack.com Sweetberry Bowls “Beautiful and delicious bowls, wraps and salads.” 150 West Holly Springs Rd, Holly Springs (984) 225-2656; sweetberrybowls.com

rise

Dine CARY Chanticleer Café & Bakery “Family-owned restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and specialty coffees.” 6490 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 781-4810; chanticleercafe.com Chef’s Palette “Creative flair and originality in every aspect of our service.” 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary (919) 267-6011; chefspalette.net Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar “Good old-fashioned burgers and bottled soda.” 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary (919) 466-0055; corbettsburgers.com Duck Donuts “Warm, delicious and just the way you like them.” 100 Wrenn Drive #10, Cary (919) 468-8722; duckdonuts.com/location/cary-nc

Gonza Tacos y Tequila “Award-winning Colombian-Mexican cuisine.” 525-105 New Waverly Place, Cary (919) 653-7310; cary.gonzatacosytequila.com La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” 4248 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; 220 W. Chatham St., Cary; 5055 Arco Street, Cary (919) 657-0657; lafarmbakery.com Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen “Exceptional renderings of classic Southern dishes.” 7307 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 233-1632; lucky32.com/cary Lugano Ristorante “Italian dining in a comfortable and casual atmosphere.” 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229; luganocary.com Mellow Mushroom “Beer, calzones and creative stone-baked pizzas.” 4300 NW Cary Parkway, Cary (919) 463-7779; mellowmushroom.com

Sweet Southern SnoBalls “Shaved ice and Hershey’s Ice Cream.” 527 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 291-3355; @sweetsouthsnoballs Thai Thai Cuisine “Home cooked Thai food.” 108 Osterville Drive, Holly Springs (919) 303-5700; thaithaicuisinenc.com Thanks A Latte “Coffee and gift boutique.” 1118 Kentworth Drive, Holly Springs (919) 577-0070; thanksalattegiftsnc.com Town Hall Burger & Beer “Neighborhood beer and burger joint.” 301 Matthews Dr, Holly Springs (919) 335-5388; Townhallburgerandbeer.com

BEERS ON TAP The best selection of German and craft beer in the area!

Vieni Ristobar “The newest Italian restaurant from the Cinelli family.” 242 South Main Street, Holly Springs (984) 225-1134; vieniristobar.com

Large

COLLECTION

Craft Bottles

Check our Facebook page for weekly events @TCBiergarten 1625 N. Main St. #133 Fuquay-Varina 919.246.6649 | tcbiergarten.com

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Dogs are Welcome! 59


Grow

Written and Photographed by L.A. Jackson

Bloom

Frilly-Dilly! The Crown Imperial Fritillaria

Fall is, of course, the prime time to plant bulbs of springbloomers such as tulips, daffodils and crocuses, but, while these pretties can add flash to the early growing season, they do tend to take on a sameness from year to year. That’s why it is fun to occasionally try out bulbs that are completely different in dazzling looks. Need an example? One of my favorites is the crown imperial fritillaria (Fritillaria imperialis). With the tag “crown imperial,” this fritillaria has to deliver the visual goods, and it does. For starters, it is a dilly of a frilly bloomer that stands out as a tower of flowers in the spring garden on singular, strong stalks stretching upwards to almost four feet tall. Topping these impressive stems are large clusters of dangling, bell-shaped blossoms crowned with tufts of green leaves, leading to its alternate name “pineapple lily.” The fancy blooms of this fritillaria come in equally flashy colors, including the rich yellow of the cultivar ‘Lutea Maxima’ and simmering reddishorange of ‘Rubra Maxima.’ These two tend to be the easiest found in local garden centers at this time of year, and online shoppers can order them from regional e-shops such as Brent and Becky’s Bulbs (brentandbeckysbulbs.com) in Gloucester, Va. Like most fall-planted bulbs, crown imperials perform better in sunny sites that receive at least some filtered shade from the afternoon sun. After buying, don’t wait to plant — these bulbs (which can be rather large) prefer to settle in sooner rather than later in the autumn garden. The growing ground should be well worked and heavily amended with fully decomposed compost or commercial soil conditioner for superior drainage, because these bulbs will rot in heavy soils. Bulb fertilizer can be added, but to prevent chemical root burn, spread such nutrient nuggets over the ground rather than in the planting holes.

With the tag “crown imperial,” this fritillaria has to deliver the visual goods, and it does.

60 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

PLANT CROWN IMPERIAL FRITILLARIA BULBS NOW FOR FLORAL SPRINGTIME FIREWORKS.

Speaking of rot — I know, lovely subject — a nifty trick to further prevent this unproductive yuck is to plant the bulbs sideways, because they have single stem ports on their tops that can turn into collection points for water. While it does look fancy in full bloom, crown imperial fritillaria has one offsetting characteristic: It stinks. There is a skunkyness to the bulbs, stems and foliage, with the flowers being slightly less so. It is not overpowering, however, and does serve a positive purpose. Rabbits, squirrels and deer will also notice the odor and leave these beauties alone, which greatly increases their chances to add a special glory to your spring garden.


in

October If you are thinking about expanding the veggie patch or flower bed next year, roll up those sleeves, and get to work now. Dig up or rototill the areas, and leave them rough through the winter to allow rains and freezing temperatures to help break up the soil.

While falling autumn leaves can be pretty sights, they can also be pretty suffocating on a lawn if such spent foliage isn’t raked up every few days. This is especially true for newly established lawns. Speaking of falling foliage, an easy way to keep such autumn debris out of the water garden is to stretch a fine mesh net or wire screen over the pond to catch any wayward leaves. During this Halloween season, haunt your favorite local garden shops for great end-of-the-growing-season sales on perennials, shrubs and trees.

in

November Did you fertilize your Kentucky bluegrass or fescue lawn this September? Good gardener! Now, follow it up with another round this month at the same rate of one pound of nitrogen per 1000 square feet of lawn.

The beginning of November is a good time to force paperwhite narcissus bulbs by planting them indoors in pots, so they will be ready as pretty flowering presents in time for Christmas. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of Carolina Gardener Magazine.

Timely Tip Butterfly bushes (Buddleia davidii) are popular landscape pretties, but if there is one knock against them, it is that they (older cultivars, in particular) can be seedy, on the verge of weedy. To prevent butterfly bushes from scattering their progeny hither and yon in your landscape, now is the time to cut off and dispose of spent flower clusters before their seed heads begin to open, which usually happens around

However, don’t get too crazy with the clippers. Now is not the time November.

for a full-blown pruning — wait until late winter to cut back any overgrown branches.

61


fun

memes

Thanksgiving 2020 is Coming Written by the Author of Fuquay-Varina Memes Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

FUQUAY-VARINA MEMES (also known as FVM) is a freelance writer, meme guru and an anonymous resident of Fuquay-Varina. She is the creator and manager of the FuquayVarina Memes Facebook page and has a talent for making people laugh and always taking the joke too far. Check out her blog at fvmwrites.com. fuquaymemes thefvmemes

I know it seems like The Year of our Dark Lord 2020 will never end, but Turkey Day is right around the corner, and Christmas is basically the day after that. So this begs the question — how in the world do we successfully celebrate the holidays during a worldwide pandemic? Is this finally the excuse we’ve all been looking for to avoid crazy extended family during an election year? Could 2020 have a silver lining after all?! Maybe, but probably not. Nine out of 10 of you are going to participate in some kind of family reckoning, be it virtual or in person, so get your fat pants and clapbacks at the ready. Here are 10 interesting ways to celebrate — or get out of — “Vidsgiving.” WEAR A HAZMAT SUIT.

ENJOY THIS BEAUTIFUL PLATE OF THANKSGIVING DINNER. THE REST OF TURKEY DAY 2020 MIGHT NOT LOOK SO GOOD.

Nothing says, “I want to be here, but I have concerns,” like attending Thanksgiving dinner in a CDC tuxedo. This is a particularly good idea if you look striking in yellow.

to re-traumatize yourself, PRETEND THAT NONE OF THIS IS HAPPENING.

PHONE IT IN.

OR, BRING UP POLITICS, THEN BAIL OUT.

When that hotline bling, it can only mean one thing — it’s Covid season, and we must protect granny at all costs. Who says you have to catch up with family in person when we’ve got Zoom, Google meets, FaceTime, Skype, etc.? There are plenty of ways to say hi over dinner without putting your family at risk.

On the other hand, it can be fun to drop a political a-bomb, and then use the resulting mayhem as an excuse to dip out.

PRETEND THAT POLITICS DON’T EXIST.

We all have PTSD from Thanksgiving during the last election year, so unless you’re looking 62 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

DISCUSS CONSPIRACY THEORIES.

Spice up a boring Thanksgiving dinner with a good old-fashioned conspiracy theory. 2020 is packed with all sorts of new and exciting theories that at least one of your crazy uncles is bound to believe, from COVID-related tracking devices, to the hazards of 5G networks, to the virus be-


ing an elaborate government hoax. If he’s busy spouting nonsense, uncle Barry will be less likely to grill you about your personal life.

ESCAPE. We have wine and WiFi!

DISINFECT EVERYTHING AND EVERYONE.

In the event that you stumble upon the holy grail lysol wipes/spray while shopping, don’t you dare use them until Thanksgiving day. Each time a masked family member walks through the front door it is your CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY to spray them down like they just survived a meltdown at the Shearon Harris nuclear power plant. If you host a potluck, everyone will be picking up spoons with their diseased little hands, so have those lysol wipes at the ready. Don’t forget to throw a gallon of hand sanitizer on the table and plenty of hand soap in the bathroom. If you don’t hear that faucet running for at least 20 seconds after the toilet flushes, throw the whole relative away.

THE MAGGY AWARDS

2020 20 20

www.trianglewineco.com Curbside Pickup and Delivery Available

Morrisville | Cary | Southern Pines | Holly Springs

RON JONES A neighbor, someone you know, someone

WEAR A CONTROVERSIAL MASK.

you can trust and respect. Call today and

Despite what your great aunt Barbara thinks, wearing a mask DOES help prevent the spread of Covid-19. Masks are also a great way to avoid seeing Barbara’s extra long nose hairs during dinner. If conversation starts to lag and you’d like to start a riot, pick a controversial mask with a pointed message or obscene image printed across the front, and see what happens.

speak with a real person who cares about your family’s protection and security.

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If you see parents having an extra glass of wine this Thanksgiving, I think you know why. Hosting a teacher? Politely look away when they shove a few extra bottles in their purse for later. Virtual school may be rife with trials and tribulations, but it’s certainly safer than politics

919-362-8310 INFO@ROGERSINC.NET

continued on page 62 63


Each time a masked family member walks through the front door it is your CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY to spray them down like they just survived a meltdown at the Shearon Harris nuclear power plant.

continued from page 61

or religion. Discuss enthusiastically with grumpy preteens while they’re avoiding mom’s runny potato salad. STAY 6-FEET APART.

The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community? Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.809.0220 or visit our website, www.nnws.org.

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER | ANGIER WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND

64 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

Unless you’re celebrating poultrygeist with your immediate family, don’t let your kids get close enough to have their cheeks pinched by grandma. Instead of a large communal table, opt for several smaller ones that are sufficiently spaced. If you’re not trying to hurt anyone’s feelings this holiday season, I suggest strapping a pool noodle to your torso so everyone keeps their distance. DO YOUR OWN THING.

How many years have you looked for an excuse to bail out of the obligatory annual family get together?! I’m not saying you should use a worldwide pandemic as an excuse to live your best life and celebrate the holidays on your own terms, but 2020 isn’t going to throw a lot of silver linings your way, so maybe strike while the iron’s hot. Order Chinese food. Stay in bed all day. Get drunk in the kiddie pool. This Thanksgiving is your oyster. MB


Seen

Heard David Bryan

, of Holly Springs Law recently celebrated 20 years of continuous service in downtown Holly Springs, providing real estate services, estate planning and business law.

ALYSSA BYRD

is the new economic development director for the town of Fuquay-Varina. Byrd’s roles will include attracting new investment and industry, encouraging the expansion of existing industry and aligning workforce education and talent to support the Fuquay-Varina business community. Byrd comes to the Town of Fuquay-Varina from the Chatham Economic Development Corporation where she previously served as president. The Town’s former economic development director, Jim Seymour was promoted to assistant town manager earlier this year.

Beth Shaver

has been named the North Carolina History Teacher of the Year by the Gilder Lehrman Institute. Shaver teaches AP United States History and African American Studies at Holly Springs High School and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Teacher Education and Learning Sciences with a specialty in social studies education at NC State College of Education. “Every day I get to share my passion for American history. I get the opportunity to be a full-time storyteller and bring history to life for (students),” she said in a N.C. State College of Education News article.

Wanda Holloway, a Holly Springs resident, recently re-

leased her second gospel album, “Inspirational Fruits of the Spirit.” The single “Circles” is an inspirational story full of words of hope. “It couldn’t have come at a better time,” Holloway says. Holloway has been singing gospel music since her childhood and has performed on stage, television and at sporting events and civic gatherings. Holloway’s music is available for download on iTunes. Read more about her other passion, volunteering in Holly Springs, on page 16.

Cotton House Craft Brewers

in Cary has just begun canning two of their most popular brews: Nothing is Real, a Berliner Weissestyle ale brewed with strawberries, and Hazy Daze IPA, a Cotton House staple. These are the first canned beers to be released from the downtown Cary brewery. Drink up — Nothing is Real is a limited seasonal special release.

SHARE WITH US

Share business news, upcoming events and town gossip with editor@ mainandbroadmag.com

RECREATIONAL ESPORTS

are coming to Holly Springs Parks & Recreation. Compete head-to-head in esports leagues for Mario Kart, FIFA, Rocket League and more. To play, download the free Mission Control App and create a new profile. Select Town of Holly Springs Parks & Recreation; then join your favorite esports league.

Fuquay-Varina’s

town board announced an 800,000 squarefoot open-air retail and commercial shopping center, currently named Bellchase, will start construction later this year. The project will be located on Highway 401. Developed by FV Retail LLC, the proposed site will consist of nearly 100 acres and will be constructed as a multiphase mixed-use shopping center. FV Retail also developed Garner’s White Oak Crossing shopping center.

65


In Focus

Just in time for Halloween By Jonathan Fredin A spider web hanging in a field catches a bewitching morning light — as well as anything else that crosses its tangle.

66 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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