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Decorative Painting, Mixed Media, Fine Art & More!

May-June 2018

Painting World Issue 15

SUMMER ISSUE

magazine

Cover Artist:

Cheri Rol

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Painting World Magazine

Conventions & Events

New England Traditions Regional Convention

OKC Painting Palooza! “Yuletide Treasures”

October 2-7, 2018 Best Western Royal Plaza Hotel & Trade Center Marlborough, MA 01752 Get registered: www.newenglandtraditions.org

Bring your painting friends, your ugliest Christmas sweater, and be ready to enjoy tons of fun, laughter, a wonderful expo and great classes! October 22-27, 2018 Sheraton Hotel / Reed Center Midwest City, OK Sign up at: http://okcpaintingpalooza.com

Creative Painting February 24 to March 1, 2019 Tropicana Hotel Las Vegas, NV Get information: www.vegaspaint.com

June 2018 Issue

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June 2018 Issue

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© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

From the Editor Greetings from Minnesota! We are excited to be continuing the excellence that is Painting World Magazine. So many encouraging messages from readers, artists, and even advertisers have been coming in over the past few weeks. We always knew the decorative painting world was filled with warm, welcoming folks. Thanks for bringing us into the fold! It is our intention to keep bringing you wonderful designs and articles from artists familiar and new. It’s simply amazing how many highly talented artists / teachers are out there, and we hope to introduce you to each one. Thanks to Laura Haughey for starting this publication and helping us get going with future issues. Thank you to all of the artists who submit projects and articles. We’d have nothing to print without you. Finally, thank you to our readers. You keep us motivated to provide the best magazine we can! Karen Brenden, Editor Loon Publishing, LLC

Who We Are Painting World Magazine is owned and operated by Loon Publishing, LLC., which is an independent publishing company. We are completely dedicated to the joy of creating delivered to our readers! We select only the best articles from the top designers in the industry and will be featuring all the hottest new techniques, products and artists.

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ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ON ENTIRE CONTENTS. June 2018, Issue 15 ©Loon Publishing, LLC. Painting World Magazine is published 6 times per year by Loon Publishing, LLC., 205 South State Street, Waseca, MN 56093, USA. All rights reserved on entire contents of magazine. We are not responsible for loss of unsolicited material. We reserve the right to edit and publish correspondence unless specific commentary and/or name and address are requested to be withheld. Reproduction of editorial or advertising contents in any way whatsoever without the written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The instructions in this magazine are published in good faith and have been checked for accuracy; however, no warranty, either expressed or implied, is made nor are successful results guaranteed. Subscription rate $29.99 for 6 issues. © 2018 Magazine DigitalPrinted Edition.& AllShipped rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale Distributed in thePainting United World States and worldwide. by Quality Print. Waseca, MN.or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. June 2018 Issue com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Contents Painting World Magazine

10 Summer Azaleas by Featured Cover Artist: Cheri Rol

16

Colonial Welcome Plaque by Lynne Andrews

June 2018 Issue

22

Gifts of Spring by Barbara Bunsey, CDA

28

Gone Fishin’ by Leslie Smith

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines


Painting World Magazine

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San Pedro Calla Lilies by Sandy McTier

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Soul of a Horse by Debbie Cushing

48

Oversize Poppy by Donna Dewberry

54

Cock-a-doodle Dandy by Linda Hollander

59

Princess Rose by Jeanne Collick

63

Wanna Play? by Beth Stodieck

MORE GREAT ARTICLES! Corner: Pure Pigment Paints, part IV 20 Innovative by Debbie Cole, CDA a Miracle 42 Expect by Nanette Hilton

77 Directory of Artists & Suppliers Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine The colors POP when Spring blends into Summer. Cheri’s Azeleas abound in just about any color. Cheri’s style of painting is perfect for gifts and gallery shows. Her technique involves blending skills to achieve realism involving strong contrast/value change.

Surface: The surface is an 8 x 10 masonite panel that can be ordered from Rol Publications, www.cherirol.com or rolpub@cherirol.com This ART work can be framed with a traditional picture frame or with a box panel 10 x 12, floating on top or suspended inside, creating a shadow box. The box panel can also be ordered from Rol Publications by size.

DecoArt® Americana® Acrylic • Soft Sage DA207 (Basecoat)

Summer Azaleas

by Cheri Rol, MDA

About Cheri Cheri grew up in Southern California in the midst of a creative family. She’s been involved with and has loved the arts from the beginning of her life. All along the journey Cheri’s been blessed with good teachers as role models and opportunities to grow artistically. She has work displayed at the Castle Gallery in Fort Wayne, IN. Cheri’s many blessings include a huge support team, led by her husband Larry, her children, grandchildren, students and her church family.

June 2018 Issue

Winsor & NewtonTM Oil Colour: • Titanium White • Cadmium Yellow Pale • Naples Yellow Light • Bright Red • Alizarin Crimson • French Ultra Marine • Raw Umber And matching Winsor & Newton Griffin Alkyds

Mediums: • Winsor & NewtonTM (OIL) – Blending and Glazing Medium • Turpenoid ® – Oderless Brush Cleaning Fluid

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Brushes:

Painting Instructions:

• Cheri Rol’s Red Sable Blenders #0, #2, #4, #8, #10 • Cheri’s Droplet #1 • Cheri Mops #1, #2, #3 from Rol Publications • Liner #000 “Syn-sable” Liner from Scharff Brush

Background

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Palette knife P-1 by Langnickel • Transfer paper - “Sue Scheewe® Wax Free” by Weber • Stylus or ball point pen • Small sponge roller with a tight/no hole roller • 3M® Magic Tape • 12” C-Thru® graph Ruler • Paper towels

Preparation: Lightly sand your masonite with #220 grit. Tack off. Apply one coat Deco Art’s #DA207 Soft Sage. Use a very fine texture roller. When dry, sand again lightly. Tack off. Apply second coat. It should be smooth like an ”egg shell”. LET DRY. Sand, tack off. Apply design using White or Grey Transfer Paper.

Oil Palette: Titanium White W Cad Yellow Pale CYP Naples Yellow Light NYL Bright Red BR Alizarin AC French Ultra Marine UMB Raw Umber RU

Basic Mixes: YT WW B G

= = = =

W + CYP W + YT RU + UMB CYP + UMB

Underlining Indicates a Basic Mix

Helpful Hints:

Mix a value scale of soft greens. ** means this is where you start mixing **

HL L M D VD

= = = = =

L + W + NYL W + NYL + G L+G+B M+G+B D+B

Start in the HL area first. Apply a thin even layer with a Cheri Blender Brush #10 using a loose XXX stroke. Then work into L value, then M and D. Mop with a Cheri #3 mop. Paint around the vase, over the flower & leaf area and around the doily. Incorporate the shadows as you go. Let Dry ! TRANSFER the flowers and their leaves in position on the dry background. Doily & Vase White:

Mix a grey green value scale for the doily and the white parts of the vase. **

HL = L = M = D = VD =

WW M + W + NYL D + W + NYL VD + W + B VD Background

Block In & Pat Blend. Trim the doily with a broken line of flower color. Add highlights of YT and WW up front on the right. Vase:

Create a value scale of Red Violets. **

HL = L = M = D = VD =

W+L W + M + NYL D + W + (NYL) VD + W RU + AC

The light source is on the upper right so as you look at the value placement map on page 14 you will see the majority of light values on the right side of the vase tummy.

For object to look real it has to have Value change (light, medium and dark). This project has an upper right light source. Every thing reflects this single light source. In an effort to maintain the integrity of the oil paint, while speeding up its drying time, I use Alkyds of matching colors in the slow drying colors: White, Yellows and Reds. Titanium White comes in Oil and Alkyd, Cad. Yellow Pale Oil matches Cad. Yellow Light Alkyd and Bright Red Oil matches Cad. Red Medium Alkyd, Alizarin Crimson comes in Oil and Alkyd. A half and half combination of oil and alkyd leaves the paint on the palette workable all day. And the cast shadows will be under and to the left. See Figure 1 Block in the values starting with the lightest adding darker values, blending as you go. Mop with a Cheri #3 mop to eliminate excessive brush marks. LET DRY ! When dry, glaze on additional highlights using Winsor & Newton’s Blending & Glazing Medium. To Glaze:

Adding a glaze over a dry painting allows the value changes established in the first stage to show through the glaze which is very transparent. Moisten the area with Winsor & Newton’s Blending and Glazing

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine Medium, float a minuscule amount of color, whether it’s an accent color, highlight, shade or reflected light, into place. Blend it’s edges out into the clear medium.

Figure 1

Block In

Blend

Detail

Vase Handles and Top Rim:

Using the grey values already established, block in the values on each handle and the rim (and the inside of the Vase).

Block In Basic Mixes B

Use a #2 Cheri Rol Blender or a #0 brush to blend between value changes. Maintaining the value change gives your handle it’s form. Add highlights of WW. When dry add increased shadows and highlights, and accents of Vase colors by glazing.

Blend

WW G Background HL

Leaves:

Mix a brighter green value scale.

L

HL = L + NYL + CYP L = M + HL Background+CYP M = D + CYP + W D = VD + CYP ** VD = UMB + CYP + B

Highlight

VD

When the leaves are dry, accent colors of flower colors can be added by glazing. Azaleas:

Mix a value scale of pretty pinks. HL = L = M = D = VD =

Off Whites L M D

The duller colors are used mostly on the left and the under petals while the brighter pinks are used on the front and the right petals. Block the colors in as you Pat Blend. See Figure 2

L+W CYP + BR BR, BR + W M + D Green D + D Green

Pat (Pull) Blending:

The vase values and the pretty pink values are used together to create variety in the Azalea petals.

June 2018 Issue

M D

Use a #2 and #0 Cheri Blender to block in values and Pat Blend one leaf at a time. Add tips and tidy up the leaf edges using the #000 liner brush and paint thinned with a DROP of Winsor & Newton Blend & Glazing Medium.

**

YT

The first key to a successful painting is blending skills. If you practice and perfect this skill, your paintings will look great. Then, with the addition of glazes, they’ll look “super terrific”. Basecoat with a thin even layer of

paint putting the light value where you want it, placing Medium value on either side of it and applying the Dark value where you want it (these suggested placements are found on Figures 1 & 2). To Pat (Pull) Blend between these values, use a flat brush and straddle the line between value changes. With a swooping motion of the brush (similar to an airplane landing and taking off), pull down the line between values with a fairly short stroke and light pressure. Then, moving a hair at a time to the left and then to the right

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine and back again, you can eliminate the line while leaving the lighter value on one side of the brush and the darker value on the other.

3. Accents --- Are all the colors of the design bounced around enough to create unity within the color scheme?

After blending each petal use a #2 mop to soften the petal pulling from its tip to the center. Wipe your brush between each pull.

Sign Your Name

Corner load a #6 blender brush with HL value. Add highlights where you want the petal to be the lightest. Blend the edges of the highlight, then mop. WW and YT are used as the lightest lights. Use the #1 droplet brush to add flips, tornadoes and tips, adding to each petal to make it perfect.

instructions on the label. Set the cooking timer for one hour. Do not exceed one hours’ time when spraying or you risk cracking and wrinkling your painting.

Varnish: When your piece is totally dry, remove all dust using a tack cloth. Varnish with many light coats rather than one thick soggy coat of varnish.

With the can held about 10 inches from the surface, spray from one side of the surface to the other being sure to spray off the edge. Spray until covered.

I like to use Krylon Satin Varnish #7002. Be sure and read the

Turn the surface and cross spray – using the same method. Now turn

Figure 2

Vase Mixes HL

Stamen & Pistils:

The center of each flower needs to be shaded with either D value or G. This gives the center a little depth from which the pistil and stamen grow.

L Block In

Blend

Detail

M D

Block In

With your liner and a drop of Winsor & Newton’s Blending and Glazing, pull lines of M leaf mix for each of the stamen and the pistil. Highlight and Shade with green mixes.

VD Leaves HL

The head of the pistil is CYP shaded with CYP + VD Bright Pink, with WW / YT highlights. The heads on the stamen are CYP + VD Pink (as mixed above) in small oval shapes, highlight with YT.

L Blend

M D

LET DRY !

VD

Finishing Touches:

Flower Pinks HL

Double check these three things: 1. Highlights – Is the lightest highlight in the center of interest area? Is every item light enough in relation to its values and position in the design? 2. Shadows – Are the cast shadows consistent throughout the whole design? Is each item dark enough in relation to its values and position in the design?

Detail

L M D Stamen

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

VD

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine the surface back and spray again repeating the first step ---- then repeat step 2. LET DRY !!! 15 minutes or until it’s dry enough to tack off. Then repeat the four layers of spray as described above. LET DRY !!! until you’re able to tack off. Repeat the four layers again. Repeat as many times as you can in one hour. In the dry hot climate we had in California I could give it five rounds in one hour. Here in Indiana with the humidity, I’m lucky to get four rounds. After each round it takes a little longer to dry. This will give you good finish. Let dry two full days. If you wish a deeper finish, after two days of drying, you can repeat the one hour process.

Until Next Time PAINT WITH A HAPPY HEART

June 2018 Issue

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines


Painting World Magazine

This is a full size pattern

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Colonial Welcome Plaque Back in Colonial times the pineapple was a symbol of friendship and hospitality. Join me as we paint this welcoming piece using layers of washes to achieve the soft appearance. In addition, we will be mopping, drybrushing and just for fun, spattering. I see this hanging by your front or back door or maybe inside a wreath to welcome your guests.

About Lynne

by Lynne Andrews June 2018 Issue

While painting professionally for 30 years, Lynn discovered decorative painting well into her career. Happily, she created a company (Lynne Andrews Folk Art), a website, an extensive line of designs and pattern packets, numerous books, instructional DVD’s, and most recently online videos. Lynne has been travel teaching non-stop throughout the country and also internationally. She hopes to continue to inspire painters as she is inspired by her faith, family and friends.

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Surface: Surface: 14” x 9” x 3/4” Pine Plaque available from Lynne Andrews Folk Art, item #2017-44S

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • Antique Gold DA091 • Antique Green DA147 • Black Green DA157 • Burnt Sienna DA063 • Burnt Umber DA064 • Buttermilk DA03 • Lamp Black DA067 • Plantation Pine DA113 • Raw Sienna DA093 • Snow (Titanium) White DA01 • Yellow Ochre DA03

DecoArt Americana® Mediums: • Multi- Purpose Sealer DS17-9 • Sealer/ Finisher (matte) DAS13-7 ®

Loew-Cornell Brushes: • Ultra round #2, 4, 8, 14 series 7020 • Scumbler #8 series 2014 • Duster/ Stippler #2 series 4 • Maxine’s Mops 3/8”, 1/2” series 4 • Brush to seal and basecoat

Miscellaneous Supplies: • 220 grit sandpaper • Tracing paper • Transfer paper • Paper towels • Water basin • Small hairdryer • Fine point permanent black marker • Pencil • Ruler • Artist’s soft kneaded eraser

Yellow Ochre Antique Gold Burnt Umber Burnt Sienna Plantation Pine Antique Green Raw Sienna Black

of the section where a wash has been applied. This is an important step when working with washes. Overlaying washes Paint one wash over another in successive layers to build up a depth of color. For added softness, mop immediately after applying the wash. Each layer must be completely dry before applying the next or the paint will lift. Use a small hair dryer set on low to speed the drying process.

Preparation: Lightly sand all areas of the wood. Wipe free of dust. Follow manufacturer’s label directions to seal the wood. Dry completely.

White

Basecoat the plaque with two solid coats of Buttermilk, drying and lightly sanding between coats.

Tips and Techniques

Transfer pattern onto the surface. Be sure to use the ruler for straight lines. Leave off small details such as checks in border, feathers on crow’s wings, hairs on leaves, etc. Make sure to apply a little extra pressure when tracing pattern onto surface. You will want to be able to see your transfer lines through multiple layers of washes.

Floating I use an ultra round brush for floating. This brush is a combination of a round and a liner. The bristles hold a large amount of paint or paint/ water mixture, while the point allows access to the smallest areas. Floating with an ultra round is basically the same as a conventional float, treating the round the same way you would a flat or angular brush. Dip the brush into water, blot on a paper towel, and dip the tip into the paint. Work the paint into the brush by brushing back and forth on a palette once or twice. Lay the tip of the point up against the area you will float. Hold the brush almost parallel to the surface and continue just as you would with a flat. After floating, use a mop to soften and blend. Blending Use a small mop brush to blend and soften the area (especially the edges)

Instructions: Pineapple Use the #14 ultra round to wash the pineapple with Yellow Ochre. Lightly mop/ stipple using the duster/ stipple in the center of the pineapple. (Figure 1) This will help to soften and blend the wash. Dry. (refer to #1 step by step) Next, wash Antique Gold around inside edges, mopping with duster/ stippler, towards center to extend some color. Dry and repeat with another light wash if needed. Use the #8 ultra round to float Burnt Umber lines on pineapple. (Figure 2) Mop as you go with

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Figure 1

Figure 2

a time and moved to a different area, away from the wet leaves. I found doing it this way helps make the depth of color on each leaf slightly different. Once all washed and dried, I went back and applied another light Plantation Pine wash to some of the darker areas. Mop and dry. (Figure 5). Lightly wash Antique Green onto some of the leaves (Figure 6) for some contrast. Mop as you go.

Figure 3

Figure 4

Continue using the #8 ultra round to wash a scant amount of Burnt Sienna onto some tips of leaves. Add center vein running down centers of leaves. Mop as you go. (Figure 7) Add some darker shaded areas where the leaves overlap, using the #4 ultra round in Black Green. Mop to blend. I used the tip of the #4 to add Burnt Sienna spikes coming out from sides of leaves. I used my #2 ultra round to line in some of the veins of the darker leaves, using Yellow Ochre. Background wash

1/2� mop. When dry, you can go back over the lines if needed to strengthen the color. (see Figure 2)

Burnt Umber to the bottom inside edges of the pineapple. Mop using the duster/ stippler.

Lightly wash Burnt Sienna (Figure 3) semi- circles onto each diamond and add a dot underneath. I used the #4 ultra round to do this. Mop if needed. Dry completely. Lightly wash edges of pineapple in Burnt Sienna, mopping as you go.

When completely dry, load the #8 scumbler with White. Wipe off excess onto a paper towel and drybrush a highlight to the center of the pineapple.

Continue using the #4 ultra round to wash (watered down) Lamp Black to shade the top points on all diamonds sections. Mop to soften. (Figure 4) When dry, do the same to each bottom point, using White. Dry. Lightly wash

June 2018 Issue

Pineapple leaves When washing on the leaves, do the bottom of pineapple at the same time. Use the #8 ultra round and wash each individual leaf in Plantation Pine. Mop the centers of each leaf as you go. I washed one leaf at

Leave the outside border and checked border in Buttermilk, for now. Float up against the check border, on the inside of the design, using the #14 ultra round with Raw Sienna. Make sure to use enough water so the paint flows easily. Mop as you go using the duster/ stippler to blend, soften and control the wash. Dry completely and add a second (light) layer. Extend that wash inward, towards the pineapple but leave an inch or two between them. Float Burnt Sienna on top of the dried Raw Sienna keeping it a little closer to your checked edge. Mop as you go. Crows I used my #8 ultra round to wash Black onto each crow. Mop slightly

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

Painting World Magazine to blend. Dry and repeat if needed. If possible, float Black underneath wings. Come back in with the #2 ultra round, loaded with White and add little lines on each wing to imply feathers. Add a dot for each eye and a nostril. Fill in legs using your fine point black marker. I used my marker to fill in each check however, you can certainly use a small flat brush to do the same. Use the #14 ultra round to float a Black wash all around the inside, up against the check border. Mop to soften. Float around the outside of the border (on the Buttermilk) with Burnt Umber. Mop. Banner Wash banner with Yellow Ochre, using the #8 ultra round. Mop with duster/ stippler in the center. Dry. Wash Burnt Sienna across bottom of banner. The shading at each end, the folds and float around the outside of banner, is all Burnt Umber. Mop as you go. The letters are painted Black using the #4 ultra round. It is opaque however I did have just enough water in my brush to move the paint easily. When dry, lightly erase any transfer lines showing. I spatter using the #8 scumbler. Dip it in water and blot slightly before mixing it in Black Green. I hold the brush downward (aiming) and flick the bristles with my finger. I did this all over the plaque.

Finishing: Because a permanent marker was used, you will need to spray the piece with several light coats of Americana Sealer/ Finisher. Once dry, you can finish the piece with a varnish of choice. The drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Figure 6

Figure 5

Figure 7

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Painting World Magazine

Innovative Corner

with Debbie Cole, CDA

Painting with Pure Pigment Paints: Part 4 Traditions are a new generation of resin paints that are versatile for both acrylic blending and acrylic layering techniques. They are a medium body paint that is formulated with a special binder that separates them from other acrylics. This formulation makes them very creamy and they stay open much longer. Because of these characteristics, they are the perfect paint for blending and creating realistic form. They dry a little slower and will stay open for hours on a wet palette. This is convenient because they will stay open for several months inside of a wet palette stored in a refrigerator. However, it is important to use distilled water for the wet palette to prevent mold from forming. This binder also keeps the paints from separating so it is not necessary to shake the bottles or rotate the paints. Therefore they have a longer shelf life than other acrylic paints. The Traditions line of paints was formulated to make mixing easier for painters. On each bottle they have a variety of information on the back label which acts as a guide for painters when mixing colors. The first number that is listed is the Pigment which is represented by the letters PB and a number. This simply is an index number for the pigment. The next information given on the label is the paints opacity which could be transparent, semi-transparent, or opaque. The next is lightfastness. This is important to know because as a painting ages it can fade from the ultraviolet rays of the sun. A lightfast number 1 means that it is not fugitive and will not fade. However as the numbers increase the paints are more fugitive and would need to be protected by glass to stop the painting from fading over time. The Hue number

June 2018 Issue

simply identifies the hue of each color. While the Value number represents how light or dark the color is on the Munsell scale. This scale was discussed in detail in the February Innovative Corner article. The Chroma/ Saturation represents the intensity or pure strength of the color in the bottle. When mixing colors it is important to know both the intensity and the value of a color because it will be a guideline as to how much of one hue should be added to another to alter the color. If mixing a high intensity hue into a duller hue, it would take less paint than mixing two low intensity paints together. Also, the value number of a color is important when mixing because it is a helpful guide to either change the value of a color or to maintain its value. For instance, with Hansa Yellow medium the information given on the label is that it is semi-transparent, a value 7.9, and a Chroma Saturation of 13.7. This means it is a semi-transparent, light, highly intense color. To mix another color into it just to tone it, as discussed in previous Innovative Corner articles, either its complement or an Earth Tone would work best to keep it in the yellow family. A complement would be in the violet or purple family. Dioxazine Purple is transparent, but has a dark Value of 2.4 and has a Chroma Saturation of 8.2. It would be very difficult to add this to the Hansa Yellow Medium without making it darker. A better selection would be from the Earth Tones. Yellow Oxide is opaque, but has a Value of 6.1 and a Chroma Saturation of 7.7. Because it is opaque very little would be needed to tone the Yellow Hansa Medium. The values are close enough where the color would only slightly darken, and the Chroma Saturation is dull enough where it would definitely dull the intensity to create a toned yellow color. Knowing these numbers helps the painter

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Painting World Magazine make an educated decision on which colors to use when mixing Traditions paints. In addition to the labels acting as a guide, another benefit is that the colors within the line were formulated to make creating full value scales easier. There are a range of values within the Earth Tone family to tone light and dark colors in the entire line. In addition, there is also a grey scale with values from white to black that also can be used to create full value scales for individual color families. There are 49 colors in the line including a few metallics. The color possibilities are endless for the acrylic painter using this amazing line. The initial investment for the paints can also be cost effective because only a few values from each family could be purchased as a starting point. When painting with Traditions it important to heat set the paints with a hair dryer in between layers and to use the mediums provided in the line as you paint. Heat setting the paints makes the paints bond to the surface where air drying does not form a hard bond. Therefore the paints may lift without heat setting them.

There are four special mediums that were created specifically for this line. The MultiSurface Sealer and Satin Varnish are for sealing and protecting the painting surface. It is important to use the Multi-Surface Sealer because it provides a stronger bond with the Traditions than other sealers. The Extender and Blending Medium and the Blending and Glazing Medium are the two mediums that are used during the painting process. Generally Traditions isn’t used with water alone so when using these mediums it is important to have a dedicated brush and container for them. Water by itself acts as a solvent and can actually lift the paint therefore it should only be used when combined with these mediums. The Extender and Blending Medium gives the Traditions more open time and improves the flow of the paint. It can be used alone or directly to the paints. To use the extender directly on a surface, load a brush, blot on a paper towel, and apply to the surface. It is important to not use too much extender because the paints will run and become difficult to control. If too much extender is applied to an area, simply blot with a paper towel or mop up the excess. When blending the paints to create form, it is important to dampen your brush with extender rather than water. Load the brush with extender then blot on paper towel and load the brush with paint. This will allow the painter plenty of time to blend and create form. The Glazing and Blending Medium can be used as a

barrier coat, as a soft sealer, and mixed into the paint to create more transparent paints. This is one of the most important mediums because its main role is to create a barrier coat to protect each layer as it is applied. Because it has different binders than the paints, it is important to shake the bottle before using the medium. It is fairly thick and can be combined with up to a 50% ratio with water to thin it. This is wonderful for creating washes or for antiquing. For thinning paints for linework or sideloading, it is helpful to keep a separate bottle filled with a 2:1 ratio of glazing medium to water. For acrylic painters who prefer the acrylic layering technique to blending, this is the ratio that can be used for floating. When painters are first learning how to sideload a brush for floating it is easier to have them load full strength glazing medium into the brush rather than water. The glazing medium gives them more control because the paint does not spread across the brush as easily as it does with water. No matter what technique is being used always remember that as the layers are built it is important to use a hair dryer to set the paints before building more layers. Many acrylic painters like to use the layered approach along with bottled acrylic techniques. For those of you who like to combine dry brushing with floating to create realistic form it can be difficult to drybrush over the Glazing and Blending Medium barrier coats because they are very slick. A little trick that I use is I add an additional thin coat of the Ultra Matte Varnish from the Media line over the barrier coat. This gives it the tooth needed to dry brush. I then continue to add the barrier coat as each layer is finished. Once the painting is completed, I use the Satin Varnish to protect the painting.

Thank you for joining me for this four part series. It is my hope that this has been a foundation for all of you to continue to build your knowledge about painting with pure pigments and the elements of art.

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June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Gifts of Spring

by Barbara Bunsey, CDA After a long winter, the glorious colors of spring welcome this season of rebirth. It is such a gift when our spring flowers begin to bloom and fill our sights with such joyous hues! “Gifts of Spring” is my gift to you, wishing you many gifts of laughter and joy.

June 2018 Issue

About Barbara Barbara has been painting and teaching for over 30 years and has taught at SDP National Conference, mini-conventions, and continues to travel teach for painting chapters. Her designs have been featured in all the decorative painting magazines, and she has been named to the Directory of Traditional American Crafts by Early American Life Magazine since 2004.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Barbara paints pieces which are sold in the Colonial Williamsburg foundation’s shops. She also demonstrates “country tin painting” at the St. George Tucker House in Colonial Williamsburg when she visits each December. Barbara was honored to have an ornament selected for the official White House Christmas Tree in 2004, and in 2005, painted an ornament to grace the Christmas tree at the Library of Congress. In 2008 she was chosen to paint over 1,000 ornaments which President and Mrs. Bush used as gifts to family, friends, and White House staff. In 2017, Barbara was awarded the distinction of Accredited Decorative Painter (ADP) by The Society of Decorative Painters. Barbara lives in Ohio with her husband and a crazy cat.

• Neutral Grey (Toning) DAO95 • Orange Twist DA266 • Petal Pink DA214 • Pink Chiffon DA192 • Plantation Pine DA113 • Primary Yellow DA201 • Royal Purple DA150 • Scarlet DA345 • Tangerine DAO12 • True Ochre DA143 • Tuscan Red DA265 • Warm White DA239 • Wisteria DA211

FM Black Gold® Brushes: • 3/4” wash • #10 & #16 shader • #0 script liner • #8 filbert • #2 & #4 round • #12 Dynasty dry brush

Surface: Wooden Basket 63019, from the Artists’ Club®, www.artistsclub.com

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • Antique Green DA147 • Antique White DAO58 • Avocado DAO52 • Bleached Sand DA257 • Canyon Orange DA238 • Carousel Pink DA274 • Chartreuse Yellow DA330 • Cotton Candy DA347 • Fawn DA242 • Grey Sky DA111 • Jade Green DA057 • Lavender DAO34 • Margarita DA299 • Midnite Green DAO84 • Milk Chocolate DA174 • Moon Yellow DAO7 • Mulberry DA294 • Mustard Seed DA264

Miscellaneous Supplies: • DecoArt® Multi-Purpose Sealer DS17 • DecoArt Extreme Sheen™ Pink Tourmaline DPM15 • DecoArt Varnish (your choice) • Plaid® FolkArt® Handmade Charlotte™ Stencils Paisley Delight 30948

the color you want. Using the dry brush, add the stencil using Bleached Sand in the brush over Antique White areas and adding Antique White to the dirty brush as you move up onto shaded areas. Using wash brush, float Antique Green at bottom, walking color up about 2”. Again, you may need to do this more than once to get the look you want.

Instructions: Leaves

Base Antique Green. Highlight with a brush-mix of Antique Green + Jade (approx. 1:1); this is your first highlight and should be the widest; each successive float should be a little narrower. Repeat, using just Jade; repeat, picking up Margarita in dirty brush; repeat, using just Margarita in brightest areas; repeat, using Chartreuse Yellow in very brightest areas. Shade with Avocado; this is your first shadow and should be the widest; each successive float should be a little narrower. Repeat, using Plantation Pine; repeat, using Midnite Green.

I use several layers of color to highlight and shade for depth and dimension. The first float listed is always the widest and each successive float is a little narrower.

Preparation: Sand, seal, sand. Base Antique White. Using wash brush, float a brush-mix of Milk Chocolate + Fawn (approx. 1:1) at top edges, working color down about 2”-3” and down side edges. I also did this on the inside of the basket. You may need to do this more than once to get

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June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine Poet’s Narcissus (White):

Base petals Antique White. Highlight with Bleached Sand, then add Warm White to brightest areas only. Shade with Grey Sky; repeat with Neutral Grey; repeat with Antique Green. Center Cup:

Base Mustard Seed. Highlight at lower right with Moon Yellow; add a little Bleached Sand to dirty brush if you want it brighter. Shade opposite side with Orange Twist + Scarlet (approx. 1:1). Shade inside center with a brush-mix of Antique Green + Avocado (approx. 1:1). Tap in dots with tip of liner and True Ochre, Mustard Seed, and just a few with Tuscan Red + Scarlet (approx. 1:1). Outline cup with the Tuscan Red + Scarlet mix (approx. 1:1). Pink Tulip:

Base Cotton Candy. Highlight with Pink Chiffon; reinforce with Bleached Sand; add Warm White to brightest areas only. Shade to separate petals, at base of petals,

and sides of front petals with Petal Pink; reinforce Carousel Pink; pick up Antique Green in dirty brush and add more shading. Shade darkest areas with Mulberry. I also added thin lines to three front petals with the shadow colors side-loaded in my dirty brush, using the chisel edge of the brush to keep the lines soft. Hyacinth:

Using Dynasty dry brush, stipple in with Lavender; add Royal Purple here-and-there for shadows. Using #8 filbert, lay in petals with a brush-mix of Lavender + Wisteria (approx.1:1). Using fairly dry #8 filbert, begin adding highlights by adding Wisteria to dirty brush and, starting at edge of petal and pulling toward base of petal, whisk the color on; repeat, adding Pink Chiffon to dirty brush; add Bleached Sand to dirty brush for final highlight on brightest petals; you may want to add just a tad Warm White to dirty brush to highlight the brightest ones. Shade at base of each petal with Lavender; reinforce with Mulberry;

add Avocado to dirty brush for final shadow. Using liner, add dots of Marigold for centers; add highlight dots with Moon Yellow. Add more highlight dots, mainly on left and top, with Bleached Sand in dirty brush. Add dots of True Ochre and Tuscan Red in darker areas. Daffodil: Petals:

Base Mustard Seed. Highlight Moon Yellow; reinforce with Bleached Sand; add more highlights with Warm White in brightest areas only. Shade with True Ochre; reinforce by adding Antique Green to dirty brush. Add floats of Mulberry to darker areas. Be sure to highlight the top of the flip on the bottom petal and add shading at the bottom of the flip and above it on the petal. Trumpet:

Base with a mix of Marigold + True Ochre (1:2). Highlight left side and ruffled edge with Moon Yellow; add Bleached Sand to brighter areas, then Warm White in brightest

Poet’s Narcissus

Pink Tulip

June 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Hyacinth

Daffodil

areas only. Shade bottom and right side and inside trumpet with a mix of True Ochre + Scarlet (3:1); reinforce by adding Antique Green to dirty brush and pull streaky lines, following the shape of the area in which you are working, with the chisel edge of your brush and this color mix. Add more shading with just Antique Green, then add Mulberry on right sides only. Wash over all with thinned Primary Yellow.

Orange Tulip:

Base Canyon Orange. Add highlights mainly to tops and some edges of petals with Tangerine; repeat, picking up Orange Twist in dirty brush. Final highlights on front petals only is Primary Yellow. Shade bottoms of petals and where something lays under another with a brush-mix of Scarlet + Tuscan Red (approx. 1:1). Also pull thin lines in petals, following the shape of the petal on which you are working,

with the chisel edge of your brush with this side-load. Repeat steps above with just Tuscan Red. Add more shading to darkest areas with Mulberry. Add Avocado to dirty brush and add darkest shadows. Snowdrops:

Using filbert brush, base with Bleached Sand. Shade at base of petals, to separate one area from another, and under green strokes with Grey Mist; repeat, using Neutral

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Orange Tulip

Snowdrops

Crocus

Grey; repeat, adding Wisteria to dirty brush. Shade in darkest areas with a brush-mix of Neutral Grey + Royal Purple (approx. 1:1). Dry-brush Bleached Sand and then Warm White to bring up the highlight areas. Green strokes are done with the #2 round and Antique Green. Add a highlight dot with Margarita. Crocus: Yellow:

Base Mustard Seed. Highlights are done with Bleached Sand; repeat, picking up Warm White in dirty brush. Shade with a mix of True Ochre + Scarlet (3:1); repeat, using just Scarlet. Add Antique Green to

June 2018 Issue

dirty brush and add more shadows. Dry-brush a bit of Bleached Sand + Warm White to bring out light areas. White:

Based Bleached Sand. Float a brushmix of Lavender + Wisteria at tops and edges of most petals, except the right petal which only has color on the right. Also pull streaks of this color onto petals using chisel edge of brush. Repeat, using Wisteria. Shade to separate petals with Neutral Grey + Wisteria (1:1); repeat, using Royal Purple. Dry-brush Bleached Sand and then Warm White to bring up the highlight areas.

Purple:

Base Lavender. Highlight tops of petals with a brush-mix of Lavender + Wisteria (approx. 1:1); repeat, with a brush-mix of Grey Sky + Wisteria (approx. 1:1); repeat, with just Wisteria. Shade bases of petals and to separate with Royal Purple. Pick up Midnite Green in dirty brush and add shading in darkest areas. Dry-brush Bleached Sand and then Warm White to bring up the highlight areas.

Finishing: Add tints of any of the colors used throughout the painting: for example, add tints—either

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine dry-brushing or floating lightly—with Scarlet, Mulberry, Wisteria, Royal Purple, Canyon Orange, Orange Twist, Tuscan Red on leaves and lightly on each flower—just hereand-there, not on the entire flower or adding all colors to each flower. You already added hints of greens to flowers in the shading, but you can add a bit more Antique Green or Avocado and even Margarita to some flower petals. Handle

I painted the handle the same as the base of the basket, floating and applying the stencil as above. Add Extreme Sheen Tourmaline Pink to edges of handle and top edges of baskets. Varnish with several coats of DecoArt Varnish. Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

The drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines

June 2018 Issue

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Gone Fishin’

Painting World Magazine

by Leslie Smith, CDA Trompe-l’œil is the French name for a style of painting; it translates to “to fool the eye.” The goal is to simulate objects with such reality that it appears that they are real and not painted. The background is faux marl (French for to “fake marble.”) The design is advanced because so many techniques are used. You are encouraged to paint the two notes and fishing line free hand; they will look more natural and make the painting your own. However, as an oil painting, it is quite simple. June 2018 Issue

About Leslie “I love painting in a style called Trompel’œil – which is French for ‘to fool the eye.’ It appeals to my scientific sense of order, my artistic side, and my sense of humor. I love that it allows me to paint the world as I wish it could be and recapture fond memories. My Dad and I shared a love of restoring. I would drag some interesting, but broken, object home from a tag sale and Dad would work his magic. When he returned it to me, it would be better than new. He was a true craftsman and loved being at our lake cottage on Lake Geneva – especially fishing.

Happy Father’s Day, Pop…. And thanks for everything.”

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

There are chores to be done… but the fish are bitin’.

• C-through ruler • Usual painting supplies

Let’s get our priorities straight.

Preparation:

Surface: The design is shown on a table top with an approximate 12” diameter; any flat horizontal surface will work.

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: These acrylic paints are chosen not only for their hue, but also for their transparency or opacity. Substituting another color or acrylic brand may make it difficult to duplicate the background. For the marble, the greens must be cool. Marble is a stone; stones are cold. Also the difference in temperatures (marble cold greens - bag warm browns) makes the bag come forward. Additional acrylic paints are listed in the instructions for those who choose to complete the entire design without using oils. • Lamp Black DA067 • Snow White DA01 • Hauser Green Medium DA132 • Black Green DA157 • Black Forest Green DA083 • Forest Green DA050 • Zinc DA304 • Grey Sky DA111

Oil Paints: It is possible to buy oil starter sets from many manufacturers and in different grades (student to artist - oil to heat set to water-miscible). For this project, use whatever brand or type of oils that you have. The color of the fishing equipment, ink, etc. can vary quite a bit and still be believable. In Trompe-l’œil, the goal is to paint realistically and

believably; matching a specific color is not always necessary. • Raw Umber • Yellow Ochre • Titanium White • Ivory Black • Cadmium Red Medium • Cadmium Yellow Light • Alizarin Crimson • Ultramarine Blue • Chrome Oxide Green (optional)

Mediums/Other Products: (Other products will be needed if the project is painted solely in acrylics.) • DecoArt American Multi Purpose Sealer DAS17 • Americana Wood Filler DA103 • Krylon Matte Finish 1311 • Lavender Spike Oil - available at arttreehouse.com/store/ • Dawn Soap dish-washing soap • Minwax Polycrylic - satin finish - available at most home supply stores

Brushes: Flats, rounds, liners in whichever brand and in the largest size you are comfortable, sea sponge (the more ragged, the better), scumblers, and mop brushes for both oils and acrylics

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Transfer paper and stylus • General’s White Charcoal Pencil • Tape for masking • Pinking shears

Wood fill imperfections; let dry. Sand gently to remove excess wood filler. Seal with DecoArt’s Multi-Purpose Sealer, let dry again, and again sand gently.

Instructions: The Faux Marl: Dribble Black Green, Black Forest Green, and Forest Green randomly onto the surface. Using a large flat brush and “x” strokes, blend the greens together just enough that the surface is covered with patches of green and no paint ridges remain. Dry. Trace around a scrap of paper, the approximate size of the note, with the General’s Charcoal pencil to show where the note will lay; this prevents wasting time painting great marble, only to cover it up later. Lay a torn strip of scrap paper diagonally across the surface. Sponge Black Green on one side. Paint should be fairly solid near the paper and fade out. Be sure to turn your sponge often so the pattern doesn’t become repetitive. Turn the paper over and repeat with Forest Green on the other side of the “crack.” Do as many or few cracks as you wish. Dry. Sponge over the crack line with some Black Forest Green and then some Forest Green only enough to prevent a stark dark line. Randomly sponging of either green in the darker areas to carry the lighter colors through out the piece. Drag the sponge to smear the paint in a place or two. Dry. Up to this point, the camera cannot really pick up the subtleties

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine Figure 1

of the marble and the photos see little change from one to another. Erase the outline of the note. Using your General’s White pencil, sketch a jagged, broken line along the cracks. Use your finger to smear the pencil into the green side of the crack. The white chalk is transparent and will streak. Try it again, but this time not only along the crack but also further into the green and maybe, wet your finger a bit. This sets the stage for the marble and can be easily washed away if it isn’t to your liking. Figure 1 Use sponges, flat brushes, scramblers, liners, and mop brushes to add details to the marble. Paint can be put down (or picked up with a moist clean sponge/brush.) But, add these details sparingly. Is there a green area that you want to lighten or darken? Add Lamp Black to the darker areas. Use Zinc in the lighter areas. Highlight the Zinc with Grey Sky. Finally, add a few tiny areas of Snow White. Remember to keep the lines jagged. The Note: Reduce or enlarge the line drawing to fit your surface, but keep the lure 3-5” in length The fishing gear must remain realistic in size. Transfer the note, except along the scalloped edge (the note is torn from a paper bag; the top edge of a bag is often both notched and scalloped) . You can forgo the scalloped edge, freehand it, paint it straight and then use the blacks/ greens to cut it in, or create a sort of template/ stencil. To do the latter, cut a jagged edge into painters’ tape with pinking shears. Mask the bag edge with your tape/stencil. Don’t forget to leave the marble background show through the round notch.

June 2018 Issue

Base coat the bag with a large flat brush and alternatively pick up Cocoa and/ or Khaki Tan. Slip Slap and allow some brush strokes to remain. They will later become wrinkles. Be sure that they remain straight lines and not curves. A paper towel, pressed or blotted into wet paint near the lower left edge) can give the illusion of the paper being thinner where torn. Let dry completely and erase all tracing lines. Figure 2 Let’s talk for a minute: The remainder of the project is painted in oils. Many people do not like to work in oils because they take so long to dry. But, there are several ways to speed up the drying process: 1. Spray drying; 2. Using a drying agent or medium; 3. Adding some alkyds to each paint mixture; 4. Patience and waiting conceivably months to finish the piece; 5. Converting the necessary paints to acrylics. Each has pros and cons. Spray drying requires adequate ventilation in a dustfree area. And, a lot of people have

Figure 2

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Painting World Magazine trouble doing it. However, I live in Florida and have been spray drying for over 30 years. I have never once had a problem with hazing or crazing. The trick is to spray or mist a matte fixative (such as Krylon 1311) into the air above the painting (which is held horizontal) and let the aerosol fall down onto the painting. Do not spray the fixative onto or into the wet paint. Another useful trick involves 2-ply kleenex or tissue. Separate the tissue so it is only one layer thick. Gently lay the tissue on top of the wet painting and press down with your hand - pat - do not rub. This will help to absorb the excess oils from the painting. Do this just before spray drying.

lapse before the painting becomes “too tacky” and spray drying is necessary. As a rule, I try to limit the spray dry sessions to eight or fewer. Of course, that all depends upon if and how drying agents were used, thickness of paint, and the humidity - so everyone’s experiences differ. Also, once you skip or cease spraydrying, it is not possible to start up again. Each spray dry session must occur while the oil paints are still wet and before it becomes too dry. Creases and rolled edge - the Paper Bag Umbers and other earth tones tend to dry more quickly - most reds and oranges can be very slow to dry. Both are used in this project. The bag starts with those paints that dry the quickest.

Drying agents can also reduce the time it takes for oils to dry; there are many available. But, most traditional The light is coming from the upper drying agents, like liquin or cobalt left; the bag is a plane with some siccative are hazardous and particularly unsafe in a closed studio. There are bio-based drying agents, such Figure 3 as Spike Lavender Oil; it smells great (albeit a bit strong), and it is my favorite way of reducing the time oils take to dry. I will be using Lavender Spike Oil (sparingly) when I need to dilute paint for lettering or any other purpose where I need the paint to move. I will also be spray drying for this project. To clean my oil brushes, I use Murphy’s Oil or Dawn dishwashing liquid.

shallow “peaks and valleys.” Lighter values indicate higher areas and darker values define depressions. Surprisingly, the lighter values are not always where the light source would logically dictate. Values define both shape (the peaks and valleys) and shadows. Prepare Low Dark, Dark, Medium Light and Highlight mixtures for the bag creases. Use the WIP (Work in Progress) photos and line drawings to suggest where to place the values on the bag. The creases are straight lines; they meet in sharp angles. The differences in values are blended, but their edges are still sufficiently defined that they remain visible at the crease. Add random tints of any of the mixtures or pure paints to add interest to the bag. The rolled edge is a cylinder. The area beneath the roll is shaded

It has been my experience that about two hours can © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine with the darks and blends out into the bag. The very top of the roll and an occasional area of the pinked edge are highlighted. Paint a tiny outline or shadow of black beneath the bottom edge of the bag, the top edge of the notch, and each divot of the scalloped edge. Keep the paint sufficiently thin to be transparent and allow the background to show. Blend the edge of this shadow to diffuse into the background. Spray dry. Figure 3 The creases can alternatively be painted with acrylic washes and mixtures. Use DecoArt American Raw Umber, Yellow Ochre, and Titanium White to make the darkest, dark, light and highlight mixtures. The medium value is the original background bag: i.e., random Khaki Tan and/or Cocoa. There is no black used on the bag, but dilute Lamp Black is used to create the shadows to the right and beneath the note. All the acrylics are DecoArt Americana. Figure 4 The Message: Consider doing the note freehand. Your own handwriting will add to the illusion and charm. It is more realistic. Lastly, there are no transfer lines to interfere with spray drying.

If you prefer, a line drawing that shows the notes is provided. One trick when lettering “free hand”is to work with a copy of the line drawing and cut out the area in which the writing will lay. It isn’t a stencil, but it will keep the lettering confined in the right area and keep the lines straight. There is a break and/or offset where a letter goes over a paper crease. To continue the project with oil paints, use a mixture of Ultramarine Blue and Black (approximately 50:50); dilute with a drop of Lavender Spike Oil to help it stay fluid. Spray dry the lettering when done. Figure 5 If you painted the bag in acrylics, use a mix of DecoArt Americana Navy Blue and Raw Umber for the ink. A bit of Khaki Tan in the mix will help the lettering “melt” into the bag and not “take over” the painting. Do not switch to acrylics if the bag creases are painted in oils; oils can be painted over acrylics - the reverse is not true. If the oils are spray dried to create a barrier between the oils and acrylics, it sometimes seems possible to “get away with it…” But, then sometimes, months later, the paint

cracks and peels. Once you start painting in oils, you are committed to finish the project in oils. The Fishing Gear - layer one: For me, one of the biggest differences between painting in oils and acrylics is the sequence in which I paint the objects. With oils, it is easier to paint all of the same colors while the mixtures are still wet and usable. I tend to lay my hand in the wet paint, which can be very frustrating. And, the brush can also pick up wet paint. So, we will paint the fishing gear in a seemingly strange order. The lures include parts made of both wood and metal. The values on the wood are more blended and gradual. This helps maintain the softness of a natural material. The values on the metal are blended, but the change between values is more sudden. This creates the shine associated with metals and man-made materials. Refer to the value map provided. Paint the red part of the lure and plastic beads on the spinner, using the first three red values: Raw Umber, Alizarin Crimson, and Cadmium Red Medium. Note that the positions of the light and darks are reversed in the lure’s mouth; i.e., the light is on the upper half of the head, but the lower half of the mouth. The highlights will be

Figure 5

Figure 4

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Figure 7 Figure 6

added after the next spray dry. Paint the white portion of the wooden lure with the grays made up of the bag values with a tiny bit of ultramarine blue to each. They are essentially neutral grays - neither warm nor cool. These grays are, however, considerably cooler than the colors used in the bag; the contrast in temperature will help the lure appear to come forward. Scrub a little Yellow Ochre into the lure where it laps over and onto the green background. Begin the tail chain and the tail with dilute Black. Figure 6 The leader line holds colorful and shiny beads to attract hungry fish. The spinner is painted simply with black, white, and the blended mixtures of the two. There are also tiny silver beads on the leader line. Their purpose is to separate the beads and promote spinning. They are also mixes of black and white. The brass, at this stage, is only Yellow Ochre on the side facing the light and Raw Umber on the shadow Figure 8

side. The line between the two is “tickled” to blend them together. Begin painting the shadows on the bag, using the same paints that were used to make the creases; where the shadow extends off the bag and onto the green background, use straight black. Shadows are darkest nearest the object casting them and have diffused edges. As an example, where the shadow meets the underside of the lure, the shadow and lure are essentially the same value (darkness). Paint the bag logo with Alizarin Crimson, diluted with a drop of Lavender Spike Oil. I used my initials; you can always use yours. Add two or three streaks of Alizarin Crimson to the lure’s tail. The painting is definitely at the “ugly duckling stage” now. Spray dry before proceeding. If painting in acrylics, simply use the DecoArt Americana paints of the exact same names; the white part of the wooden lure can be painted with Zinc, Raw Umber, Driftwood, and Grey Sky.

The Fishing Gear - layer two: Painting with white is like cooking with salt. You almost always use it, but too much will ruin everything. So, almost many of the highlights will be mixtures including some white, but few will be actually straight white. (By the way, the same is true of black.) A line drawing with values has been provided. Paint his eye with a circle of the darkest crease mixture. The center is Black and there is a tiny highlight of Titanium White. His eye protrudes and casts a crescent shaped shadow of Alizarin Crimson. Highlights on the red lure and beads are Titanium White; be sure not to cover the eye’s shadow. If the highlights appear chalky, add a touch of Cadmium Yellow Light and then repeat, in a smaller area, with Titanium White. The hooks and chains on the lure are Black and then highlighted here and there - with Titanium White. The only reason they were not painted earlier is that the paint beneath them was still wet. The highlights are not smooth the chain is beat up. Figure 7 The fishing line is made up of jagged segments that are either

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Painting World Magazine Figure 11

Figure 10

Highlights on the brass are first with a mixture of Cadmium Yellow Light and Titanium White and then with a final Titanium White. Highlights on the steel chain, beads, and spinner are straight Titanium White. Figure 10

a mixture of Titanium White and Ultramarine Blue, Titanium White and Yellow Ochre, or Titanium White. The variation in value and temperature will help the illusion that the line is crinkled and not lying flat on the bag. There is no real strategy to which color to use where - except that paint needs to be varied - and the ends look more realistic if highlighted.

Spray dry.

The line drawing shows the fishing line and one possible path. But, you can also paint it freehand and not have to worry about transfer lines. It can curve; its shadow, painted with the darker crease values, should “jag or break” if it lays on a crease in the bag. Figure 8 I have painted this project many times and once added some extra fishing line to go over the chore’s list. It covered up some awkward lettering. Figure 9 Note that the shadow cast by the fishing line is not always the same distance from the line. When the line and shadow are close, it gives the illusion that the line is lying on or close to the bag. When the line and shadow are further away (or even cross), it gives the illusion that the line is sticking up from the surface. Shadows are a critical component to Trompe-l’œil.

June 2018 Issue

All that Jazz and Pizazz - tying it all together: Walk away, come back and look at your painting. Technically, it is done at this point - you can skip to the section on finishing. But, I love to putter - can’t you tell? And maybe, there’s something you’d like to revisit. Try any combination of the following suggestions, or all, or none. “Play” with contrasts - values, hues, intensity, and temperature - Repeat the highlights, as many times as you want, each time making the highlight area smaller.

Add reflected or accent colors, preferably in the focal area - Rogue Cadmium Red Medium into the spinner behind the touching red bead…Add a cool white tint (Titanium White and a tiny bit of Ultramarine Blue) along the shadow edge of the lure, beads, hooks, and/or spinner. This is very faint and lies between the object and its shadow. Figure 11 Add the unexpected sparingly - How about putting some dirt on the lure? Unpaint. Look at your painting. It is so easy for decorative artists to get in the rhythm of a process and forget to stop painting: Maybe scumble Black, Titanium White, Chrome Oxide Green, or even Yellow Ochre into the marble to get rid of some of the “busyness.” This step can be used to darken the marble where it touches the lighter paper bag. It can be used to lighten the marble where contrast is needed to make the fishing line show up better. The Figure 12 shows the project painted in both oils and acrylics. Can you tell which is which? The answer will be in the next issue. Figure 12

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Finishing: When pleased, sign your piece with pride and do one last spray dry. Let the piece dry for three or four days and then varnish with Minwax Polycyclic if the surface is being prepared for heavy use or handling. If not, simply spray with your favorite aerosol satin finish; Krylon products are the most likely to be compatible over the Krylon Matte Finish. Wipe the threads and caps of the oil paint tubes clean. Rub a drop of vaseline along the threads and close the tubes gently.

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Suggested creases

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Painting World Magazine

San Pedro Calla Lilies

In 2017, I hosted a workshop in San Pedro, California with my great friend and fellow artist, April Numamoto. The gardens around the clubhouse had the most amazing flowers to include calla lilies. I took a lot of reference photos for future paintings and shortly after the workshop I designed and painted these! Hope you enjoy painting these simple, yet elegant flowers as much as I did.

About Sandy

by Sandy McTier

June 2018 Issue

Sandy’s passion for painting and creating over the last three decades has lead her on an incredible artistic journey. She is a published artist, designer and teacher who enjoys sharing her gifts and talents. Sandy creates in a variety of mediums, from acrylics to oils and clay to colored pencils. She has taught at her local Hobby Lobby for over a decade and travel teaches around the United States and Asia. Sandy is a proud DecoArt Helping Artist and Dynasty Artist. She makes her home in Georgia and is a wife of 27 years to a U.S. Air Force Veteran, mom to three amazing young men, ages 23, 22 and 21, and a little dachshund named Becks. Look for Sandy on Facebook at Sandy McTier Designs. You can also find her on Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.

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Surface:

Sandy’s Color Mixes:

9 x 12 Canvas

Martin/F. Weber wOils®: • 7421 • 7411 • 7417 • 7425 • 7426 • 7406 • 7428

White Permanent Dioxazine Purple Paynes Gray Prussian Blue Raw Sienna Cad Yellow Light Sap Green

Martin/F. Weber Medium: • 7477

Fast Dry Medium (FDM)

Martin/F. Weber wOils® Brushes: • 5501 • 5502

#6 Perfect Bright #0 Perfect Round

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Paper Towels • Transfer Paper • Water bin • Pen or Stylus

Preparation: Transfer pattern onto canvas using a pen or stylus.

Instructions: Load #6 with Fast Dry Medium (FDM); work into some Raw Sienna and paint a thin layer around the Figure 1

Figure 2

• 1 part Sap Green to 1 part Paynes Gray = dark green mixture • 1 part Sap Green to 1 part Paynes Gray + White = soft sage green • 1 part Prussian Blue to 3 parts White = darker Sandy’s Blue • 1 part Sap Green to 1 part Prussian Blue = aqua (add touches of white to lighten the color to desired shade) • 1 part Sap Green to 1 part Cad Yellow Light = light green mixture (add touches of white to lighten the color to desired shade) line drawing. Wash the brush and dry well. Dip the tip of the brush into FDM and work into some Sap Green; paint the leaves. Keeping the Sap Green in the brush, load a bit more FDM and work into some Paynes Gray; slip slap the flat of the brush here and there on the background. Wipe the brush off, load with FDM and work into some Dioxazine Purple. Slip slap some of this color on the upper half of the canvas. Wash the brush and dry well. Load the brush with FDM and work into some White. Load a touch more FDM and work into a little Prussian Blue. Be careful – this color is strong. Mix the Prussian Blue and White together on the palette and add a touch more FDM if it needs to be thinned. Paint all over the canvas as shown, wiping off the brush and reloading as needed. Figures 1, 2 & 3 Wipe the brush off. Starting at the top of the canvas and using the flat of the brush, soften and lightly blend the background. Don’t over blend!

Helpful Hint: Wipe the brush off often to keep the colors from getting muddy. The brush will start to dry out and the bristles split – so simply wash out the brush, dry well and with a light touch, go back to softening the background..

Load the brush with FDM and work into some Raw Sienna; paint a thin layer on the calla lilies and stems. Wash the brush out and load with White. Slide along the chisel edge of the brush to outline the top of the big calla lily as shown. Figures 4 & 5 Load brush with FDM and work into some White. You want a clean paper towel in your other hand so that you can wipe the brush off before reloading it. Start at the top right of the flower, and with

Figure 3

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Figure 4

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Painting World Magazine Figure 5

Figure 6

light pressure, pull the brush down toward the center. Wipe the brush off. Reload and pull from the edge toward the center until the flower is painted. Don’t worry about how dingy it’s looking right now. We’ll add layers of white to brighten up where needed. Make sure to pull the brush strokes to follow the shape of the flower. Wipe the brush off. Pull the flat of the brush from just above the petal and lightly pull some of the background color into the petal. We’ll cover some of it up with more white but that step will add a subtle dip into the petal. Wash the brush out and dry well. Load brush with just a touch of FDM and work into some White; repaint the strokes with an even lighter pressure. Wash the brush out and dry well. Load with a tiny touch of Paynes Gray (no medium) and work Figure 9

June 2018 Issue

Figure 7

into the brush on your palette. You want very little paint on the brush! Paint a soft stroke along the “U” in the center of the flower and up over onto the left side as shown in the picture above and to the right. Wipe the brush off; stroke over it to soften the look just a bit. Figures 6, 7 & 8 Load the brush with a touch of FDM and work into some White; paint the tube part of the flower down to where it meets the stem as shown. Wipe the brush off. Lightly pull strokes from just under the flip down to where the white meets the stem again to soften the paint. Wipe the brush off. Pull the flat of the brush up from just below the white (on the Raw Sienna stem) up into the white area. Wash the brush and dry well. Load the brush with FDM and work into some Paynes Gray and Sap Figure 10

Figure 8

Green; mix together on palette. Paint the stem as shown. Figures 9 & 10 Load some White onto the brush and mix to make a soft green; paint stem. Wash the brush and dry well. Leaves: Reload brush with FDM, Sap Green and Paynes Gray mixture; paint leaf. Add a touch of White to the brush and then mix on the palette. Starting with the chisel edge of the brush on the edge of the leaf, lightly pull the flat of the brush down toward the base of the leaf. Repeat down both sides of the leaf. There isn’t much color to this right now – just a subtle difference from the dark green you painted first. We’re also not covering all of the dark – just adding strokes of the lighter color. Wipe the brush off. Lightly pull the flat of the brush from the stem up Figure 11

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Painting World Magazine Figure 12

into the white area just above the stem. Wipe the brush off. Load with a touch of White, and this time, lightly pull a stroke from the white of the flower into the stem. Wipe the brush off. Repeat to soften the area just a bit. Leave the pretty streaks you get when pulling these colors into each other. Figure 11 Load the brush with FDM and work into some Sap Green. On one corner, load a touch of Cad Yellow Light and stroke the brush on the palette in the same place to work the paint into the brush, keeping the brush on the same stroke on the palette. Add a touch of White to the yellow corner and repeat blending in the same area. Starting at the top of the leaf and with the chisel edge of the brush on the edge of the leaf (Note: The light corner is on the right), slide along the edge of the leaf and, every now and then, lean the light corner onto the leaf as you’re pulling the brush. Come back up to the chisel edge on the edge of the leaf and repeat down both sides of the leaf. Wipe the brush off. Load the corner with Cad Yellow Light and White again and blend on palette. Softly swipe the corner of the brush on the leaf to brighten up some of the flips, making sure to stay out of

Figure 13

the darker area. To paint the center vein, slide on the chisel edge of the brush down the center of the leaf. Note: Add a little bit of this lighter green color to the center of the big flower. Use very little paint and then stroke over the paint again to soften the look. Wash the brush out and dry well. Load the brush with Paynes Gray and pull some strokes from the center vein of the leaves out, if necessary, to darken some areas. Wipe the brush off. Load with a touch of Dioxazine Purple and a touch of White; lightly brush some of the color onto the leaf if desired. Load #0 with a touch of FDM and work into some Raw Sienna; paint stamen. We’ll add more to the stamen after we’ve painted the bud. Figure 12 Load the #6 with FDM and work into some White. Slide on the chisel edge of the brush to outline the smaller flower. Add a very small touch of Paynes Gray to the brush and work into the brush on the palette; paint along the top as shown to add in some shadow areas. Wash the brush out and dry well. Load the brush with White; softly pull strokes of white down from the top edge to the stem. Wipe the brush off.

Figure 14

Figure 15

Load with White; pull strokes from the flipped edge down toward the stem. Wipe the brush off. Load a tiny touch of the light green mixture; pull from the base of the flip up on the petal just a bit. Wash the brush and dry well. Load the brush with FDM, Sap Green and Paynes Gray; paint stem. Pull the flat of the brush up from the bottom of the stem; as you are pulling into the white area, lift, so that the bristles feather through the white paint. Wash the brush and dry well. Load the brush with a touch of Raw Sienna and lightly paint on the left side of the flower down toward the stem. Wipe the brush off. Load with a tiny touch of the dark green mixture and add to the top of the flower to separate the back side of the petal from the front. Load the brush with White. With very light pressure, slide along the front edge of the petal to brighten up the white. Load the #0 with White and brighten the tip. Wipe the brush off. Add a touch of Paynes Gray and paint a small shadow on the curl as shown. Repeat the same for the curl on the larger flower. Figures 13, 14 & 15 Stamen: Load the #0 brush with Paynes Gray and add to the bottom

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Painting World Magazine Figure 16

mixture. Swipe the brush on the stems to add this punch of color.

Figure 17

and right side of the stamen. Wipe the brush off. Lightly tap the tip of the brush to soften the Paynes Gray into the Raw Sienna. Wipe the brush off. Load with Cad Yellow Light and tap the tip of the brush along the top and down the left side and middle of the stamen. Wipe the brush off. Load with Cad Yellow Light and White and repeat. Wipe the brush off. Load with White and lightly highlight the top left of the stamen. Darken the shadow up if necessary with Raw Sienna and Paynes Gray. Figures 16 & 17

Figure 18

June 2018 Issue

NOTE: The background was feeling a bit too dark so I brightened it up with some touches of aqua (Sap Green and Prussian Blue + White to lighten). Then it was a bit too light, and I didn’t have the contrast with the flower and the background, so I added in some more Dioxazine Purple around the flower. I tell you this because I want you to see how easy it is to change the colors around your design to achieve the desired look. Figures 18 & 19

Finishing touches: Darken one side of the stem with Paynes Gray and brighten the highlighted side with some touches of the light green mixture we made earlier. Wipe brush off and load a touch of the aqua

Load the chisel edge of the #6 with a tiny touch of Cad Yellow Light and White and work into the brush on the palette. Pull up a small highlight on the front of both flowers and on the small flip on the right of the small flower. Wipe the brush off. Load a tiny touch of Raw Sienna and add some on the small flower flip. Load the chisel edge of the #6 with a touch of Paynes Gray and work into the brush on the palette. You want very little paint on the brush. Starting with the chisel edge of the brush right up under the flip on the big flower, very lightly pull the brush down to paint a shadow. Wipe the brush off and repeat if necessary. If necessary, fix up or reshape the edges of the flowers, stems or leaves, with the background color. Proudly sign your name with a stylus or the edge of a wipe out tool while the paint is still wet!

Figure 19

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Painting World Magazine The drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine

Expect a Miracle by Nanette Rasband Hilton Nanette Rasband Hilton’s artwork has been licensed for decades on products ranging from nutcrackers to textiles. Her writing has been published digitally and in print in periodicals and instruction books. She holds a degree in Writing and is currently pursuing a graduate degree at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. When she’s not creating, she may be found cycling the Mojave or enjoying time with her husband and their five daughters’ families.

“Don’t Waste the Miracle,”1 is the title of the tiny Mary Engelbreit book adorning a shelf in my front entry. It has been there for twentythree years, undisturbed except for an occasional dusting. I bought it when Mary’s stuff was all the rage and I, her devoted fan. She’s currently celebrating her fortieth year in business. I once wrote to Mary Engelbreit, back in the 1900s, asking how to get my own artwork “out there.” She wrote back with good advice. Since then, my artwork has been around the world, licensed on products ranging from nutcrackers to textiles. But, today, I re-open Mary’s book, considering miracles. The first page says, “This little book belongs to _____________.” It’s blank. Apparently, I’ve failed to appropriately claim ownership. So, I get out a reliable pen and inscribe my name on that line. “There,” I think, satisfied, and put the book down. “Really? That’s all you’re

June 2018 Issue

going to do?” I ask myself, disgusted. “Twenty-three years and you’re not going to flip further?” Acquiescing to my better-self, I begin to get reacquainted with this little treasure. First, I notice the end papers. They are black with white stars showing Mary’s coloring lines as she has turned white paper into night sky using her black marker. There, in the center of the right-hand page, is a big white star radiating out with white-penciled shine-lines. The star has the faintest blue shading on its arms, transporting it, and me, from the flat paper in my hands to the boundless universe it lights. Now I’m remembering why I love this book and have displayed it in my home’s entry for over two decades. I’m remembering the art of Mary Engelbreit.

Take notice of your art. When did you begin making it? Do you have your first painted piece? Who introduced painting to you? Bless them. Savor the memories. Share the stories. I invite you to email me with yours.2 How do you feel as you paint and how do you feel about your finished projects? Reacquaint yourself with your painting roots.

Stop and own it, always signing your name to whatever you create. JoSonja Jansen, renown folkartist celebrating thirty-five years designing for decorative painting, signs each piece of artwork with her registered trademark name. The photo below is the back of the plate she was teaching at the Las Vegas Creative Painting Convention, which I attended. I suggest you take a photo of everything you paint. I can mark the years by the art I’ve made during them, but only if I have a record of it.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Mary’s little book holds twentyfour detailed illustrations reduced down to fit inside the three-inch by two-and-a-half-inch book. Knowing first-hand the life-blood that went into these pictures, I ponder the time it took Mary to create them. It is a miracle. The art we create truly is a miracle. It springs from our tender, invisible artist’s heart. We shouldn’t waste it. As you embark on a new painting adventure, realize the miracle you’re living.

The simple process of creation is itself a miracle. God’s first work was to create, according to Genesis.3 Creating is a divine act. With this mindset, we should expect a miracle when we endeavor to make art. Perhaps an angelic choir gathers, expectantly peering over our shoulder, to herald our masterpiece. Masterpiece? Uh…I fear I will disappoint. “Nonsense!” shouts my better-self. Hear me shouting at you, too: “You’re the masterpiece!”

The first painting is dated 1985. The next includes window light subtly reflected onto snow. And in another illustration, to the delight of the recipient (a self-portrait of Mary), a holly-bearing dove flies from a just-opened gift-box trailing hearts and stars. Each illustration has similar genius. I am remembering the kindred spirit I found in Mary’s drawings when I first saw them and how they inspired my own creativity. It has been a long, miraculous journey.

thinking, get up and do. Do that creative thing that draws from your artist’s heart the awaiting miracle called art, expecting a miracle. You’ll get a miracle. Don’t waste it.

You’re invited to sit a spell. Think about yourself in connection to your art work. In this very fastpaced world of instant-gratification, thinking is undervalued, underplayed and rarely done. Thinking, itself, is a miracle. When you’re done

3. Bible. Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” Authorized King James Version. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1979.

Notes: 1. Engelbreit, Mary. Don’t Waste the Miracle. Andrews and McMeel, 1993. 2. You’re invited to send your story of how you got started painting to: nanettehilton@gmail.com.

Before I set Mary’s book back on my shelf, I look through it again. This time I’m noticing the miracle on each page.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine

Soul of a Horse I love animals of all kinds, but horses have always been my favorite. I especially like to do an animals eyes; you can see the soul of the animal in them. Here I hope you can capture the soul of this mare’s eye in this painting as well as learning to layer the hair to look lifelike.

About Debbie

by Debbie Cushing

June 2018 Issue

Debbie is self-taught Artist from Wichita, KS, but has lived in Springfield, MO for the past 24 years. She started off drawing horses when she was in grade school, then moved into painting in her teens. It wasn’t until she joined an SDP Chapter in 2004 that she started painting every day. Now she does commission pet paintings, online classes, designs pattern packets and teaching where she can to help others learn to paint realistic animals.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Surface:

Preparation:

I painted this on an 8” x 10” Masonite Board. You can use wood, but make sure to seal and sand to a smooth surface first. Masonite doesn’t need to be sealed and already has a smooth surface.

Base coat surface with True Ochre using the sponge, then sponge in Raw Umber around the outer edges and in the corners fading out towards the center. Sponge in Cadmium Yellow more in the center and fading out toward the edges into the Raw Umber. Finally, highlight with Moon Yellow from the center fading out ward. Lightly sand. Figure 1

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • True Ochre DA143 • Raw Umber DA130 • Cadmium Yellow DA010 • Moon Yellow DA07 • Lamp Black DA067 • Slate Grey DA068 • Grey Sky DA111 • Graphite DA161 • Zinc DA304 • French Mauve DA186 • Warm White DA239 • Snow White DA01 • Raw Sienna DA093

• Mane with Lamp Black • Darkest areas on body and head with Graphite • Middle grey is Slate Grey • Highlight areas are Grey Sky We will be adding lots of layers so don’t fret over this too much at this time. Eyes: Wet large brush with clean water, then lightly tap on paper towel then dampen one eye at a time with water. With 6/0 Round and Warm White thinned with water, tap on the bottom of the dampened eye and let the paint disperse. If you get too much, lightly tap with a small mop. Add a stronger highlight at the top left of the left eye. Figure 3

Scharff Brushes • 1/4”, 3/4” Filbert Comb Series 430 • #2, #6 Moon Filbert Series 425 • #2 Filbert Cats Tongue Series 429 • 6/0 Round Series 405 • #8 Faux Squirrel 1827 Wave Filbert by Dynasty • Small Mop • Any brush to use to dampen areas with water • Small dry brush

The rest the base coating will be done loosely with the #6 Scharff Filbert and paint thinned with water as follows: Be sure to pull the paint strokes in the direction of the hair growth. I always pull fur or hair towards myself. If you work the same way, turn the piece accordingly.

Transfer the pattern. Base coat the ears, eyes, nostrils, and bottom lip with a solid color of Lamp Black. Figure 2

Other Supplies • Wet Palette • Paper Towels • Grey or White Graphite Paper • Stylus • Fine Sand Paper • Wedge Make-up Sponge • DecoArt® DuraClear Satin Varnish DS21

Dampen and do the right eye the same way, but a stronger highlight will be on the top right of the right eye. With the 20/0 Scroller add a thin line at the bottom and up the right side of each eye. Fill in the eye lashes on the left eye with Warm

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine White and add Lamp Black to the very ends of the lashes. Lamp Black lashes on the right eye. Figure 4

down to an inky consistency (you want to see some of the darker colors under it), pull strokes to form a hump over the top of the eyes in a loose upside down C. Add a thin line around the ears with Warm White. Add a circle of strokes coming from the center of the forehead (refer to hair growth chart). Then switch to the #8 Faux Squirrel Wave Filbert with inky Warm White and pull out more hair following the growth over the whole face using short strokes. You will still see some of the dark underneath. Pull strokes on the neck where the highlights are with the Warm White. Then with Zinc pull in hair strokes on the darker areas on the neck.

the bottom lip. Add Warm White around the outside of the nostrils, the white only comes down part way on the outer inside edges. Then go over the same areas around the nostril with Snow White. Add some thinned Warm White hairs in the center of the muzzle tapering off as you come down. Add whiskers coming out using the 20/0 Scroller. On the upper and lower lips are really short hairs coming out. Make them different lengths. Then add really fine hairs coming from the white of the nose over the black areas. Don’t add whiskers on the left side of the muzzle yet. We need to work on the body first.

Muzzle and nose: Figure 6 Face and neck: Figure 5 Using the edge of the #2 Moon Filbert and Warm White thinned

June 2018 Issue

Dampen one nostril with water. While it is wet pick up a little bit of Zinc and with the #2 Cat’s Tongue lightly paint a highlight around the outer edge of the nostril on the black. The water will make the paint disperse on the edges so you have no hard lines. Using the #8 Wave brush and thinned French Mauve lightly add color between the nostrils on the muzzle. With the #2 Moon Filbert and Lamp Black add spots above the top lip (this does not need to be solid). Add a little French Mauve inside the bottom of the right nostril. With Warm White and a 6/0 Round add a line around

Ears: With the 20/0 Scroller and Warm White, add tiny hairs around the ears on the white. With a dry brush of Zinc, dry brush on the outer part of the black of the ears. Body: Using the 3/4” Filbert Comb and Graphite with a touch of Lamp Black mixed in and thinned to an inky consistency, pull strokes of hair down the neck using the tips of the brush only. Layer over the strokes you just made building layers so they blend together. Pick up some thinned Lamp Black and go over areas that are the darkest. Clean

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the brush, pick up thinned Grey Sky and start adding in lighter hairs. Add closer layers for the brightest areas. With the 20/0 Scroller with thinned Warm White add a few hairs here and there for detail. Figure 7

Keep working these colors until you get it to look the way you want it. Head: Figure 8 With the 3/8” Filbert Comb and a mix of Graphite with a touch of Black in it, start pulling hair strokes on the curve above the eyes and continue adding in all the dark areas on the horse’s face. Refer back to the original photo. Remember to go in the direction of the hair growth. Overlap the strokes. With the same brush pick up thinned Grey Sky for the middle colors. The last layers will be added with thinned Snow White. Blend the colors where they meet so you won’t have blunt end lines. With the 20/0 Scroller add detail hairs with Lamp Black (refer to photo) and do the same using Snow White. Add whiskers coming from the just

Mane: With Lamp Black and the #8 Faux Squirrel Wave pull in mane hairs. Use the 3/8” Filbert Comb and thinned Zinc, start adding lighter hair in the mane. I used the side of the brush in some of it. Make some of the lines wavy. Then with Grey Sky, add more highlights on top of the zinc in areas. With the 20/0 Scroller and Warm White add in detail hairs here and there. There are also some detail Black hairs that stick out of the top of the mane in a few places. The ends of the mane hairs

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines

on his forehead are done with Raw Sienna. I usually keep tinkering with it adding layers until I get it to look how I want it.

The drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

below the eyes with Lamp Black. Then with Snow White, add the rest of the whiskers around the muzzle that show on top of the neck.

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Painting World Magazine

Oversize Poppy by Donna Dewberry Quick and Easy! That’s what Donna Dewberry’s One Stroke Painting technique has always been about. This large, bold flower takes on that description and so much more. The elegance of this piece can be applied to any home décor by simply changing up the background and accent colors, and it’s so Quick and Easy to create.

About Donna A self-taught decorative painting artist, Donna Dewberry is the creator of the One Stroke ™ technique. Discovered by Plaid Enterprises, a leading American Craft Company, and with their support in paints, tools and media, Donna has risen to become a highly-respected, accomplished and published artist with over 100 books and 50 instructional videos to her credit. She also

June 2018 Issue

has an amazing education program with over 13,000 One Stroke Certified Instructors globally; all of whom, including Donna, love to share and educate others. Donna is proud to have her own YouTube Channel for Education, and her previously recorded PBS shows are still broadcasted on the PBS Create television channel.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Surface:

Preparation:

16” x 20” Gallery Wrapped Canvas

Draw just the flower design on a blank canvas using the pattern and transfer paper or free-hand with chalk. Load the 3/4” flat with Berry Wine and occasionally pick up Burnt Umber, flip-flop the flat side of the brush to loosely blend these colors onto the canvas around the outside of the design, to the edge of the canvas and around the sides. The basecoat of the canvas will include the white of the canvas, the Berry Wine and the Burnt Umber. Figure 1 Pick up Bright Gold and add to the canvas using the same method of flip-flopping the gold into the wet canvas, allowing the three colors to blend loosely. Figure 2 Allow basecoat to dry.

Plaid® FolkArt® Multi-Surface Acrylics: • Berry Wine 2941 • Burnt Umber 2909 • Bright Gold 2966 • Coffee Latte 2906 • Wicker White 2894 • Sap Green 2985 • Daffodil Yellow 2912

Plaid® FolkArt® Mediums: • Floating Medium 868

Plaid® FolkArt One Stroke™ Brushes: ®

• 3/4” Flat, 1176 • #12 Flat, 1058

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Paper Towels • Pencil or Chalk • Water Bin • Transfer Paper • Foam Plate or Palette

Painting Instructions: Back Petals: Stroke the center of left back petal with 3/4” flat loaded with Coffee

Latte, making sure you leave a feathered edge to the stroke by lifting up gradually at the end of the stroke. Don’t stop with a straight, hard line and work on one petal at a time. While paint is still wet, wipe the brush off on paper towel and pick up Wicker White on the flat edge. Starting at the outside edge of the petal, touch, push down slightly and pull into the Coffee Latte to the center. Wipe off after each stroke if you pick up too much of the Coffee Latte and pick up fresh Wicker White to stroke the next stroke. Figure 3 Repeat the previous steps for the remaining petals in the back of the flower. Figure 4 Now you are ready to stroke the Berry Wine center on the back petals. Load Berry Wine on a clean 3/4” Flat and pull strokes upward from the center of flower into the petals. This works best

Helpful Hint: The beauty of One Stroke painting is that blending, shading and highlighting is achieved in one stroke! This is achieved by loading multiple colors on the brush at the same time and not using any water, with the exception of initial dampening of the brush before loading. Adding a little Floating Medium is the key to smooth strokes and preventing dry edges, especially on rough surfaces.

Figure 1

Figure 4

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 5

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine Figure 6

Figure 7

when white petals are wet so the colors will blend, making them all a little different. Some strokes should be done on the chisel edge and some on the flat to give variation and depth. Figure 5

Center: Pick up Sap Green on #12 Flat and tap in the center. Wipe off the brush and pick up Daffodil Yellow. Tap lightly over the green center to show seeds or texture. Figures 6 & 7

Figure 9

Front Petals: Continue stroking the front petals in the same manner as the back petals, starting with Coffee Latte centers,

Figure 8

then adding Wicker White from petals edges down to centers and finally pulling up Berry Wine. Figure 8 The final stroked petal has a little more of a flared look. The Coffee Latte strokes are spread out and go up high to the petal edge. The Wicker White is stroked down following the same curved directions as the Coffee Latte and finally Berry Wine is added for shading. Figures 9 & 10

Leaves: Draw leaves outline on below the flower using the pattern and transfer paper or free-hand with chalk. Figure 11 Refer to the leaf worksheet for detail. Double-load the 3/4� Flat with Sap Green and Daffodil Yellow. Figure 12 Dip the loaded brush into

Figure 10 Figure 11

June 2018 Issue

Figure 12

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Painting World Magazine

Figure 13

Floating Medium and work into the brush on the palette. Position the brush for the first leaf from bottom center of the flower, starting the stroke for the first side by pushing down slightly on the handle of the brush to lay the bristles down on the flat of the brush, wiggling the brush as you pull the stroke. Slide out to first leaf tip and then slide in towards leaf center, then out again and slide back to center. Figure 13 Finish the leaf side by wiggling out and sliding down to the tip of the leaf, lifting as you get to the tip and sliding to the chisel edge. Figure 14

Figure 16

Figure 14

Repeat the same strokes for the other side of the leaf, meeting at the tip to finish. Figure 15 Pull a stem into the leaf on the chisel edge of the brush, leading with the light color and dragging the dark color bristles behind. Add a few more leaves towards one side of the flower, without so many points and wiggles. Figure 16 Continue adding leaves on the other side of the flower as well, following the same stroke techniques and colors as previously directed, to complete the design. Make sure to pull stems into all of the leaves coming from under the bottom of the flower. Figures 17, 18 & 19

Figure 17

Figure 15

Finishing: If the background is dark enough and petal and leaf strokes have been applied as instructed, this alleviates any need for additional shading. The Multi-Surface paint is self-sealing and thus, no additional sealing is required. The beauty of One Stroke! Sign your name and enjoy your masterpiece!

Figure 18

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Painting World Magazine

Figure 19

June 2018 Issue

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

The drawings have been reduced by half. Please enlarge 200% for full size drawings.

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines

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Cock-a-doodle Dandy by Linda Hollander This patriotic rooster will look grand on your front door to commemorate Independence Day and other national holidays. The surface is an inexpensive 2’x4’ piece of underpayment from Home Depot. One sheet will make four door hangers…one for you and three to gift!

I have been painting, drawing, and crafting since childhood, but my art supplies had been collecting some dust while I was busy raising my three active boys. It wasn’t until 1999 that I discovered the world of decorative painting while flipping through some magazines. I bought them all, and poured over them daily with renewed excitement. I used the instructions to teach myself most of the techniques until I could get to seminars and conventions. I chose vintage furniture as my

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine substrate… “go big or go home” is my mantra! Collecting vintage pieces is half the fun of painting. Garage sales and flea markets are hard to pass, as my boys will attest to. I am also not above picking up curbside treasures on trash day. The things people throw away simply amazes me! Painters are fortunate to have all the wonderful new mediums and paint formulas we have today. There is virtually nothing that can’t be painted… as long as it doesn’t move too fast!

Techniques used: Stenciling, Distressing, Floating, Drybrushing

Surface: 12” x 24” piece of Luan underlayment plywood from home improvement store

Delta Ceramcoat Acrylics: • Antique Gold #02002 • Antique Rose #021169 • Black Cherry #02484 • Blue Velvet #02562 • Butter Cream # 02523 • Dark Chocolate #02523 • Golden Brown #02054 • Liberty Blue #02416 • Maroon #02075 • Mudstone #02488 • Spice Brown #02049 • White #02505

Delta Ceramcoat Mediums: • All Purpose Sealer #07005 • Matte Exterior/Interior Varnish #07008

Royal Brushes: • Aqualon Liner Series R2585 - 10/0 • Aqualon Round Series 2250 - # 2 • Aqualon Angular Series R2160 - 1/4”, 1/2”

• Aqualon Shader Series R2150 - #4, 8, 12 • Aqualon Glaze/Wash Series R2700-1” • Mop Series 4999-#4 • Stencil Series 1111-1”

Helpful Hints: Use appropriate sized brushes unless otherwise noted. Where “sheer” floats are called for: Load shader or angle brush for a float but walk the paint out on the palette until it’s semi-transparent.

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Stencil - 12” x 24’ Pledge of Allegiance Stencil from Oakland Stencil (www.etsy. com/shop/OaklandStencil) • Graphite paper • Tracing paper • Stylus • Medium and fine grit sandpaper • Jute twine • Drill and bit slightly larger than the jute twine • Painter’s tape • Cellophane tape • Yardstick and ruler • Paint cubbies (to store paint mixes) • Motsenbacher’s Lift Off Acrylic Paint Remover (from Wal-Mart) or stencil cleaner of choice • Household scrub brush with flat bristles

Notes: Use appropriate sized brushes unless otherwise noted. Where “sheer” floats are called for: Load shader or angle brush for a float but walk the paint out on the palette until it’s semi-transparent. Use the mop brush to soften floats as needed. Dry brushing: Begin with a clean, dry or damp brush loaded with a moderate amount of paint. Offload the excess paint from the tip of the brush onto a paper towel. Lightly stroke the brush over the area to be highlighted.

Use the mop brush to soften floats as needed. Dry brushing: Begin with a clean, dry or damp brush loaded with a moderate amount of paint. Offload the excess paint from the tip of the brush onto a paper towel. Lightly stroke the brush over the area to be highlighted.

Preparation: Cut a 12 x 20 piece of plywood (some home improvement stores will cut the wood for you for free or very inexpensively) Drill two holes in the upper corners large enough for the jute to pass through. Sand rough edges of board with medium grit sandpaper. Use fine grit sandpaper to smooth the good side of the board. Apply All Purpose Sealer. Let dry and lightly sand again with fine grit sandpaper. Mix a large amount to White + Mudstone (5:1) and place in a paint cubby. Basecoat the entire board in this Basecoat Mix. Make a tracing of the pattern.

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Instructions: Flag background: Tips for taping: Make sure your basecoats are cured several hours or overnight before taping off areas. If you are using regular masking tape you can make it “less sticky” by applying the tape to your clothing first then use as you would painters tape. Use light finger pressure to burnish the edges of tape to your surface. Stroke in the direction of the tape as opposed to across the edges to prevent paint from being forced under the tape. Gently remove the tape as soon as you finish painting by pulling the tape away from the painted area. To remove paint that may have bled under the tape, use a damp shader to lift paint long the edge of the painted area. For stubborn dried paint use a small amount of rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer to coax the dried paint off. Be careful not to remove the basecoat along with the unwanted paint! Blue field: Use the yardstick and a pencil to mark off a 7 1/4” long section from the top for the blue field. Apply a piece of painter’s tape along the bottom edge of the area. Use Liberty Blue to base the blue field. Remove tape. Let dry. Red stripes: Use the ruler to measure and tick off seven stripes approximately 4.5cm ( 1 3/4”) wide. Use painter’s tape to tape off one red stripe at a time. Use the wash brush and Maroon + touch of the Basecoat Mix to paint the red stripes. Use long smooth strokes painting parallel with the tape so as not to force paint under the tape. Repeat until the stripes are opaque. Repeat for the other three stripes. Let dry.

June 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Distressing: Use the fine grit sandpaper to distress the background. This will lighten the paint slightly to give it a faded, aged look. Sand the outer edges of the board more heavily to expose the wood here and there. Wash Basecoat Mix thinned with water over red stripes.

Stencil: Apply the gross outlines of the pattern for the flag and rooster. Center the stencil over the surface. Check that the words “United States of” are placed within the blue field (see photo). Secure the stencil in place with small bits of painter’s tape. Load the tips of stencil brush with the Basecoat Mix. Off load the excess paint onto a paper towel. Use a swirling motion to apply the paint over the stencil. Reload the brush as needed. Lightly stencil the lettering over the blue field. Avoid stenciling over the flag and rooster but try to come to the edges of the patterns. Its ok to stencil very lightly over the pattern edges so you don’t have gaps in the lettering. Do not try to cover each letter perfectly and opaquely as the lettering should look aged and faded here and there. Wash and dry the brush thoroughly. Mix a puddle of Liberty Blue + Basecoat Mix (4:1) and use it to stencil the lettering over the stripes. Remove stencil. Reapply any pattern lines covered with lettering. To clean stencil, lay flat on a flat surface covered with plastic sheeting. Spray both sides with Lift Off Acrylic Paint Remover. Let stand for a few minutes then gently scrub paint off with the flat scrub brush. Rinse and let dry.

Painting the design: Ground: Thin Dark Chocolate to a wash consistency and paint in ground area. Rooster: Base face, comb, and wattle Maroon. Float shading Black Cherry + touch of Blue Velvet. Drybrush highlights Antique Rose. Transfer eye. Use Black Cherry + touch of Blue Velvet to float shading around eye on face. Use Golden Brown to base eye. Use Dark Chocolate to base pupil. Use a small amount of Butter Cream to add reflected highlights on eye, face, comb and wattle. Base beak Golden Brown. Use Spice Brown to float shading. Deepen shading next to face with sheer floats of Dark Chocolate. Use Antique Gold to float highlights. Use Butter Cream to drybrush highlights. Add reflected highlights with Butter Cream. Use dark Chocolate to add a nostril on the upper beak section. Base body and wing Liberty Blue + touch of Butter Cream. Transfer details. Float shading with sheer Blue Velvet. Let dry and repeat to deepen as needed. Float highlights with Liberty Blue + Butter Cream (4:1). Base head and neck feather area Mudstone + White (1:1). Transfer detail. Use sheer Mudstone + touch Dark Chocolate to float shading on head and under the first two layers of neck feathers. Float sheer Dark Chocolate shading on the left side of the last layers of neck feathers. To drybrush highlights, use the round brush and Butter Cream + touch of Mudstone. Tip: Off load excess paint from the tip of the brush onto a paper towel. Turn the project upside

down and lay the tip of the brush on the tip of the feather. Draw the brush toward you lifting as you stroke so the paint hits the high areas of the surface leaving a soft gradation of color behind. Use the liner and the same paint mix to enhance the tips of the feathers as needed. Base light tailfeathers Butter Cream. Use sheer Mudstone to float shading. Use thinned Dark Chocolate to paint details. Use Maroon to base red tailfeathers. Use Black Cherry + touch of Blue Velvet to float shading. Float highlights and add details with sheer Antique Rose. Use Liberty Blue to base blue tailfeathers. Use sheer Blue Velvet to float shading. Use sheer Butter Cream to float highlights. Use Butter Cream + touch of Liberty Blue to add details. Use the round brush generously loaded in Butter Cream to stroke in a few saddle feathers. Let dry. Load the brush with a generous amount of Maroon then add a touch of Antique Rose to the tip. Stroke a few red feathers allowing the two colors to blend as you stroke. Let dry. Alternate the two colors until you are satisfied with the number of saddle feathers. Feet (and flag pole): Transfer patterns. Use a straight edge to transfer flag pole lines. Use Spice Brown to basecoat until opaque. Use the round brush and Golden Brown to drybrush the first highlights. Be sure to leave the outer edges dark. Use the dirty brush and Antique Gold to drybrush a smaller area of lighter highlights. Use the liner and thinned dark Chocolate to add feet details. Use the liner and Antique Gold + touch of Butter Cream to add touches of reflected highlight here and there.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine Flag: Use Liberty Blue to base blue field. Transfer stars by making a single dot for each star. Use the stylus to add a small dot of Butter Cream over one dot. Immediately use the liner brush to pull 5 arms from the dot of paint to form a star. Repeat for the other 12 stars.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

The drawings have been reduced by half. Please enlarge 200% for full size drawings.

Use Butter Cream to paint the white stripes. Use Maroon to base red stripes. Use sheer Blue Velvet to float shading. Use the #8 shader and Butter Cream to drybrush the highlight over the center of the blue field. Use the round brush and Butter Cream to drybrush the highlights over the stripes. Use Spice Brown to paint the rope connecting the flag to the pole. Use the dirty brush and a touch of Antique Gold to add a highlight.

Finishing: Erase graphite marks. Apply 1-2 thin coats of varnish. Cut a piece of jute twine approximately 18� long. Place a small piece of cellophane tape on each end and wrap it tightly to form a stiff tip to thread through the drilled holes each in the surface. Thread one end of the twine through the front of one hole and make a knot. Repeat with the other end of the twine. Cut off the cellophane tips.

June 2018 Issue

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/June2018Lines


Painting World Magazine

Princess Rose

by Jeanne Collick This project combines my two favorite things, roses and gourds. I have begun cutting out some of my dried gourds to make bowls and vessels. By combining the two and enhancing with quikwood, this piece will be a hit at craft shows or as a gift for someone that has everything.

About Jeanne Jeanne began painting when in high school and discovered decorative painting in 1975. Her first projects were in oils, but she switched to acrylics in the early 80s. Painting was a great stress reliever from teaching teenagers. After retirement Jeanne combined her two loves, teaching and painting, and has since created several unique projects on gourds.

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Surface: A dried and cleaned 7” diameter gourd is available from Front Porch Gourds, LLC

DecoArt Americana Acrylics, Metallics, and Neons • Banana Cream DA309 • Burnt Sienna DA063 • Citron Green DA235 • Forest Green DA050 • Festive Green DA230 • Hauser Dark Green DA133 • Poodlleskirt Pink DA267 • Royal Fuchsia DA151 • Snow White DA01 • Extreme Sheen Pink Tourmaline DPM 15 • Extreme Sheen 24K Gold DPM04 • Moss Pearl DA246 • White Pearl DA117 • Dark Patina DA248 • Neon Light Green Energy DA343

Mediums: • Jo Sonja Retarder • Quikwood or Kwikwood available at Menards

Brushes: Scharff Brushes Moon Mop 685 Loew-Cornell • 3/4” flat wash 7550 • 1/4” and 1/2” angle 7400 • 18/0 liner 7350 • 3/8” deerfoot 410

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Coarse sea sponge • Paper towel • Sand paper various grits for smoothing • Compass with pencil • Transfer paper • Palette paper • Sharpie black marker (thin point)

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• Stylus or exacto knife • Tracing Paper • Water basin • Wood putty for holes • Mini Jigsaw by Minicraft available from www.turtlefeathers.net • Power Drill of your choice • Cleaning balls (course and fine) available from Welburn Gourds • Paper doilies

Preparation: Trace the pattern of the rose onto thin tracing paper. It may be necessary to make some cuts in your tracing paper to allow it to fit over the rounded surface of the gourd. Using a new sheet of graphite or transfer paper go over the pattern. Reinforce the lines that will be cut out to make them easier to see with the Sharpie marker. Cut the gourd with a Mini jigsaw. Clean out the seeds and membranes inside the gourd. A cleaning ball and power drill makes this job easier. Fill any holes in the gourd with wood filler and sand when it is dry. Using a large wash brush paint the outside with one coat of Snow White, going around the stem and leaves as Figure 1 much as possible. Retrace pattern for the leaves and Rose. Cut off about 1/2” of the quikwood from the roll. Apply a drop or two of Jo Sonya Retarder in the palm of your hand and work into the quikwood. Knead or work the quikwood until it is one solid color (no marbling). It is now ready to

shape and apply to the rose where indicated on the pattern. Push firmly so it adheres to the surface of the gourd. Shape and trim with a stylus or exacto knife. This will harden in about 15 minutes, so don’t play with it too long. Figure 1

Sponging: Place Moss Pearl, White Pearl, Extreme Sheen Pink Tourmaline, and 24K gold on your palette paper. Wet the sea sponge with water and squeeze out the excess water. Apply White Pearl over the gourd to cover. You may need to add Snow White to make it more opaque. While this is still wet, pick up the other colors and sponge separately over the White Pearl. Blend the colors together as you sponge until you are pleased with the results.

Instructions: Leaves and stem: Create a mix of Leaf Green + Snow White (4-1). This mix will be used for the leaves and stem. To this mix add more white (3 parts mix and 1 part Snow White). The lighter mix is the Calyx. Begin to dry brush Neon Lights Green Energy on both sides of the center vein on all of the leaves

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Figure 2

Figure 3

and the center of the stem. Shading is done with sheer floats of first Forest Green and then Hauser Dark Green. Use an angle brush and form a large C stroke starting at the side of the leaf to the base and moving up the center vein. Repeat this for the other side of each leaf (two strokes per leaf). Reinforce the lights again with dry brush of Neon Green Energy then Citron Green. Figure 2 Paint Veins with Neon Green Energy plus a touch of Forest green and a liner brush. Float below the vein and under side veins with Hauser Dark Green. Tint some edges of the leaves with Burnt Sienna or Fuchsia Pink with a float and small angle brush. Base the calyx of the rose with the lighter green mix. Highlight the outer edges with Neon Green Energy. Deepen the shaded areas under the rose base with Hauser Dark Green, and line the center of each calyx with Hauser Dark Green. Tint in some small areas of the calyx with Poodleskirt Pink.

Rose: Base the entire rose with Snow White, including the flips and quikwood accents. Two coats of Snow White may be necessary to completely cover the quikwood. Retrace any petal separations that may be necessary. With an angle brush float Banana

Cream at the base of each petal “walking” it out towards the top of the petal, about half way. Using an angle brush again, but with much less paint, deepen the base of the petal with Burnt Sienna. With Poodleskirt Pink and an angle brush float the flips and outer edge of the center bowl. Deepen some of the flips with Royal Fuchsia and Pink Tourmaline Pearl. Light areas of the rose will need to be accented with White Pearl and are floated on with a larger angle. (At the base of the rose between the stem and calyx there is an open space that is painted white.) Figure 3

Finishing Touches Using a compass set for about 3/8” draw a band around the top of the bowl and continue this behind the leaves to a point behind the stem. Prior to painting this band, use your doilies as a stencil and with your deer foot brush pounce the design with Dark Patina. Basecoat the band with Poodleskirt Pink and use White Pearl and Pink Tourmaline Pearl in a mix of 4 white to 1 pink, and paint over the band. Place a line under this with Dark Patina. To set the leaves in float around the outside of the leaves on the gourd with a mix of Hauser Dark Green and Dark Patina. The inside of the gourd is painted Snow White then White Pearl as a final coat. I did not varnish the gourd since I wanted the pearl essence to show more.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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This pattern is full size Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

June 2018 Issue

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Wanna Play?

Painting World Magazine

by Beth Stodieck Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine After I’d painted for a few years, I figured out there are two kinds of decorative painters; BA and AA . . . . as in Before Acrylics and After Acrylics. Those who started decorative painting before acrylics became commonplace had a whole different attitude and skill set than those of us who started painting in acrylics. For us beginner acrylic painters, we looked at a pattern, went to the store and bought the 27 bottles of paint the designer recommended and painted our pieces. But then we wondered why our projects didn’t look right when we decided we “just” wanted to change that background color because a different color would match our house. It’s because we had NO CLUE how color theory played out when the artist designed it and how changing that one tiny little thing affected the whole. The experienced oil painters never seemed to have the same problems because they’d been mixing their colors all along! Little did we know how lucky they really were. Fast forward many years to an incredible opportunity that fell into my lap. For 13 years, I taught art at a kids’ art camp in the New Mexico mountains! I proposed that instead of just teaching these kids to paint a project, I teach them to THINK the project. I wanted them to not only recognize color combinations that worked together but also to know WHY they worked and how to make decisions on design based on color theory. It worked! They left camp being able to apply color theory to their own art. That’s what I want this project to bring to you. While at camp I was blessed to meet and learn from one of my

June 2018 Issue

About Beth “I began painting in 1983, with a neighbor, to give us an excuse to have an evening without energetic 1 ½ year old daughters! When I was growing up, art meant music and though playing cello sent me to wonderful places around the world, it wasn’t until I picked up a brush that I knew I’d finally found my version of the arts. It was so much fun to be so new and so artistically stupid that I didn’t know I couldn’t do something just because it was considered “advanced” and I was just a beginner. I was blessed with a teacher who didn’t bother to tell me I couldn’t do it, so I did! I haven’t met a medium I didn’t want to try but international folk art is where my heart lies when I want to do serious painting. Cartooning, however, is my happy place and I love working on projects like this.” favorite artists, Mark Kistler from PBS Imagination Station. Mark used fun, a healthy dose of crazy and cartooning to teach those kids how to use drawing tools, just like the old masters, to turn two dimensional paper into a three dimensional illusions. Most of us have said it, “Oh, I can’t draw!” but because it was cartooning it wasn’t intimidating and we all learned so, so much. I fell in love with drawing and cartooning and I continue to use all those things I learned at camp. This under the sea project just begged to be made into a cartoon. Mark is my drawing hero! This lesson is not so much a project as an opportunity. I’ve crammed LOTS of elements onto a XXXL man’s shirt, not so that you can copy it but so you can see relationships and put them on YOUR shirt in a way that’s perfect for you. I want you to see how the colors relate, how they flow from one element to the next, how the really dark darks make the lights so much brighter and brilliant. I want you to see the color wheel pouring across the shirt, flowing from one color family to the next so that the whole piece is cohesive, logical and FUN!

I recommend you trace the designs onto small pieces of paper and play with them on your shirt, move them around until you like the layout and then start deciding where YOUR colors will go. In a perfect world, you’ll paint this multiple times, playing with different colors and combinations on each, so you can see how colors relate.

Surface: White, all or mostly cotton, oxford cloth men’s shirt

Paints by DecoArt So Soft Fabric Paint: Some of the colors used in this original are discontinued or hard to find. Very few places carry the whole line. If you do not have a supply of So Soft Fabric Paints already, I am including alternate color substitutions (indicated with * ) for hard to find colors that will work just as well. Also, if there are color names that are the same in both DecoArt Acryic Paint and So Soft Fabric Paint, the colors will also be the same. You will just need to use their fabric medium instead of water while painting and then heat set the acrylic paint after everything is dry.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine • Lamp Black DSS24 • Ultra White DSS36 • Bright Pink DSS72 *Bright Azalea or Dk Rose DSS94 • Christmas (Primary) Red #DSS25 • Magenta (Shimmering Pearl) DSP5 *Fuchsia DSS52 • Tangerine DSS76 • Cadmium Orange DSS4 • Cadmium Yellow DSS3 • Primary Yellow DSS37 • Antique Gold DSS2 • Christmas Green DSS26 • Hauser Light Green DSS 47 • Green Apple DSS 75 • Island Blue DSS74 *Ocean Blue DSS86 • True Blue DSS13 • Bright Blue (Metallics) DSM11 *Navy or Primary Blue DSS42 plus Pearl Medium • Grape Purple (Shimmering Pearl) DSP19 *Purple Passion DASSG08 or Purple Metallic DSM7 • Dioxazine Purple DSS32 • Lilac (Shimmering Pearls) DSP6 *Lavender DSS12 plus Pearl Medium Optional: Glittering Topcoat DS57 *Glimmer Glitter DHM3

Mediums/Other Products: • Transparent Medium by DecoArt, DSF1 • Pearl Medium (2 oz.) by DecoArt, DS41 • Tikteck A4 Ultra-thin Portable LED Light Box tracer USB Powered LED Artcraft Tracing Light Pad, ASIN # B01JPD6QZK (Found on Amazon. This is fabulous! Thinner than a legal pad. Perfect with fabric.) • Owens Corning Foamular Insulation sheet, UPC# 0 47563 70937 7 (shirt sized sheets available at Home

Depot) or other rigid, waterproof backerboard to go inside your shirt. • Zebra Onamae Mackee DoubleSided Name Marker-Fine/Extra Fine Twin Tip, Black, Available from www.Jetpens.com. • Wrights Medium or Jumbo size Rainbow Rick Rack, 2 packages, optional. (Carried by most retailers that carry craft and sewing supplies)

Brushes by Scharff: • Series 300 or 330 for flats and angles • Series 310 or 305 for rounds and filberts These white nylon brushes work very well on fabric. One small round brush, size 4, Scharff SKU #1310-PC13, is especially helpful for small areas but for the rest of the project choose the style and sizes that are comfortable for you.

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Kitchen trash bags • Sewing pins or tape • Freezer paper (optional) • Paper Towels • Small containers, X2, for mediums (pill bottle lids work great) • Palette (I use wax coated, white, paper plates) • Water bin

and arrange them on your shirt, moving and adjusting until you like the placement. Since there are so many different sea critters, move some to the shoulders or the back if you like. Just make the pieces flow. Once you like your placement I recommend taping each small piece into place while you trace one at a time onto the shirt. Slide your light box between the backerboard and the shirt, slide the pattern into place on the light box and trace the critter onto your shirt with a fabric pen. The pen is easy to see while painting but you will have to do some touch up and detail work when you are finished painting. Do not put the black eye pupils or the eyeball strands on the tube coral in at this time. We’ll talk about placement later. Also, do not trace on the bubbles. You will freehand those after everything else is done. Once you finish tracing everything onto your shirt, attach your shirt to your backerboard using either tape or sewing pins to secure the shirt tightly on the board. Cover the sides and back with a second trash bag if you choose.

Painting Instructions: Color Theory in Action: The little fish in the photos are samples of color combinations using

Preparation: Choose a shirt with as much cotton content as you can find. Oxford Cloth is the perfect weight. Knits can be hard to paint on because of their stretch. Wash the shirt normally but without any fabric softener in the wash or dryer. Iron as needed and mount on the backerboard of your choice, with the board inside the shirt. Trace all pattern pieces onto tracing or computer paper. Cut them out

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Helpful Hints: I love using the housing insulation for so many things. It is perfect for fabric painting because it allows you to pin your fabric in place and easily move from area to area just by moving a few pins. If you buy a full sheet of foam (8’ X 4’) you can cut it into boards for fabric painting and use the leftovers to cut out backerboards for watercolor, totebags and any other surface that needs stability. They also last forever! If you choose not to use the foam sheet, pick something stiffer than cardboard and cover it with a plastic trash bag to protect it. A quilter’s cutting mat works well. You will need to tape your shirt in place and retape it if you need to move your shirt around while painting.

Large surfaces like this are just asking to be dunked into a puddle of paint. The other hint has saved me numerous times. I take a large square of butcher paper, fold it into quarters and make a slit up one of the sides to the center. While folded, cut a circle out of the middle of this sheet and move it around your shirt, waxed side down, so it covers everything between the area you are painting and your palette/water bucket. It has saved me from so

I have found two tricks to be invaluable when painting on large surfaces like these shirts. The first is to tape a second trash bag around the backside of your shirt, wrapping the bag around to the front to protect the back and sides of your shirt while you paint. the color wheel. The fish in Figure 1 look quite similar but one is painted with three analogous colors, colors that sit next to each other on the color wheel, blue, purple and pink (a tint of red) and the other is just well blended red and blue. Notice that the two primary colors, red and blue, mix to make the color purple used in the first example. They are virtually the same except the primaries are darker. Having the

June 2018 Issue

many drips, smears and disasters since you can’t wipe a stray drip away like you can on a wood piece. As I’ve worked on fabric, I’ve tried pretty much everything and one of the hardest items to find is a really great permanent pen for use on fabric. Sharpies and Micron pens do not work well with fabric paint. They smear during painting and fade with washing. Even the regular IDenti pen, per the company rep, is not meant to be used on or recommended for use on fabric. I have found the Zebra pens listed under supplies. So far, these have proven to hold up well to both the paint and washing. There was absolutely no smearing of the ink while I painted with this paint. The only drawback is that the product is labeled entirely in Japanese so I’ve had to go by the info provided on Jetpens website. Do not use these pens anywhere near wet paint. Wet paint will permanently ruin the tip.

middle purple just makes it a little easier to blend colors. Figure 2 (Analogous Samples) shows two more examples of analogous color combinations: blue, green and yellow or red, orange and yellow. When you choose any three colors that are next to one another on the color wheel, including tints made by adding white or medium, you will get a pleasing combination, easily blending from one color to the next.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Figure 3 (Monochromatic vs complimentary) shows two different color schemes. The red fish is monochromatic, that is, it is only painted with one paint color, using light and dark versions of that color. In this case it’s the lights and darks that create interest and dimension. The second fish in this photo is done with complimentary colors, two colors that are exactly opposite each other on the color wheel. You see this done quite often. Think of gorgeous purple irises with their bright yellow center stripes, Christmas with seasonal red and green or a beautiful blue ocean with a glorious orange sun rising from it. God had this color theory stuff figured out a long time before I did! Complimentary colors are the trickiest to work with. If you blend them together they will produce a brownish grey. We’ll be extra careful keeping them separate, using medium between the two to keep them apart if needed. You can see the brown that was made when I painted purple stripes onto the wet yellow tail. Not a great idea on a vibrant piece like this shirt. FEATURES PLACEMENT: While you’re looking at these little fish, look at the eyes. Placement of the pupils and eyebrows make the difference in your fish’s mood:

surprised, happy, angry, looking up above or down below? All of these are determined by the placement of the pupils and the eyebrows. Once you have all of your critters placed and traced, then you can decide where you want them to be looking and what their mood will be. Look at the seahorses, the scallop, the starfish and all of the other fish. Look at the eyes on Squiggy, the tube coral on my pocket, and you can see that by moving the pupil around, I can make them look in every direction. The same thing applies to all the other fish and you will have to decide pupil placement after you decide where your critters are going to be. The eyebrow placement and eyelashes also influence mood. Look at the critters to see surprise, shy, excitement and love, all expressed with eyebrows and lashes. VALUE: Another important part of this piece in color theory is value: the span between very light and very dark. Look again at the sample fish we just talked about. A natural tendency is to add white to lighten and black to darken. The So Soft paints have beautiful, brilliant pigments and adding white or black tends to muddy those crisp colors. Instead, I try to use one of the two mediums to lighten a color, creating the highlights. The darkest color in my plan for that fish will do the shadows. Your patterns are shaded where the shadows, the dark areas, will be. You will start with a medium value of a color in the middle of the critter and, as you work out from the center, add a darker value paint to make shadow areas and add more and more medium to make a highlight area. Since this is a fantasy, cartoon piece, I used the Pearl Medium for almost all of this. I love the shimmer. Just remember the basics. Things closest

to the light, in this case, the top of the shirt/water, are painted in the lightest values. The things furthest from the light, the lower parts of each piece, are painted in the darkest values. Also, things that are on top of something else are lighter and things that are behind other things are the darkest. The seaweed is a great example of this.

LET’S PAINT! To start let me stress, strongly, that unlike acrylic painting, we do not use water when painting with fabric paints. You will rinse your brush in water to change colors or to remove buildup of paint but then dry it very well before using one of the mediums instead of water to make your paint move. Water wicks along the fabric fibers and makes the paint bleed all over. It is often easier to blend and change values if you paint the whole object with a layer of Traditional or Pearl Medium and then put color on top of that. To keep your paint from getting too thick only put paint out a drop or two at a time. It dries out quickly and you need very little for each critter. Work on one critter at a time, adding more paint to your palette as needed. You can see from my photo (next page) that I use the same small palette for the entire piece, labeling color as I put it out. I keep these palettes if there’s any chance I’ll want to do it again or teach the project. Do not worry if you paint over some of the ink lines. At the very end you will replace lost linework and add new lines as needed for areas you went outside the lines.

Seaweed: When looking directly at the sample, mine starts out on the right with blues blending into greens (Metallic Blue, Island Blue, True Blue, Christmas Green, Apple Green,

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Palette World Magazine Painting top. Because we are going from one color to the next around the color wheel, blending is easy. When everything is completely dry you will go back with Pearl Medium and paint, darks and whites, to deepen the shadows as needed and add highlights. Highlights are done with light strokes, mainly Pearl Medium with just a touch of Ultra White or a very light color, on top of the dry paint.

Antique Gold, Ultra White). The next bunch begins with those greens but moves into the yellows and then into oranges (Christmas Green, Hauser Green Light, Metallic Blue, Primary Yellow, Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Orange, White). Moving on to the left, the third bunch begins with those oranges and yellows and moves into reds and red violets (Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Orange, Christmas Red, Magenta, Bright Pink, Grape Purple, White). Finally, the last group on the far left begins with the reds and violets and moves on to purples, blues and even a touch of the blue greens we started with on the right (Christmas Red, Magenta, True Blue, Grape Purple, Lilac, Bright Blue, Hauser Green Light, White). We’ve just painted our way all the way around the color wheel! And you thought color theory was hard! Keep it darker toward the bottom of the shirt and in the background and keep it lighter as you move closer to the

June 2018 Issue

Since I want you to decide where your colors will go, I’ll describe the colors used in each of my critters as I did them but remember! – YOU can switch around the colors on any of the critters to make this project yours.

Critters: Cheeks - Cheeks for all critters are your choice of Magenta, Christmas Red or Bright Pink, blended out as you move into the bodies. Because I think a gal can never have too much glitter, I’ve used Glitter Topcoat on most of the cheeks. Lips – All lips, except for the boy seahorse, are your choice of either pinks or the salmon pink mix used in the scallop. Shade the lower edges with a darker value and use extra medium toward the top to keep top edge light.

Eyes – All eyes begin with a drawn oval with a black pupil placed to make that critter look a certain way. I did my pupils with my marking pen but you could use Lamp Black. The remainder of the eye is filled in with Pearl Medium and a fine line of color, to match that particular critter, is painted just outside the pupil.

Scallop: Snap! The base of Snap!’s shell is a pale grey, Ultra White with just a touch of Lamp Black and a tiny touch of Bright Blue at the very top edge. When dry, make S strokes with a touch of Ultra White mixed with Pearl Medium in strokes from the top edge to the base. For the upper shell, mix Magenta and Cadmium Yellow to make a peach/salmon color. Starting at the lower shell fill in the background, not the eyes or pearl, gradually adding Pearl Medium as you move to the top to lighten the value. Lightly stroke Pearl Medium + a touch of Ultra White pulling from the top edge toward the center, following the curve of the shell. Fill in round pupils at the top of the eyes with Lamp Black or ink pen. Fill the eye white with Pearl Medium and make a small line of Hauser Green Light just under the pupil. The pearl is Pearl Medium with just a touch of the salmon mix added in. Starfish: Steevie This starts with Pearl Medium + a

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Painting World Magazine Green. His mane and tail are very lightly drybrushed in curved, wispy strokes going away from the head and tail in both greens and both blues. This is very light and open, not basecoated solid. You will add ink hair later. His cheeks are Magenta and his lips are Lilac with Dioxazine Purple shadow. Notice where his pupils are. . . . near the top, so he’s looking at his lady love. If you move your lady seahorse the pupil placement will change. This is true for all critters. Petal is painted with Bright Pink with Lilac and Grape Purple shadows around tail curl, back fins, back of head and inside the ear. The big fin is Lilac with Grape Purple accents. Her mane and tail are drybrushed with touch of Cadmium Yellow in the center, adding more yellow as you move out to the legs. Shade one side of each leg with Antique Gold and then a small bit of Cadmium Orange just in the toes and a couple of the inner angles. His mouth is Magenta. While you have yellow and gold on your brush, lightly swipe horizontal strokes across the entire front, between seaweed, behind Steeevie and Snap! to just dust in a little seabed. Do not make this heavy.

Seahorses: Skye & Petal Since this is a seahorse couple, obviously in love, I had to do them in traditional pink and blue. Skye is painted mainly with True Blue and Pearl Medium around the edges, behind the fins, inside the tail coil and behind the bridle on his head. This is strengthened with Metallic Blue in the darkest areas, at the top of each back crease and inside the ear. On the big fin, the bottom of each back crease and his belly are Green Apple with Pearl Medium to keep them very bright. His bridle is Green Apple, shaded with Christmas © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http://www. copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

both pink and purple of your choice just like his. Though we’ll do the bubbles later, notice that they make a large heart around these two using colors from both of them.

Octopus: Oscar Oscar is based with Green Apple mixed with lots of Pearl Medium and shaded around some of the feet, the bends in the legs, under his smile and around the back of his head with Christmas Green plus Pearl Medium. His mouth and the little suckers are Magenta. Please note that I extended the pattern of the body partly inside the pocket so the body shows inside the pocket when it gapes open. Tube Coral: Squiggy June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine His body is based with Lilac, Grape Purple and Pearl Medium keeping the front tubes lighter and the back tubes darker. The tips are Primary Yellow with a shadow of Christmas Red. This is a fun place to study the placement of the pupils on the eyes. Their location is what determines where each eye is looking. I didn’t draw the eye strands on until the tubes and fish around the pocket were completed so I could have them looking at specific things.

Goldie Goldie is on the right arm of my shirt. She is basecoated with Cadmium Yellow + Ultra White + Pearl Medium at the top, changing to Cadmium Yellow in the middle and bottom of the body. Tangerine is shaded where the body meets the tail and around the bottom fin. The fins and tail start with Cadmium Yellow and Primary Yellow with shadows of Tangerine and Cadmium Orange in the darkest areas. The stripes on her body and the eye are Christmas Green.

more paint as you move to the bottom. Fins are Grape Purple with Lilac highlights and his scales are Grape Purple. Keep the yellow stripe on the tail separate from the purple. Do not blend. Curly’s pupils are placed large and low so he’s looking eagerly at the tryst between Prince and Sweetie Pie, below.

Prince and Sweetie Pie See photo on next page.

Spike Spike is on the left arm of my shirt. He’s a wild child! His body is Magenta, lightened with Pearl Medium towards the top and darkened with Christmas Red toward the bottom edge. Lips and cheeks are Christmas Red. His fins and tail are based in Green Apple + Pearl Medium and shaded with Christmas Green. There is a touch of Cadmium Yellow highlighting the center of the tail and side fin. Linework on tail is done with the chisel edge in Christmas Green. Body scales and eye are Green Apple. Eye is shaded with Christmas Green.

These are mirrored versions using the same colors. Prince is mainly Metallic Blue with a little Green Apple for highlights and Christmas Green for shadows. Sweetie Pie is mainly green, moving from Green Apple at the top and front, to Christmas Green in the shadows and Metallic Blue to shade the lower fins. The upper fin and tail are highlighted with just a touch of Cadmium Yellow. Cadmium Yellow that is used in Sweetie Pie is used for Prince’s spots and Prince’s Metallic Blue is used for Sweetie Pie’s spots so they are tied together completely. Notice that the placement of their pupils makes them gaze at each other.

Curly Curly and Spike are both painted in complimentary colors. Red/Green and Purple/ Yellow. Study them and note that I painted them so the colors were on opposing sections, with definite delineation and no blending between the two colors. Start Curly with lots of Pearl Medium + a little Primary Yellow, using less medium and

June 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Finishing: Once everything is dry, stand back and look for deep shadows and good highlights, adding more if more value change is needed. Go back over each critter with the Zebra pen, strengthening some lines, replacing those that have been painted over. If you’ve decided to use the rickrack, sew it to your shirt with a long, wide, white zigzag stitch. I put it around the collar, across the shoulders, around the bottom of each sleeve, across the shoulder seam across the back and all the way around the bottom of the shirt. And finally, be PROUD of what you’ve painted! Sign your work! Now it’s time to paint a tote bag to match!

Puff Puff is hiding down near Snap! in the seaweed. Her body is Bright Pink at the top blending to Magenta at the bottom. To keep the yellow face from blending into orange I’ve carefully kept the two separate, blending only at the bottom of the fish. Use the same care when painting the Cadmium Yellow on the body fin, putting in Magenta stripes only at the top of each section. It is easiest when you let the yellow dry before using the Magenta. Her top fin is Primary Yellow with a Magenta outline. The lower fin is Magenta with a Lilac outline. Her tail is the pinks and purples.

Bubbles: The bubbles come from each critter. They are dots made with the end of a paintbrush. Vary the size and make them random instead of in any particular pattern. If you’ve dripped paint on your shirt, bubbles are a good way to fix it. Put a small stroke of an appropriate contrasting color on one side of each. When they are finished, lightly draw an ink circle around them. Only the seahorses have bubbles in a pattern, a heart, around them. Put a few in and around the seaweed.

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June 2018 Issue

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Skye Petal

June 2018 Issue

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

72 Painting World Magazine

Snap! Steevie

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Painting World Magazine

Squiggy

Oscar

Goldie

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June 2018 Issue

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74 Painting World Magazine

June 2018 Issue

Spike

Curly Sweetie Pie

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Painting World Magazine

Puff

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Prince

Center Left Seaweed Enlarge 200%

Center Right Seaweed Enlarge 200%

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Far Left Seaweed Enlarge 200%

Far Right Seaweed Enlarge 200%

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Painting World Magazine

Directory of Artists Lynne Andrews andrews181@cox.net www.lynneandrews.com

Nanette Hilton nanettehilton@gmail.com www.nanettehilton.com

Barbara Bunsey, CDA bbunsey@calicogoose.com www.calicogoose.com

Linda Hollander paintingfool@live.com

Debbie Cole, CDA debbie@debbiecole.com www.debbiecole.com Jeanne Collick jcollick@sbcglobal.net jcollickheartworks.com Debbie Cushing debbiespaintedart@gmail.com Donna Dewberry donnaontheroad@hotmail.com donnadewberry.myshopify.com

Sandy McTier sandymctierdesigns@aol.com sandymctierdesigns.com Cheri Rol rolpub@cherirol.com www.cherirol.com Leslie Smith laspaints2@gmail.com Beth Stodieck colormebeth@sbcglobal.net

BOGO on Books Buy one book* at the regular price and get another of equal or lesser value FREE *Published by Viking Offer good through 8/31/18

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Directory of Suppliers The Art Treehouse www.arttreehouse.com 608-819-1765 DecoArt www.decoart.com 800-367-3047 ®

Debbie Cole Designs® www.debbiecole.com Dynasty® by FM Brush www.dynastybrush.com 718-821-5939 JetPens.com® www.jetpens.com

Krylon® www.krylon.com Lynne Andrews Folkart www.lynneandrews.com Martin/F. Weber www.weberart.com 215-677-5600 Minwax® www.minwax.com 800-523-9299

Rol Publications www.cherirol.com 812-366-4180 Royal & Langnickel® www.royalbrush.com 800-247-2211 Scharff Brushes, Inc. www.artbrush.com 770-461-2200 Winsor & NewtonTM www.winsornewton.com

Plaid® FolkArt® Delta Ceramcoat www.plaidonline.com 800-842-4197

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June 2018 Issue

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June 2018 Summer Issue Painting World Magazine  

80 pages, full color print magazine; 10 projects and educational editorials from these awesome artists! Includes work by: Cheri Rol, Lynne A...

June 2018 Summer Issue Painting World Magazine  

80 pages, full color print magazine; 10 projects and educational editorials from these awesome artists! Includes work by: Cheri Rol, Lynne A...