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Decorative Painting, Mixed Media, Fine Art & More!

Mar-April 2018

Painting World Issue 14

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Cover Artist: Deb Antonick

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NEW! Artist-grade, quality

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April 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

From the Editor Who We Are

Painting World Magazine is owned and operated by Loon Publishing, LLC., which is an independent publishing company. We are completely dedicated to the joy of creating delivered to our readers! We select only the best articles from the top designers in the industry and features all the newest techniques, products and artists.

Welcome to Our New Editor! I’m delighted to announce that Painting World Magazine has a new editor, Karen Brenden! I will be moving on to other opportunities, but will certainly keep up on Painting World and all the great new updates that are going to be happening. Your favorite painting magazine is in excellent hands and I just couldn’t be happier that Karen and her team will be taking over. Karen has been an active and involved member of the decorative painting industry and publishing for over a decade. She’s been working with Viking Woodcrafts creating painting books for the top

decorative artists you all know and love, and she’s delighted to now be able to create and run the best print magazine available for decorative artists!

Together with her great team of highly experienced publishers at Loon Publishing, LLC., and the best artists around the world, she’s going to bring you tons of beautiful print issues packed with the best artists in the world, projects you’ll love and editorials to inspire and educate. So welcome, Karen Brenden! I’ll miss the magazine always but couldn’t be happier to pass it on to such a fantastic new editor! ~Warmest wishes always, Laura Rucker, former editor

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ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ON ENTIRE CONTENTS. PAINTING WORLD MAGAZINE (ISSN 2472-694X). April 2018, Volume 01, Issue 14 ©Loon Publishing, LLC. Painting World Magazine is published 6 times per year by Loon Publishing, LLC., 205 South State Street, Waseca, MN, USA. Subscription price $29.99 per year. Periodical postage paid at Albert Lea, MN and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Loon Publishing, LLC., 205 South State Street, Waseca, MN 56093. All rights reserved on entire contents of magazine. We are not responsible for loss of unsolicited material. We reserve the right to edit and publish correspondence unless specific commentary and/or name and address are requested to be withheld. Reproduction of editorial or advertising contents in any way whatsoever without the written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The instructions in this magazine are published in good faith and have been checked for accuracy; however, no warranty, either expressed or implied, is made nor are successful results guaranteed. Subscription rate $29.99 for 6 issues. Distributed in the United States, Canada and worldwide. Printed by Quality Print, Waseca, MN. © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Conventions & Events

New England Traditions Regional Convention October 2-7, 2018

Best Western Royal Plaza Hotel “Under One Roof”

141 Boston Post Road West Marlborough, MA 01752 100+ classes, demos, special events, and the best decorative arts shopping in the Northeast. Thank you painters, teachers, ad business partners!

More info at www.newenglandtraditions.org April 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Back to the Beach!

The 46th Annual Society of Decorative Painters Conference & Expo

May 8 – May 12, 2018 Ocean Center, Daytona Beach, FL You’ll return to Daytona to walk on the beach, relax your soul and breathe in the salt water air to stimulate you to paint, paint, paint! Make new friends, see new products, and try new techniques at this annual event. Sign up at: www.decorativepainters.org

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Contents

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Painting World Magazine

12 Love, Forever, Always by Cover Artist: Deb Antonick

16

My Pond Friend by Maureen Baker

April 2018 Issue

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Listen With Your Heart by Shara Reiner

32

Tulip Trio by Michael Cheek

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

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Lois Borgenicht, Contemporary Artist

46

Spring Chickadees by Linda Hollander

62

Sly Fox by Kay Witt

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Iris by Debbie Cole

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Fairy Tales by Leslie Smith

MORE GREAT ARTICLES! Furniture: Upcycling Found Chairs! 36 Chairish’d by Janelle Warner Corner: Pure Pigment Paints, part III 49 Innovative by Debbie Cole, CDA

78 Directory of Artists, Suppliers & Advertisers Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Love Forever & Always by Deb Antonick


Painting World Magazine

In this project, I’ll show you how to create a fun, colorful piece using Premium™ acrylics. This painting can make for a great wall hanging for your home or a wonderful Mother’s Day gift.

• Dioxazine Purple DTA36 • Sap Green DTA22 • Diarylide Yellow DTA16 • Quinacridone Magenta DTA02

DecoArt® Americana Premium Mediums: • White Gesso DTAM07 • Extender Medium DTAM03

Other DecoArt Americana Products: • Matte Spray DAS13 • Acrylics - Lamp (Ebony) Black DAO67 (optional)

Dynasty® Brushes:

About Deb I live in beautiful Penticton, British Columbia, Canada with my recently retired husband and two fur children. My husband and I have spent the past two years renovating my husband’s childhood home that was built by his father in 1946. My painting journey began in 1990. From the first time I picked up a brush I was hooked. I painted for craft sales and taught classes at Michaels® for five years. Since then I have gone on to be one of the original-founding members of Painting with Friends®, the brainchild of my friend Terrye French.

Surface: • 11” x 14” Wood Canvas Panel, from your local craft store

DecoArt Americana® Premium™ Acrylics: • Green Gold DTA20 • Cobalt Turquoise Hue DTA27 • Titan Buff DTA41 • Titanium White DTA40 • Raw Sienna DTA10 • Primary Magenta DTA03 • Carbon Black DTA37 • Prussian Blue Hue DTA32

• 3/4”, #4, #8, & #12 Black Gold® Flat Shaders, 206S • #2 & #6 Black Gold Round, 206R • #10/0 Black Gold Script Liner, 206SL • #3/8 & #1/2 Black Gold Angular Shaders, 206A • #1/2 Dynasty Stencil Brush, 22183

Miscellaneous Supplies: • M2-10 Stencil (small harlequin pattern), from www. sandymctierdesigns.com or www.tracymoreau.net

• 1/8” Polka Dots Stencil • Stampendous® Script Lines Rubber Stamp CRP297 RS-P297, • Makeup Sponge (for loading stamps) • Baby Wipes • Transfer Paper • Tracing Paper • Pen • Pencil or Stylus • Sticky Notes (optional)

Preparation: Note: Refer to the color photos for shading and detail placement. Basecoat the entire surface with a coat of White Gesso. Trace on the pattern. Then, basecoat the background (around the design) with a slip-slap method, working in small areas until you’ve completed it as follows: Load the 3/4” flat shader with Titan Buff, and quickly paint a small

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Helpful Hints I use a wet-on-wet process with the same brush for the basecoat, shading, and highlighting. I also pat/blend the shading and the highlighting. You should dampen the brush when needed, or use a small amount of Extender Medium. I only float color when I deepen the shading or brighten the highlights. This is usually the last step, and I’ll note it in the instructions below. area of the background. While that’s still wet, pick up a tiny bit of Dioxazine Purple on the corner of the dirty brush. Slip-slap this into the Titan Buff to create a soft tint of purple. Be sure not to cover all of the original color. Repeat this process to complete the background. Sporadically pick up Cobalt Turquoise Hue instead of the Dioxazine Purple to add hints of blue. Blend in more Titan Buff as required. When painting against the design, pick up more of the Dioxazine Purple to create shading. You can deepen this at the end. Tip: I use sticky notes to mask areas that I don’t want to paint. Let everything dry. Randomly stamp the background with Prussian Blue Hue and the Script Lines stamp. Basecoat the outer edge of the canvas panel with Prussian Blue Hue.

Painting Instructions: We’ll be painting the project from the bottom up. Tip: Undercoat the painting area with White Gesso. This will make it easier to paint colors that are more vibrant.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue


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Painting World Magazine

Ground: Paint using a slip-slap method with a mixture of Green Gold + a touch of Titanium White. Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Green Gold for the shadows and more Titanium White for the highlights. Deepen the shadows with the same dirty brush tipped into Sap Green. I added the flowers at the end (see below). Note: Follow the same process for all painting unless otherwise mentioned.

Blanket: Basecoat with Titan Buff. Pick up Raw Sienna for shading and Titanium White for highlighting. Line the tassels with Titan Buff. Line the plaid with watered down Cobalt Turquoise Hue and then with watered down Primary Magenta.

Blue Box: Paint with Cobalt Turquoise Hue mixed with a touch of Titanium White for a lighter blue. Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Cobalt Turquoise Hue for shading. Deepen the shading by loading the same dirty brush’s corner with Prussian Blue Hue. Stencil with the M2-10 (small harlequin) stencil and Titanium White.

Heart: Paint with Primary Magenta mixed with a touch of Titanium White. Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Titanium White for the highlights on the right. Still using the same dirty brush, blend in more Primary Magenta for the shading on the left. Deepen the shading by loading the same dirty brush’s corner with Quinacridone Magenta.

Stencil the polka dots with Titanium White.

Load the liner brush with Titanium White, and tap in the flower petals. Dot the center with Diarylide Yellow, and then with Titanium White.

Pink Box:

Lid:

Paint with Primary Magenta mixed with a touch of Titanium White. Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Primary Magenta for the shadows.

Basecoat with Titan Buff. Pick up Raw Sienna for shading and Titanium White for highlighting.

Deepen the shading by loading the same dirty brush’s corner with Quinacridone Magenta.

Load the #2 round brush with Primary Magenta, tip it in Titanium White, and then stroke in the little hearts.

Line the stripes with Titanium White. Line the “X”s with Primary Magenta.

Paint in the stripes using the same color combination as for the boxes. Line between the stripes with Titanium White.

Green Box: Paint with Green Gold mixed with a touch of Titanium White. Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Green Gold for the shadows. Load the same dirty brush’s corner with Sap Green, and then deepen the shading. Stamp with the Script Lines stamp loaded with Titanium White.

Rose: Line the flower vine with Sap Green. Load the liner brush with Sap Green, tip it in Green Gold, and then tap in the leaves. Load the #2 round brush with Primary Magenta, tip it in Titanium White, and then stroke in the rose. Dot the center with Diarylide Yellow, and then with Titanium White.

Lid: Paint with Dioxazine Purple mixed with a touch of Titanium White.

Line the flower vine with Sap Green. Load the liner brush with

April 2018 Issue

Sap Green, tip it in Green Gold, and then tap in the leaves.

Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Dioxazine Purple for shading and more Titanium White for highlighting.

Lid: Use the color combination from the blue box to paint the blue stripes and the color combination from the green box to paint the green stripes. Line the blue stripes with Titanium White.

Flower: Basecoat with Titan Buff. Pick up a little Primary Magenta for shading around the middle and Titanium White for highlighting. Paint the center with Primary Magenta mixed with a touch of Titanium White. Pick up more Primary Magenta for shading and more Titanium White for highlighting.

Ribbon: Basecoat with Titanium White, picking up a little Cobalt Turquoise Hue for shading. Dot with Cobalt Turquoise Hue.

Leaves & Vines: Line the vines with watered down Sap Green tipped in Carbon Black. Paint the leaves with Green Gold mixed with a touch of Titanium White. Using the same dirty brush, blend in Sap Green for shading and more Titanium White for highlighting.

Heart (Upper Left): Paint with Primary Magenta mixed with a touch of Titanium White.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Using the same dirty brush, blend in more Titanium White for the highlights on the right.

Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Still using the same dirty brush, blend in more Primary Magenta for the shading on the left. Deepen the shading with the same dirty brush by loading the corner with Quinacridone Magenta. Load the #6 round brush with Titanium White, and stroke in the wings.

Tag: Basecoat with Titan Buff. Pick up Raw Sienna for shading and Titanium White for highlighting. Paint the “&� with Primary Magenta.

Lettering: Paint the letters on the boxes with Titan Buff. Outline all lettering with watered down Carbon Black.

Flowers on the Grass: Line the stems with watered down Sap Green tipped in Carbon Black. Load the liner brush with Diarylide Yellow, and tap in the flowers; tip the loaded brush in Titanium White for some of these flowers. Next, load the liner with Sap Green, tip it in Green Gold, and then tap in some tiny leaves.

Finishing: Line all stitching and the string with Carbon Black. Outline as desired with Carbon Black. Tip: If you prefer, you can use the DecoArt Acrylic Lamp Black for the liner work. Spray the piece with Americana Matte Spray.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

My Pond Friend

by Maureen Baker

About Maureen: Maureen has been creating art since she was a child growing up in Chelmsford, Massachusetts. Her love for color and texture lured her more and more into painting, April 2018 Issue

starting on canvas and working with many different mediums on a variety of surfaces. The world of possibility grew to endless creative opportunities; walls, furniture, metal, clothing, everything is an

option! Defining unique space in her home and studio was so rewarding. Age 45 is when she came to realize that she should dedicate

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine • Transfer Paper

Techniques: Basecoat: The application of paint to establish a foundation of solid, opaque color to the object you’re painting. You often need to apply two or more layers.

private collections throughout New England.

her career to doing what she loves, so she began the journey of painting professionally. She has won numerous awards locally, regionally and nationally, and has been in many juried shows and

Maureen is now designing full time and living on a wonderful natural pond where she finds great inspiration from the natural beauty around her. Surface: • 11” x 14” Canvas DecoArt Americana® Premium™ Artist Acrylics: • Cobalt Blue Hue DTA31 • Cobalt Teal Blue DTA29 • Prussian Blue Hue DTA32 • Warm Grey DTA45 • Cadmium Orange DTA12 • Burnt Umber DTA08 • Yellow Oxide DTA15 • Carbon Black DTA37 • Titanium White DTA40 DecoArt® Brushes: • #8 Traditions™ Flat Brush, TB33-B • #12 Traditions Flat Brush, TB35-B • 1” Traditions Flat Brush, TB38-B • #3 Traditions Round Brush, TB21-B • Americana Mini Fan Brush, DT01-B Miscellaneous Supplies: • DecoArt Americana DuraClear® Satin Varnish DS21 • Water Container • Palette or Plastic Plate • Paper Towels • Palette Knife

Float: The application of transparent paint to bring value, dimension, and depth to the object you’re painting. Sideload the paint onto one side of the brush, and blended on a palette to work the paint into the brush evenly. When you’ve properly prepared the brush, there should be a gradation in color from transparent paint to the absence of color on the other side of the brush. Stipple: Apply with a dry brush, such as a short round sable. Tap the paint into the dry brush, and then tap the brush on a paper towel to remove excess paint. Gently tap onto the painting to create a slight texture. Line Work: Load a damp liner with paint and water so the paint has an “ink” consistency, or the consistency of 1% milk. Load the liner by rolling the brush end between your thumb and pointer finger. Next, drag the paint out on your palette so the paint is evenly in the brush with no overload on the sides. When painting line work, the amount of pressure you apply to the brush will determine the thickness of the lines; the more pressure, the thicker the lines.

Instructions: Phase 1 - Blocking in the Painting & Creating a Touch of Texture: You should mostly create water and water movement in a vertical direction. (Figure 1)

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Figure 1

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 2


Painting World Magazine Work the paint wet-into-wet, blending the edges together. Keep some of the areas lighter and some darker. Don’t over-blend your paint. Sideload your 1” flat brush with Cobalt Teal Blue, and streak it across the canvas. Sideload your brush with Titanium White, and streak it across the canvas. Repeat this with Cobalt Blue Hue. Blend to create soft transitions of color while still holding onto some areas of more intense color. Let the paint dry completely. Basecoat in the swan with a mix of Warm Grey + Titanium White (1:1).

Figure 5

Phase 2 - Creation of Form & Texture: Water & Snow Development: Lights, darks, and subtle strokes create the water and water movement. Develop the water first, and then tap in the snow area while the paint is still wet. (Figure 2) Sideload your #12 flat with Cobalt Blue Hue, and streak in the dark areas in the water. Soften out one side of your stroke. For the dark area in front of the swan, sideload your #12 flat with Cobalt Blue Hue. Lead with the paint - the water side of your brush is toward the swan. As you come to the end of the

ripple, make a slight c stroke. Repeat this with a #8 flat and Prussian Blue Hue. This will strengthen the darks. (Figure 4) Create some light areas to the ripples in the water. Mix Titanium White + Cobalt Blue Hue (3:1). Sideload your #8 flat, and paint in some highlights in the water. While everything is still wet, load your fan brush with Titanium White, and tap in the snow area; do not blend. Be sure to hold onto the dark area in the water where the ice has melted. (Figure 3)

Form of the Swan: Sideload your #8 flat with Titanium White, and highlight the left side

Figure 6

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine Load your round with Carbon Black, and paint in the markings around the swan’s beak and eye.

Figure 7

Sideload your #12 flat with Yellow Oxide, and shade the right side of the swan’s neck. This shade should come over 3/4 of the neck. (You will be highlighting again.) Then, sideload your #12 flat with Burnt Umber, keeping the paint transparent (see note). Make this float smaller, and tap it in to create texture. Repeat these two steps along the bottom of the swan’s head. Note: To keep paint transparent, dip your brush in water, and then shake it out; do not tap it on a paper towel. Sideload your brush with paint, and blend it out well on your palette until you have transparent paint. At this stage, your brush should be damp, but not dripping. Apply this transparent paint to your piece.

Figure 8

Next, sideload your #8 flat with a tint of Prussian Blue Hue. Keep this transparent, and tap it in here and there on the left side of the neck.

of the swan’s neck. Do this by tapping the highlight onto the swan to help create texture. Next, sideload your #12 flat with Titanium White, and pull the feathers onto the swan’s body. Start on the outside edge of the feather, and pull into the body, gently lifting up and off the swan. Be sure to hold onto the swan’s basecoat areas. (Figure 5)

Phase 3 - Full Development of the Forms & Details: April 2018 Issue

Developing the Swan with Tints & Details: Basecoat in the swan’s beak with Cadmium Orange and the #8 flat. Let the paint dry completely. (Figure 6) Sideload your #8 flat with Yellow Oxide. Start at the outside tip of the beak, and highlight. Let that dry completely. Then, sideload your #8 flat with a mix of Titanium White + Yellow Oxide (4:1), and highlight the middle of the beak.

Using transparent Cobalt Blue Hue, sideload your 1” flat, and wash over the body of the swan. This should be a light tint. Let it dry completely. Sideload your #12 flat with Yellow Oxide, and shade where the wings separate from the body. Repeat this in the intense dark areas using Burnt Umber. (Figure 7) Then, sideload your #8 flat with Prussian Blue Hue, and tap in the intense shading on the swan’s body. Be very careful with Prussian Blue Hue - it’s an intense, dark color. When that’s completely dry, sideload your #8 flat with Titanium White, and highlight

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine the feathers on the swan’s back. Paint some of these feathers on the chisel edge of the brush for intense texture. Sideload your #8 flat with Titanium White, and highlight the left side of the swan’s neck. Lay your brush flat, and gently raise it to the chisel edge as you pull your paint across the swan’s neck. This will create the texture on the neck and help reinforce the form.

Finalizing the Water Details: Using transparent Burnt Umber, sideload your 1” flat, and tint the open water to the swan’s right. Let the paint dry completely. Load your #12 flat with transparent Titanium White, and highlight this open water in the middle. Walk the paint out a bit.

in front of the swan. These strokes are tight under the neck and looser under the body. Keep these strokes transparent. (Figure 8) You are all done painting! Sign your name. Let the paint dry for two to three days. Varnish with DuraClear Satin Varnish.

Sideload your #8 flat with transparent Titanium White, and streak s-type strokes in the water

Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity. © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Flags Flying in the Cove April 2018 Issue

by Theresa Frappier Prokop

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Weathered, nautical-style houses, a lighthouse, blue water and skies, a docked ship, flags waving in the wind, and a crackle-painted window frame are all part of this fun cove painting. This painting will be a treasure for you to own and an heirloom for generations after to enjoy! About Theresa I’ve been painting for what seems like my whole life, and I paint a LOT. I won’t say how old I am, but to give you a clue, I remember holding a sign that read “I LIKE IKE”! My surfaces have been as diverse as my subjects and mediums have. I teach painting to all levels of painters. I also have a line of Whimsical Doodles All Occasion Cards that seem to fill my fun time of painting.

Surface: • 24” x 30” x 1-1/2” Gallery Wrapped Canvas

DecoArt Americana Acrylics:

®

• Tomato Red DA169 • Cadmium Yellow DA010 • Pumpkin DA013

• French Grey Blue DA098 • Sea Breeze DA256 • Snow (Titanium) White DA01 • Hauser Light Green DA131 • Hauser Dark Green DA133 • Napa Red DA165 • True Blue DA036 • Lemonade DA252 • Warm White DA239 • Lamp (Ebony) Black DA067 • Antique Gold DA09 • Burnt Sienna DA063 • Burnt Umber DA221 • Antique White DA058 • Slate Grey DA068 • Plantation Pine DA113 • Primary Blue DA200

DecoArt® Mediums: • One Step Crackle DS69 • Americana Matte Spray DAS13

Dynasty® Brushes: • #3/4 & #1 Black Gold® Flat Washes, 206FW • #4, #6, #8, #10, #12, #14, & #20 Black Gold Shaders, 206S • #20/0, #10/0, & #5/0 Black Gold Liners, 206L • #3/8 Black Gold Angular Shader, 206A • #3 Black Gold Round, 206R • #1/8, #1/4, #3/8, & #1/2 Deerfoot Stipplers, 300 • #1 Mini Mop, 400

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Palette Paper • Fine & Large Tip Black Sakura® Pigma® Micron® Pens 70131, available from ArtistsClub.com® • Transfer (Graphite) Paper • Tracing Paper • Double-Ended Stylus • Water Basin • Paper Towels • Ruler • Yardstick • 1-1/2” Blue Painter’s Tape or FrogTape® • Old Toothbrush • Wet Wipes • Hairdryer

Preparation: Trace the pattern. Use a ruler and a pencil to measure down 1-1/2” around the entire canvas and down the center muntins. Use the yardstick to draw straight lines. This next step may be a little confusing, but just remember “Tape ON, Tape OFF, Tape ON!” Tape ON! Use 1-1/2” painter’s tape to tape around the entire INSIDE of the measured off 1-1/2” frame and muntins to create windowpanes. Use your fingers to apply pressure, sliding them along the taped area so it’s secured well. Paint. Basecoat the entire window frame and the muntins with Lamp Black. Let the paint dry well. Tape OFF! Remove this tape. Tape ON! Now, place tape over the already painted Lamp Black window frame and muntins, and leave it on until you’ve finished all of the painting. The tape will allow you to keep the smooth, straight frame lines. It’s OK if some paint goes onto the tape. Transfer the major lines of the design onto the canvas by sliding graphite paper beneath your tracing and using a stylus.

Painting Instructions: Sky, Water, Sand, Clouds, & Rocks: Basecoat the sky with Blue Haven using a large wash brush. Then, basecoat the water with True Blue. Blend the area where the sky and water meet. Mop to soften the edges. Load a 1/2” deerfoot brush with Titanium White. With a twist of your wrist, paint big circles to create the puffy clouds. Use a mop to soften the bottoms of the clouds. Dry brush a few scattered clouds.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine Use the round brush to paint the birds Titanium White. Paint the tips of their wings and their beaks with Lamp Black. Paint the tiny sails on the sailboats with Titanium White, and paint the boats with Lamp Black. Dry brush some highlights in the water with Titanium White. Use the ruler as you do these; slide the brush along the ruler to get straight lines. Basecoat the sand areas along the water and grassy areas with Antique White, and shade them with Burnt Sienna. Use Slate Grey to basecoat all of the rocks. Shade them with Lamp Black. Make a thin wash of True Blue (50% paint, 50% water), and brush it over the rocks. Add the rocks’ highlights with Titanium White using the round brush. Basecoat all of the grassy areas, bushes, and trees with a mix of Lamp Black and Plantation Pine by using a large brush and picking up both colors at the same time. Begin to build your bushes and trees by using DIFFERENT SIZE deerfoot brushes. Stipple and apply layers of colors using Plantation Pine, Hauser Dark Green, Hauser Light Green, Lemonade, and Cadmium Yellow to develop the bushes’ and trees’ shapes. Refer to the pictures. Paint the tree trunks with a double load of Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber using the round brush.

Waving Flags:

• 2nd Flag - Base with Lemonade, and add a Napa Red star. Paint stripes of Plantation Pine, Pumpkin, and Antique Gold. Add Cadmium Yellow stars outlined with Tomato Red. • 3rd Flag - Base with Primary Blue. Add a stripe each of Pumpkin, Antique Gold, and Tomato Red. Dry brush with Tomato Red. • 4th Flag - Base with Cadmium Yellow. Paint thin stripes of Tomato Red and thick stripes of Pumpkin and Tomato Red. Dry brush the Tomato Red section with Pumpkin.

For the flags between the lighthouse and the American flag: • Top Flag - Base with Cadmium Yellow, and add Tomato Red stripes. • Bottom Flag - Base with Sea Breeze, and add Pumpkin stripes.

For the flags on the right side:

Use 1-1/2” painter’s tape (blue painter’s tape or FrogTape) when taping off the windowpanes and the lighthouse. Wait until all of the painting is completed and dry before applying the One Step Crackle medium on the painted window frame. Re-apply the pattern as often as you need. Use the size brushes that you feel most comfortable using when painting. doorknob with Antique Gold, and add its shadow with Lamp Black. Trim the windows and door with Titanium White. Paint the widow’s walk railing with Titanium White. Outline each piece of it using a 10/0 liner and Lamp Black.

Church on Hill:

Using a 10/0 liner and Lamp Black, freehand paint the shingle lines. They do not need to be straight.

Basecoat with Cadmium Yellow. Shade with Burnt Sienna. Paint the door Tomato Red and the windows Lamp Black. Add detail with your 20/0 liner and Burnt Sienna.

Basecoat with French Grey Blue. Shade with Lamp Black.

For the flags on the left:

Paint the roof Lamp Black. Dry brush the roof with Slate Grey.

• 1st (Top) Flag - Base with Pumpkin. Dot with Napa Red.

The windows and door are also Lamp Black. Paint the

April 2018 Issue

Use a ruler and a black Micron pen for drawing straight lines.

• Left Flag - Base with Pumpkin. Paint a Tomato Red star. • Right Flag - Base with Tomato Red, and add Titanium White stripes. Note: We’ll paint the American flag later.

Gray House (Bottom Right Side):

Use your round brush to paint the flags. You may use colors from what you have on your palette if you choose not to use those in the instructions.

Helpful Hints This is a large canvas, so make sure you have a large area to work on.

Dry brush inside the windows with Titanium White.

Paint the sign Titanium White and the trim Tomato Red. Using the round brush and Lamp Black, paint the house’s railings. Use your fine tip Micron pen or a 20/0 liner and Lamp Black to write on the sign.

Side of the Ship: Basecoat with Burnt Sienna. Shade with Burnt Umber. Paint the trim with Tomato Red. Using a 10/0 liner, paint Burnt Umber board lines.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Stone Walls & Stairs: Basecoat the wall Lamp Black. Paint random-shaped stones with Slate Grey. Add a wash of True Blue over each stone. Then, add Antique White strokes for highlights. Refer to the pictures.

Lighthouse: Use painter’s tape to tape the lighthouse before painting it so it will be straight. Basecoat with Titanium White. The stripes, roof, and windows are Lamp Black. Float the left side with True Blue. Dry brush down the center of the lighthouse with Titanium White.

Using the round brush, paint the trim Antique Gold. Paint the door Antique White. Paint the sign Titanium White. Outline the sign using a 10/0 liner and Lamp Black. Use a fine tip black Micron pen to write “PELICAN Bed and Breakfast” or whatever you like on the sign.

Sand Area: Basecoat the sand area Antique White. Shade with Burnt Sienna. Cover the painted sections with pieces of paper towels, and use an old toothbrush dipped in Lamp Black to add tiny flecks in the sand.

Signs:

Paint the light at the top of the lighthouse with Cadmium Yellow. Shade it with Pumpkin.

Paint the signs with Titanium White. Outline them using a 10/0 liner and Lamp Black.

Use Titanium White to paint the sign. Use your 10/0 liner to outline it with Lamp Black. Paint the words or use a Micron pen.

Let the paint dry. Using a fine tip Micron pen, write what you would like on the signs. I wrote “BOAT RENTALS,” “SEBASTIAN,” and “ART GALLERY.”

Middle House with American Flag: Basecoat the house Antique Gold. Shade with Burnt Sienna, and trim with Tomato Red. The windows, roof, and sign are Lamp Black. The door is Sea Breeze. Dry brush on the roof and inside the windows with Antique White. Use Warm White to paint the sign’s text and border. Basecoat the American flag Titanium White. Add Tomato Red stripes. Paint the square with True Blue and the star with Titanium White.

Red House (Bottom Left Side): Basecoat the house Tomato Red. Shade with Lamp Black. Paint the roof and windows Lamp Black. Dry brush the roof and windows with Antique White.

Flowers: Use the colors on your palette. With the tip of the round brush, pick up a double load of a color and Warm White, and dab random dots for flowers.

Finishing: Using a black Micron pen and a ruler, draw in the rope lines from the ship that hold the flags. Crackle Painting the Window Frame: If you have not used One Step Crackle medium before, you need to know that it works INSTANTLY and there are NO DO OVERS! It’s a good idea to practice first!

painter’s tape from the black window frame and muntins. TAPE ON! Apply tape to the insides of the window frame and muntins so the Crackle medium does not come in contact with the already finished areas. Use a 1” brush to apply the One Step Crackle medium. Be generous when picking up the Medium, and be sure that you cover every area with it. DO NOT rush the brush! Let the Medium DRY WELL! After it has dried, pick up a generous amount of Antique White on a 1” brush. Paint sections at a time completely and QUICKLY, as it begins to react and crackle immediately. DO NOT go over an area you’ve already painted, as it will lift off or make paste. Once you’ve painted it, leave it be! Let the paint dry completely (overnight is good). Remove all tape. Adjust any painting that needs adjusted. Use the larger tip Micron pen and a ruler to draw a black line along the edges of each pane. Optional: If you feel comfortable doing so, use a 3/4” brush and True Blue to float along the edges of each pane. Spray on three coats of Americana Matte Spray.

Here we go again: Tape OFF! Tape ON! Tape OFF! After the painting has dried and you’ve completed all the detail work, remove the

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

26 Painting World Magazine

Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

April 2018 Issue

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM


Painting World Magazine

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

April 2018 Issue

27


Listen With Your Heart & Hear the Angels Sing

by Shara Reiner, CDA


Painting World Magazine

This project is a good lesson on my simple angel faces. My angels have red hair, as my first granddaughter is a redhead. You will also have plenty of practice on leaves done Shara’s way. Enjoy your project…

• Warm Beige • Spice Pink • Deep Burgundy • Burnt Sienna • Whispering Turquoise • Aqua Blue • Wedgewood Blue • Deep Midnight Blue • Foliage Green • Hauser Medium Green • True Ochre • Camel • Black Plum • Oyster Beige • Burlap • Espresso • Tangelo Orange • Metallic Gold of your choice

Scharff® Brushes:

About Shara I have been painting almost 40 years and still love every minute of it!! I am a wife, a mother, grandmother and painter.... I have authored hundreds of pattern packets, written many books, I’m a teacher and have been a shop owner. My life revolves around travel teaching now both in states and Europe. I love the people I meet and have made lots of friends. I like my painting to be free and HAPPY. I hope each pattern of mine is a new adventure for the painter.

Surface: • Metal - Lamp Base with Cord and Socket 10” x 7” x 5.5” TLA74389, from Painters Paradise® (Note:

• #6 to #16 Scharff Golden Taklon Champagne Handle Flats 142 • #1 Scharff Golden Taklon Liner 455 • 3/4” Moon Mop 685

Transfer the basic pattern on. Basecoat using Burlap for the angel dresses, Warm Beige for the faces and legs, and Camel for the basket. When that’s dry, trace the pattern on again to add the details.

All Leaves & Veins: I put the veins all around using a liner and Hauser Medium Green. I then added a dry brush of Foliage Green here and there. The leaves are one medium coat of Hauser Medium Green. The background will show through a tad. Shade the leaves with a sideload of Black. Highlight the tips of the leaves with Foliage Green. Paint the veins with a liner using Foliage Green + a tad Warm White. The tendrils are also Foliage Green + a tad Warm White.

Miscellaneous Supplies:

Basket:

• Tracing Paper • Transfer Paper • Pen • Pencil or Stylus • Permanent Black Pen • Light Gray Auto Primer Spray

Shade the outside edges of the basket with very thin Black Plum. The liner is Camel + a tad Warm White.

Preparation: I sprayed the surface with Gray Auto Primer. Base the entire outside with Black. For the inside, I used my Metallic Gold - this will take several coats. Trim with colors of your choice from the color list. I used Adobe on the top rim and Aqua Blue on the bottom rim.

The ribbon on the basket is Aqua Blue. Shade it with Wedgewood Blue, and highlight it with Whispering Turquoise. Base all the hearts with Adobe, and shade them with Deep Burgundy. Highlight the rounded parts with Spice Pink. The stroke at the top of each heart is Camel. Check the pattern - some hearts have dots, liners, or plaid; paint these using very thin Spice Pink.

Many craft stores have wonderful metal lampshades in now - you can adapt this pattern to fit many shapes.)

DecoArt Americana® or Delta Ceramcoat® Acrylics: • Black • Adobe • Warm White © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Angel #1: Shade the dress with Espresso, and highlight it with Oyster Beige. Paint the plaid and dots with very thin Oyster Beige. The angel’s arms are Burlap + a bit of Oyster Beige. The dot buttons are Warm White. The small heart is a wash of Adobe.

Angel #2:

The dot filler-flowers are Warm White with a smaller True Ochre dot in the center.

wash of Adobe. Use Tangelo Orange and a liner brush to paint the hair. The eyes are Black.

All Angels:

The halos are Aqua Blue. Highlight them with Whispering Turquoise.

Shade across the top of each head with a sideload of Warm Beige + Burnt Sienna. With a liner brush and the same mix, pull a stroke for each nose; start about 2/3 down the face, and pull up to the hairline. Paint the cheeks with a very thin

Paint all the wings with a wash of Warm White. Shade them next to the dresses with Black. Highlight their outside edges with Warm White. The lines are also Warm White.

Shade her dress with Espresso. The dots are very thin Oyster Beige. Her arms are Oyster Beige + Burlap. Paint the strip at the bottom of the dress with Warm White, and add the checks with Black. The buttons are Warm White. The ribbon is Aqua Blue. Shade it with Wedgewood Blue, and highlight it with Whispering Turquoise.

Angel #3: Shade with Espresso around the apron. Paint the dress collar with Warm White. The apron is a wash of Warm White. Shade it with Deep Midnight Blue. Add the ribbon and dots with Warm White. Shade with Deep Midnight Blue. The heart is a wash of Adobe.

Lettering & Pen Work: The lettering is Aqua Blue.

Dry brush some Whispering Turquoise for a highlight. Add the pen work using the pattern and picture as guides. Add as much or as little as you like.

April 2018 Issue

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine

Download all line drawings ready print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM has full rights to to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has been printed in red ink for verification of authenticity.

April 2018 Issue

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Tulip Trio by Michael Cheek


Painting World Magazine

This is the time of year when the weather starts warming up and nature starts showing off all its beautiful colors. And what better way is there to celebrate spring than by painting flowers? In this project, I’ll show you how to use oils to paint this lovely tulip trio.

Hue PO-43, PR-170 • Titanium White PW-6, PW-4

Brushes: • #12 Loew-Cornell® Flat Bristle 1801 • #12 Daler-Rowney® Robert Simmons® Flat Shader E60 • #4 Loew-Cornell Script Liner • Chip Brush or Sponge Roller

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Tracing Paper • Black Graphite Paper • Pen • Pencil or Stylus • Paper Towels • Kanvas Koat® - Grey, from www. palettecreationsbymichael.com

Canvas Preparation/ Michael’s Kanvas Koat:

About Michael Michael was born in the small mountain town of Boone, North Carolina. In 1983, Michael began his journey in the art world. Over these past three decades, Michael has devoted a lot of time developing his “easy to learn” techniques. Since the early years, Michael has had the opportunity to teach countless students the joy painting can bring to an individual life! Michael now resides in Taylorsville, North Carolina where he continues to teach local workshops as well as traveling to neighboring towns and cities.

Surface: • 11” x 14” Canvas

Martin F. Weber® Prima® Oil Colors: • Ultramarine Blue PB-29 • Alizarin Crimson PR-83 • Cadmium Yellow Light Hue PY-97 • Cadmium Red Light

Using a chip brush or sponge roller, apply two coats of Michael’s Kanvas Koat (grey) to the canvas, allowing plenty of drying time between coats. Using black graphite paper, transfer the pattern to the canvas. Note: Michael’s Kanvas Koat is not available in any art or craft store. It is only available by ordering from Michael’s website, www. palettecreationsbymichael.com. When using Kanvas Koat, you will not need any oil medium to make the paint move, spread, or blend!

Cadmium Yellow Light Hue + a touch of Titanium White. This will be a blue-green mix (more to the blue side). Starting at the bottom left side of the canvas and working off the right side corner of the brush, use short, downward strokes to paint in the background; work around the stems and tulips. Note: Switch to the #12 flat bristle for a faster block-in! As you progress near the top tulip, pick up a bit more Cadmium Yellow Light Hue (this will be more of a yellow-green mix), and continue painting in the background using crisscross strokes. Wipe the brush. Load a mix of Titanium White + a bit of Cadmium Yellow Light Hue. This will be a lemon-yellow mix. Working off the right corner of the brush, paint in the highlighted area, again using a crisscross (or even a tap-tap) stroke, intermixing with the previous color. Work for a nice blend between the colors. If you lose too much of the brightness, just reload the colors and repeat the step.

Helpful Hints: When transferring the pattern to the canvas, only trace the basic lines. For instance, it will be difficult to paint around objects such as trees, bushes, etc. Instead of cleaning the brush in thinner each time, use a paper towel to pinch the paint out of the bristles. This allows some color to remain in the bristles, causing more variety of color tones when loading the next mixes. Let’s paint! Shall we?

Background: Using the #12 flat shader, load a mix of Ultramarine Blue +

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Using the #12 flat shader, load a mix of Cadmium Red Light Hue + just a touch of Alizarin Crimson. Working off the right side of the brush, paint in each tulip petal. Wipe the brush.

Tulips, Stems, & Leaves: Note: You’ll paint the tulips, stems, and leaves the same way, and it really doesn’t matter which tulip you start with!

April 2018 Issue

Load a bit of Titanium White on the bottom left corner of the brush. Turn the brush over so the paint is now on the top right of the brush. On the edge of each petal and working off the top right of the brush, push upward, and then release the brush downward,

blending into the tulip. You will want the brightest highlights on the edges of the tulips. When you’ve painted all three tulips, wipe the brush! Load a mix of Ultramarine Blue + a touch of Cadmium Yellow Light Hue. This will be a dark green mix. Bring the brush to a chisel edge. Using the brush vertically, paint in the stems and leaves with a downward tapping stroke. Be sure to bring the stem part up around the bottom of the petals. This will create a more realistic look to the tulips. Wipe the brush. Load a bit of Cadmium Yellow Light Hue, and bring the brush to a chisel edge. Using the brush vertically again, paint in the highlights on the right sides of the stems and leaves with a downward tapping stroke.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine Paint in a few smaller buds and stems here and there to help balance the composition. Don’t over-do it!

Final Touches: Sign your painting using the #4 script liner and any color you wish. Be sure the paint is an inky consistency. After the painting is dry, you may want to reinstate some of the darker and lighter values in the painting. Most of the time, it is difficult to

achieve the desired brightness when the painting is still wet. When you use my Kanvas Koat product, the oil colors will take on a sheen of their own once the painting is dry. This allows you to frame the painting and hang it right away! If you want to use a permanent varnish, it’s best to wait at least six months.

Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal use. This notice has World beenMagazine printed in red Edition. ink for All verification of authenticity. © 2018 Painting Digital rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You

agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Chairish’d Furniture by Janelle Warner

You see them everywhere! A lone chair, sitting on the curb for bulk trash, sitting at a flea market or tag sale, or sticking out of a dumpster, waiting to be discarded forever. I see them as perfect surfaces for paint, and feel honored to give an old, perhaps broken, chair a new life. Many are free, and I have never paid more than $8.00 for one. My friends and family keep me well supplied with more than I have room to store. I love the entire process: Hunting, finding, sanding, cleaning, basecoating, and finally creating a work of art. Some old chairs have loose stretchers or legs,

and require a bit of work to make them structurally sound before beginning, but they can still serve a purposeful life as a seat as well as a conversation piece for years to come. Many chairs with “good bones” have broken wicker seats. After some serious thinking, I came up with a trompe l’oiel method of painting a cushion and a bouquet of flowers, or even perhaps a kitten drinking a bowl of milk. My husband cuts a 1/4” piece of plywood in the shape of a cushion to cover the opening where I removed the broken wicker. I choose my chairs based on the amount of painting surface or the interesting lines and carvings they have. The glaze or dark crème wax I use collects in the grooves

and makes the carvings pop. Occasionally, I use dark wax to age a piece, but I frequently like the clean look that clear crème wax gives. Sanding over the edges also gives an aged appearance, and helps make the flaws look intentional. I’ve taken classes from Ros Stallcop, and paint with her annually in Virginia Beach at her week-long seminars. I fell in love with her loose style of painting foliage, flowers, and ribbons. She is truly my inspiration! It is so much fun to plan what I will do on each chair. I begin my plan immediately after I obtain it, and while I always intend to take before and after photographs, I frequently get so anxious to begin that I neglect to do it.

My imagination runs wild wondering what activity may have taken place while someone was sitting around the kitchen table on my old chair. My chairs have stories to tell, and I feel like I’m giving them the chance to live longer and tell even more stories. I have given my chairs as gifts and donated them for raffles. And when my house has collected too many, I sell them at a local garden center. Most folks don’t want to sit on them, but I encourage it since

April 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

I finish them with crème wax.

bouquet each as a different piece.

I don’t have a website or business, because I’m as busy as I want to be just painting as a hobby. I came up with the name Chairish’d because it perfectly describes how I feel about each creation.

For example, I may paint, stencil, and then age the chair by sanding the edges and using dark wax, while I treat the cushion as a new cushion, and use clear wax that doesn’t age it. Of course, I would never age the bouquet of flowers. If I want both the chair and cushion to look old, I’ll dark wax both.

Each chair is truly “one of a kind,” and you are limited only by your imagination when creating them. I would love to see what creations you come up with. Please email me with questions, comments, or photos at nellwarn@aol.com.

Tips: I treat the chair, the cushion, and the

I use a lot of stenciling on my chairs before I begin decorative painting, but I would never use the same stencil on both the chair and the cushion. Also, while I want the colors to coordinate, I would not paint the chair and cushion the same color. That would not be realistic. I try to keep the colors subtle to help the bouquet be the focal point when someone looks at it. If your stenciling is darker than you like, lightly dry brush some of the cushion basecoat paint over the stenciling to put it into the background a bit. I attach the following to each creation:

Behind each piece of Chairish’d furniture is a story……. © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine

a story that may or may not have been partially sanded away. Each piece has been sanded, primed if necessary, painted with chalk or acrylic paint (to make it look new again), distressed and aged (to make it look old ) and finished with polyurethane, wax or varnish. However, what has not been removed is the story of where it may have been or who may have rested their weary backside upon it. While being prepared for you to enjoy in your home, it has been imagined

April 2018 Issue

by the preparer, the small child who may have rested his little feet along the rail while waiting for breakfast or doing his homework. What new puppy may have laid under it chewing on the chair leg? What old man may have propped his foot on the seat while lacing and tying his boot?

chair or table would ever be used as a “decorative� piece of furniture. Enjoy the flaws! They have a story to tell. Has anyone of importance ever owned this piece of furniture?.... one can only imagine

Many of these pieces came from a time when furniture served a purpose in a home for many years and the owner would have never imagined that their old

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


s

Scottie’s

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Folk Art

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Bavarian Quick and easy painting fun!

Visit Scottie’s online shoppes at www.bavarianfolkart.com

Wood Surfaces, Pattern Packets and More...

Design by Laure Paillex Sea Shell Wishes #PPLP556 Wood Surface #328 Packet or surface $8.95 Each

www.jbwood.com PO Box 3081 • So. Attleboro, MA 02703 • (508) 222-5790


“Sunflowers & Squash” Oil on Canvas by Lois Borgenicht


Painting World Magazine

Contemporary Post Impressionist

Artist Lois Borgenicht Captures the Beauty of Post Impressionism With Modern Colors. Brush Work and Spatial Relationships “Taking the standard pleinair nature scene, Lois Borgenicht is inspired at times to add a still life, such as in her oil painting: Squash and Sunflowers. She thereby integrates aspects of Post Impressionism with Surrealism through an uncanny combination of elements.” - Nicole Borgenicht The Post-impressionist Painters, from Cezanne and Gauguin to Bonnard, had painted many of the most historically prominent still life works. Their bright colors, personal point of view angles, and versatility in developing atmospheric color fields later led to Fauve freedom and Cubist planes. As a Contemporary Post-Impressionist, Borgenicht encompasses the beauty of former masters in her still life and

by Nicole Borgenicht landscape works, while juxtaposing it with loose brush strokes revealing a new arena of subtle abstract shapes with surprisingly, composed imagery. Classical elements of line, color value and detail present her exceptional hue highlights and symmetrical form. Most importantly, Borgenicht’s joyful spirit emanates through wide color palettes and picture balance acuity, in these delightful compositions. Lois Borgenicht shares her artistic considerations and tools for Painting World

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine Professor Emeritus at Maryland Institute, College of Art.”

Magazine readership in each sample, as well as business formulas of a professional artist. An artist education from many sources, Borgenicht believes in the everlasting process of learning and improving one’s skills. From the beginning art was in her spirit, she recalls, “I spent most of my time in high school in the art rooms. I had the terrific opportunity to study painting at a wonderful program in Fontainebleau, France the summer between high school and college. My first two years of college I studied Art History. I was not quite sure what to do next not knowing at the time that I wanted to pursue life as an artist. My mother allowed me to take some of my education money to travel to Europe. I stayed in Paris for three months, visiting the Louvre every morning and doing life drawing each afternoon at the studio La Grande Chaumiere. I sent my drawings home with an application and I was accepted at Boston University School of Fine Arts as a freshman. After two years I transferred to the New York Studio School for Drawing, Painting and Sculpture. Since moving to Baltimore, I have continued my education and practice, drawing every week and studying with Paul Moscatt,

April 2018 Issue

As an artist she frequently travels to different places and paints still life and/or nature scenes. Taking the standard plein-air nature scene, Lois Borgenicht is inspired at times to add a still life, such as in her oil painting: Squash and Sunflowers. She thereby integrates aspects of Post Impressionism with Surrealism through an uncanny combination of elements. She says, “Having been a studio artist most of my life, I was inspired to paint outside after moving to Baltimore. I started painting in my garden and I have continued to work outdoors in other environments. Having an affinity for still life, I often set up the still life outside. It is a special challenge to make quick decisions as the light changes and the flowers shift position,” Lois Borgenicht says.

From local to national, Borgenicht’s works are exhibited and sell in galleries. Plus, her bond with the local community comprises art district in-studio events, and exciting public showings with her workshop group. “I participate in Baltimore’s Annual Open Studio most years. Having a group of artists in the same building helps to bring new people to see my work. My landscape painting group and figure drawing group show at different venues in Baltimore, which has helped me build a local reputation. Plus I have shown in at a variety of galleries in New York, Florida, New Jersey and in Maryland. I have had the most success selling where I am a member of the community. Friends and friends of friends may start by buying something small and word spreads, encouraging the occasional large purchase. It is important to me to offer works in a wide price range. I sell small drawings or edition prints (I do

In her Plein-Air Still Life series, Borgenicht evokes an awareness of symmetry between human design and pure nature. In addition of course, she paints and draws straight up plein-air nature scenes as with her Birdhouse pastel and the Permapaque drawing.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine not make giclees) for under $100 while paintings may be priced from $300 - $5,000 or more.” Furthermore many special commissions have been requested, Lois Borgenicht shares a few key hints about how she’s made them successful. “My commissions are most often from people who are already acquainted with my work. I visit the space and then set up my still life with their décor in mind. Should customers have certain objects they request, I try to accommodate them if it fits the setup in form and color. I may take 1/3 of the agreed price to start and once I have the general composition and color established, the client will give me another installment and then the final payment on delivery.”

With special care for objects in still life, and/or nature’s elements in plein air works, Lois Borgenicht creates perfect compositions, Her friend, wonderful workshop teacher-artist Paul Moscott says, “She is brilliant at composition.” In her beautiful oil Sunflowers and Squash Borgenicht shares her painting steps, and we observe varied paint strokes providing fine detail and volume, in front of a loosely painted abstract dimension of shapes. Borgenicht achieves overall picture fluidity by painting all parts of the canvas simultaneously, so that all components from lighting to color and brush strokes are harmonious.

Step One: I set up the still life, Sunflowers and Squash, moving around the objects and arranging the flowers until I feel a thrill of anticipation to start. A bright white surface can be distracting, so I lay the composition onto the toned canvas with a neutral, easily covered color such as green earth. I work standing, backing up often to assess if the composition is pleasingly balanced, rag and turpentine in hand to change whatever is necessary.

Step Two: I keep the work open in the early stages, continuously willing to adjust compositional imbalance or drawing errors. I work the entire canvas, building up the image overall.

Step Three: As I progress, I sharpen my focus. I may choose to leave parts of the work loosely described, painting others in more detail. © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine You may observe differences between the photograph of the scene and the easel with still life set up. As with the Post Impressionists, point of view is frequently an expressive element of the work. Borgenicht says, “I did not actually change the color in the background much. I was looking from above and saw the ground more distinctly than the woods. I did simplify the background somewhat so as to keep it from competing with the main subject.”

Tips on professional paints, brushes, mediums and mixtures is all provided by Lois Borgenicht below: “I have been using Richeson brushes which hold up nicely. As for medium, I might use a product made by Robert Doak & Associates called Venetian Medium - otherwise I make my own mix with turpentine, linseed oil and a touch of damar varnish. Although you can use paint thinner to clean your brushes, it does not work in medium. I use a smaller can with holes punched in the bottom, suspended in a larger can to clean my brushes. The heavy material sinks to the bottom of the larger can, keeping the gunk out of the brushes. I recently purchased a lot of paint from Doak Associates, which is made with walnut oil rather than the usual linseed mixture. I also use Old Holland or Windsor Newton. Various colors may have a different cast, depending on the manufacturer. Typical colors on my palette may be Titanium white; ultramarine blue; cobalt blue; mineral turquoise, which may only be made by Doak - Thalo green, can substitute, but watch out for it’s staining qualities. I use a cadmium yellow light; a naples yellow and yellow ochre. I try for a variety of warmer and cooler greens such as viridian, chromium oxide and perhaps an emerald shade of green. I generally have a cadmium orange medium, a cadmium red medium, Alizarin crimson, perhaps a baroque red and then a selection of warm and cool earth tones: raw umber; burnt umber, burnt sienna and ivory black which I use only sparingly. I look for artist grade paint to go on sale. Having more pigment than the student grades, I find I do not have to use so much to achieve a good color mix. Earth colors are a bargain and provide a great color range, especially to begin a work.”

For Birdhouse pictures, Borgenicht has designed the view with her unique composition. A superbly, April 2018 Issue

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

descriptive storyteller and writer: Lois Borgenicht shares the inspiring scene for her Birdhouse drawing here: “The birdhouse was nestled in the crook of a tree outside the dining room window in the house in Wellfleet. The metallic white roof of the house which had been a license plate, contrasted with the soft marsh grasses and gnarly bark of the tree which attracted me to draw the scene.”

First: I started the pastel, lightly sketching in the composition in charcoal.

As a final note about art enriching all our lives, Borgenicht says, “Art provides the artist an opportunity to describe his or her vision of the world, whether it is depicted in abstraction or in realism. The artist proffers an invitation to others to see what they may not have noticed, be it challenging or pleasing, familiar or startling.” www.loisborgenicht.com

Next: My second session I worked to establish the spatial relationship between the tree and birdhouse in the foreground and the marsh grasses in the distance.

Then: I used Permapaque. I drew the little birdhouse work in permanent markers over the next two days.

Final: Happy with my little marker drawing, it was only afterwards I realized I needed to go back to my pastel to emphasize the contrasting textures and clarify the relationship of the foreground to the background.

Forethought on Types of Pastels: “As for pastels, I use many brands - some colors are soft, some harder. Having a mix is useful. Friends whose parents had been artists have given me quite a few pastels; some pastels are hand made which tend to be very soft and luscious. I have some by Rembrandt, which tend to be harder; Sennelier tend to be softer; Robert Doak made his by hand are soft and rich. He is retired now. I have a variety of others I cannot name.” In terms of the lifestyle of an artist, working frequency is significant. Borgenicht says, “I paint or draw most days. I have been in a weekly life drawing group since art school. More than any other practice, life drawing is a perfect discipline to keep my eyes and hands connected to the visual cues that surround me.”

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Spring Chickadees & Dogwood by Linda Hollander


Painting World Magazine

This lovely, lacy metal tray was a lucky thrift store find and made the perfect surface for a fun spring design. Black-capped chickadees are such adorable, friendly little birds! I’ve had the pleasure of watching them eat seed right out of my hand. They get their name from the song they sing… chick-a-dee-dee-dee.

new mediums and paint formulas we have today. There is virtually nothing that can’t be painted… as long as it doesn’t move too fast!

Surface: • 14” Round Vintage Metal Tray, or surface of choice

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • Driftwood DA171 • Foliage Green DA269 • Hauser Medium Green DA132 • Graphite DA161 • Grey Sky DA111 • Lamp (Ebony) Black DAO67 • Raw Sienna DAO93 • Red Violet DA140 • Snow (Titanium) White DAO1 • Soft Black DA155 • Spicy Mustard DA284 • Turquoise Blue DA268 • Whispering Turquoise DA305 • Warm White DA239

Mediums: About Linda I have been painting, drawing, and crafting since childhood, but my art supplies had been collecting some dust while I was busy raising my three active boys. It wasn’t until 1999 that I discovered the world of decorative painting while flipping through some magazines. I bought them all, and poured over them daily with renewed excitement. I used the instructions to teach myself most of the techniques until I could get to seminars and conventions. I chose vintage furniture as my substrate… “go big or go home” is my mantra! Collecting vintage pieces is half the fun of painting. Garage sales and flea markets are hard to pass, as my boys will attest to. I am also not above picking up curbside treasures on trash day. The things people throw away simply amazes me! Painters are fortunate to have all the wonderful

• DecoArt® Metallic Lustre™ - Fab Fuchsia ML14C • DecoArt Americana Drying Time Extender™ Medium DAS1 • DecoArt Americana Matte Spray DAS13 • DecoArt Americana MultiPurpose™ Sealer DS17 (optional) • Rust-Oleum® Painter’s Touch® 2X Ultra Cover® Primer Spray - White

Royal® & Langnickel™ Brushes:

Miscellaneous Supplies: • Gray Graphite Paper • Tracing Paper • Stylus • Art Eraser • Sanding Sponges (optional; I get inexpensive ones at SherwinWilliams® that work great) • Paper Towels

Helpful Hints: Use appropriate sized brushes unless otherwise noted. When I call for “sheer” floats, load your angle brush for a float, but walk the paint out on the palette until it’s semi-transparent. Use the mop brush to soften floats as needed. To dry brush, load a clean, dry brush with a small to moderate amount of paint. Offload the excess paint from the tip of the brush onto a paper towel. Lightly stroke the brush over the area you want to highlight.

Preparation: Sand off any rust or raised paint designs on the tray. Rinse the tray under running water, and then dry it thoroughly. Spray the tray outdoors with Painter’s Touch 2X Ultra Cover Primer until it’s opaque. Use several light coats to avoid puddling and dripping.

• #10/0 Aqualon™ Script Liner R2585 • #1 & #3 Aqualon Round R2250 • 1/4” & 1/2” Aqualon Angular R2160 • 1” Aqualon Glaze Wash R2700 • #2 Kingslan Majestic Mop R4999 • #6 Fusion Shader R3150 • #4 Fusion Filbert R3170

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Painting World Magazine

Figure 1

Figure 9

Figure 2

Figure 10

Figure 3

Figure 11

Figure 4

Figure 12

Figure 5

Figure 6

Basecoating: Use the wash brush and Warm White to base the front and back of the tray. Repeat until it’s opaque. Sand lightly if needed to achieve a smooth painting surface.

Sky Background: Use the photo of the background as a guide. Apply a thin coat of Drying Time Extender Medium to the sky area using the wash brush. Load the dirty brush with Whispering Turquoise. Use long, sweeping strokes to apply the paint. You can add small amounts of water to your brush to help blend and smooth the paint as you work.

April 2018 Issue

If you’re painting on a round surface, be sure the strokes conform to the shape of the surface. If you’re painting on a square or rectangular surface, stroke back and forth. Leave some of the Warm White background showing through here and there. Let the surface dry. Apply a thin coat of Drying Time Extender Medium over the sky area. Load the dirty brush with Turquoise Blue, and stroke in some darker blue areas here and there. You may add more Warm White here and there as needed to lighten some areas. Let the surface dry. Optional: To protect your background, apply a thin coat

Figure 7

Figure 8

of Multi-Purpose Sealer. Note: While wet, the Drying Time Extender Medium allows for smooth blending. If your brush begins to drag while you are painting, the medium is probably beginning to dry. It’s best to stop, allow ample drying time, and then repeat the step until you are satisfied with the results.

Transfer the Designs: Using the graphite paper and stylus, lightly transfer the design, omitting the bird’s eyes and the fine twigs. Use the photo as a guide to paint the twigs. Use the art eraser to lighten any lines that may show through your painting.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Branches: Base the thickest branches using the #3 round brush and Graphite (Figure 1). Switch to the liner brush, and use Graphite + a touch of Driftwood slightly thinned with water to paint the fine twigs and stems. To dry brush highlights on the main branches: Load the chisel edge of the Fusion shader with Driftwood. Offload excess paint onto a paper towel. Stand the brush on its chisel edge at the top of the branch, and paint a C-stroke downward. Repeat this step until you’ve highlighted

Figure 13

Figure 15

all the main branches. When the main branch becomes too narrow to paint a C-stroke, just tap the chisel edge of the brush on the branch to highlight it (Figure 2). Use the #3 round and Raw Sienna thinned with water to add washes of warmth here and there along the main branches (Figure 3). Repeat this step with thinned Warm White to add reflected highlights (Figure 4).

Flowers: Basecoat the petals and buds with Warm White until they’re

opaque (Figure 5). Float shading with Foliage Green (Figure 6). Use sheer Red Violet to float a narrow band of color at the tip of each full petal. Use the liner and Red Violet thinned with water to paint fine veins. Use Hauser Medium Green to paint the centers and the bud calyxes (Figure 7). Add tiny dots to the centers using the stylus and Spicy Mustard (Figure 8).

Figure 14

Figure 16

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

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Leaves: Base the leaves with Foliage Green + a touch of Warm White (Figure 9). Use Hauser Medium Green to float shading (Figure 10). Use sheer floats of Red Violet to deepen the shading here and there (Figure 11). Dry brush highlights using the tip of the filbert and a small amount of Foliage Green + Warm White (3:1) (Figure 12).

Birds: Base the bodies and tails with Grey Sky. Basecoat the caps and beards with Soft Black and the #1 round. Use short, choppy strokes on the edges to avoid hard outer lines. Paint the lower areas of the heads with Warm White (Figure 13). Apply shading using the dirty brush and Grey Sky. Dry brush highlights on the caps and beards using the filbert and a small amount of Grey Sky. Use sheer Graphite to float shading on the bodies, wings, and tails (Figure 14).

April 2018 Issue

Use the filbert and Warm White to dry brush highlights on the bellies and the lower area of each head. Enhance the highlights by dry brushing Snow (Titanium) White to the centers of the highlighted areas. Float Warm White highlights on the wings, wiggling the brush slightly as you paint. Use Warm White and the #1 round to dry brush the tail highlights. Base the beaks and feet with Graphite. Float sheer Graphite shading on the lower area of each head. Float a touch of sheer Lamp Black on the back of each cap. Use Lamp Black to float a backward C-stroke on the front half of each eye. Use Grey Sky to float a C-shape on the back of each eye (Figure 15). Float sheer Raw Sienna over the bodies directly under the wings with the 1/2� angular shader. Walk the float out to cover a wider area as needed. Let the paint dry, and

then repeat to deepen the floats. Dry brush Grey Sky over the beaks and feet. Add a tiny dot of Lamp Black on the upper beak. Use the liner and Warm White to paint a small comma stroke on the front of each eye. Add a tiny dot of reflected light on the back of each eye with Warm White (Figure 16).

Finishing: Erase any graphite marks gently. Spray all painted surfaces with several light coats of Sealer/Finisher. Load a small amount of Metallic Lustre onto your fingertip. Offload excess onto a paper towel. Run your finger along the outer edge of the tray. Let it dry, and then buff it with a clean paper towel. To clean off excess Metallic Lustre, use a small amount of rubbing alcohol on a paper towel.

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Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

April 2018 Issue

51


Fairy Tales

by Leslie Smith, CDA


Painting World Magazine

Trompe-l’œil (French for “to fool the eye”) is one of my favorite styles. In 2013, I had the opportunity to travel in Italy, where the magnificent paintings in the churches and chapels enthralled me. Many employed trompel’œil to raise the vaulted ceilings, simulate statuary, and give the illusion that God and His force of angels were all about. Life is a wonderful adventure – some days, it really is a fairy tale.

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • Lamp (Ebony) Black DA067 • Forest Green DA50 • Hauser Light Green DA131 • Burnt Umber DA064 • Honey Brown DA163 • Mocha DA060 • Warm Beige DA078 • Buttermilk DA03 • Light Buttermilk DA164 • Snow (Titanium) White DA01 • Blue Harbor DA283 • Margarita DA299 • Golden Straw DA168 • Primary Red DA199 • Zinc DA304

Other DecoArt® Products: • Extreme Sheen™ 24k Gold DPM04 • Extreme Sheen Pearl DPM01 • Americana DuraClear® Soft Touch Varnish DS123 • Americana DuraClear Ultra Matte Varnish DS124 • Americana Wood Filler DS103

Brushes: (I seldom specify brushes; sizes will vary with the size of the surface and design. The following are the brushes I Figure 1 used on my book.)

About Leslie At first, painting fit into the corners of my life. Now, the kids are grown and I am retired - I can (and often do) paint all day. Facebook and travel bring me new painting friends. I hope to count you among them!

Surface: • Craft supply companies make book-shaped boxes in both wood and paper-mâché. Several are available online. I painted my design on a real book measuring 8-1/2” x 11” that I altered (instructions follow). I’ve also provided photos of boxes during preparation stages.

• 1” Flat (to basecoat) • 1” Chip Brush cut at an angle, available from any home supply store (I cut mine at about 45o with a pair of scissors I’ve had this poor, rusty thing for years and use it often) (Figure 1) • #4 Maureen McNaughton Round (for the entire rest of the painting), available online from several sources

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Miscellaneous Supplies: (I’ve listed additional supplies below in the section on preparation; the supplies you’ll need will depend on which surface you’re using.)

• Usual Painting Supplies & Materials • C-Thru® Ruler • Sharpie® Retractable Ultra Fine Point Marker - Black 21399-2000 • Circle Template • Your Favorite Transfer Supplies (i.e. transfer paper and/or chalk) • General’s® Charcoal White® Pencil 558 • Krylon® Matte Finish 1311 (or matte finish of your choice)

Preparation: Wooden Box: Additional Supplies: • DecoArt Americana MultiPurpose™ Sealer DAS17 • Ragged Sea Sponge • Sandpaper Fill the imperfections with wood filler, and let it dry. Sand gently to remove excess wood filler. Seal the piece with MultiPurpose Sealer. Again, let it dry, and then sand gently.

Paper-Mâché Box: Additional Supplies: • All-Purpose Glue, such as Elmer’s® • Ragged Sea Sponge Seal the piece with a 50:50 mixture of glue and water; this helps prevent buckling from the water in your paints. Let it dry thoroughly.

Altered Book: Additional Supplies: • All-Purpose Glue, such as Elmer’s • Sandpaper

If Cutting the Book, You’ll Also Need: • BULLDOG® Clips or Weights • Razor Knife or Carpet Cutting Tool • Sturdy Metal Ruler • Scissors • Watercolor Paper or

April 2018 Issue

Other Paper Stock • Cloth Adhesive Tape (optional)

them with bulldog clips or weights, and leave them overnight to dry.

If there are engravings or embossed areas on your book, try to work with them and paint them with metallic paint.

Cut two pieces of cardstock, heavy watercolor paper, or other heavy paper; cut one the size of the inside cover and one the size of the “bottom” of your box. Glue them in place.

However, if they’re in the area you’re going to paint, you can use wood filler to cover them. Dilute the wood filler so it flows into the engravings. This may take several coats. Avoid using wood filler in the crease where the cover attaches to the spine and bends (the joint). Filler in the crease tends to crack when the book opens, but you can easily cover problem areas with cloth adhesive tape and repaint them. You should sand very gently to prevent hurting a fabric or paper cover. You can also flip the book over, so the front cover becomes the back cover.

Once everything is dry, paint the page edges with diluted Snow White (or a color to match the paper you chose for inside the box), just skimming the edges. (Figures 2-3)

Basecoating & Final Figure 2

There are many neat ways to alter a book. One is to glue the pages shut, making the contents irrelevant. The book becomes a Figure 3 decorated block. Another is to cut into the pages to create a box. This is easier than one would think… Open the book, and lay it as flat as possible. Cut a square out of the center of the pages using a razor knife and as much pressure as you can safely apply. You can cut or leave the heavier pages inside the front and back covers (the end papers). Use the metal ruler to guide the knife, leaving the outer 1” of each page intact. Use an old paintbrush to apply diluted all-purpose glue to the pages and the outer and inner edges of your “box.” Move fast. Once you’ve glued the pages, secure

Preparation: Basecoat the book cover with Blue Harbor and a large flat brush. Let it dry. Repeat if necessary to achieve full coverage. For the wooden or paper-mâché books, basecoat the sides (page edges) and inside with Snow White. It may take more than one coat. Let the paint dry. Randomly sponge the page edges and inside with diluted Blue Haven. Let it dry. You can draw the pencil lines

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Painting World Magazine Figure 5

Figure 4

that create pages on the boxes now or later. Draw them broken and partial with simple graphite pencil lines and a ruler. But, once you’ve drawn them, you should seal them before handling the piece further. I sealed the samples by brushing a single coat of DuraClear Ultra Matte in the direction of the pages. Use little pressure, and do not overwork; you want the pencil to blur slightly, without making the book look dirty. If you’re working on either of the boxes, paint the string that binds the pages together with alternating dots of Golden Straw and Primary Red. Once that’s dry, add tiny strokes of diluted Snow White to make it look more like twisted threads. Shade on either side with diluted Graphite. You can also do this now or later. (Figure 4) If you wish, you can also add a bookplate. You can download bookplate graphics from a variety of online sources; there are also stamps available, or you can use a real bookplate. Re-size the line drawing(s) to fit your book. Transfer the tree using your favorite method; make sure the tree is square with respect to the book’s edges.

Instructions:

Paint the cover in layers; complete each one before moving on to the next.

First Layer - The Tree She’s Already Painted: Pounce diluted Lamp Black to form the tree’s canopy using the tip of your altered chip brush. Vary pressure and rock the brush so the leaves form branches. Repeat with Forest Green, letting some black remain, especially on the right side of the tree. Repeat again with Hauser Light Green, letting some of the Forest Green remain, especially on the right side. If you lose all the holes that show the background, let the leaves dry, and pounce in some Blue Harbor.

Figure 6

Paint the trunk with vertical lines. Both trunk sides are Lamp Black; the black is wider on the right side. Paint the middle of the trunk into the wet black with Burnt Umber, and add highlights with Honey Brown. Let everything dry. It is not necessary to remove the white transfer lines. That is a matter of personal taste - after all, the painting is still in progress. (Figure 5)

Second Layer - The Lettering She’s Painting:

Basecoat the gold areas with Golden Straw. Paint them a second time with 24K Gold. Be sure to shake the bottle - metallics tend to settle.

Transfer the lettering. Be sure that the letters are square with respect to the book edges.

The green borders are Margarita. Note that our fairy hasn’t painted the borders on all the letters yet.

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Painting World Magazine Figure 7

Figure 8

Add a little Blue Harbor to the right side of the tree trunk, and let the paint dry completely (preferably overnight). Using a ruler and retractable Sharpie, outline the gold portions of the lettering. (Figure 6)

Let’s talk for a minute… This is my second trompe l’oiel design in the series in Painting World Magazine. The first is “Sketching Lemons,” published in February 2018. That design is more sophisticated in subject and color scheme. But, in reality, this is the more difficult painting. The fairy is a complex shape, as opposed to the sharpener (a simple rectangular box) and pencil (a simple pointed cylinder). In “Sketching Lemons,” (February 2018 issue) the shadows mostly fell against a black background or a neutralcolored piece of paper; in “Fairy Tales,” the shadows fall onto many different colored objects, and the fairy’s legs even cross.

This project will require the use of more techniques to achieve depth: • Value - objects/surfaces closest to the viewer are lighter

April 2018 Issue

• Temperature - objects/surfaces closest to the viewer are warmer • Intensity - objects/surfaces closest to the viewer are brighter • Shadows - cast shadows show that objects are in different planes • Foreshortening - objects approaching the viewer are distorted by making them shorter We only used basic variations of the first four techniques in the lemon project.

Third Layer - The Fairy: Transfer the fairy. Do not transfer her wings, clothes, or the shadows yet. The light is coming from the upper left, but does not affect the tree or lettering, as they’re painted and “not real.” Basecoat the fairy with Honey Brown. Darken each fairy edge with Burnt Umber. There are so many ways to achieve nicely blended values. Dilute, float, walk… do whatever you need to do to blend the Burnt Umber into the Honey Brown. I used diluted paint on a round brush and “pit patted” along the edge, gradually working inward. If I got an unblended line, I picked up a little Honey Brown on my brush,

Figure 9

patted it into the lighter area of Honey Brown, and worked outward into the Burnt Umber. My technique is a cross between stippling, washing, and brush mixing. Continue shading with Burnt Umber to show the depressions of her waist, her shoulders, the back of her left knee, her feet, etc. These darker values create shapes. The shading on the fairy’s right side is darker and occupies larger areas because the light source in from the upper left. (Figure 7) Comb her hair with more Burnt Umber. Her panties are also Burnt Umber. Figure 8 illustrates the placement, darkness (value), and edges of the Burnt Umber on her skin. Note that I repainted the little blue triangle back into her left arm, since I covered it with the Honey Brown basecoat. (Figure 8) Add Mocha highlights, and strengthen them with Warm Beige. Blend well, and refer to the photos. The highlights are not all the same; some brighter Warm Beige highlights are near or on her shoulders where the light falls.

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Painting World Magazine Figure 10

Use Buttermilk for a final highlight only on her right hand and her raised foot. Her hand is both lifted and near the light source, so it is a tad lighter and brighter. But, her left foot is the very brightest because it is closest to the viewer. Finally, wash over the dry highlights with some diluted Golden Straw. Be subtle. She isn’t shiny, but she does glow. At this point, our fairy looks like she is floating, and she’s undressed. No worries - we’ll “anchor” her to the book in the next step, and we’ll dress her in wings soon. (Figure 9)

Fourth Layer - Playing More with the Light: Highlight her hair with Golden Straw, and then with Buttermilk. Keep most of the highlights to the front of her head, closest to the light source. If the browns get lost, just put them back. She can be blonde or brunette, depending on how much Golden Straw you use. Trace the pail. The bottom of a bottle of DecoArt Americana paint makes a good template for its outer edge. Paint the pail’s rim with Light Buttermilk. The paint is Margarita

Figure 11

Figure 12

with a Golden Straw highlight. I used the retractable pen and a circle template to add grooves to the rim and handle.

the brush’s shadow (which conforms to an extent to her hand and arm) and her left leg’s shadow (which falls on both her right leg and the book).

The paintbrush is Lamp Black, and the paint is Margarita highlighted with Light Buttermilk. There is a tiny Light Buttermilk ferrule. Highlight the brush handle with Zinc.

Paint Honey Brown over the 24K Gold letters where the shadows fall. Then, paint shadows over the tree trunk and foliage with diluted Burnt Umber.

Her wings are semi-transparent, but still cast a shadow. So, you’ll paint the shadows before the wings. That’s also why we paint her form with such care - she is semi-visible through her wings.

Use Burnt Umber to create shadows on all areas that are browns and greens, such as the shadow her hair casts onto her back and the shadow her left leg casts onto her right leg. The edges of cast shadows (as opposed to shading to achieve shape) are typically not sharp or as blended.

Not all shadows are gray or black. They are a duller and darker hue of the surface they’re resting on. A shadow may even reflect a patch of the color of the object that cast it. Shadows are darker and more intense nearest to the objects casting them, and fade or diffuse at their edges. The location of the light source and the distance between the object and the surface can affect a shadow’s direction and length/width. Lastly, the shape of a shadow depends not only on the object casting it; the shape also changes if the shadow falls upon an uneven surface. Uneven surfaces shape both

Note where her legs cross; I blended the upper dark area into her leg more than the lower dark area (shadow), which stops somewhat abruptly and curves onto her leg. Be sure to end your shadow where noted on the line drawing. Paint the shadows that fall onto the blue book cover with diluted Zinc. Once the wash is dry, repeated it, but carry each wash a shorter distance from the fairy. Doing this makes the shadow darker near the fairy, but rather transparent at its edge.

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Painting World Magazine Figure 13

Figure 14

When the veins are dry, paint over her wings with a thin and even coat of Pearl. The thinner the Pearl, the more transparent it is. Or, you can paint more than one coat to make them more solid. Finally, paint the thin lines of Snow White a second time over the Pearl. Highlight the paint in the pail with Snow White; this is smaller than the Golden Straw highlight. Highlight a tiny area of her hair to the right of her part (maybe four short brush strokes) with Snow White.

The paint pail’s shadow is diluted Zinc, but paint the shadow inside the rim first with diluted Burnt Umber. Paint a smaller shadow of Zinc into the Burnt Umber. The pail’s shadow and the fairy’s shadow are about the same length. That helps convince the viewer that the pail and fairy are the same height from the surface of the book cover. The shadow from her upper right wing is longer, to help convince the viewer that her wings are extended further upward. Why do these colors work for these shadows? Many black paints contain a lot of blue. So, black (or gray) is a reasonable color to use for shadows against a blue background. And, Burnt Umber is typically considered in the red family. Red and green are complementary colors, so a wash of Burnt Umber naturally dulls and darkens the greens beneath it.

Her Wings: Transfer her wings using white chalk or transfer paper. Extreme Sheen Pearl has some transparency. We are going to use that transparency to allow her body and clothing to show through the wings. This will also keep her wings delicate. Starting at the middle of her back, paint each vein with Zinc. Do not reload your brush as it runs out of paint, unless you’re moving on to the next vein. Load the brush with Snow White to highlight the veins closest to the light (i.e., near the top of her wings or at the edges, which are pointing upward). Again, do not reload your brush as it runs out, unless you’re moving on to another vein.

Figures 11 and 12 show the fairy’s wings at this stage. The black and white photo shows where the grays, buttermilks, and whites of the veins lay. (Figures 11, 12 and 13)

All that Jazz & Pizazz: The additions that make a painting better depend in part on the artist’s individual painting style. The following are suggestions that made my painting better, but you may not need them. I included many of these changes in the line drawing. Put Figure 14 here - it is the photo of the finished work and should be the largest I added additional tree roots under the fairy’s left foot. I also added black lines with the retractable pen to resemble bark. Both of these changes create a darker value to contrast with the fairy’s left knee and right foot.

Figure 15

Both Figure 10 and the dotted lines on the line drawing show the shadows. The faint white lines in the figure show the outline of her wings. (Figure 10)

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

I sketched unpainted flowers and a grassland using the General’s Charcoal White Pencil. I highlighted the pail’s handle with Snow White. I shortened the paintbrush, and strongly highlighted it starting at the top end (foreshortening). I added more shadows: (1) where her upper left wing casts a shadow onto her head and (2) where her lower left wing casts shadows onto both legs. These are subtle, but make a big difference. This is easy to see when you compare Figures 13 and 14. The highlights on her left leg, foot, and arm somehow got lost, so I painted them again.

Finishing: Sign your work proudly. Spray with Krylon 1311 or your favorite matte finish. A light misting didn’t affect the white chalk or the Sharpie ink. Protect the piece with multiple coats of DuraClear Satin Varnish. Have fun… when you tilt the book, the wings change from a see-through gauze to solid pearl. (Figure 15) Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

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April 2018 Issue

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM


Painting World Magazine

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

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Sly Fox

by Kay Witt


Painting World Magazine

This project delves deeper into pastels and how to use them for breathtaking, photo-realistic results. You can create this beautiful red fox by applying pastel pencils and hard pastels to Clairefontaine® Pastelmat® Card. By learning these techniques, you can create animal and pet portraits for wonderful gifts that will make lasting treasures for years to come.

About Kay Kay Witt is a popular Workshop Instructor and Fine Artist living in Strasburg, VA. Kay helps others achieve their artistic goals in her popular classes. She is a realistic pastel artist known for her photorealistic paintings of wildlife. She creates hand drawn pastel paintings of animals, capturing their spirits and personalities. Her favorite subjects are wolves and horses.

Surface: • 9-1/2” x 12” Sienna Clairefontaine Pastelmat Card, available in pads of different colors & individual sheets.

Pastels & Pencils: • Derwent® Pastel Pencil P300 Pale Ultramarine

Stabilo® CarbOthello® Pastel Pencils:

(Note: CO used as abbreviation in the text)

• Cold Grey 1 720 • Dark Flesh Tint 680 • Caput Mortuum Red 645 • Bister 635 • Prussian Blue 390 • Ivory 105

General’s® Charcoal Pencils: • 2B Charcoal Pencil • Charcoal White® Pencil

Nupastel® Firm Pastel Color Sticks: (Note: NP used as abbreviation in text)

• White 211 • Black 229 • Cordovan 353 • Cold Very Light Gray 299 • Indian Red 263 • Warm Medium Gray 219 • Chrome Yellow 207 • Raw Sienna 233 • Cocoa Brown 253 • Burnt Sienna 203 • Rust 343 • Buff 276 • Endive Green 348 • Bottle Green 298 • Cold Deep Gray 259

Helpful Products: • X-ACTO® School Pro® Classroom Electric Pencil Sharpener 1670, available from Amazon® • Möbius & Rupert™ Round, Double Hole Brass Sharpener (for sharpening Nupastel sticks), available from Amazon • Small & Medium Paper Blending Stumps

Miscellaneous Supplies: • 1/2” Masking Tape • Paper Towels • Hand Towel • Black Construction Paper • Glassine Paper (optional) • Transfer or Carbon Paper • 150 Grit Sandpaper • Kneaded Eraser • Drawing Board • Baby Wipes

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Painting World Magazine Figure 2

Figure 1

Figure 3

Figure 4

Helpful Hints:

Preparation:

Make sure your pencils and pastels are very sharp, and wipe the dust off on your hand towel after sharpening.

Cut or obtain 9-1/2” x 12” paper. Tape the paper to your drawing board. Transfer the pattern to the surface of your paper with transfer paper.

Sharpen the flat edge of your Nupastel stick by holding it perpendicular to the sandpaper and rubbing back and forth to make a flat, smooth edge. (A video of this process is available on YouTube®. Just search “Kay Witt”.) Then, wipe off the excess dust on a towel. I sharpened all the Nupastels to a point on one end with the Möbius & Rupert sharpener. (There is also a video showing how to do this on my YouTube channel.) Use the black construction paper to rest your forearm on, as not to smudge your painting in the process. When it’s complete, make sure to keep your painting flat. I recommend that you cover your finished piece with a glassine paper to protect it until you frame it.

April 2018 Issue

Instructions: Eyes: Outline the eyes with a 2B charcoal pencil. Blend that into the paper surface with a paper stump. (Use one end of the paper stump for darker colors and the other for lighter colors. You can clean the stump by rubbing it gently on sandpaper.) Color in the irises evenly with NP343 (Rust), and blend with the smaller stump. Use NP229 (Black) to add the slit-shaped pupils. Add the light area near the bottom of each eye with NP207 (Chrome Yellow). Use NP353 (Cordovan) to add the dark areas of the eyes near the top of each eyeball and underneath where the highlights in the eyes will be.

Figure 5

Blend carefully with the stump. Use your Derwent P300 (Pale Ultramarine) pencil to add the highlights on the lower eyelids. Use a zigzag motion to add the upper blue highlights on the eyeballs with the same pencil. Use a Charcoal White pencil to add the brightest highlight under the one you just applied. Restate the darks around the eyes with NP229 (Black). (Figure 1) Block in the colors of the fur around the eyes with NP343 (Rust), NP263 (Indian Red), NP203 (Burnt Sienna), and NP253 (Cocoa Brown). NP263 (Indian Red) is darker (for shading), NP203 (Burnt Sienna) is a redder color, and NP253 (Cocoa Brown) is a warmer brown color. Make sure your strokes go in the direction of the fur. Look at the diagram carefully for color placement. Use the CO635 (Bister) pencil to add darker areas in the eyebrow areas over the eyes, along the sides of the nose, and under the mouth. Blend

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Painting World Magazine carefully with the stump. (Figure 2)

Nose: Block in the nose with your 2B charcoal pencil. Use the CO390 (Prussian Blue) pencil to add some blue color to the black. Blend. Add highlights on the top and both sides of the nose with the Derwent P300 (Pale Ultramarine) pencil. Use your Charcoal White pencil for the brightest light on the right side of the nose. Use the CO105 (Ivory) pencil for the light on the muzzle above the nose. Start adding darker hairs around the eyes with NP263 (Indian Red). Also use the CO635 (Bister) pencil for more darks around the nose and mouth. Add the light hairs around the muzzle and on the lip with the Charcoal White pencil. Use the 2B charcoal pencil to add the dark areas on the side of the muzzle. (Figures 3-4) Use NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) for the shadows around the mouth. Begin adding lighter hairs around the eyes with the CO105 (Ivory) pencil, and use the Figure 6

CO635 (Bister) pencil to add any additional dark hairs needed. Working down the face to the muzzle, use NP276 (Buff) to block in the color, and blend with the stump. Use NP211 (White) on the muzzle around the nose. Blend. Use the Charcoal White pencil to draw in some brighter hairs. Use your CO720 (Cold Grey 1) and Derwent P300 (Pale Ultramarine) pencils to add the shadow hairs under the nose. (Figure 5) Block in white areas of fur on the left side of the face with NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray), and add shadows to the fur with NP219 (Warm Medium Gray); blend with the stump. Add some darker hairs to the fur as needed with your CO635 (Bister) pencil. Use the Charcoal White pencil to add the whiter hairs on top of this blended layer. Use some NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) and your CO635 (Bister) pencil to add darker hairs. Add red hairs with NP203 (Burnt Sienna) or the CO645 (Caput Mortuum Red) pencil. Add more black to the nose with NP229 (Black). Also use

NP229 (Black) to add more dark around the nose and mouth if needed. (Figure 6)

Background: Use the flat side of the NP298 (Bottle Green) pastel stick to block in the background on the left side of the fox. Rub it into the paper well with your fingers. Make sure you have even coverage. If it creates dust, just rub it back into your paper. On the upper fourth of the paper, add a layer of NP229 (Black), and blend it in evenly to darken this area. Add a nice light green area with NP348 (Endive Green); place it near the center of the background area, rub it in a circle, and blend it well with your fingers. Continue to add NP298 (Bottle Green) the rest of the way down, and add some NP229 (Black) at the bottom. Use the flat end of the NP203 (Burnt Sienna) pastel stick to add a secondary light area by applying it in a circular motion about 2/3 of the way down and blending well. (Figure 7) Finish blocking in the fox’s fur on the left side with NP299

Figure 7

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Painting World Magazine Figure 9

Figure 8

(Cold Very Light Gray). Add the final outer hairs in the upper third on the left side of the fox’s fur with NP276 (Buff). This adds a reddish glow on the face. In the rest of the areas, use the CO105 (Ivory) and Charcoal White pencils to add the final hairs. Use combinations of NP219 (Warm Medium Gray), the Derwent P300 (Pale Ultramarine) pencil, and the 2B charcoal pencil to add some additional darks to the fur. I especially like the Derwent P300 (Pale Ultramarine) pencil in the shadow area next to the muzzle and under the chin.

Ears: Outline the left ear with your Charcoal White pencil to separate the ear from the dark background. Block in the dark areas of the inside of the ear with NP229 (Black) and NP253 (Cocoa Brown). Place NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray) on the outside edge of the ear. Place a line of NP229 (Black) along the edge of the back of the ear (located to the right) and a smaller line of NP253 (Cocoa Brown) above the black. Blend all of the areas well with the paper stump. Then, block in the hairs on the inside of the left ear with NP203 (Burnt Sienna) and NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray). Remember to add them in the direction the hair grows. (Figures 8-9)

April 2018 Issue

Use the Charcoal White and CO720 (Cold Grey 1) pencils to add the final light hairs to the left ear. Use the flat edge of your NP253 (Cocoa Brown) pastel stick to add the light hairs at the top of the ear. Use the CO635 (Bister) pencil to add any darker hairs back into the light hair in the inside of the ear. Outline the right ear with NP229 (Black). Block in the colors of the fur with NP229 (Black) in the inner ear and NP253 (Cocoa Brown) on the tip of the ear. Use NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) on the outside edge of the ear near the NP229 (Black), and use NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray) on the hairs located on the left side of the right ear. Add some color at the base of the ear with NP253 (Cocoa Brown). (See Figure 10 for color placement.) Blend the colors with the stump. Add the hairs on the outside of the ear first with your CO720 (Cold Grey 1) pencil, and then add the hairs on the inside of the ear with your Charcoal White pencil. (Figures 10-11)

Top of the Head: Place some NP203 (Burnt Sienna) and CO635 (Bister) at the top of the head, and use NP276 (Buff) to add the light hairs at the very top next to the background. Use some NP211 (White) as well. Blend with the stump. (Figure 12)

Using NP298 (Bottle Green), add background color over the top of the head. Blend carefully. Next, use the Charcoal White pencil and the CO105 (Ivory) pencil (at the top) to draw in the final hairs. Drag some hairs into the background. Add a few darker hairs with the CO635 (Bister) pencil and the flat edge of either the NP263 (Indian Red) or NP203 (Burnt Sienna) pastel stick. (Figure 13) Block in the right side of the face starting around the eye area with NP343 (Rust) and NP203 (Burnt Sienna). Use NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray) in the white fur areas and NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) in the shadows of the white fur. Remember to stroke in the direction the fur grows. Blend the areas thoroughly with the stump. Add more darks with NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) if needed. Use NP211 (White) to add the light hairs on the face. Add any needed additional darks around the eyes with NP263 (Indian Red). You can also use the 2B charcoal pencil to add darks. Blend lightly. Add some final light hairs with the Charcoal White and CO105 (Ivory) pencils. (Figures 14-15)

Fur Under the Chin: Block in the red hair on the left side directly under the face and chin with NP263 (Indian Red) for the dark hair, NP343 (Rust) for the medium value hair, and NP276 (Buff) for the light hairs on the edges. Blend together, and use the CO105 (Ivory) pencil to draw in the final light hairs. Next, block in the white fur area under the chin with NP219 (Warm Medium Gray). Blend well. Using NP259 (Cold Deep Gray), add some shadows to the fur. Blend with the stump.

Š 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Figure 10

Figure 11

Figure 12

Figure 14

Figure 17

Figure 13

Figure 15

Figure 16

Figure 18


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Painting World Magazine make sharp hairs. As you move down the body where it is more in shadow, use NP233 (Raw Sienna) to make the fur. Blend.

Use NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray) on the edge to add the light hairs. Blend lightly. Add more darks with NP219 (Warm Medium Gray) between hairs as needed, and blend. Then, use the Charcoal White pencil on the very ends of the hairs to add bright, white tips. Blend lightly into the darker hairs. Add additional light hairs on the chin with the Charcoal White pencil. Use the CO635 (Bister) pencil to add darker hairs as needed around the face, near the eyes, and in the eyebrow areas. With a very sharp 2B charcoal pencil, add the whiskers. (Figures 16-17)

Finishing the Body: Block in the red fur on the right that forms a ring of hair around the face. To do this, use NP263 (Indian Red) for the dark areas next to the white fur, and follow with NP343 (Rust). Blend.

Then, use your CO680 (Dark Flesh Tint) and CO105 (Ivory) pencils to draw in light hairs. Use the CO635 (Bister) and 2B charcoal pencils to add dark hairs in the fur as needed. With the flat edge of the NP233 (Raw Sienna) pastel stick, draw hairs up into the background on the upper back area. Use the flat edge of the NP299 (Cold Very Light Gray) pastel stick or the CO720 (Cold Grey 1) pencil to draw in some gray hairs down at the bottom of the fox where the white hairs blend into the red fur of the fox’s body. This softens the white area as it blends upward into the red fur. Add dark hairs in the fur as needed using the CO635 (Bister) and 2B charcoal pencils. Sign your name. You did a great job!

Continue by adding lighter hair with NP233 (Raw Sienna) and NP276 (Buff), using the sides of the sticks to make sharp hairs; blend. Use your CO680 (Dark Flesh Tint) and CO105 (Ivory) pencils to add light hairs. Use NP343 (Rust) to block in the rest of the fox’s body on the right side. Use NP263 (Indian Red) for the darker fur and NP353 (Cordovan) for the darker accents. Draw hairs up into the background at the top with NP343 (Rust). Use NP263 (Indian Red) and NP353 (Cordovan) to darken the paper at the bottom right corner and along the right side. Blend well with the stump. Add the bright hair on the fox’s upper back with NP276 (Buff), using the side edge of the stick to

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Download all line drawings ready to print here: http://bit.ly/April2018PWM

April 2018 Issue

69


Iris

by Debbie Cole, CDA


Painting World Magazine

One of the most majestic flowers of spring, the beautiful Iris has an enchanting scent and those beautiful ruffled petals that have made it a favorite of artists and gardeners alike for centuries.

DecoArt Americana® Acrylics: • Bubblegum Pink DA250 • Celery Green DA208 • Eggshell DA153 • Hauser Medium Green DA132 • Light Buttermilk DA164

Other DecoArt® Products: • Americana DecouPage™ Paper DS115 • Americana Decou-Page Paper – Vintage Silhouette DP09, text page • Americana DuraClear® Matte Varnish DS60

Martin F. Weber® wOil® Colors:

About Debbie Debbie Cole, CDA is an award-winning artist that is widely recognized as one of the leading contemporary decorative painters of the 21st century. Author of numerous books and pattern packets, Debbie has been a soughtafter instructor who has taught throughout the United States, Japan, Argentina, and Canada. While Debbie loves traditional decorative painting, she also loves stamping, mixed media, and jewelry design. No matter what her medium, Debbie’s main source of inspiration comes from her faith in God. She knows that her creative talent is a gift and feels blessed to be able to share it with others. Her mission is to be able to reflect her joy onto others through her artwork.

Surface: • 12” x 12” Canvas

• Cadmium Yellow Light Hue 7406 • Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue 7407 • Dioxazine Purple 7411 • French Ultramarine Blue 7429 • Ivory Black (Warm Shade) 7413 • Magenta 7414 • Raw Sienna 7426 • Red Permanent 7419 • Rose Permanent 7420 • Sap Green 7428 • White Permanent 7421

Silver Brush Ltd® Brushes: • #0, #2, #4, & #6 Monza® Synthetic Mongoose Short Filberts 2632S • #12 Monza Synthetic Mongoose Short Round 2629S • #0, #6, & #8 Monza Round Brushes from the Debbie Cole Creative Blending Set DC-2624S • 1/2” & 3/4” Golden Natural™ Square Wash 2008S

Miscellaneous Supplies: • StudioR12® Delicate Vines Stencil - 6” x 9” STCL314, from Creative Arts Lifestyle • Basic Acrylic Painting Supplies • Martin F. Weber wOil Modified Linseed Oil • Small Mop Brush • Old Scruffy Brush • Brayer • C-Thru® Ruler • Plaid® Mushroom Sponge • Palette Knife • Tape

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Helpful Hints Painting with water-soluble oils is the same as painting with other oils. I use a very thin application of paint, blocking in and blending the basic form. I then layer additional values onto the first application of wet paint as much as I can. Once it starts tacking up, allow the paint to dry completely. You may use accelerant to help it dry faster, but that does change the viscosity of the paint. Also, I use glazing to add depth to the painting. I do this once the paint is completely dry. To glaze, thin the oils with water combined with the Linseed Oil medium until the paint is transparent.

Instructions: Background: Apply the Decou-Page medium to the entire canvas using a “mushroom” sponge. Apply the tissue paper to the canvas, starting in one corner, and then continuing onto the entire canvas. Use your fingertips to smooth out the paper, and then roll it with a brayer to remove any trapped air. Allow the paper to dry. Apply a second application of DecouPage medium over the paper, and allow it to dry again. Apply a thin layer of Eggshell + Light Buttermilk (1:1) over the entire canvas. Allow it to dry, and then float Eggshell around the outer edges of the canvas using a large flat brush. Transfer on the line drawing. Once you’ve completed the first stage of the flower, clean up around the edges of the flower and leaves with a float of Eggshell, working it out toward the background. Allow the surface to dry.

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April 2018 Issue


72

Painting World Magazine To create the orange mixes, simply add Cadmium Yellow Medium to the Mid Tone, Low Light, and Light petal mixes. Add some of these orange colors in the throat of the Iris. (Figure 1) Flower Petal Color Palette

Create a wash of Eggshell, and apply it over the entire background again if too much text is showing. The goal is to have it just lightly showing through, so it does not distract from the flower, yet it adds interest to the background. Tape the scroll stencil on at an angle in the upper left corner of the canvas. Using a small mushroom sponge, pounce Celery Green over the openings. Repeat in the bottom left in the same manner. Mix Celery Green with a little Eggshell. Tape the scroll on the upper right corner, and stencil the lighter color in the same manner. Repeat in the lower right corner, rotating the stencil on an angle. Allow the paint to dry, and float the outer corners of the canvas with Celery Green. Use a #12 Monza short round to scumble the flower lightly with the Low Light color around the two upper corners and the lower left corner of the background. Transfer on the “Iris” lettering, using a C-Thru ruler as you trace it onto the background. Line the outer edges of the letters with Hauser Medium Green. Fill in the centers of the letters with Bubblegum Pink.

Flower: (See Flower Petal Color Palette and Orange mixes)

April 2018 Issue

Palette Mixes for Flower: As you mix the palette for the flower, please refer to the Flower Color Palette color reference. • Warm White: White Permanent + a touch of Cadmium Yellow Light (add just enough Cadmium Yellow Light to warm the white, but not enough to turn it yellow) • High Light: Light + Warm White • Light: Low Light + Warm White • Low Light: Mid Tone + Warm White • Mid Tone: Red Permanent + Rose Permanent + Warm White • High Dark: Mid Tone + Magenta • Dark: Mid Tone + Magenta + a touch of Dark Leaf Mix • Low Dark: Magenta + a touch of Dark Leaf Mix

Top Petals: The top petals are much lighter than the bottom petals are, and you’ll paint them with lighter values. It is important to keep the values very subtle. The overall color of the petal will be the Low Light color on the chart. Begin by blocking in that color in the middle value areas, along with the Light color in the lighter areas and the Mid Tone color in the dark areas. Once you’ve blocked in the colors, blend them with a very light touch using the filbert brushes. Be aware of how you blend the petals, always pulling toward the center of the flower.

If too much text is showing through the flowers, reinforce the first stage values once they are dry. Add additional lights with the High Light color and additional darks with the High Dark color. Thin the Mid Tone color to pull the vein line on the right petal. Add the anther (the areas sticking up behind the center beard) with the Orange palette + a little Raw Sienna using a liner brush. In a similar manner, add the beards with the same color, with the flower Dark color on the outer edges, using a liner brush. (Figure 2) Allow the paint to dry, and glaze some of the Dark in the darkest areas of the upper petals and throat. (Figure 3) Glaze Raw Sienna + Cadmium Yellow Medium accents on areas of the petals where the medium turns into the dark.

Bottom Petals: Begin by blocking in the Mid Tone color in the medium tone areas, along with the Low Light in the highlight areas and the High Dark in the dark areas.

Orange Mix Palette

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Figure 01

Figure 02

Figure 03

Figure 04

Once you’ve blocked in the colors, softly blend them together using the Monza round brushes. (Figure 01) Thin the Dark color, and glaze over the darker areas of the petals, leaving the edges light. Using an old scruffy brush and full strength Dark color, stipple texture very lightly onto the bottom

petals. Allow the surface to dry, or spray it dry with Matte Varnish.

beard with Raw Sienna + Cadmium Yellow Medium. (Figure 03)

Next, thin the Dark color with water and a little of the water-soluble Linseed Oil medium, and add the lines to these petals. Soften the lines with a mop brush, and dry the petal. (Figure 02)

Then, glaze Raw Sienna accents on areas of the petals where the medium turns into the dark. Also, add a little Dioxazine Purple into the Low Dark color, and glaze the darkest areas of the flower.

Glaze the dark areas with the Low Dark color. Add additional lines to the


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Painting World Magazine

Stem & Leaves: (See Stem and Leaves Palette)

Palette Mixes for Stem & Leaves: • Light: Low Light + Warm White • Low Light: Mid Tone +

Warm White + a touch of Cadmium Yellow Medium • Mid Tone: Sap Green + Warm White + a touch of Petal Mid Tone • High Dark: Mid Tone + French Ultramarine Blue + a touch of Petal High Dark • Dark: High Dark + French Ultramarine Blue + a touch of Petal Dark • Low Dark: Dark + a touch of Ivory Black

Finishing: Allow the paint to dry completely. Spray multiple thin coats of Matte Varnish to protect the painting.

Due to the large size of this painting, the drawing has been reduced by half. Enlarge 200% for full size painting.

Painting the Stem & Leaves: Begin by blocking in the Mid Tone color in the middle value areas, along with the Low Light color in the highlight areas and the High Dark color in the shade areas. Once you’ve blocked in the colors, blend with a filbert. (Figure 01) Add additional lights with the Light color and shades with the Dark color. Allow the paint to dry. Glaze the dark areas with the Low Dark color. Glaze Raw Sienna accents, and allow the paint to dry. Add a little Dioxazine Purple into the Low Dark color, and glaze the darkest areas of the stem and leaves. Add some of the Mid Tone petal color on top of the Raw Sienna accents.

April 2018 Issue

Note to reproduction companies/stores: The bearer of the original color magazine has full rights to have this drawing reproduced and enlarged one time for personal © 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights Not forin distribution, resale or reproduction. You use. This notice hasreserved. been printed red ink for verification of authenticity. agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.


Painting World Magazine

Innovative Corner Painting with Pure Pigment Paints: Part 3

by Debbie Cole, CDA

I could not continue this series on pure pigment paints without discussing water-soluble oil paints. These are among the hottest new paints on the market and are a dream to paint with, because they’re just like traditional oil paints. The big difference is that you can thin them and clean them up with water. Water-soluble oil paints have a few names, including “water miscible” and “water mixable” oils paints. Paint companies created these paints out of necessity, because so many painters have developed sensitivities to traditional oils and/or their mediums.

There has been a lot of confusion about these paints, because in theory, water and oil do not mix. It’s important to understand that they are oil paints, and not water-based paints like acrylics. They are oil-based paints that have had emulsifiers added so that you can thin them and clean them up with water. Therefore, you can use them in the same manner as traditional oil paints without having to use harmful chemicals, such as turpentine. While you may thin them with water, it’s best to use the rule of layering where you apply fat over lean, because they behave like traditional oils. Most of the paint manufacturers have created watersoluble mediums to use along with the water-soluble oils. When thinning the paints, it is best to add a

linseed oil medium or another medium to water as the thinning agent. This will supply the needed “fat” to keep the layers of oils from cracking as they dry. Daniel Smith®, Holbein® Works, Martin F. Weber® Co., Royal Talens™, and Winsor & Newton™ are some of the popular companies that create traditional oil paints and now also create water-soluble oil paints. It is important to buy a professional grade, just as it is with the traditional paints. These have the purest pigment, which is important when you are mixing paints. Water-soluble paints tend to be slightly more transparent than their traditional counterparts, and that is why selecting brands with pure pigments is important. It is also important to know that each company has created water-soluble mediums to go with their paints. They include thinner, linseed oil, safflower oil, stand oil, fast drying medium, and impasto medium, as well as gloss varnish, matte varnish, satin varnish, and varnish remover. It’s important not to mix traditional mediums into the water-soluble paints.

© 2018 Painting World Magazine Digital Edition. All rights reserved. Not for distribution, resale or reproduction. You agree to follow all international copyright laws as well as the terms and conditions outlined at paintingworldmag. com. You may NOT reprint or make copies, even for non profit uses. Any violation of these terms will result in a nonrefundable cancellation of your subscription and possible prosecution with fines up to $150,000 USD. http:// www.copyright.gov/title17/ Please contact info@paintingworldmag.com if you have received this PDF illegally.

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

Also, the question of mixing acrylics into watersoluble paints has been one of controversy. While manufacturers have added resins and other emulsifiers to these paints, there seems to be conflicting responses regarding whether you can mix acrylic paint into the watersoluble paints. Some manufacturers claim that you can mix their water-soluble oils with tube acrylic paints. In my experience, I have not found that to be successful. The acrylics have a different drying time than the water-soluble oils. When I experimented with combining them, I found that as the two different paints dried, cracks formed because of the difference in drying times. There’s also conflicting information about the drying time. Some manufacturers state that the drying time of water-soluble oils is faster than traditional oils. I have found that they dry in about the same amount of time. To increase the drying time, many manufacturers have created drying accelerants. You can add these into the paints to allow the paints to dry faster. They work wonderfully, but they do change the viscosity of the paint. Just as with traditional oil paints, you may spray the water-soluble oils with a matte medium, such as Krylon® Matte Finish, to speed “dry” the paints. This helps with adding layers quickly, but the key is that the paints are still wet underneath. There are always risks that the paint could crack as it dries under the layer. If you use this spraying technique, it is best to add a little watersoluble linseed oil medium into the paints as you continue to add the additional layers.

April 2018 Issue

Here are some of the best characteristics of water-soluble oils: • They have all the same aspects of traditional oils, but clean up with water. • They give the painter more time to work with the paint than water-based acrylics allow. • Using water and the water-soluble mediums allows the painter to create varied effects, which are unique to these types of oils. You can paint them with very thin, watercolor-like applications or with very thick impasto layers. • Because they dry slowly, there is no need to remix a color palette. You can cover the palette with plastic wrap and store it in the freezer. • They’ve been engineered to preserve the original hues without yellowing over time. One of the biggest benefits is that because the paints are watersoluble, they completely rinse out of paintbrushes, allowing the painter to use the same brushes for other water-based mediums. This is not the case with traditional oil paints or their cleaning mediums, which can leave an oil residue in the brushes.

I find the best brushes to work with are shorter-hair brushes, such as brights or filberts. The shorter hair aids in blending the values of the paint together. While some artists prefer natural hairs, I prefer the synthetic versions of the natural hairs. They are stronger fibers, so they last longer. They also move the paint easier while you’re blending than a natural hair brush will. Thank you for joining me for this third part on Painting with Pure Pigments. In the next issue, I will continue the series, discussing DecoArt® Traditions™ paints and how they vary from bottled acrylic paints. Until then, may painting bring you joy!

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Painting World Magazine

Directory of Artists Deb Antonick adeb@shaw.ca www.paintingwithdeb.ca Maureen Baker maureenjbaker@msn.com www.maureen-baker.com Lois Borgenicht www.loisborgenicht.com Nicole Borgenicht nicoleborgenicht@gmail.com Michael Cheek mscheek@charter.net www.fineartamerica.com

Linda Hollander paintingfool@live.com Shara Reiner shara@angelthyme.com www.angelthyme.com Leslie Smith laspaints2@gmail.com Janelle Warner nellwarn@aol.com Kay Witt kaywitt2@gmail.com www.kaywitt.com

Debbie Cole, CDA debbie@debbiecole.com www.debbiecole.com

April 2018 Issue

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Painting World Magazine

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April 2018 Issue

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April 2018 Issue Painting World Magazine  

80 pages, full color digital magazine; 10 gorgeous projects and educational editorials from your favorite artists! Includes work by: Deb Ant...

April 2018 Issue Painting World Magazine  

80 pages, full color digital magazine; 10 gorgeous projects and educational editorials from your favorite artists! Includes work by: Deb Ant...