Page 1

129


130


RYERSON UNIVERSITY Department of Architectural Science 325 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3 (416) 979-5000

aanon-profit, non-profit,annual annual publication publication produced producedand and published publishedby bythe the students the studentsof the Department Departmentof of Architectural Architectural Science Science

Say hello! arch325magazine@ryerson.ca

B

A

28’ B

325

2017 2018

© 325 Magazine 2017-2018 Ryerson Department of Architectural Science All rights reserved All photographs and drawings are courtesy of students and contributors unless otherwise noted. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this publication, and assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular project. The opinions herein are the responsibility of the contributors concerned.


2


325 Team

Special Thanks

Editors-In-Chief Erik Aquino Jasmin [Minji] Kim

Chair of the Department of Architectural Science Dr. Mark Gorgolewski

Creative Directors Jessica Feng Arash Ghafoori

Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science Dr. Thomas Duever

Copy Batoul Al Waadh Adrian Chîu

Vice Provost Academic Dr. Christopher Evans •

Manager of Student Relations and Development, FEAS Zohair Khan

Graphics Kelly Hayoung Bang Caitlin Chin Elizabeth Dejong Anna Halleran Maya Higeli Wincy Kong Lena Ma Erin Pang Sarah Tyl

• Special Projects Coordinator Sara Berman • Executive Director of the Office of the President Amy Casey

• Marketing Batoul Al Waadh Arash Ghafoori

• Faculty Supervisors

Yew-Thong Leong

Kendra Schank-Smith

Sponsorship Caitlin Chin Jessica Feng Anna Halleran Lena Ma

• Print Coordinator

Alexandra Berceanu

Other Contributors Victoria Beck

Financial Coordinators Kathleen Sojor Champlin Allyne Sareno

3


4


Message from the Dean This issue of 325 Magazine is a compendium of dazzling ideas and vision. From chaos to contemplation, from the past to the future, projects like Nest, Condenser and Resonance make it clear that DAS students are breathing new life, direction and meaning into this city and beyond. The integrated and interdisciplinary curriculum that DAS is known for is on brilliant display in these pages. Truly, these students have come to understand every stage of their projects, from concept to completion, to the societal, economic and environmental impact. As Dean, I couldn’t be more proud. Winston Churchill once said, “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.� I can say with confidence that I look forward to the shape of many things to come, especially the achievements of the architects and building science professionals of the future. Enjoy your copy of 325 Magazine! Dr. Tom Duever, P.Eng., FCIC Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science

Note from the Editors-in-Chief For several years, 325 Magazine has served as a platform for students to share and acknowledge their outstanding work, both within the Department of Architectural Science, and beyond its shell to the AEC industry. With every new issue, it becomes evident that the commitment and passion for design excellence and innovation from our students only continues to grow. And in this growth, there is a tremendous amount of work and focus to fleshing out these projects that rarely rises to the surface. Behind the final product do we seldom see its processes; its evolution from sketch to reality. As designers, we each explore our ideas through a variety of methods, unique to our own skill sets and acumen. Through trial and error, we learn what ideas work and what may need some more nurturing. In this edition, we hope to illuminate these processes, celebrate them in all their grit and nascency. We invite you to take a glimpse of what DAS has been up to this past year and to join us as we celebrate another year of accomplishments. On behalf of the 325 Magazine team, we thank you for taking the time to read this edition. As you delve into this latest review, we hope you find ideas that may inspire and we wish that you enjoy flipping through it as much as we do. Happy reading! Sincerely, Erik Aquino & Jasmin [Minji] Kim

5


8

Grange Park Pavilion Arash Ghafoori

Pavilion & Residential Projects

10

12

In • Sight Francesca Cuda Christian Iannantuono Amanda Nalli Noeline Tharshan

Weaving Shengyu Cai Ruotao Wang

16

Amber Road Trekking Cabin Tatiana Estrina Shengnan Gao

20

22

Botanist Research Field Station Hayoung Kelly Bang

Constructing Architecture: Cinematography Studio Johnathan Chan

6


26

28

Decongestion Maya Higeli

Lumina Christian Maidankine

30

Network Shengnan Gao

32

34

Serenity Charbel Nassif

Berkeley Senior Co-Housing + Preschool + Bookstore Ryan Fernandes Douglas Peterson-Hui Nineveh Rashidzadeh

7


2nd Year

Arash Ghafoori

01

The Grange Park Pavilion is a static structure that mimics motion in hopes to encourage further user engagement and liveliness in Grange Park. The pavilion takes a dynamic form to reflect the continuously evolving nature of architecture. Its wooden lattice structure creates vistas pointing towards both the old and new buildings of the surrounding context to illustrate the change in architectural styles. Housing music and performance art activities, the pavilion incorporates amphitheatre seating to provide visitors a comfortable space to watch performances or simply to interact with others.

02

03

Grange Park Pavilion

a

A

c

A

N

Design Studio II

b

a process sketch b plan c exploded isometric 01 primary beams 02 secondary beams 03 complete structural frame d section a-a e site plan f night rendering

d 8


e

f 9


4th Year

Francesca Cuda Christian Iannantuono Amanda Nalli Noeline Tharshan 01

Located in Pape Nature Park in Latvia, In•Sight is a bird observatory that aims to unify the natural environment with its built form. Drawing its form from the movement of birds in flight, In•Sight offers an educational journey through architecture. The site is approached by a slightly elevated path, guiding individuals towards the first lookout point, oriented towards the land. This first area connects and grounds its visitors, emphasizing the animal diversity that is sustained by the site’s vegetation. Proceeding from this point, the directionality of the pavilion leads users up the stairs to the second level, where there is a view down and onto the surrounding environment, as well as directly up into the sky. Upon arriving at the final platform, the view is oriented towards the water. This is area presents the pinnacle of the site’s natural diversity and thus, is framed by its architecture. In•Sight’s structure is elevated just above the wetlands below to functionally - and gracefully - minimize intervention on the natural environment. At the same time, the unique pavilion allows humans to become the observer, offering an extraordinary viewing and educational experience in the remarkable national park.

02

03 04

05

In•Sight

06

07

a

c

The Small Building

b

a concept diagram b process sketch c exploded isometric 01 corten steel roof 02 wire railing 03 pine wood floor 04 2” x 8” wood joists 05 corten steel ribbon & stairs 06 platform & path assembly 07 structural wood columns d lower platform plan e upper platform plan f southeast elevation g northeast elevation h winter rendering i spring rendering

d

e

10


f

g

h

i

11


2nd & 3rd Year

Shengyu Cai Ruotao Wang

To link something is to connect separate elements; to establish close ties; to form strong relationship between both objects and people - like weaving.

Weaving

Weaving is a footbridge located in Vancouver, BC, that builds a strong link between Vanier Park and Sunset Beach Park, across the English Bay. Offering more than just a direct connection between sites, Weaving also acts as a shared, public space between its two established landscapes. The bridge is designed to accommodate both cyclist and pedestrian traffic through a central bike strip and lateral lanes dedicated towards foot passage. The bridge crossing is an experience in itself, where people are invited to weave through the support structure along its deck, culminating in a journey that provides visitors spectacular views overlooking the city. Structurally, the pedestrian bridge is composed of two rigid space-frame arches with the long-span decking suspended from these supports. At connection junctions, suspension rods are attached to the decking at multiple angles, imitating woven threads. Acting as a strut, the shared platform connecting the two arches - at its top stabilizes these structural elements. Additionally, tensile components are used in stabilizing the arches; the tensile structure, composed of cables and membranes, transfer loads from these arches through tensile forces. The membranes (sheets of fabric) provide a soft skin to protect the pedestrians and cyclists below which can also be seen as a product of weaving.

a

b 02

CISC Steel Competition

01

a process sketches b diagramatical isometric 01 primary route (yellow) 02 observation route (red) c rendering of both routes d rendering of shared platform 12


c

d

13


01

02

03

05

e 06

04

f e sectional perspective 01 arch segment 02 cross bracing 03 tensile corner structure 04 main decking 05 guardrail 06 suspension rod f east elevation g rendering of arch path h details (respective to sectional perspective drawing) 14


g

01

04

02

05

03

06 h 15


2nd Year

Tatiana Estrina Shengnan Gao

The Amber Trekking Cabin’s design blurs the boundaries between interior space and landscape through its use of fabric, serving, simultaneously, as the project’s windows, doors and walls. White nylon sheets are suspended on the cabin’s structural wooden studs through use of button-shaped extrusions, allowing visitors to open and close the space at their leisure. This provides the user freedom to manipulate the fabric to suit their specific needs. To minimize its ecological footprint, the building can be mounted on either large trees or man-made posts that can be located anywhere along the trekking route. The cabin itself can be situated at various elevations for the different site conditions. Elevating the cabin ensures passage for both humans and animals below, and prevents unwanted visitors - both the animal and human variety from entering the cabin at night. The roof is composed of polycarbonate panels which create viewports towards the sky, perfect for stargazing at night.

Amber Road Trekking Cabin

01

a

BODY

FLIRT

boutique

02

37

37

03

Amber Road Trekking Cabin Competition

04

05

b

a concept diagram b floor plan c exploded isometric 01 steel cable supports 02 polycarbonate panel roof 03 storage hangers 04 cedar wood structure 05 nylon string railing 06 nylon sheets 07 ladder d exterior rendering

06

07 c 16


d 17


e

e sectional perspective f exterior rendering g site section 18


f

g

19


1st Year

Kelly Hayoung Bang

The Botanist Research Field Station and Cabin is perched on a steep hill in the Evergreen Brickworks park, looking out onto its beautiful, man-made ecosystem. The station and cabin establishes not only a visual connection to its site but responds physically, giving the illusion that it emerges from within its landscape by way of its sinuous form. In the attempt to mitigate environmental impact, the building moulds to the shape of the existing vegetation and terrain. The interior is divided into two spaces: one dedicated to work and the other for rest. The cabin’s wood cladding provides a harmonious dialogue with its context throughout the change in seasons.

01

03

02

04

Botanist Research Field Station

a

b

Communications Studio

c

a floor plan 01 office 02 lab 03 bedroom 04 kitchen b section c process sketch d sectional perspective e interior rendering f exterior night rendering

d 20


e

f

21


4th Year

Johnathan Chan

The understanding of reality is elicited in an aggregation of facets. As prescribed by Plato in the Allegory of the Cave, the conception of a belief system is limited to what one may discern. The art of cinematography, developed as a by-product to better the perception of man - the studies completed by Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne Jules Marey - has ultimately unveiled what people cannot see, but is nevertheless existent. The development of motionfilm has exposed the deficiency for one to perceive a holistic reality, as much of what one perceives is a constructed reality comprised of a series of instants. Entry

Cinematography is the art that is comprised of a curated sequence of instants presented in a manner that creates the illusion of movement with respect to the element of time. The notion of sequence is explored in the construction of architecture.

Constructing Architecture: Cinematography Studio

b

a

Options Studio

c

a b c d

process sketch combined plans isometric diagram collage renderings 22


d

23


e

e model photo f cantilever interior rendering g unfolded section

09

08 24

07

06

05

04


f

g

03

02

01 25


1st Year

Maya Higeli

Designing on King Street meant being cognitive of the recent changes employed by the King Street Pilot Project. In addition, as observed from the surrounding context, many restaurants and cafes provided limited visual transparency between their interior space and the streetscape. Reflecting the pilot project’s hope to alleviate congestion along the frequented avenue, Decongestion creates a space with a similar treatment, offering freedom for movement and one that does not feel cramped or tight. With a narrow site, and nearby competing venues, the design required a facade that would attract the attention of pedestrians. The facade, appearing to be stripped away, opens a visual connection towards its interior space for the public to equally enjoy. The interior was designed to allow passersby to view simultaneously into its belowgrade art gallery, main floor and cafe mezzanine. Open to below spaces allow for encouraged movement as well as provide the most natural light possible, making the spaces feel larger.

Design Studio I

Decongestion

a

b

a b c d e

process sketch of exterior north elevation sectional perspective lobby rendering cafe interior rendering

c

26


d

e 27


1st Year

Christian Maidankine

With the new King Street Pilot Project, the way that people travel and experience the city has changed; there is a greater focus on using the streetcar and allowing for pedestrian traffic. Lumina is a mixed-used building, housing a cafe, gallery and residences. Drawing from the nature of many organisms using light as a communicative device, Lumina employs the use of light installations within its gallery space as a strategy to encourage people from the street to enter and explore. The combination of clear glazing and coloured polycarbonate panels provides interesting light effects to wash its environment. The residences are centred around a courtyard where light can similarly flood the interior spaces. Both programs of the building curate experiences through its use of material, transparencies, voids and light.

b

Lumina

a

UP

c

Design Studio I

d a b c d e f

preliminary sketches transverse sectional perspective ground floor plan elevation gallery interior renderings residential interior rendering 28


e

e

f

29


2nd Year

Shengnan Gao

From a series of surveys and reportings, people feel more comfortable talking with others who have similar backgrounds, especially those who have experienced traumas. Network is a homeless shelter that intends to create a place that feels like home, to provide not only professional treatment and training but also encouraging internal support from its own users. In addition to transitional housing, Network is composed of various social spaces and common amenities, including a cafe and both private and public counseling spaces. The cafe, serviced to the public by the shelter’s users, offers opportunity for interaction and training. The counseling spaces offers views towards several outdoor, green spaces, like Allan Gardens, which have proven stress relief effects and support mental illness healing.

11000 mm

7500 mm

4500 mm

a

Network

1500 mm

x 6 Mutual St

b

d

Design Studio III

c

a section sketch b spatial conceptual diagram c office space & outdoor area diagram d transitional residence section e section f exterior rendering g transitional housing interior rendering

e 30


f

g

31


2nd Year

Charbel Nassif

For all the youth who have been rejected by their own communities and have had nowhere to turn but to the streets, Serenity is a place to call home until they get back on track. It is a shelter where one can re-establish the meaning of community alongside others who have experienced the same fate. A place to calm down, decompress and get aid during hard times. The homeless youth shelter driving intention is for its occupants to achieve peace of mind and soul. This is promoted through the combination of both transparent and contrasting materials in its interior spaces, which are filled with an abundance of natural light and greenery. All circulation rests on the perimeter of a central courtyard which provides a safe haven for the youth, as well as offer communal spaces and a variety of activities. Serenity’s exterior facade follows a pattern of simple geometries to establish balance and harmony, and this is reflected similarly in the simple organization of its residences.

a

04

Serenity

04 04 03 02

06

02

01

05

Design Studio III

b

a form diagram b section 01 communal space 02 clinic & treatment rooms 03 activity workshop 04 transitional housing 05 restaurant 06 crisis housing lounge c experiential section d interior rendering e south elevation

c

32


d

e 33


Masters

Ryan Fernandes Douglas Peterson-Hui Nineveh Rashidzadeh

Located in downtown Toronto, this proposal uses strategies of adaptive reuse, and a sensitivity to the neighbourhood and streetscape to address both the needs of a population that desires to age in place, and the city that faces growing housing demands. The design of the project is configured as a series of three main spaces: a bookstore/cafĂŠ as the communal/public commercial space, a cohousing/preschool complex that uses an intergenerational approach to benefit both populations, and a central courtyard/parkette which serves as a mediating space that bridges the two volumes/programs, while also introducing some valuable open public space within the dense city fabric. Juxtaposing new and old, both materially and formally, the heritage designated Berkeley Church - which is preserved and reconfigured to shelter a bookstore/cafĂŠ - is contrasted with the new addition of a residential/communal complex that respects and maintains the language of the old church in a contemporary manner, alluding to its significance as rich part of the historic urban fabric.

a

02 01 03

Berkeley Senior Co-Housing + Preschool + Bookstore

b

Studio in Collaborative Practice

c

a parti b program diagram 01 bookstore/cafe 02 co-housing/preschool 03 central courtyard/parkette c ground floor plan d north elevation e exterior rendering of central courtyard

d 34


e 35


f

g

f g h i

n-s section e-w section interior rendering - preschool interior rendering - church 36


h

i

37


38


The students at DAS have this distinct penchant to want to translate their designs into reality. This past year saw two new residential projects come to life through the initiative of three current undergradauate students: The Inwood House by Katherine Swainson and The Belleville House Renovation by Mitchell Cairns-Spicer and Philip Fors These projects presented a rare opportunity for these individuals to exercise their education and delve into the world of permits, construction drawing and dealing with tumultuous interactions between clients and contractors. But of course, with almost any project, challenges and difficulties are inevitable.

Conversation I

Home Sweet Home Whether finding strategies to employ sustainable design, combatting budget restrictions or trying to develop a process for fabrication, the architectural practice is littered with problems in need of a solution.

In this article, we look at the process behind the product, discovering just some of the many realities of undertaking these types of projects through the lens of a student. What are some of the ongoing technical - and sometimes personal - struggles faced? How were they solved?

Contributors 1:

Katherine Swainson

2: Mitchell Cairns-Spicer, Philip Fors 39


The Inwood House with Katherine Swainson

Inwood House is located in the municipality of North Saanich on Vancouver Island and is a key transportation terminal between the mainland and the island. The design aims to optimize the natural depression of its site, the exposure to daylight, and to views of the bay, whilst maximizing gross floor area and connectivity between its primary living spaces. Elements of this new construction include an upper living exterior deck, which wraps around the entrance and central staircase, and new bedrooms, storage and utilities spaces. The new residence focuses on using local Douglas fir lumber to be incorporated as structural elements like columns, decking and stairs, as well as interior finishes.

40


What was the design process with your clients? The schematic design phase took place over about three months. A lot of the work was done remotely: sending sketches back and forth, marking them up and discussing them either over the phone or through e-mail. We also met with the contractor a few times to hash out details and to provide initial quotes from trades. Once we had the quotes, several changes were made to remain within the budget. There was a major push to start the permit process and have it approved for early summmer of 2018. Additionally, the drawings needed to be sent to the septic and structural engineers so they could use them as base drawings for their work, as well as for their approval. The design documentation and construction phases took place over approximately a month thereafter.

What was your response to this unique site? The topographic condition and trapezoidal lot resulted in very limited access to the site from Inwood Road. With this in mind, we wanted to preserve as much of the existing native vegetation and bedrock as possible, and with a natural clearing roughly in the center of the lot, this determined the rough footprint of the house. Furthermore, although the property is directly on the water, there is a view of Swartz Bay to the east. Maximizing this view was particularly important for the client. The site also receives the most direct sunlight in the afternoon hours from the southwest. These were the main criteria in driving the massing and orientation of the house, along with the direction and angle of the roof pitch.

41

Can you explain your use of locally sourced materials in the construction process? The construction industry on Vancouver Island is an enclave market in terms of the manufacturers that the contractor had worked with prior. A large portion of wood utilized was directly reused from the site, most of which were Douglas fir trees that the arborist had advised to clear. Many of the trees had rotten roots, but the trunks of the trees were in good condition, when dried adequately. The Douglas fir was milled on site then treated and re-used for most of the exterior finishes, posts, deck railing and interior furnishings.


Can you explain the water drainage system in the roof? A simple mono-pitch roof was a feature that the client was very particular in seeing. The climate is significantly milder in North Saanich on Vancouver Island, however, it does not receive the same amount of annual precipitation as Vancouver does. Working with the natural depression of the site, the aim was to have highly controlled water flow away from the building enclosure. With the low point of the roof on the easterly side, high quality hung gutters and eavestroughs were installed and connected directly to perimeter drains to prevent surface run-off. Deep 4ft (1.2m) overhangs and a waterproofed deck also assisted shedding water away.

What challenges did you face during construction? Working independently on the project, with very little experience in residential construction, definitely proved to be difficult. Initially, finding resources was a challenge. The Canadian Wood Frame House Construction (CMHC) was the Bible! I was lucky to have a few colleagues and professors (thank you, Garth!), who were kind enough to answer my specific construction questions, should I have any. We were also very fortunate to have a good contractor who was able to clarify local standards and was up to date with the building requirements for singlefamily residential homes.

42

Another initial challenge was working remotely during the critical weeks prior to permit submission. Once the initial quotes had come back from the trades, there was a big push to get the excavation and building permits submitted as soon as possible. Over 75% of the work was done in the few weeks prior to building permit submission. For the initial design phases, discussion via phone and email worked well (I also had the benefit of knowing the client earlier), however when it came to making many final decisions, I found it more efficient meeting in person. I was only able to do this on weekends as I was working full time in Vancouver.


ROOF ASSEMBLY NOMINAL INSULATION VALUE (RSI) = 4.93 T/G CEDAR CEILING FINISH POLYETHYLENE VAPOUR BARRIER 9 1/4" TJI JOISTS AT 12" O.C. W/ MINERAL WOOL BATTS (R28) 2" PURLINS FOR CROSS VENTILATION EXTERIOR1/2" WALL ASSEMBLY: OSB SHETATHING NOMINAL INSULATION VALUE (RSI) = 4.93 BUILT-UP ROOFING MEMBRANE 13

FASCIA BOARD ROOF ASSEMBLY NOMINAL INSULATION VALUE (RSI) = 4.93

2 184

19

50

T/G CEDAR CEILING FINISH POLYETHYLENE VAPOUR BARRIER 9 1/4" TJI JOISTS AT 12" O.C. W/ MINERAL WOOL BATTS (R28) 2" PURLINS FOR CROSS VENTILATION 1/2" OSB SHETATHING BUILT-UP ROOFING MEMBRANE

25

1/2" GYPSUM WALLBOARD POLYETHYLENE VAPOUR BARRIER 2" x 8" STUD WALL AT 24" O.C. W/ MINERAL WOOL BATTS 3/4" OSB TYVEK AIR BARRIER 1/2" WOOD FURRING STRIPS 6" HORIZONTAL LAPPED HARDIE BOARD (WHITE)

RIM JOIST BLOCKING

328

BASE TRIM

328

2" CONCRETE SUBFLOOR W/ INFLOOR RADIANT HEATING

19

EXTERIOR FLASHING LAPPED OVER AIR BARRIER AND STARTING DECK MEMBER

304

19

51

50

3" HARDIE BOARD STARTER STRIP

CEDAR SOFFIT FINISH

375

2" CONT. PERFORATED SOFFIT VENT STRIP

286

3

CONT. ENGINEERED BEAM CANTILEVERED FOR DECK TONGUE & GROOVE CEDAR CEILING FINISH

TONGUE & GROOVE CEDAR CEILING FINISH

1067

SEALANT OR GASKET JOINT AT POLYETHYLENE (A&V) TO PLATE (A.B.)

SEALANT OR GASKET JOINT AT POLYETHYLENE (A&V) TO PLATE (A.B.)

6" HARDIE BOARD TRIM

29

292 GASKET

EXTERIOR WALL ASSEMBLY:

1/2" ANCHOR BOLT

NOMINAL INSULATION VALUE (RSI) = 4.93

1/2" GYPSUM WALLBOARD FOUNDATION WALL ASSEMBLY: POLYETHYLENE VAPOUR BARRIER NOMINAL INSULATION VALUE (RSI) = 4.22 2" x 8" STUD WALL AT 24" O.C. W/ MINERAL WOOL BATTS 12

100

50

365

3/4" OSB 1/2" GYPSUM WALLBOARD POLYETHYLENE VAPOUR BARRIER TYVEK AIR BARRIER 2" x 4" STUD WALL AT 16" O.C. W/ MINERAL WOOLFURRING BATTS (R14) 2" WOOD STRIPS 2" RIGID INSULATION 6" HORIZONTAL LAPPED HARDIE BOARD (WHITE) 8" (200mm) C.I.P. CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL W/ VERTICAL BOARD FORM EXTERIOR FINISH

203

EXTERIOR WALL AT ROOF SECTION DETAIL 1:5

EXTERIOR WALL AT FLOOR SECTION DETAIL 1:5

154

EXTERIOR WALL AT ROOF SECTION DETAIL 1:5

101

2 x 6" RAILING BACKING TO ALIGN WITH TOP OF POST

32

2 x 2" PRESSURE TREATED DOUGLAS FIR RAILING

B

A 2000

C

E

D 2000

2000

2000

CHANNEL FOR LED LIGHT STRIP

F

2000

G

2000

G 2000

436

1

T/O Roof

914

32657.6

436

B/O Roof 31743.2

T/O Roof 3658

1087

32657.6 1 x 3" HORIZONTAL TREATED CEDAR LOUVRES SPACED 3/4" 2743

B/O Roof 20

31743.2 6 x 6" PRESSURE TREATED DOUGLAS FIR POST

3658

2

375

Level 2

202

Ground Floor 26000.0

203

27500.0

Foundation

E/W SECTION 1:50

15

Ground Floor 26000.0 Foundation 25568.2 0

43

1065

1

235

203

229

38

25568.2

25

375

27500.0

COMPOSITE DECKING

Average Grade 2625

2625

Average Grade

Level 2 29000.0

229

200

1500

29000.0

2

4

76

25


How did you budget the project/ ensure the project stayed under budget? The project was budgeted by the contractor, however, there were several collective decisions that were made to remain within budget. Some of the major changes included: 1.The reduction of full 12ft glazing on the east facade, to 10ft & 6ft windows with a 2ft transom.

2.Reducing the glulaminated timber roof beams to standard engineered TJIs, and not having the ceiling exposed. 3. The change from a standing seam metal roof to a torch-on roof membrane. 4.Removal of the board form finish on the exterior concrete walls. 5. Removal of a shower on the second floor.

44

6.We went with polished concrete floors on the lower floor, instead of finishing them with hardwood, as we were already providing a concrete sub-floor for radiant heating. 7.We had also initially proposed a fully enclosed and separate garage; however, this was ultimately phased out of the proposal as it was determined to be unnecessary for the time being, and a carport which could be built by the client at a later date would suffice.


Were any changes made to the design during construction? Yes, there were many minor modifications made prior to and following the first permit submission, and during construction. One major change was following the first permit submission, the elevation of the foundations (and the entire building) had to be raised to accommodate for the pre-existing storm drain of which was put in by the previous owner for the approval of the subdivision of the three lots. The foundations had to be at least one meter above the storm drain invert location. This would allow water to flow adequately from the weeping tiles to the storm drains.

What are some insights you have gained from this experience as a designer? I learned that being bilingual between metric and imperial is key! Especially since the municipality required some permit drawings to be submitted in metric, however the contractor required an imperial set of documents for construction. I have also indefinitely gained a stronger sense of scale, as well as understanding of trade standards in residential construction. I found it overwhelming at first to grasp the scale of the project. When we visited the construction site, the roof framing had just been installed. I remember thinking, that’s how high 11ft is! You really don’t understand the impact of a space until you see it in full scale.

45

Overall I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to have worked on such a project at this stage in my career. I can easily say that I learned more from the process than the final project itself. Being able to be highly engaged in the construction process can be very onerous but rewarding. The most valuable experience was the ability to go to the site and discuss what detail conditions worked and what didn’t work. There was a lot of refinement.


The Belleville House with Mitchell Cairns-Spicer & Philip Fors

Belleville House is located in Wellington, Ontario. Built initially in the early 1900s without plumbing or electricity, the renovation opted to provide a liveable space that focused heavily on implementing sustainable strategies. Major architectural changes include altering the ceiling conditions and replacing the structural with a custom beam to provide an open space layout. As part of the renovation, a custom barn door as access to the bedroom was machined and fabricated from aged wood from the owner’s own barn.

46


Why did you decide to renovate/redesign your home?

What were some of the changes you envisioned for the house?

MCS: My dad purchased the house with the intention of renovating and selling it. There was a financial motivation to this, however he also wanted to provide me an opportunity to redesign the home.

MCS: There were two major architectural changes to the original house. The first was to remove a structural wall to create an open plan. The second was to remove the ceiling in the entryway, kitchen and bedroom, creating vaulted ceilings in those spaces.

What was the design process with the client being a family member?

In what ways did your design change through the duration of the project?

MCS: The design process was unique from a standard project in every way. There was no general contractor, instead my dad did a significant portion of the construction work, and we employed acquaintances who worked in the trades for the more complex aspects of the project.

MCS: As the project relied on the removal of the structural wall, we put a lot of resources into ensuring this was possible. We did however have to scale back on intended ceiling interventions. The entryway and bedroom have vaulted ceilings however we did not follow through in the kitchen.

47

Can you explain the structural reconfiguration of the home? MCS: Originally there was a central structural wall which ran north to south bifurcating the main space. The design uses two columns and a beam to replace this wall and allow for an open plan. To keep costs low, instead of using a large heavy timber member I opted to create a built-up beam with 2x8 framing members. Typically when creating a beam such as this, the members are aligned with each other, however in this case I designed them to be spaced apart, creating a more interesting structure. The members are fastened together using large carriage bolts, and the entire assembly is left exposed.


Can you explain the fabrication process?

How does this differ from the original design? MCS: The original design had a similar spacing of the column members, however the contractor we hired for this task was uncomfortable with the entire load being transferred through bolts alone, and we decided on a built up column.

PF: Most of the design and fabrication process comprised of small alterations to the materials used. This is a case where the desire for a simple product becomes very complex to execute. In many components of the final product, the dimensions were dictated by the lumber that was cut over 100 years ago and have since shifted and decayed. I went through extensive measures to ensure that the barn-board would not have any visible cut edges but also retain the heavily weathered appearance.

48

Did you apply new fabrication techniques? PF: From the inception of the project, it was important that I pushed the boundaries of my fabrication abilities. I had experience with similar fabrication projects on a smaller scale, but a lot of my knowledge would not translate to components of this scale, and I knew I would have to improvise. One of the most difficult operations was machining the 8 foot steel c-channel with metal working equipment not intended for material` that large. There was a steep learning curve involved with this part of the process.


49


The barn door was locally sourced and custom fabricated, can you elaborate on the design process?

Another new experience for me was the integration of precision CNC fabrication with use on less predictable materials. When a project is entirely produced with CNC machines, all dimensions are known or created in the design. The barn-board, on the other hand, was cut over 100 years ago and had warped and decayed since. Similarly, the hot-rolled steel components, mainly the structural c-channel, warp and shrink to some extent when they cool after being forged. These materials make up the major components of the barn door, but they are near-impossible to measure accurately. This needed to be taken into account in both the design and construction process.

PF: I think many of the design decisions made by Mitchell and I were based on one major principle; a resiliency in material choice, and for the design to speak true to the age of its construction. To achieve this, we tried to employ the use of raw and rustic materials, using simple geometric relationships and often relying on the dimensions established by the material in its raw state. When subjected to the wear and tear of daily activity, these materials age gracefully and the initial design expression is preserved. It was very important to design bold yet simple gestures that would also stand the test of time, like the material itself. This was achieved by a carefully arranging a material palette and using only simple geometries.

50

Can you elaborate on the sustainable strategies you incorporated? MCS: Sustainability was a major driver of this renovation. We removed every layer of the existing wall assembly including each stud. The original studs were 4 inches, which we increased to 6 inches to allow for more insulation. We used ROXUL’s semi-rigid exterior insulation instead of the polyiso (silverboard), which is extremely common in residential construction. Semi-rigid wool mineral wool allows vapour to pass through, while the polyiso boards act as a vapour barrier. Typically you would insulate in the attic, but as we removed the ceiling in portions of the house we realized we needed to develop a work around. My solution was to add a 2x2 member to the 4 inch roof joists and insulate between the joists. Lastly, we used polyiso on the underside of the joists to mitigate thermal bridging.


51


54

A Non-Motorized Water Sports Centre Timothy Lai

58

Commercial & Institutional Projects

Toronto Centre for Architecture Daniel Jiaqi Liu

60

Disperse Gabriel Garofalo

62

SLICE Matthias Brenner Sebastian Schaaf

52


64

Framed Michael Evola

68

The Academy of the Distilling Arts Tetyana Gradyuk Julianne Guevara

72

UNUN Angela Chau Jimmy Hung

76

The Condenser Distillery Jessica Gu Ciara Martins

53


4th Year

Timothy Lai

A Non-Motorized Water Sports Centre seeks to reflect and enhance the nature of play in dialogue with its adjacent body of water. The centre’s various levels and elevations emphasize the site’s sloped terrain and to allow for different forms of engagement with the neighbouring lake. These strattas are staggered to provide numerous views of the lake and to mimic a playground environment, where users are encouraged to explore and meandre throughout the building. Users enter from the highest elevation and as they travel throughout the centre, they will eventually descend to the where the building meets the water. Wood is used for both its structural purposes, serving as a scaffold to hold different programmatic elements and objects, and for its experiential qualities, evoking the soft and welcoming nature of the material. The roof employs polycarbonate panels to allow for increased light penetration but still providing weather protection, as necessary.

Divide and Connect in Wood Studio

A Non- Motorized Water Sports Centre

a

b

c a b c d e

parti perspective sketch wall section sketch rendered perspective section elevation rendering 54


d

e 55


01

02

03

04

05

06

f

exploded isometric 01 roof 02 timber structure 03 cross bracing 04 deck overhang 05 upper level recreation and dining 06 lower level change room, equipment storage, deck g plan h sectional perspective

f

56


g

h

57 UP

DN

UP


2nd Year

Daniel Jiaqi Liu

01

The Toronto Centre for Architecture is a place that encourages the celebration of construction and reinforces the culture behind diversity. The centre is situated on the western portion of Nathan Phillips Square, adjacent to several key landmarks and monuments on the site, and acts as a threshold between two distinct densities: Osgoode Hall and Toronto City Hall. The design ultimately settled on a quiet intervention which preserves the visual openness of Nathan Phillips Square by depressing the building into the ground. Its spaces embrace the building’s structure and elements, whether the geometric, concrete waffle slabs or its curving staircases. The centre houses an enfilade of gallery spaces on either end of the basement level, running parallel to several exterior stramps.

02

03

04

Toronto Centre for Architecture

05

a b

Design Studio II

c a parti sketch b exploded isometric 01 roof structure 02 oblique columns 03 stramp 04 floor plates 05 waffle slab c sectional perspective d exterior rendering e interior rendering of gallery space 58


d

e 59


2nd Year

Gabriel Garofalo

Disperse is situated adjacent to Nathan Phillips Square, surrounded by both historic architecture and diverse culture, making it an ideal site for a Toronto based architecture centre. This melting pot of culture and architecture lent itself well to observing how people may interact with architecture and how the senses, like touch and sight, are involved. The centre strategizes its placement of varying transparencies, masses and materiality to create a series of moments that allow the visitor to reflect on their surroundings. The site sits alongside a busy pedestrian path of travel which influenced the decision to split and disperse the building around this axis. Splitting the building into two forms and the dispersion of light wells along the pathway offers pedestrians a glimpse into the gallery spaces and maker space. Upon entering the centre, visitors are greeted by a large open volume followed by a long stairway that leads to the galleries. The centre strives to bring an awareness of the architecture to its users, inviting the community to enter and learn about the world of architecture that surrounds them.

a

Disperse

b

DOWN

DOWN

UP

DN

c

1m

Design Studio II

d a b c d e f

conceptual diagram parti sketch section ground floor plan exterior rendering interior rendering 60


e

f

61


4th Year

Matthias Brenner Sebastian Schaaf

SLICE is located on a small island off the shores of southern Italy. An old Sarazen castle sits on the hillside overlooking the coastline of the mediterranean sea, which becomes conserved and integrated into the design. As a contemporary art museum, it combines gallery spaces alongside ateliers for local artists, hotel suites and a restaurant to offer a complete immersion into the artistic sphere and stimulate all senses. It seeks to embrace the bridge between civilization and nature while providing a stage to reminisce on the Island of Favignana’s history. The project presents incredible views that the island has to offer, creating an opportunity to not only reflect back on the castle’s history as a prison, but also provide an outlook to the present development of free expression.

01

Historic Fortress 02

SLICE’s geometric structure is inspired by local limestone mining sites, and additionally, through mirroring the contour-lines of the site. The intention for the “360° sliced” structure is in order to best present the food, lifestyle and cultural practices of the island, and it achieves this through a highly-curated layout. The layout provides the possibility to not only experience the art but to have an insight into the ongoing processes of creating and crafting these works. A stroll through the structure implicates a journey through art and culture; walking through the building, one is greeted simultaneously with bare, carved stone on one side and with mesmerizing views over the Mediterranean Sea on the other. 03

04

SLICE

Cultural Forum 05

06 07

b

Competition Studio

a

a site plan b exploded isometric 01 exhibition space 02 sky terrace 03 culture centre 04 restaurant 05 art-scape-hotel 06 art-ateliers 07 art-luxury-hotel c section e-w d exterior rendering e gallery rendering

c 62


d

e 63


3rd Year

Michael Evola

Framed is a new cultural gathering place for Toronto’s distillery district. The project connects an existing distillery complex to a new open space, expanding the potential for public activities and events. The built form borders around a recessed courtyard, and as a result, it establishes a microclimate, increasing the comfort of the space throughout the colder months. Additionally, the courtyard connects to the building through an accessible ramp that doubles as an art walkway. The courtyard is connected to the building through a central glass volume that houses the primary circulation. Brick volumes replicate the heritage context surrounding the building which houses its distilleries, a restaurant and a bar. These contrasting, cantilevered volumes, coupled with a brokenglass-patterned curtain wall, make the project identifiable from the surrounding context.

01

02

03

04 a B

04

4. UP

DN

Framed

5.

2. 02

3. 03

DN

UP

A

1. A

DN

UP

01

DN

03

2. 02

3.

DN

DN

4. 04

1. Reception / Presentation Area 2. Distillery 3. Raw Material Storage

Integration Studio I

0m

B

4. Quality Control Lab 5. Loading / Service

a circulation and public space diagrams 1:100 10 m 01 public space 02 circulation - central atrium 03 circulation - accessible outdoor art walkway 04 hospitality - positioned for views b ground floor plan 01 reception/presentation area 02 distillery 03 raw material storage 04 quality control lab c exterior rendering of courtyard

b

GROUND FLO

64


c 65


01

02

03

04

05

d d wall detail 01 separated curtain wall and glazedFlat roofing Sloped Roofsystem 02 Toward hiddenDrain drain behind extended facade 03 Space sloped roof towards drain toflat hide 04 Mechanical exposed steel truss Exhaust 05 750mm beam e program diagram Steel Structure 01 distilleries + loading Hidden by Drop, 02 offices Gysum ceiling. 03 restaurant 04 800 rooftop barWatermm for 05 Source utilitiesHeat + storage Pumps 06 events + tasting/class f exterior rendering g sectional perspective

DOUBLE BRICK FACADE

01

DISTILLERIES + LOADING

Irregular Mullion Grid O F02 FICE

CURTAIN WALL

66

03

RESTAURANT

04

ROOFTOP BAR

05

UTILITIES + STORAGE

06

EVENTS + TASTING/CLASS

e


f

g

67


3rd Year

Tetyana Gradyuk Julianne Guevara

The Academy of the Distilling Arts is an adaptive reuse project that presents distillery culture to the public realm. Its intention is to bridge the old and the new through materiality, detailing, and volumetric responses. The academy’s massing introduces a heavy volume that intersects with the existing brick industrial building and creates an exciting contrast for the revitalized site. The southern tower was mirrored on the north side to pinch the mass, and an atrium in the center offers a moment of relief where visitors are encouraged to explore the rest of the building. The vertical distillery within the new north tower and the old south tower displays the processes of whiskey and vodka making onto the forefront of the street facade. A visitor continues their experience through the constriction of space and atmosphere as they walk through the academy on the ground floor, surrounded by a series of double-height barrel storage. At the building’s center, a light, suspended stairwell encourages further exploration to its top, where one can reach the restaurant, housing an open-concept kitchen and an expansive column free bar.

a

b

2

3

J

4

The Academy of the Distilling Arts

1

5

6

7

8

9

A

Electrical Closet

B

UP

Janitor Closet DN

C

Office Reception

I DN

Principal Office

Private Tasting

Comptroller Office

H

Administration Office

---

Jazz Bar

D Conference Room

E

Distillery Director Office

F

Distillery Director Office

Automation & Control Equipment

Distilling

Integration Studio II

G

c

a b c d e

-

-

---

---

massing sketches parti diagrams second floor plan interior rendering at bar interior rendering at restaurant 3 Third Floor

1

1 : 100

68


d

e

69


116

36 19

01 mullion covering bottom flashing 02

insulating double 05 glazing unit vapour barrier 06 connection strip clamp 07

drainage profile 03 foam gasket 04

09 continuous cant strip gravel drainage layer 10 11 EPDM membrane 12 100mm rigid insulation air/vapour barrier 13 metal decking 14

100

25

08 W210x36 steel joist

102

10

35mm air space15 16 batt insulation travertine panel (stonelite) 17

50

150mm light 18 gauge steel stud

f

sealant and23 backer rod

f

skylight detail 01 mullion covering 02 bottom flashing 03 drainage profile 04 foam gasket 05 insulating double glazing unit 06 vapour barrier 07 connection strip 08 clamp 09 continuous cant strip 10 gravel drainage layer 11 epdm membrane 12 1200mm rigid insulation 13 air/vapour barrier 14 metal decking 15 35mm air space 16 batt insulation 17 travertine panel (stonelite) 18 150mm light gauge steel stud 19 w310x74 steel beam 20 76x76x6 L angle bolted connection 21 w200x36 steel joist 22 interlocking channel system 23 sealant and backer rod g west elevation h sectional perspective

201

76x76x6 L angle20 bolted connection W200x36 steel joist21 interlocking 22 channel system

109

W310x74 steel beam19

70


g

h

71


3rd Year

Angela Chau Jimmy Hung

UNUN is an academy of distilling arts located at the intersection of Trinity and Mill Street, just north of Toronto’s Distillery District. The building houses the production for distilling whiskey and vodka for its proposed brand “UNUN.” Additionally, the project offers a bar, restaurant, branded liquor store, and academy for distilling alcohol. As a heritage preservation project, the existing south façade becomes a prominent piece that helps illustrate the oscillation between innovation and tradition. The academy’s pristine white aluminum and traditional brick distinguish further between the old and new forms. Although balancing the distinct spaces within the building proposed a challenge, by unifying the unique programs under a sloped roof, a symbiotic relationship between the program related to the production and consumption of alcohol was discovered. From each entryway, the building can be perceived differently. Approaching from the Distillery District, south-east of the site, the traditional red brick material blends in appropriately with the street fabric. The heritage portion of the building mainly houses and showcases the production and aging of the alcohol. At the other end of the building, approaching from the west side, the sloped roof invites visitors to the spaces dedicated to the consumption of alcohol and its 2-storey bar, which overlooks the scenic view of the city and the adjacent park. The academy reveals the inception of the UNUN brand in hopes of establishing an appreciation towards the making of whiskey and vodka. UNUN

a

01

02

03

04

Integration Studio II

b a concept sketches b site diagrams 01 connecting with existing pathway 02 existing heritage building 03 centralized entrance 04 curved additional massing c exterior rendering d interior rendering at bar 72


c

g

d 73


01

P

02

K

03

e

e skylight detail 01 premanufactured gfrc panel 25mm 02 kawneer 2000 skylight system 03 skylight sill flashing 04 kalzip 50/429 standing seam profile 50mm 05 e 160 +dk 10 aluminum composite clip 231mm 06 structural silicone flushed finish 07 glass fibre kalzip insulation plus 37 08 bolted light fixture 09 angle section (280x100x12mm) 10 tr38/215 steel decking 11 19mm grfg board white painted finish 12 spacer component 13 c chanel (210x48x8mm) f longitudinal section g detail section at roof 74

S

04

K

05

E

06

S

07

G

08

B

09

A

10

T

11

19

12

S

13

C


f 3 Third Floor 8585

8

9

2 Second Floor 4724

1 Ground Floor Plan -711

g 75


3rd Year

Jessica Gu Ciara Martins

The Condenser Distillery is an adaptive re-use project that acts as a revival of its surroundings by displaying its history and presenting potential future uses. As one of the most well preserved industrial areas in Toronto, is was imperative to retain as much of the Distillery District’s existing heritage building as possible, and to restore its facade to original design conditions. Contrasting the contextual brick streetscape, Condenser Distillery’s new interventions use current industrial materials: steel for structure and corrugated metal cladding. The new building joins three distinct additions: two spaces sitting atop the existing building that collectively house a bar, an academy and support administration spaces while the third, acting as a reflection of the existing tower on the south facade, holds the vodka and whiskey distillery programs.

The Condenser Distillery

The Condenser is organized to display the processes and elements involved in distilling vodka and whiskey. Public atrial spaces enclose the distillery and barrel storage introducing visitors to the building and its functions. These atriums explore various material choices that juxtapose the existing brick conditions including glass and a variety of metal. Furthermore, systems that are typically hidden, like structural and mechanical, are instead celebrated. Drawing from the context of the site, charming elements such as gabled roofs and chimneys are also incorporated and revealed.

10

9

8

a

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

UP

F

F

UP

e

e

D

D

C

C

b

b

Integration Studio II

A

A

b a b c d

massing sketch first floor plan exterior rendering interior view to distillery

10

9

8

7

6

76

5

4

3

2

1


c

d

77


e south wall section f south elevation g longitudinal section

e 78


CONDENSER

f

g 79


80


The benefits of an urban campus often cannot be stressed enough. Access to diverse culture, cuisine and activity make living in Toronto an engaging experience. These benefits have a habit of bleeding into our education, making our interaction or impact to the local communities very easy and worthwhile. Yet, many times, our reach and participation extends beyond the streets of the our city and in some cases, over borders and oceans.

Conversation II

The Nature of Design Builds This summer saw the creation of two design-builds with the intention of improving and animating their city’s streetscapes: one built on King Street in Toronto, and the other, in the small town of Bergen, Norway. In this article, we look at how these teams, under different and highly specific scenarios, were able to adapt to the demands of their build and produce an installation that excites a little curiousity from passersby.

Contributors

81

1:

Marwa Al-Saqqar, Rutuja Atre, Shengnan Gao

2:

John Benner, Adrian ChĂŽu, Liam Hall


Resonance

with Marwa Al-Saqqar, Rutuja Atre & Shengnan Gao

Part of the King Street Pilot Project, Resonance is a semi-permanent installation that uses both the visual and sonic qualities of drums to engage pedestrians in play and exploration. Partnered with shapelabto, the project offered students the chance to collaborate with other disciplines and engage in the process of working with the Toronto municipality.

82


Can you describe your source of inspiration? I believe what my team and I have produced had resulted from a simple approach to design. Our inspiration was purely social, we catered to the public use, and nothing more. We just wanted to have fun and provide a diverse range of visitors the access to interact with the installation, regardless of age or background. We saw potential in using drums, an almost international language, and how they can stimulate the users’ senses, creating an experience that is simultaneously heard, seen, and/ or felt. Ultimately, the intention of our installation was to bring a smile to a kid or elderly person’s face as they walk down King Street.

How did you resolve the portability of the installation given that it was installed on site? Employing the use of simple geometries and sourcing local materials offered us the opportunity to design the installation as modular pieces. As we continued developing Resonance, we began focusing on its feasibility and for the ease of fabrication and transportation. Most of the units - divided into 3 sections - were fabricated off-site. The whole installation was constructed at school and was able to be transported by truck to the site. While designing the details, as well as performing mock-ups, we were able to predict how to screw, bolt, and secure the installation to the deck on-site. What I learned: modularity is your best friend.

83

Why did you select these materials? It was a mixture of many variables: budget, material availability, aesthetics, fabrication feasibility, among other things. It was crucial for the team to utilize local materials in order to connect with the surrounding community and create architecture from readily available resources. Therefore, we used North American wood, fabric from Toronto’s fashion district, and buckets and lights from local hardware stores. This aligns with our intentions to design with a simple approach and illustrates the powerful and creative impact we can make with everyday objects and material around us.


2X8 TREATED LUMBER -Top Cap

2X4 TREATED LUMBER - Cap

3/4�x4x8 CNC Plywood

2X4 TREATED LUMBER -Side Cap 2X6 TREATED LUMBER -Bottom Cap

75.00 mm

73.50 mm

67.50 mm

71.00 mm

2X6 TREATED LUMBER -I beam Column

2X4 & 2X8 TREATED LUMBER -U Channel Column

2X4 TREATED LUMBER -Joists

2x4 TREATED LUMBER -Deck Joists

Given that it is a long-term installation, how did you ensure durability? To add to the previous point, the materials were selected also because they had to endure constant interaction with pedestrians and the summer weather. We ensured that they were durable through continuous prototyping and testing. Waterproofing and damage control were made either by redesigning details, using a certain material for specific uses (wood vs metal vs plastic), and through the feedback we received during the fabrication.

Were there any changes to the design or fabrication? How was it different working with the municipality? There were many ongoing changes to the design before and during fabrication. These changes coincided with the demands of the municipality and with having to work alongside the building code. It was challenging to go through many iterations of the design, but because it was the city, we had many guidelines and codes to adhere to and ensure the installation was safe for public use.

84

It was hard to balance the city’s wants and needs while also expressing the intentions behind the initial concept and the reality of the situation means there is always the likeliness that something will change. We had to perscribe to what can be accomplished within the given timeframe and budget, and if any changes happened, we were quick to rebound with a solution. Working with the municipality, I felt that my problem-solving skills had become more agile!

mm


What was the public response? Once the first prototype for the unit of drums was created, we were given the chance to present it to the public (near our official site) to promote and discuss what improvements can be implemented. The public’s responses, which were very positive, helped us continue to develop the installation.

I took the responsibility to capture Resonance in action, and because of that, I saw first-hand the public’s reaction to the installation during both day and night. As intended, a variety of people were ecstatic to play along King Street and engage with the drums musically, visually and tactically. It was a joy to witness families, couples, and even businessmen on their lunch breaks tap away on the drums and smiling!

85

Given the feedback and reaction from the public - which I believe is the most significant concern - this will hopefully encourage other Torontonians to become more vocal about what change they would like to see implemented in their city to help improve our streets. The movement to a safer Toronto begins with gaining support from the community, and judging by the public’s take on these interactive interventions, it may hopefully inspire further positive change to our streetscapes


Lodge

The Bergen International Wood Festival is a four day competition held every two years in Bergen, Norway. Teams are invited to build experimental spatial structures, exploring wood as a material though its constructive, structural and tactile qualities. This year’s theme, Climate Change, offered builders and visitors the chance to investigate the unique properties of wood.

with John Benner, Adrian Chîu & Liam Hall

Lodge is a space of welcoming, protection and comfort. An individual entering its space experiences a moment of both isolation and contemplation, all while maintaining a visual dialogue to the nature surrounding it. Wood, arranged and stacked in layers, allows for a multitude of views to its nearby context. The contrast of Lodge’s screenlike transparency through its heavy wall alludes to the blurred line between humanity and its intrinsic connection to nature.

86


What was the driving idea behind the project?

Explain how working on a time constraint may have changed the design?

The intent behind the form was to create an inviting enclosure that gave a sense of ‘interior’ while still being outside. A supple opening in the wall creates a gentle entrance that invites visitors inside the pavilion. Inside, a seemingly dense palisade separates individuals from the surrounding context, contrasting the large opening to the sky above which emphasizes connections to nature. Specific patterns of stacked wood allows for a dynamic natural lighting conditions that surrounded the user, while also creating minute moments of temporary connection to the exterior context, to intensify the feeling of enclosure and contemplation.

In order to meet the constricting schedule and unknown site parameters, the workflow and order of construction was a large influence on the design. Majority of the wood was cut to a few pre-determined sizes to increase efficiency and were stacked in a recursive pattern that was adaptable to different forms. This algorithm allowed us to adapt to any changes to the site while still being straightforward and quick to construct. Since there were only four days to construct, the completion of the pavilion was not particularly dependent on the height, as the design was amenable to the team’s speed of construction and time constraints.

87

As a Canadian team in a foreign country, what design sensibilities did you bring with you? As a Canadian team in an international competition, the design sought to be a reference to forms found in Canadian architecture and a reflection of attitudes towards the current state of forestry practices. Opposing attributes of building and nature, heavy and light; openness and enclosure was expressed to juxtapose the damage of deforestation and wood as a renewable resource. The inviting entrance, multiple seating and circular form were designed to encourage multiple visitors to have dialogue amongst each other on how climate change has affected the forestry industry and the sustainability of wood.


How did you ensure that this build would be successful considering the challenges of building somewhere unfamiliar? As the site and host country were largely unfamiliar, planning for flexibility was a major component to tackling logistical issues to ensure that this build would be successful. By using a parametric methodology in designing the construction of the pavilion, the design would be guided more by its concept and still be adaptable to any site location. Visiting the site early allowed the design to adjust to final crucial site planning decisions like orientation, views and size before the actual build.

Looking at the other teams, how would you describe the similarities and/or differences behind your process and theirs? Other teams brought a variety of perspectives and representations of the designated theme. It was engaging to discuss the difference in ideas that were the inception to many of the designs. In addition, the build quality and detailing that some teams brought were phenomenal.

88

While similarities were largely the result of many teams interpreting the theme and brief as one of communal dialogue in order to create solutions to climate change, their expression and methods were as varied as their backgrounds. With such a diverse selection of teams, some come from very distinct industries such as carpentry, that inevitably influenced and benefited their designs.


89


92

94

Long Lock Sahil Saroy Dan Sobieraj

POLY House Stephen Chun Adam Oliphant

96

Design Build & Conceptual Projects

Contemporary Kozolec Gregor Tratnik

100

104

NEST Adrian ChĂŽu Arnel Espanol Henry Mai

Stratum Shengyu Cai Tatiana Estrina Daniel Jiaqi Liu Thomas Gomez Opsina

90


106

Activate Johnathan Chan Jason Glionna Timothy Lai Hugo Lim Christopher Pin Kristen Wiebe

108

112

Dramatis Personae Hugo Lim

Bloom Mariam Elzein

114

Museum of Language Deena Jamokha

116

118

Recreation 2057 Brant York

Exhibition 120 Kristen Wiebe

91


4th Year

Sahil Saroy Dan Sobieraj

Long Lock is an integrated lock and lighting mechanism for longboards, providing added safety and security for its riders. Some issues recognized within the skateboarding community were the inability to see or be seen at night and the limitation to locking skateboards. The Long Lock is a two piece locking and lighting product that does not impede with a rider’s skating performance, requiring only a one-time installation before use. The lights - offered in red and white - are positioned at the front and back to provide rider visibility to cars at night, as well as giving the rider the ability to see potential obstructions ahead of them. The product uses Kensington locks which are placed on both trucks of a board, allowing the skateboard to be secured in a vertical orientation on a conventional bicycle rack/ stand as not to obstruct the sidewalk. Long Lock is modeled to standard truck dimensions, universal to most longboards, skateboards and penny boards. Long Lock underwent several 3D printed tests to ensure strength and stretch of the product. The Long Lock was placed in the top ten for the Extreme Redesign 2018 Challenge engineering, post-secondary education category.

Long Lock

a

01

02

03 b 03

03 02

1 01

05

01

Digital Tools

04 a conceptual sketches b assembly diagram c component exploded isometric 01 security nut 02 combination lock 03 locking arms 04 lights 05 counter-rotation rod d rendering e photo

04

c

92


d

e

93


4th Year

Stephen Chun Adam Oliphant

The scope of the project was to design an innovative shelter that would promote an ethical treatment of animals, specifically surrounding canines used in dogsledding activities. POLY House seeks to uphold to a set of criteria related to thermal comfort, energy efficiency, and cost-effectiveness that, in return, will benefit both the owners and their canines, over a long term basis. Additionally, the design improves upon ease of transportation and assembly. Overall, the design achieves an energy use intensity of 48.53 W/m2 during the heating season, and 58.52 W/m2 in the cooling season, based on its materials and form. A 12-sided polyhedral form was employed as it reduced the overall surface area of the enclosure while offering opportunity for modular panelized construction and scalability. The materials selected were dependent on satisfying durability and constructability requirements. In using SIP panels, each modular piece can be fastened together at its joints through applied pressurized forces, sealing the envelope.

01

02

POLY House

a

Building Science Studio II

b

c

a scalability diagram 01 +/- volume, density, space 02 +/- surface area, buget, material b section aa c section bb d joint detail e assembly diagram f rendering

d 94


e

a

f 95


4th Year

Gregor Tratnik

Found exclusively to Slovenia, the Kozolec has long stood as a symbol of the country’s cultural landscape throughout its history. The Slovenian vernacular structure represents constance and embodies the strong and determined nature of its people amidst an ever-changing and chaotic history. The kozolec acts as an agricultural tool (for drying farmers’ hay and fodder), a shelter and a gathering place for the village after harvest. As Slovenia matures as an independent country through this unprecedented societal shift, the Contemporary Kozolec creates a reinterpretation of the humble structure to represent Slovenia’s emergence into the modern world. Located in Caledon, on the Slovensko Letovisce - a small Slovenian community - the Contemporary Kozolec rests in a small wheatfield, maintaining its connection to a familiar setting. Using traditional Slovenian construction, materials, and proportions (such as the slavic quadrature), the kozolec expresses the notion of shelter in its purest form: a roof. The kozolec seemingly floats amidst the landscape, creating minimal impact on the earth and honouring the humble work of its construction. This is a space not only for the Slovenian people, but to all those who aspire to practice their culture beneath the symbol of the Slovenian way of life.

Contemporary Kozolec

a

The Small Building

b

a b c d e

massing and program diagrams sketch proportions diagrams rendering perspective sketch

c

96


d

e 97








 







 



  



e 













f

 

g

f g h

detailed section elevation traditional connection details 98




 



   



 

       

  

   





   

    



        





 

        











 







    





   



 





      



 

   



  





 







  





       









  



 

 





    





  



     









  

 

  







 









 

 

















  



 

















     





 

  



     

 



 



   

 





 



  



     

 









   

 















 





  







 

 



  

 





 











  

 

 



 



 

           



 





     

      











 









   





 

 



 





  



 

            

 

 





   



 









 









        



h

99


4th Year

Adrian ChĂŽu Arnel Espanol Henry Mai

NEST

NEST is driven by the idea of creating a space for comfort and introspection within a system of complexity and disarray. The overwhelming nature of information in everyday life is expressed through the installation’s use of chaotic textures and asymmetrical form. Composed of modular cells, each containing a colourful web of straps, NEST provides not only shelter, but moments of playful interaction with light and shadow in its space. The interior experience allows the visitor to momentarily step away from the noise; to pause and to view the world through a clearer lens.

02

Winter Stations 2018

a

01 a conceptual sketches b exploded isometric of structure 01 typical modeul 02 existing lifeguard tower c photo 100

b


c 101


01 02

03

04

05

06

d

d cell axonometric detail 01 rabbet joint 02 webbing stapled to plywood 03 1/2� plywood 04 burlap with white acrylic coating 05 polyester webbing 06 2� corner brace e sectional perspective f close-up of cell photo g elevations

e 102


f

g 103


1st, 2nd & 3rd Year

Shengyu Cai Tatiana Estrina Daniel Jiaqi Liu Thomas Gomez Opsina 01

As geological weathering and geomorphic drivers shape our natural landscape, our species, similarly, constantly redefines our relationship with the organic world. Drawing from references such as the Scarborough Bluffs, Stratum creates an immersive experience using sculpture and light to examine how humans live within natural forces of gravity, erosion and stratification. The installation is composed of a series of panels, each emulating bedrock erosion and charting the effects of glacial movement and precipitation of over 14, 000 years. These panels incorporate an isomalt (a sugar substitute) and tonic water solution, which glows as an effect of the exposure to black light.

02

03

Stratum

04

b

01

02 03

a

Grow Op 2018 Exhibtion

04 a panel sketches b isometric panel hanging system 01 2” screw 02 1” x 4” x 8” french cleat 03 1” x 3’ x 1’ cnc’d panel 04 1” x 1” stopper c section 01 american dj blacklights 02 french cleat system mbf 03 mbf cnc’d panels 04 spf studs d final photo e process photo f detail photo under blacklight

c

104


d

e

f

105


4th Year

Johnathan Chan Jason Glionna Timothy Lai Hugo Lim Christopher Pin Kristen Wiebe

Activate is an installation that seeks to create a visual dialogue between the built environment and its occupants. Depending on the number of individuals present and their distance from the installation, this information will influence its form and will respond to the needs of its users by providing an architectural barrier when necessary. Activate is proposed for the first floor lobby of Ryerson’s George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre. Acting as a living, animated and interactive shading device, this installation will be placed at the west exterior glass wall to mitigate current issues surrounding daylighting. The purpose is to provide shading while users of the space are present. The first floor lobby is a highly active thoroughfare, providing an opportunity to translate the movement in that space into a visual response, visible from both the interior and exterior. Furthermore, the project acts as a research tool, analyzing how similar mechanisms used for shading might operate on a larger architectural scale.

Module, Fully Extended Module, Fully Extended

Module, Partially Closed

PROXIMITY PROXIMITY

Module, Partially Extended Module, Partially Extended

Module, Fully Closed Module, Fully Closed

PROXIMITY PROXIMITY

PROXIMITY PROXIMITY

a

Advanced Digital Design

Activate

Module, Partially Closed

PROXIMITY PROXIMITY

b

a response to human proximity b assembly process c response to population density 106


c 107


4th Year

Hugo Lim

This project is an exploration of the subliminal, the liminal, and the threshold between the two, in the context of architecture. It attempts to illustrate transient experiences that typically subsist within a singular architectural journey and unearths these experiences into individual architectural characters. The title, Dramatis Personae, is defined as the “characters of a play, novel, or narrative�. This scheme explores these architectural characters within a city park narrative. Each individual character questions the threshold of what can be perceived as liminal architecture. From a manufactured park bench to the sublime of a dramatic hill, each character attempts to coagulate these experiences into tangible architecture. To watch, to sit, to explore, to enter, to play: these are all verbs that are commonly associated with architectural experiences. In this study, these verbs take form in a set of architectural pavilions that are set upon Riverdale Park in Downtown Toronto.

01 1

1

Dramatis Personae attempts ask several questions. Can a mechanism as simple as a public drinking fountain be considered architecture? Can the light that permeates through overhead foliage be considered architecture? And if the answer is no, at what point do these casual experiences become designed to a point where they become architectural?

Dramatis Personae

1

| TO ENTER

| TO ENTER

2

| TO ENTER

| T O P L AY

2

| T O P L AY

4

| TO ENTER02

1

2

| TO ENTER

2

| T O P LAY

1

5

| T O W AT C H

2 1

4

| T O GA ZE

5

| TO ENTER | TO ENTER

| T O W AT C H

| T O GA4ZE

4

4

| TO P L AY

4

1

| TO GA Z E

6

5

4

3

| TO 2GA Z E

4

| TO C L IMB

5

| TO PLA Y | TO PLAY

2

05

3

| T O W AT C H

6

8

5

| TO CLIMB C L IMB

6

06| TO

SIT | TO SIT

| TO SIT

| T H E C HAR AC T ER S

7

| T O EX P LOR E

| T O EXP LORE 8

| T O R EC U P ER A T E

| T H E C HA R A C T ER S

8

7

6

| T O R EC UPERA TE

7

Architecture and Time

| T O GA Z E

| T3 O WA T C H | TO

| TO WATCH 6 | TO WA TCH | TO6 SIT

| T O EX P L OR E

b

a character axonometrics 01 the arc | to enter 02 the ground | to play 03 the hill | to climb 04 the telescope | to gaze 05 the cinema | to watch 06 the stop | to sit 07 the forest | to explore 08 the station | to recuperate b concept axonometric c the story (respective to character 7 | T O EXP L ORE axonometrics drawings)

| TO SIT

| TO SIT

| TO GAZE | TO GA Z E W5ATC H5 | TO

7

5

6

04

| T O C L IM B

3

| TO ENTER

3

| T O C L IM B

03 1

| TO CLIM

| TO P LA Y

3

| T O GAZE

2

3

7

07

| TO EXPLORE | TO EXPLOR E

| T O R EC7U P ER AT E

| TO EX P L OR E

108

| T HE CHA R AC T ER S

8

8

08

8

| TO RECUPERATE | TO R ECUPER A TE

| TO R EC UP ER ATE | T HE CHARACTERS | TH E CHA R A CTER S

a


T H E T E L E S CO P E | TO GA ZE

T H E C I N E M A | T O WA T C H

T H E S TAT I O N | TO RECUPER AT E

T H E S TO P | TO SI T T HPLA E F OYR E S T | TO E XPLORE T H E G R O U N D | TO

T HREEA R C | T O EN T ER T H E F O R E S T | T O E X PLO

D R A M AT I S P E R S O N A E THE STO RY

T H E H I L L | T O C LI M B

T H E S TAT I O N | TO RE CUPERATE

T H E H I L L | T O C LI M B

E S GAZ TAT I E O N | TO RE CUPERATE T H E T E L E S CO P ET|HTO

D R A M AT I S P E R S O N A E D R A M THE AT I SS TO P E RY RSONAE THE S TO RY

THE CIN EE M A | T O WA T C H T H E S TAT I O N | TO RECUPER AT T H EOCRI N T H E F O R E S T | TO EXPL E E M A | T O WA T C H

T H E S TO P | TO SI T 109

T H E G R O U N D | TO P LAY

c


7 07 4 04

5 05

2 02 6 06

1 01

03 3

8 08

1

d site isometric e the story 01 the forest | to explore 02 the station | to recuperate

01

2

02

3

03

04

4

5

05

06

6

7

07

08 8

d

D R AMAT I S P ER S ON A E | T HE S ET T I NG 110


THE FOREST | TO EXPLORE

T H E S TAT I O N | TO R E C U PE R A TE 111

01

02 e


4th Year

Mariam Elzein

In the distant future, humanity’s relationship with death has changed. Gone are the days of infections, disabilities, and permanent injuries. Healthcare coverage is present worldwide, creating a system where people can be easily cured of any injury or disease. Even the aging process has been altered, allowing people to live nearly indefinitely; death is no longer an inevitability. However, no one can live to be truly immortal and a time comes, for everyone, where they feel their life has been lived to its fullest extent and, ultimately, wish to end their life. To fulfill this desire, Memento Mori centres have been built in most major cities. These areas allow people to live out their final days in comfort, and eventually, receive a quick, painless and ethical death. Toronto’s Memento Mori centre is divided into five different areas, each with its own focus. Each sector provides its own living quarters, where people can live out their final days in comfort. Additionally, all sectors contain relaxation and interaction spaces, for people to talk with one another, and share their final thoughts, or simply go to relax. Finally, each sector contains a ceremony space, where final death ceremonies are held, and people can die surrounded by loved ones.

Bloom

a

b

Four Futures

c a b c d e f

d

isometric water pod diagram plan model photograph detailed plan rendering 112


e

f 113


4th Year

Deena Jamokha

Fossils serve as a moulds, taking the imprint of a moment in time from a distant era. In the same vein, languages similarly capture the culture, heritage and history of its communities. Though some languages have died out, they still have left a significant impact on our understanding of what language is. The Museum of Language is a cast of the languages which have grown, disseminated, and disappeared in our world. This museum focuses on various material properties such as deterioration, cracking, casting, and carving to compose a space dedicated to preserving and educating visitors about endangered languages.The circulation of the building is carved by the movement of its users as they travel through the underground entrance towards the voids of the gallery spaces. Visitors are encouraged to interact with the walls and different volumes to in order to learn how languages have shaped the design of the museum.

a

Museum of Language International Competition

Museum of Language

Museum of Language received Archasm’s honourable mention for the Museum of Language International Competition.

01

b

02

03

c

d

a site plan b formal casting diagram c entrance generation 01 perfect cube 02 cut corner 03 gradual cut d section e gallery atrium rendering f entrance rendering 114


e

f

115


4th Year

Brant York

This project was developed within a future scenario that is highly socialist and focused on human equality. The aim was to challenge the concept of recreation in this society, and express the ideas through a specific piece of architecture in Queen’s Park. With Canada’s legalization of marijuana, this project insists that our perceptions of what is recreation is drastically shifting, affecting not only what we build, but how we interact as a community of people.

Four Futures

Recreation 2057

Advancement in technology, changes in politics, and the growing social-digital realm has drastically changed the way humans choose to recreate. How architecture approaches recreation is centered around new concepts of what is considered leisure in today’s world, and how spaces might accommodate and enhance those activities. Simultaneously, the architecture should work to express equality, as a reflection of the current socialist society and its values. Recreation 57’ explores architectural and programmatic theories expressed through schematic design. Advanced construction techniques, and digital and cognitive euphoric integration are implemented and explored through the formal expression, spatial qualities and how the user might choose to interact with the building program in either an individual or group scenario. This is done through a series of spaces, each designed to contribute to human senses; Dancing and Music (Rave), V.R. Centre (Omnidirectional Cognitive Orbs), Interior Lounges and Beach, Open Courtyards, a Slide, and access to spaces for personal expression.

a

a isometric massing b roofscape 01 slide acces to v.r. centre 02 skylights to art studio 03 accessible zone for user access 04 openings above beach c elevated level d lounge & beach 01 programmable flooring 02 open courtyard 03 slide access to v.r. centre 04 tropical beach 05 pool rings e longitudinal section 116


01 02

01 02 03 04 03

04 05

b

c

d

e

117


4th Year

Kristen Wiebe

In 2050, society is ruled by the elite; those who have monopolized on the modern day technologies that society has grown dependent upon. Mass production and standardization of residential and commercial developments - alongside a growing dependency on technology - has stripped the individual of their emotional faculties and have created merely shells of human beings. Suicide rates have risen tenfold causing concern for the elites’ control over society. In response, the elites have assigned forty architects under the governing headquarters to curate the development of a permanent emotional exhibition at Queen’s Park. This exhibition hopes to reduce suicide related deaths by creating spaces that revive and draw from the emotional responses people have lost over the years. This exhibition will become the centre of research for the governance headquarters as a means of developing strategies to create and control an individual’s emotional responses.

01 - ENTRANCE: SKY DOOR Driverless taxi services arrive through the skydoor where the participant receives a grand welcoming to Exhibition 120.

05 - CALM ROOM

Four Futures

Exhibition 120

Acrylic tubes carry light through from above into the water below where reflections of light evoke a sense of infinity.

118


02 - SAD PODS

03 - ANXIETY ESCAPE ROOM

04 - INSIGNIFICANT

As the participant enters the room, the pod walls begin to surround the occupant and form to their body.

High volumes of people make their way through an enclosed room where they soon realize the only way to escape is through climbing a large net enclosure.

Large concrete tubes are subtracted from each other to form a grand central space.

06 - WORRY ROOM

07 - LED ROOM

08 - EXPLORATORY

Simple rectilinear rooms transform as you move through the space causing you to fall to an inflatable surface below.

Simple rooms are formed with bright neon lights irritating the observer and integrated in a manner to appear as though there is no escape.

Participants are encouraged to find their own paths to explore.

119


Thank You There are not enough words to express our gratitude to the following university groups, offices, and departments for their dedication to supporting student education and initiatives. Their encouragement and assistance make a successful 325 Magazine publication possible every year. Thank you for supporting Ryerson’s Department of Architectural Science students in their path towards the avenue of design and problem solving. We would like to acknowledge the yearly support from the following: arc.soc Department of Architectural Science Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science (FEAS) Ryerson Provost and President’s Offices Student Initiative Fund (SIF).

120


121


Thank You This publication would not have been possible without the benevolence and generosity of our sponsors. We thank them for supporting our students and their education in architectural studies. Their contributions make it possible for 325 Magazine to continue to provide a platform for students in Ryerson’s Department of Architectural Science to feature their work. The outstanding projects showcased in this issue are only a glimpse of what can be expected to arrive for the future of the industry. Thank you for supporting our students’ innovation and creativity. We would like to amiably thank the following industry patrons: Altius Architecture Baldassarra Architects Design Workshop Architects Gow Hastings IBI Group NEUF Architects Perkins + Will PLANT Taylor Smyth Architects Toronto Society of Architects Sweeny & Co Architects WZMH

122


WORLD ARCHITECTURE FESTIVAL Highly Commended 2018


Your work goes here

Creativity Functionality Client satisfaction

BALDASSARRA Architects

www.baldassarra.ca


IDEAS+BUILDINGS THAT HONOUR THE BROADER GOALS OF SOCIETY

Daphne Cockwell Health Sciences Complex

perkinswill.com


plant. Building conversations about the city. branchplant.com King Street Pilot Project parklet · Face to Face | Tête à Tête

2018

We are a globally integrated architecture, planning, engineering and technology firm. We design every aspect of cities for people to live, work and play.


DETAILED REPORT PAGE 1 OF 1

LIST

RESULTS

of products used:

Based on the Rolland products you selected compared to products in the industry made with 100% virgin fiber, your savings are:

2,315 lb(s) of Rolland Enviro Print 100% post-consumer

20 trees 1 tennis court Generated by : calculateur.rollandinc.com Sources : Environmental impact estimates for the North American marketplace are made using the Environmental Paper Network Paper Calculator Version 3.2. For more information visit www.papercalculator.org. The fine papers' environmental savings related to greenhouse gaz impacts are based on the Life Cycle Assessment methodology. The LCA was made by Rolland and validated by a third-party www.rollandinc.com.

71,856 L of water 205 days of water consumption

881 kg of waste 18 waste containers

2,894 kg CO2 19,359 km driven

17 GJ 79,853 60W light bulbs for one hour

4 kg NOX emissions of one truck during 12 days


arch325magazine@ryerson.ca issuu.com/mag325 325.mag

131


132

Profile for 325 Magazine

325 Magazine | 2017 - 2018  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

325 Magazine | 2017 - 2018  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

Profile for mag325
Advertisement