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ryerson university Department of Architectural Science 325 Church St., Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (416) 979-5000 say hello! mag325@gmail.com

Š 325 Magazine 2015-2016 Ryerson University Department of Architectural Science All rights reserved. All photographs and drawings are courtesy of students unless otherwise specified. Every reasonable attempt has been made to idenitfy owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in the subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this publication, and assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. The opinions expressed herein are the responsibility of the contributors concerned.


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from visitor centres to basilicas 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38

Church of Transition Crawford Lake Visitors Centre Ryerson School of Dance Community Library Architectural Palimpsest Inglenook Sports Hall Beacon of Hope Centre for Architecture Crawford Lake Visitors Centre Inglenook Athletics Centre Raised Awareness Inglenook Boxing Gym Basilica of the 21st Century

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real-world application 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76

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Chair 01 Stratatone Shelter of Four Hale Coffee Shop Lithoform Notch Chair Intersection Fracture Flummox Flow Frozen Seasons Mt. Tolmie Tiny House Nova

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House Wood in One Apocalyptica Modulate Pando Forma Net Zero House Reverb Stronghold Studio on Bell Island Eastern Pine Botanist Research Cabin Apocalyptica Studio

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Arbo[re]scence A:voidance MaracanĂŁ Serotinae Fluid Architecture

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t h e c i t b e f o r e narratives of Toronto

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Jennifer Pham (Editor-in-Chief, Creative Director) Andrew Harvey (Editor, Creative Director) Laura Herrera (Editor, Creative Director)

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Nastaran Bakhtiyari Sareh Daneshian Eired Mousa Jessica (Zu Ting) Feng Laura Herrera Jasmin Kim Robin Nong Valerie Poon Bethany Stock Victoria Staseff Jessie (Jing) Tian Agnes Yuen Lynda (Meng) Ye

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Parandis Abdi Anthony Baduria Navindra Budhawa Jean-Paul Guay Sanaa Syed Kadri Krystyne Kontos Amanda Nalli Amelia Phagoo Emily Phagoo Sahil Saroy Paul Szywacz Noeline Tharshan Briana Zitella

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We would like to express our utmost gratitude to all who helped made this issue possible.

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Dr. Chris Evans

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Dr. Thomas Duever

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Alexandra Berceanu

George Kapelos

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Each year we showcase the work created by students in the Architectural Science program at Ryerson University. And each year without fail, we are left amazed and inspired by the innovation that our peers are capable of. Ranging from sport-centers to living spaces to virtual realities, Ryerson students embody both a love of design and a tireless strive for excellence. We hope that as you page through this edition of 325, you not only see talent, but also passion and the dedication of countless sleepless nights. Every issue of 325 brings a new opportunity. This year we celebrate our home city, offering readers a look at Toronto’s past and encouraging exploration of our rich urban fabric. In a similar vein, the 2016 Kultour students take us to the cities of Germany and Italy, sharing photos and thoughts from their time abroad. Extending thought beyond the content of the magazine, the physical publication is treated as a design feature of its own, with an emphasis put on navigation and tactility. The magazine is a reflection of our students’ drive and commitment; in just a year’s time, we’ve all learned and accomplished so much. We invite you to step into the world of 325 Church St., and hope you find much to inspire you! Yours Truly,

editor’s note

The 325 Team

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sponsors

There are not enough words to express our deep gratitude for the generosity of our sponsors. Your support for our students’ education and the future of the industry is nothing short of spectacular. We would like to humbly thank the following benefactors (in no particular order): Ryerson Alumni Association; The Student Initative Fund; the Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science; arc.soc; CBRE; ERA Architects Inc.; Gow Hastings Architects; Greenberg Consultants Inc.; HOK; RAW Design; Parkin Architects Ltd.

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sponsors

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www.parkin.ca

1 Valleybrook Drive Toronto, Canada M3B 2S7 Telephone: 416.467.8000 Fax: 416.467.8001 Email: info@parkin.ca

1737 West 3rd Avenue, Suite 220 Vancouver, Canada V6J 1K7 Telephone: 604.283.8054 Email: vancouver@parkin.ca

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CBRE Project Management is the place to grow your career and shape the commercial real estate industry.

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We are project leaders with backgrounds in architecture, engineering, and interior design, and a passion for creating the built environment.

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congratulations to 325 magazine

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w w w.raw desig n.ca

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c h u r c h o f t r a n s i t i o n

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2 1 timothy lai

Based off Roman Catholic architectural concepts of shadow, image, and reality, the Church of Transition sees humans as given the opportunity to strengthen their vertical relationship to God instead of their horizontal relationship to the world around them. From within the confines of a horizontal podium structure clad in masonry, a worship space rises dramatically to the heavens.

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angled skylight

gypsum board vapor barrier batt insulation w/ wooden stud rigid insulation sheathing air space zinc cladding

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exterior view process sketch program axonometric diagram 01 sanctuary 02 sacristy and priest offices 03 preparation room 04 seminar room

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CONCEPT CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DIAGRAMS DIAGRAMS

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brandon bortoluzzi yekatarina korotayeva nineveh rashidzadeh robert rocco

The new Visitor Centre for Crawford Lake Conservation Area challenges the notion of a centre defined by a rigid framework of spatial organization, and thus, is designed as an antithesis to this typology. Carved out of the ground to blend with its surrounding environment, the centre becomes a part of one’s natural journey through park grounds, revealing itself simply through two gradually descending plazas, and skylights that perforate the continuous landscape.The majority of the building is designed as a fluid open space that is tectonically defined by three voids that are sculpted by concrete walls, and programmatically defined by the users and staff members. The momentum that drives the project planning revolves around the individual and their definition of a visitor centre at a particular moment in time, as the building can be transformed into a gallery, an event venue, an educational space, or a workshop. Driven by factors of sustainability, the placement of the entire structure below ground allows for a significant reduction in cooling and heating loads, requiring minimal energy from the building’s geothermal system. Additionally, sufficient natural lighting is provided to all major spaces within the building by means of skylights, providing the only views of the interior for those traversing the landscaped roof. 6

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1 - MULTI-PURPOSE EVENT SPACE - OPEN LAYOUT 2 - GALLERY - EMBEDDED AND MOVABLE DISPLAYS (EVENT SPACE EXTENSION 3 - THEATRE PRESENTATION SPACE 4 - SEATED FORMAL EVENT ARRANGEMENT OF MULTI-PURPOSE 5- GALLERY EXTENSION HANGING DISPLAYS IN MULTI-PURPOSE 6 - GLAZED ROOF

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1 - MULTI-PURPOSE EVENT SPACE - OPEN LAYOUT 2 - GALLERY - EMBEDDED AND MOVABLE DISPLAYS (EVENT SPACE EXTENSION 3 - THEATRE PRESENTATION SPACE 4 - SEATED FORMAL EVENT ARRANGEMENT OF MULTI-PURPOSE 5- GALLERY EXTENSION HANGING DISPLAYS IN MULTI-PURPOSE 6 - GLAZED ROOF

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1 - FEATURE WALL - GIFT SHOP - EQUIPMENT RENTAL - DISPLAYS 2 LARGE GROUPS OR EVENTS 2 - CLASSROOMS - LARGE ARRANGEMENT3 - CLASSROOMS - DIVIDED REGULAR CLASS SIZE 4 - NATURAL LIGHTING

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1 - FEATURE WALL - GIFT SHOP - EQUIPMENT RENTAL - DISPLAYS 2 - CLASSROOMS - LARGE ARRANGEMENT- LARGE GROUPS OR EVENTS 3 - CLASSROOMS - DIVIDED REGULAR CLASS SIZE 4 - NATURAL LIGHTING

1 - MULTI-PURPOSE EVENT SPACE - OPEN LAYOUT 2 - GALLERY - EMBEDDED AND MOVABLE DISPLAYS (EVENT SPACE EXTENSION 3 - THEATRE PRESENTATION SPACE 4 - SEATED FORMAL EVENT ARRANGEMENT OF MULTI-PURPOSE 5- GALLERY EXTENSION HANGING DISPLAYS IN MULTI-PURPOSE 6 - GLAZED ROOF

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

1 - FEATURE WALL - GIFT SHOP - EQUIPMENT RENTAL - DISPLAYS 2 - CLASSROOMS - LARGE ARRANGEMENT- LARGE GROUPS OR EVENTS 3 - CLASSROOMS - DIVIDED REGULAR CLASS SIZE 4 - NATURAL LIGHTING

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BRING NATURAL LIGHT TO INTERIOR SPACES SUCH AS OFFICES, CLASSROOMS AND ASSEMBLY SPACES

GLAZED ROOF

SKY LIGHTS ADDING INSULATION VALUE AND A USABLE RECREATIONAL SPACE, THE ROOF IS PLANTED WITH NATIVE GRASSES AND WILDFLOWERS THAT HAVE HISTORICIAL, CULTURAL AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OFFERING AN OPPORTTUNIY FOR THE LANDSCAPE TO BE AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL AS WELL AS A RECREATIONAL AMENITY.

GREEN ROOF

SWEETGRASS

BARE INDIAN GRASS

BIG BLUSTEM GRASS

HEATH ASTER

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE

CANADA ANEMONE

SMALL FLOWERED AGRIMONY

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EARTHWORK

A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF EXCAVATED EARTH WILL BE USED AS CUT AND FILL O THE SITE TO MOUND THE EARTH AROUND THE NEW VISITOR CENTRE AT CRAWFORD LAKE REDUCING WASTE AND THE EMISSIONS AND ENERGY NEEDED TO DISPOSE OF THAT DIRT.

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WINDOW WALLS

MORE THAN 90% OF THE STRUCTURE IS COMPOSED OF CONCRETE. TO REDUCE THE IMPACT OF AN ALREADY ENERGY AND MATERIAL INTENSIVE PROCESS OF CONCRETE PRODUCTION, 80% OF THE PORTLAND CEMENT WILL BE RPLACED WITH THE RECYCLED MATERIAL GROUND GRANULATED BLAST FURNACE SLAG (GGBFS) SOURCED FROM HAMILATON AS A BI-PRODUCT OF STEEL PRODUCTION. THE SLAG ALSO INCREASES THE STRENGTH OF THE CONCRETE. ON THIS PROJECT: 2300 CUBIC METRES OF CONCRETE; 400 CUBIC METRES OF GGBFS or 208,000 POUNDS or 95,000 KILOS OF RECYCLED MATERIAL

FLOOR SLAB

EXCAVATION PIT STORAGE

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MULTI - PURPOSE SPACE

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AIR HANDLING IS SEPERATE FROM THE HEATING SYSTEM. TO PROVIDE FRESH AIR AND RETURN EXHAUST TO THE EXTERIOR, DUCTS RUN BELOW THE FLOOR AND AT THE PERIMETER OF SPACES DELIVERING FRESH AIR AND TAKING IN EXHAUST THROUGH FLOOR GRILLES. tHE AIR DUCT RUNS ARE COUPLED WITH ELECTRICAL SERVICE RUNS.

iv A GEOTHERMAL HEAT SOURCE PUMP IS UTILIZED TO PROVIDE HEATING TO THE BUILDING. THE HEAT IS DELIVERED VIA IN FLOOR HYDROTHERMAL RADIANT HEATING TO 8 DIFFERENT HAETING ZONES TO CUSTOMIZE USER COMFORT.

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ARRIVAL / ORIENTATION AREA

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INTERIOR PARTITIONS

RAIN WATER STORAGE

i THEATRE; ii KITCHEN; iii + vii WASHROOMS; iv CIRCULATION + GALLERY + LOBBY; v MULTI PURPOSE SPACE; vi CLASSROOMS; Viii OFFICES

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GREY WATER TREATMENT

RAIN WATER HARVESTING

THE FACILITY IS EQUIPPED WITH A GREY WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM THAT TREATS AND CLEANS GREY WATER FROM THE FACILITY AS WELL AS RAIN WATER COLLECTED FROM THE ROOF RUN OFF AND SITE DRAINS.

RAINWATER IS HARVESETD FROM SITE DRAINS AND RUN OFF FROM THE GREEN ROOF. THE WATER IS STORED IN AN UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK AND TREATED ON SITE WITHE THE GREY WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM.

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conceptual diagrams sectional perspective program axonometric drawings sustainability features ground floor sectional perspective

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r y e r s o n s c h o o l o f d a n c e

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The Ryerson School of Dance is located on an east-west axis that serves as a border dividing the city between small diverse dance studios to the north and the larger production companies to south. Bringing these two dance communities (the formal and informal) together in a central, neutral space, it promotes collaboration between professionals and students. The black box theatre acts as a meeting point between the two communities, a more intimate performance space with the dancers, enlightening the viewer’s sense of emotions. As the dancers enter the building and rise up towards the black box, they find themselves ascending above a large theatre mass into a spacious volume accessible from both the north and south ends of the site. The black box theatre is suspended over the public zone, allowing for people to experience the performance space in many different ways through the interior, exterior, within the space, under it, and over it. The proposal fills a gap in Toronto’s dance community by creating a bridge between two extremes, then finding a way to integrate the two together in a space that benefits Ryerson dance students.

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amber goveas gregor tratnik kristen wiebe

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STUDENTS

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160 MM CONCRETE WITH 50 MM METAL DECK

400 MM X 400 MM FIREPROOF STEEL COLUMNS 160 MM CONCRETE WITH 50 MM METAL DECK

686 X 254 UB UNIVERSAL STEEL BEAMS

160 MM CONCRETE WITH 50 MM METAL DECK

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OPEN WEB STEEL JOIST M PRATT FLAT TRUSS

REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURE FIRE STAIR CORE

REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURE FIRE STAIR AND ELEVATOR CORE

REINFORCED CONCRETE LOAD BEARING WALLS REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS

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c o m m u n i t y l i b r a r y

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shengyu cai

Located by Ryerson University’s downtown campus at Church and Dundas streets, this community library activates the neighbourhood and becomes an area icon. The design of the tensile membrane at street level transforms the entrance plaza into a public gathering place, and controls the intensity of sunlight. Three light-wells connect the membranes, while also bringing in daylight and centralizing activities on each floor. They lightwells also offer the opportunity for integrated audio and illumination features.

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aerial view tensile structure sketch connection sketch west elevation site plan pedestrian path membrane sketch

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a r c h i t e c t u r a l p a l i m p s e s t

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The intention of this studio was to examine preservation in contemporary architecture, and develop a project which expresses a particular method of engagement. Preservation, for this project, is associated with a memory of an event, an era, or a culture in time. In this sense, architecture itself is a preservation of the time from which it emerges. With this notion, preservation in architecture becomes more complex than the question of “Is this worth keeping?” and towards questions like “Does this work effectively evoke the memory it represents?” and “Is the memory worth remembering?” Uno Prii’s 77 Elm Street is a preservation of Toronto’s ‘coming-of-age’ in the middle of the 20th century. The city underwent a considerable change from a small rotestant town to a global city. The city’s maturity was represented in many concrete works of architecture and infrastructure such as the CN Tower, City Hall, SkyDome, and Gardiner Expressway. Concrete therefore has a specific meaning in Toronto; it is evocative of a time where the city started to think big. 77 Elm Street has the history of the city embedded in its materiality.

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adrian bica michael stofko

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sectional perspective 3 level floorplan concept diagrams interior atrium curtain wall experiential detail curtain wall sectional detail

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i n g l e n o o k s p o r t s h a l l

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The Inglenook Sports Hall is designed to be a nexus: a connector between the fine arts program at Inglenook Community High School and a new community athletics program, as well as a connector of neighbourhoods. At a unique intersection that disrupts the Toronto street grid and serves as an intermediary between two disparate neighbourhoods, the Inglenook Sports Hall is conceived as an act of urban design and public space. A new gymnasium is raised and placed at a tangent to Sumach Street, creating an expansive urban plaza at grade, activated by school use, public events, and a cafĂŠ. Along the west portion of the site, the existing schoolyard is framed and defined by a podium building. The new public plaza connects the former industrial lands immediately west and south to the Pan Am Athletes Village, with the mass of the gymnasium raised above as a visual nod to athleticism.

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andrew harvey laura herrera

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public plaza interior gymnasium view concept diagrams view looking southwest ground floor 01 lobby 02 cafe

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b e a c o n o f h o p e

a elizabeth chong amanda mota

This 21st Century Basilica is located adjacent to Toronto’s Distillery District, an industrial and historic area known for its high pedestrian, vehicle, and bike traffic throughout the site. The building is orientated at the east end of the site enhancing the entrance to the Distillery District, while being an art piece within itself. The extravagant curvilinear shapes throughout the building create sacred spaces that contrast the surrounding context to emphasize its importance on site. These sacred spaces are enclosed by a rectilinear form, framing the place of worship while relating to the context in the area. The dominant curvilinear labyrinth wall that flows through the building allows the public to interact with one another as a community or individually. It is divided into three separate components: a green wall for the community’s well being; a prayer wall for an act of open prayer; and a reflecting wall, allowing the public to light candles after worship. Located in a growing family oriented neighbourhood, the church also offers various opportunities for the public to give back to the community, encouraging social gathering, and enriching life within the area.

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c e n t r e f o r a r c h i t e t u r e

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The Centre for Architecture proposes a program of exhibition, education and workspaces dedicated to the creation, promotion and exhibition of architecture and design. The project considers the impact of new methods of design on built form. In response to changes in the way we work, characterized by an emphasis on cooperation and group dynamics, the building is experienced as a modern city, where freedom and spontaneous interaction are prioritized. A program composed of flexible and dedicated spaces realizes this ambition through a fluid program organization. Where suitable, boundaries are inferred by function rather than by solid form. A material palette of blackened steel, translucent insulated glass, blackened plywood and smooth concrete provide a soft, minimal expression of form enabling the creation of open, multifunctional spaces well-suited to a diverse range of uses.

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nick callies

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exterior view parapet detail longitudinal section cross section ground floor looking towards queens park drive interior atrium

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c r a w f o r d l a k e v i s i t o r s c e n t r e WOOD STRUCTURE

GREEN ROOF

PV PANELS

OPERABLE OPENING

GREY WATER COLLECTION SYSTEM

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GLAZING STRATEGY

mark melnichuk

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GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM

The Crawford Lake Visitors Center aims to connect the visitor to the overarching theme of the Conservation Area which is the landscape. By experiencing and learning about the unique landscape of the site, one can better understand the important historic moments of Crawford lake, including its agricultural past, the Iroquoian Village, and the Crawford family. The center’s primary focus is to orient and connect visitors not only to the immediate existing Iroquoian village but also to the broader regional context that may not be accessible to most visitors. The Visitors Center facilitates this connection through its massing, by orienting towards visitors coming from the parking area, guiding them through the interpretive center and out to the landscape in one formal gesture. The Visitors Center takes into account the regional and cultural history of the site , reacting to the Iroquoian Village and the long-houses to the south. The Center is also a reflection of the surrounding landscape, taking advantage of site conditions and sustainability opportunities.

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sustainability initiatives 01 storage/workshop 02 mechanical space 03 arrival 04 gift shop 05 cloakroom 06 washrooms

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07 multi-use/assembly/lunch room 08 kitchen/food prep 09 interpretive display exploded axonometric 01 roof mounted PV panels 02 backing wall

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i n g l e n o o k a t h l e t i c s c e n t r e

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assembly

matthew bretonhoneyman madison jantzi

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The Inglenook Sports Centre is located at the corner of Sumach St. and Eastern Ave. on the site of the historic Inglenook Community School. The design is a response to the growing urban context to the south of the site, which includes an influx of young professionals moving into the Canary District. The sports centre also caters towards the students of Inglenook, who do not currently have a gym at their school. The secondary programing of rock climbing responds to the needs of both of these demographics, providing a space for young people who look for less conventional forms of physical activity. The three storey sports hall provides vertical integration between the different programs in the building. It also allows for flexibility of activities in the vertical axis, aiding to create a space for activities less typical than that of a regular gym. The building becomes both a physical and visual extension of the existing school, with a bridge connecting the two. The rectilinear form juts through a juxtaposing jagged roofline to create this connection. The roofline was key to the expression of the building, and it was important that it was visible through both the interior and the exterior of the building. Expressing this form was a challenge, because the structure had to span the entire gymnasium, while maintaining its form and matching the aesthetic character of the rest of the building. An angled truss system was used, and the interior was clad with a wooden slat ceiling, which allowed for the expression of form.

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New Construction

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r a i s e d a w a r e n e s s

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Designed by Mies van der Rohe and sited in the landscape of a park across a river, the Farnsworth House is an iconic and historic architectural piece. As such, this visitor center proposes a new link from across the river, not only providing a greater connection to the park system, but more importantly, it seeks to establish a new ritual, celebrating the experience and approach to the House. The visitor center preserves the Farnsworth House’s notions of man’s experience with nature, juxtaposed against a contrasting application, allowing the elements of nature to realize themselves within the work. Further, the submerged feature, discretely serves the Farnsworth House while allowing the architecture and its purity in the landscape to prevail. The concept of the visitor center looks towards the movement of water. Of particular interest is the rhythmical meandering that is found within water as it traverses downstream. These circulatory systems weave through with inner currents that revolve around the axis of the river creating an intertwining web. Created are pockets of spaces that have prescribed the initial placement and organization of form.

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zohra akbari ashleigh crofts tae hoon kim michael stofko

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Located in downtown Toronto, this athletics facility provides both focused programs and public space to the developing community, and explores the relationship between esoteric and exoteric activities. Situated between two distinct architectural site conditions, the building flow draws from the pedestrian axis, and builds on them by creating an interior street through the building. From this interior street, the public is able to have a relationship with both the gymnasium and boxing program. Both programmatic elements are situated in relation to the context in accordance with their nature; the gymnasium being exoteric, and therefore having a relationship with the street, and the boxing program being esoteric, and therefore embedded into the site. Through structural and material expression, as well as designed paths of travel, these dichotomous programs gain a sense of unity with one another, and develop a comprehensible relationship. The character of the different program spaces maintain their individuality, but also contribute to the overall language and experience of the facility, allowing there to be a homogenous expression and a cohesive understanding of the building as a whole.

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This project aims to reconcile two major themes of Roman Catholicism, namely, the church as the image of heaven, and the church as the coming together of people. Central to the scheme is an elongated pathway that runs along the site, drawing users into the complex from both ends. On one hand, the elongated path symbolizes the pilgrimage path, the search for light that leads one from the profane to the sacred. The articulation of natural light along the way heightens the procession through time to reach the final destination, through which the faithful is progressively brought closer to God. On the other hand, the pathway gathers the diversified community into one place, encouraging and celebrating the communion and interaction of people under the name of God. The design utilizes screens as a means to condition light entering the building. On the exterior, warm coloured ceramic rods wrap over both opaque and transparent facades. Movement throughout the building is accompanied by alternating episodes of transparency, translucency, and enclosure. Wooden screens are used on the interior to foster a mystical quality of light which propels further movement. One is then released into the nave space where tall, dematerialized, and curvilinear walls bring focus to the altar. At night, the movement of people along the pathway is revealed through the translucent facade.

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City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 47, Item 42.

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A photograph from 1975 depicts the Eaton Centre, First Canadian Place, and the CN Tower while all were still under construction

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At Ryerson University, we find ourselves in the dynamic and ever-changing heart of Canada’s largest city. Our university experience is inextricably tied up in the excitement of the urban environment. Between studying in the SLC with its panoramic views and attending lectures high above Dundas Square, our university experience is unlike any other in Canada. It’s no surprise that we take these surroundings for granted; for the current generation, this is the only Toronto we’ve ever known. But the all-hours vibrancy of our downtown neighbourhood and the seemingly endless experiences it offers us are not static or fixed. In recent decades, the heart of Toronto was a very different place. Read on for a taste of Toronto’s modern urban history, suggested reading, and a list of ways you can get involved to impact our city for the better.

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“But for all this show of confidence and dynamism, the downtown core was not the stage. This was the era of suburbanization” A postcard from 1963 depicts guests enjoying the pool at the Inn on the Park

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Northrop Frye once called Toronto “a good place to mind your own business.”1 Robert Fulford wrote that the Toronto of old was “a city of silence, a private city, where all the best meals were eaten at home and no one noticed the absence of street life and public spaces.”1 But by the time of New City Hall’s opening in 1965, Toronto was undergoing a seismic shift in its self-perception and its identity in the world. Previously a sleepy Victorian town, the 1960s saw prosperity, multiculturalism, and the Canadian Centennial pivoting Toronto toward the dynamic energy of a world city.

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But for all this show of confidence and dynamism, downtown Toronto was not the stage. This was the era of suburbanization. New shopping centres, office parks, hotels, and homes spread across the landscape horizontally. The 1950s and ‘60s saw a Toronto that is almost inverse

to the city we’ve known in recent years: entertainment and leisure were primarily associated with the suburbs and outskirts of the city. If most Torontonians saw the downtown core as a place of business, the suburbs represented recreation and domesticity. The leisurely promise of suburban living was epitomized by Don Mills, a vast new development north-east of the city proper. It became so influential in suburban development that in the decades following, it seemed the only way to build a residential community was according to its example. Curving roads snaked their way through the 2000-acre neighbourhood, effectively closing it to outsiders and shunning the disciplined street grid of the downtown core. Greenspace was abundant; roads were not bordered by sidewalks but by grassy ditches and extensive lawns. Ranch houses were scattered across the landscape

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seemingly without any rule or pattern. Newspaper ads from the 1950s depict families spending leisure time in open-plan living rooms and generous backyards around a barbecue, freed from the perceived grit and grime of the old city. Meanwhile, the approach of the Canadian Centennial saw a concerted effort to promote cultural activity among the populace. New venues for art, performance, and education were being funded and constructed in anticipation of 1967. A new interest in science and technology was ignited when the Ontario Science Centre (originally the Centennial Centre of Science and Technology) opened in 1969. Designed by 34-year-old Raymond Moriyama, the building appeared as an extension of the complex topography of its site as it descended into the Don River ravine. Its hands-on program was a fresh idea in museum programming at the time,


Toronto Modern Blog robertmoffatt115.wordpress.com

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A print ad from the 1950s advertises homes in Don Mills

its strengths, the suburb lacked the benefits of the city as well as those of the country, as each compromised the other. Traffic and long commutes made the escape from the workplace seem less leisurely than had been imagined, and a lack of programmed space or street life came to characterize the suburbs. In a generation, the locus of homegrown leisure and entertainment gradually shifted to urban spaces.

Perhaps it had to happen; the brash dreams of the 1960s have left us with mistakes and lessons, but also a taste of unrestrained optimism that we can Similarly, suburban living began to carry into our future urban design and fall short of its lofty promises. For all architectural endeavours.

City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 217, File 133, Item 16.

The Ontario Science Centre in 1969 A 1964 photograph depicts new suburbs in North York

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Resorts and hotels also factored into the suburban Toronto dream. When the Inn on the Park opened in 1963 (featuring Canada’s first-ever disco), the trend of the ‘staycation’ had middle-class Torontonians seeking entertainment and relaxation in their own backyard. Designed by Toronto’s own renowned modernist architect Peter Dickinson and his associate Peter Webb, The Inn on the Park boasted all the R&R amenities one could want, including tennis, golf, shuffleboard, swimming, and skating

in the winter. It also featured a health club, which was a new concept at the time. Motels on the periphery of the city became synonymous with middle-class leisure, and remained so until cheap airfare and suburban backyard pools snuffed out the romance of a weekend in the suburbs or by Lake Ontario. Honeymoons and vacations could now be affordably taken overseas to exotic destinations outside of Canada. Despite their high style and the leisurely fantasies they brought to life, local resorts and inns began to lose their lustre.

Toronto Modern Blog robertmoffatt115.wordpress.com

and placed a world-class science centre within reach of thousands of children and families.

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Walking through the charming and desirable St. Lawrence Neighbourhood, one could be forgiven for thinking the area has always been there, just as it appears today. In reality, it’s one of the largest government housing schemes created in North America in the 1900s, rising out of the ashes of reckless mid-century demolition and sprawling parking lots. The St. Lawrence Neighbourhood as we know it today - apart from landmarks like the Gooderham (Flatiron) building, heritage warehouses along Front Street, and the market itself - did not exist until the 1970s. Most Torontonians have already forgotten that this successful community of mixed-incomes, mixed uses, and parkettes, was in fact planned. Given what has become of so many planned neighbourhoods in the past, its many

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An aerial image view east over Old Town Toronto before the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood was constructed

planners and consultants - including matters of urban design and planning Jane Jacobs - might take that as a in the city. compliment. Architecture and planning students If 1950s and ‘60s Toronto was about in Toronto today are familiar with dreaming big, demolishing the past the concept of mixed-use, mixedand paving the way forward to a bold income planned neighbourhoods: the new future, the 1970s represented West Don Lands (Pan Am Athlete’s a more measured approach to Village), and down the road, the city-building. Plans for the Spadina future Portlands. But when David Expressway - which would have Crombie became mayor in 1972, the ripped through downtown Toronto idea of a new, 44-acre, 10 000 person where Chinatown stands today - neighbourhood in downtown Toronto were scrapped by reform politicians was a risky proposition. Given the following outcry from the community. failures of planned areas like Regent Cracks were showing in many of Park (whose style of planning was the bold planning projects from the now coming under fire, in part thanks 1950s, including in Regent Park, to Jacobs’ activism), the city ran the where isolation from the downtown risk of a colossal embarrassment. street grid and a lack of activation for Fortunately, early in the planning its copious greenspaces seemed to process it was resolved that this new breed unsavoury activity and crime. In part of town would use principles what would become a great stroke of of established neighbourhoods like fortune for the city, Jane Jacobs had The Annex and The Beaches, and moved to Toronto from NYC toward the would not have clearly defined edges. end of the 1960s, bringing her brand of Jane Jacobs would correct planners grassroots community engagement to and architects who used the word

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City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 12, Item 48.

City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 100, Item 2.

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Church Street looking south to the Esplanade in 1987

Jacobs herself was not entirely convinced of the neighbourhood at its completion, noting that the architectural expression was not great enough in variety because the buildings mostly hailed from the same time. But as Robert Fulford wrote, “St. Lawrence is not a perfect Jane Jacobs neighbourhood. Making a perfect Jane Jacobs neighbourhood takes a century or so.”3 Almost four decades later, natural turnover in retail, small renovations to buildings, and enhancements to local parks have given the neighbourhood a lived-in charm that completes the narrative with a flourish.

Today, it’s easy to be cynical about Toronto city politics. Our city is grappling with big choices: the condition of our affordable housing has reached a crisis point, the Gardiner Expressway seems immune to any easy (or affordable) solution, and public transit development moves in a two-steps-forward, one-step-back fashion at best. But the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood should remain an icon for us: it demonstrates that the puzzle of the urban neighbourhood is not too great to be solved. We’ve done it right before, and we can do it again. At the neighbourhood’s opening in summer 1979, Housing Commissioner Michael Dennis had to say of St. Lawrence: “This won’t be the last downtown neighbourhood, but it could be the model for all the rest.”3 It’s up to us to remember its legacy and to use its lessons for the future.

Looking west on the Esplanade toward the Financial District in the 1980s

It must be noted that St. Lawrence was achieved as much by great ideas as by great people-power. All three levels of government worked together and cooperated to an astonishing degree, with a host of individuals from Mayor David Crombie to John Sewell to Jane Jacobs making the project a labour of love. A daring public investment had to be made in the hopes that it would eventually pay off.

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“project”, asking that they use terms like “community”, “neighbourhood” or “infill” instead. Where projects like Regent Park had been planned for a diagrammatic level of clarity and, as Robert Fulford criticized, “left no room for happy accidents and no room for life”, St. Lawrence was planned with integrated community centres, schools, places of worship, and streetlevel retail, spread over a grid of small blocks, laneways, and pedestrian connections.2

Numerous co-op housing schemes, low-cost housing, mid-range and condominium development created a healthy balance of income levels; St. Lawrence was planned as a place for anyone and everyone to call home.

City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 478, Item 13.

“Jane Jacobs would correct planners and architects who used the word ‘project’, asking that they use terms like ‘community’, ‘neighbourhood’ or ‘infill’ instead.”

Jarvis St. outside the former north market building

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Paris is known for the Haussmann boulevards, Barcelona for its chamfered corner buildings and courtyard blocks, and NYC for its canyons of art-deco blocks with dramatic setbacks. If any typology has defined Toronto in recent years, for better or worse, it is the skinny point tower on a podium.

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Around the beginning of the condo boom in 2000, many Torontonians were welcoming of the new residential growth of the downtown core as they felt the immediate benefits of more activity, more eyes on the street, and an expanded range of retail, nightlife, and services. In more recent years, some have begun to fear that we are testing the limits of these benefits, including concerns that public infrastructure isn’t keeping pace with private development and is homogenizing

our neighbourhoods. Another new Looking west over downtown Toronto debate has emerged: is this a real- from the top of the 58-storey L Tower estate bubble waiting to pop? Are the The view down from a new mixed-use prices of homes and condos going project in the city’s Southcore district to ever come back down? Or is this just the new normal for a city that has living commonplace; they brought become an internationally soughtdowntown Toronto back to life. In an after place to work and live? Maybe interview with the National Post in the truth is somewhere in the middle. 2015, Ken Greenberg noted “We love the iconic Manhattan skyline, because The change has been remarkable. In 2005, a proposal for a 50-storey condominium tower precipitated awe and wonder. In 2017, news of another 50-storey condominium tower elicits a yawn. Of the tower typology in general, we currently have approximately 140 projects under construction in the downtown core alone, and many more midrises and proposed towers set to reach construction in future years. Love or hate them, the condo projects that dot the city have made urban

“Love or hate them, the condo projects that dot the city are responsible for bringing it back to life.”

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what we’re really doing is associating that with what we know happens on the streets.’’4 It’s a keen observation about the vibrancy and foot-traffic that new residential and office towers bring to a city’s streets. It was only in the early 1990s that Toronto started to relax its zoning bylaws in a meaningful way, opening the door to mixed-use development in former industrial areas. Beginning with loft conversions in what had been factories and warehouses, and eventually spurring on new developments, a trend emerged. Torontonians, who had long clung to a tradition of detached homes (unlike NYC with its brownstones, or Montreal ‘s walkups), were beginning to embrace high-density living. In what was arguably one of the boldest planning moves in Ontario’s history, the provincial government created the Greenbelt in 2005, protecting 1.8 million acres of land in the Greater Golden Horseshoe from development. This provided greater impetus to the densification of cities and was in part

responsible for the higher-density demand a greater number of familymode of development we’ve seen in sized condominiums, and local school boards and the city initiated the its wake. creation of new downtown schools In the years following relaxed zoning and community centres. bylaws and the birth of the Greenbelt, condominium development came This is where we find ourselves today. to represent more than the sum of We have seen the rise of the suburbs, its parts. The return of investment to the sparks of interest in city life, and downtown Toronto contributed to a now an unprecedented shift in the way renaissance among the city’s cultural we live in downtown Toronto. The clock institutions. In 2006, the Four Seasons feels as though it is racing forward as Centre for the Performing Arts opened an increasing number of people seek - a miracle after years without an opera to call Toronto home and the city house - and in the two years following, booms around us. We are tasked with both the Royal Ontario Museum and the city’s most crucial call to action in Art Gallery of Ontario re-opened with years: to work together, listen to one high-profile expansions of their own. another, and take advantage of the But beneath a cultural renaissance, privileged position the building boom a more mundane shift was taking has put us in. Working together as place that had a greater impact on future architects, urban designers and day-to-day life. The assumption that planners, we can create public spaces “the home” belonged in the suburbs and shared infrastructure worthy of was being entirely subverted. Big- the millions of us who live in the great box retailers introduced urban format city we call Toronto - and the many stores to serve the thousands of new new Torontonians that will live here in residents in the core who require the generations to come. access to grocery stores, furniture, and hardware. Planners began to

Image credit: Andrew Churchill / Instagram: @to.capture

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SUGGESTED TO RO N TO READI N G robert fulford - accidental city Robert Fulford’s storytelling is so engaging that one doesn’t need any knowledge of Toronto or even have been to the city to be pulled into his narrative. From the legend of bullish mayor Fred Gardiner (the man who gave us the Gardiner Expressway) to the planning history of Cloud Gardens, you will be a Toronto fanatic by the time you put this book down.

ken greenberg - walking home Local planning consultant and former Director of Urban Design and Architecture for the City of Toronto, Ken Greenberg has been a champion of liveable, walkable cities for decades. His experience ranges from NYC to Boston to Amsterdam to Toronto, and this book sees him reflecting on lessons from those cities and beyond.

alice sparberg alexiou - jane jacobs: urban visionary Whether you enjoy the urban design theory of Jane Jacobs’ seminal writings, or take a greater interest in the woman herself, this is a book you must read. Alexiou’s writing goes beyond The Death and Life of Great American Cities to provide a deeper understanding of Jacobs’ personal life, activism, and writings, including her later years in Toronto.

john sewell - the shape of the city This 1993 book sees former city councillor and mayor John Sewell placing Toronto planning in the context of the modern movement and the urban reform that followed. From Don Mills to St. Jamestown to Bramalea, this is essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand the physical form of the city today.

mark osbaldeston - unbuilt toronto An essential part of Toronto’s built history are the things that ‘never were’. Mark Osbaldeston’s book takes readers through the rise and fall of Toronto’s greatest urban visions, from the never-built Queen Street subway line to the 140-storey John Maryon Tower of the 1970s. Heritage enthusiasts will also take an interest in an array of City Beautiful master plans and near-demolitions that never saw the light of day.

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1 Robert Fulford, Accidental City, (Toronto, Macfarlane Walter & Ross, 1995), 1.

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2 Robert Fulford, Accidental City, (Toronto, Macfarlane Walter & Ross, 1995), 77. 3 Robert Fulford, Accidental City, (Toronto, Macfarlane Walter & Ross, 1995), 89. 4 McWilliams, Emily. “Toronto skyline’s ‘absolute transformation’ captured by two photos taken 13 years apart.” National Post, January 2015.

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1 . wa lk + explore You don’t come to understand a city by just reading planning theory or doing your course readings; you do it by walking around the city and observing. If you usually walk to campus from Dundas Station, then why not switch things up and walk from King or Bloor? Or - better yet - take a day off to go explore a neighbourhood you’ve never seen before.

2. lis ten Read the musings of Toronto’s great city thinkers. Spacing Magazine is a great way to keep on the pulse of design in the city. Writers to follow include Shawn Micallef, Edward Keenan, John Lorinc, and Alex Bozikovic.

3. g et p lugge d i n Get on your local city councillor’s email list: you will get all the notices about meetings in your neighbourhood. And remember, your councillor is your representative - you can always email them your thoughts & ideas about what matters most to you in the city and where you stand on local planning and urban design matters.

4 . attend me et i n gs & advocate Cities don’t become great by accident; we need to mould them. Any given week in Toronto there are consultations for a range of planning matters from development proposals to master plans and transit consultations. Sometimes they even offer free food, and they always provide a chance to network with like-minded individuals.

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NOW GO GET OUT THERE!

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Using traditional Japanese wood joinery techniques and focusing on craft and tectonics, Chair 1 has no metal screws or nails to support it. Purely based on friction fit joints and notches, including mortise and tenon and those learned from Sam Maloof precedents, several iterations designed and test joints were constructed before making the final model. the aim was for the chair to achieve an ephemeral quality with the floating backrest, almost a certain lightness of being. This was to showcase the natural strength and beauty of Birch hardwood, and express the chair as a singular, monolithic piece, sculpted out of a single material. With slight curvatures and angles, Chair 1 was carved and cut completely by hand by the designer, using different tools such as the hand planar, flexible saws, and chisels to achieve the desired joints and sculpted curvature.

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Society has become defined by webs of communication. Never before has a message been as widely distributed as has recently been allowed by modern technology. With this distribution comes distortion. A message becomes more abstracted the more people pass it along; an inevitable case of broken telephone. Stratatone replicates this concept. A pattern (the message) should be simple to repeat, yet as the commotion of those around it increases it becomes distorted; moving, growing, shrinking. The project consists of two stepper motors per drawing surface. A base code runs the pattern which in a perfectly silent space would remain constant. As people traverse the surrounding area, noise peaks amplify the form and create a unique image over the course of time.

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Shelter of Four is a study in four contrasts between the delicate nature of materiality and the solidity of the built form, as well as between the gentle undulations of the exterior and the carved, cave-like interior. It provides shelter and a sense of protection while preserving one’s connection with the world outside. The linear pattern of circulation suggests themes of travel and transience, in connection with the exodus from Egypt that gave rise to the first Sukkot. The patterned perforations in each layer are based on the arba’a minim: four species of plants mentioned in the Torah in relation to Sukkot. Interpretations of the symbolism of the four species include the desire to unite the four “types” of Jews, the parts of the human body, and the plants used in the construction of a traditional sukkah.

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john benner adrian chiu liam hall gregorio jimenez stephen jones matthew lau john (jiayi) zhang

The Hale Coffee Shop is located in the Junction neighborhood of Toronto. We were asked by the Toronto-based roasters to design the interior of their new cafĂŠ and production. Wood became the prevalent material, from the cherry countertops to the undulating wood counter fronts. We took advantage of the high ceiling space, creating a dynamic 2x2 modular ceiling installation around the existing mechanical system. The initial visit to the coffee shop presented an empty canvas filled with opportunities. Originally, the schematic design aimed to create a bright and lively atmosphere, complimented by a light colour palette. Through multiple meetings with the clients where we collaborated and shared ideas, A darker colour scheme proved preferable, creating a warm and cozy environment. The entire cafĂŠ was built from scratch, from the ceiling fixtures right down to the furniture. This amazing feat could not have been possible without the enthusiastic efforts of both the roasters and the numerous volunteers.

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Lithoform aims to create an interlude in the windy winter conditions outside. Recreating the natural formations of our lithosphere formed as a product of frost wedging, it provides a space to thaw during frigid temperatures. Lithoform’s fissures guide you through a polychromatic cavern of filtered light around the centrally located lifeguard station. A contoured mass adorns the lifeguard station with sheltered seating, allowing users to experience the outdoors without being subject to the icy winds. Users passing by the installation are enticed to enter by the soft shadows of those moving through the interior. A CNC-milled wood frame structure supports the faceted translucent acrylic elements of the design, using zip-ties to secure the white panels to the exterior along the body and the roof’s fissured blocks. Colourful transparent acrylic extrusions protrude from the chimneys to infuse the space below with colored light.

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Using locally sourced white ash, the Notch Chair was constructed using a minimal palette of materials. 30 mm strips of wood were milled and cut to attain a square profile and were used for all components of the chair excluding the seat. A series of tests were conducted to achieve a successful bend in the wood using steam bending methods. Formwork was designed and cut with a CNC machine to ensure a consistent bend. After allowing the strips of wood to steam for an hour, the pieces were removed and quickly clamped to the formwork with the help of some extra hands. The moment that the wood leaves the steam chamber, it begins to dry and becomes increasingly difficult to wrap and clamp around the formwork. Once the wood was clamped in place, it was left to dry completely for 48 hours. After sanding the components of the chair, notches were made by hand using a Japanese hand saw. Components were then notched and glued in to place without the use of fasteners.

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In following this year’s theme, “The Green Transition,� our design seeks to represent the harmonious strength between people, space, and materiality. Wood is a sustainable material that is often neglected or overlooked due to its susceptibility to the outdoor environment. By blending both architecture and sculpture, the design seeks to engage the public to explore the interior as well as appreciate the exterior form. The design is comprised of two shapes that are merged together, representing how nature and society are inevitably connected, and how society should strive for a harmony between the two to achieve a sustainable way of life. The structure is designed such that its construction follows a specific order. Once the appropriate pieces are cut, they are put in place one after the other. The order alternates between the two separate shapes; even in construction, the masses are intertwined. The alternation also allows for gaps within the surfaces of the structure, allowing for light and visibility. In elevation, the center frames the surrounding environment and brings into focus both nature and development. The design allows for users to interact within and around the structure, experiencing the variable spatial qualities created.

built

david luong doan thy-vo john (jiayi) zhang

64

B ER G EN I NT E RN AT I ON AL WOOD FE ST I VAL


BUI LT

b

b

b

b

c

parti project at completion site axonometric

built

a b c

b

B ER G EN I NT E RN AT I ON AL WOOD FE ST I VAL

65


BUI LT

f r a c t u r e

01

02

The marketing structure for TEDxRyersonU is a vital outreach strategy which helps to promote the annual conference to members of the school as well as the public. Due to its unique and iconographic design, it often becomes the main logo for the event and a significant promotional tool. Its main focus is to catch the attention of the public in order to spread word about the conference. One of the key drivers for the design of Fracture was to incorporate elements of interactivity and tactility. This presented opportunities for the user to take with them ideas that they have written on tags or souvenirs. The nature of interactions with the marketing structure generate a change in the overall appearance of the structure. With the concept of fragmentation, the structure was split into multiple pieces displaying a sense of push and pull. In following the theme of this year’s conference, ‘Iconoclast’, our marketing team suggested to display a question that would challenge the public to think and respond. This completed the interactive aspect of the structure and led to its final design. The public approach the structure and answer the question on a red X tag. Then, they attach it to the overall structure. As more contributions are made, the white structure slowly becomes red, representing the flow of ideas.

03

built

jasmin (minji) kim david luong claire tam

04

66

T E DXRYE RSON U

b


BUI LT

a

exploded axo interaction diagram 01 approach 02 question 03 respond 04 contribute

built

a b

T E DXRYE RSON U

67


BUI LT

f l u m m o x

a

farah elmajdoub deena jamokha doan thy-vo

Flummox, designed for the 2016 Toronto Design Offsite, is a window installation located at a used record and book store in the Junction. Made of approximately 250 vinyl records, each individually melted and shaped, the installation is suspended from the store’s ceiling, giving the impression of a floating mass of vinyl. Using custom acrylic connectors, the vinyl units are attached to airline tubing and aircraft wire. Within the vinyl, wired LEDs allow the installation to light up at night, offering the viewer a contrasting experience from the daytime. Flummox won People’s Choice Award for that year. b

5

4

3 2

built

1

68

c

TOR ON T O D E SI G N OFFSI T E

d


BUI LT

e

c

e exploded axonometric elevation vinyl connection 01 acrylic centre connection 02 vellum 03 airline tubing

d e

04 vinyl module 05 acrylic button assembly axonometric project at completion

built

a b c

e

TOR ON T O D E SI G N OFFSI T E

69


BUI LT

f l o w

a

b c calvin fung victor huynh

Snow structures are constructed and celebrated by Canadians every winter. Flow attempts to capture the transitional moment between freeze and thaw. It begins with the reinterpretation of a single ice crystal. The elementary particle is reinterpreted as a wooden, 3D “star” module, digitally fabricated with slot-fit connections. Informed by aggregation processes exhibited by naturally granular material such as snow, the system contains over 1300 plywood modules and is capable of crystallizing into a metastable, solid state; yet the material is able to be easily reconfigured, like a liquid, due to the system’s loose bonds. While snow melts away eventually leaving little trace behind, Flow serves as a reminder of the snow structures that once speckled the landscape. Like water transforming from solid to liquid, the dynamic process of freezing and thawing is expressed in an equally charged wave-like form capturing the flow of energy. For the concept behind this project, see ‘Fluid Architecture’ on page 122

d

built

e

70

W I NTER STAT I ON S COMPE T I T I ON


BUI LT

f

g

h parti deriving concept project at completion 1 construction model project at completion 2 project at completion 3

h

project at completion 4

built

a b c d e f g

W I NTER STAT I ON S COMPE T I T I ON

71


BUI LT

f r o z e n s e a s o n s

a

victor huynh tim melnichuck

Canada is well known for its natural landscape and with each season brings new life and beauty. Frozen Seasons is designed to embrace the cold weather as well as showcase the seasonal changes that occur throughout year. An abstracted tree appears frozen within time as it sits within a crystal structure. As time progress, the tree emits seasonal colours bringing the sculpture to life.

b

built

c

72

WI N T E RLUD E


BUI LT

d

f

f

e

axonometric close updetail project at completion 1 project at completion 2 installation triangular pattern project at completion 3

built

a b c d e

WI N T E RLUDE

73


BUI LT

m t . t o l m i e t i n y h o u s e

4

1

2

5

3

6

a

1

2

4

5

3

b

michael hankus gregorio jimenez douglas peterson-hui daniel sobieraj

Built at the Base of Mt. Tolmie in Victoria, British Columbia, the Mt. Tolmie Tiny House is Island Life Tiny Home’s first project. It is a response to the recent rise in real estate prices making housing unaffordable across major cities in Canada. Building on a trailer not only allows the user to move the home wherever they may please but it allows the design of the building to be small and efficient. As many jurisdictions have minimum square footage requirements it is hard to build homes so small. However, since the dwelling sits on wheels it is not classified as a house allowing it to be built under the minimum square footage. The most challenging aspect of the design was to decide what was required and what was unnecessary to live comfortably in such a small space and to fit within the footprint 8x20 ft. The Tiny House is also required to be road-legal so it had to be designed around a specific width, length, and height. And it had to be designed to withstand forces that a normal building would not.

c

www.islandlifetinyhomes.com

built

d

74

P E RSON AL I N I T I AT I V E


BUI LT

a

ground floor plan 01 exterior storage 02 bathroom 03 kitchen 04 stair/shelving 05 fold out sofa bed 06 double height living

b

room Loft plan 01 queen bed 02 cabinet 03 cupboard 04 open to below 05 storage loft

c d e f g h i

f

g

h

i

loft framing plan section perspective rendering close up detail team members construction process structure frame work

P E RSON AL I N I T I AT I V E

built

e

75


BUI LT

RD

OA

GB

IN EIL

C

n o v a

ILM

RF

RO

MIR

2 G MIN

A

FR

Y WA

1

EY

ALL

OR

FR

OM

GO

UL

R MIR DS

TR

D

AR

BO

EE

T

R

OU

NT

CO

a ING

M RA

F

2000mm

2000mm

2000mm

2450mm

2450mm

b

452mm

980 mm

760mm

built

1180mm

N UI T BLAN CH E

510mm

c

760mm

2000 mm

5425mm

1180mm

5425mm

510mm

5200 mm

452mm

www.nova2016.space

76

2000mm

2450mm

NOVA originates from the homonymous natural phenomenon - when a dormant star meets another star due their gravitational pulls, the dormant star experiences a brief re-ignition, releasing a moment of intense brightness. This incredible cataclysmic nuclear explosion is what is seen in the sky as a Nova. Similarly, NOVA, initially appearing to be a dormant mass, momentarily lights up to display a show of lights upon interaction with passers-by. As individuals make their way through, the colourful, bright lights intensify, exhibiting responsiveness to the proximity of the visitor. With the lights infinitely reflecting off of the parallel-running mirrors, the illusion of an expansive space within the seemingly narrow passageway is created. Once visitors have exited from the installation, the lights will begin to die off, once again hiding within the dormant mass until becoming re-ignited by another encounter throughout the night.

2450mm

jessica hoang chen ishan patel nineveh rashidzadeh shivathmikha suresh kumar stephanie tung doan-thy vo

ING

AC

BR


BUI LT

d

f

g

e axonometric drawing elevations plan view rendering 1 project at completion mock-up model rendering 2

built

a b c d e f g

N UI T BLAN CH E

77


U RBAN E XPE DI T I ON

take a walk

We’ve all heard it during our architectural education: “Consider the ground plane!” “Use every surface!” And it’s good advice. The ground plane is our most immediate connection to the city. It gets us from Point A to Point B, but more importantly, it provides the primary stage on which urban life unfolds. Fortunately, landscape architects in Toronto have been injecting some whimsy and character into our streetscapes in recent years, with a range of patterns and motifs scattered around the downtown core serving to remind us that the flat surface beneath our feet deserves some attention and personality too.

urban expedition

Chances are, you spend a significant portion of your week walking around the city, and much of it looking at the sidewalk ahead and scanning the surface below your feet. Consider this a test of your paving IQ - how observant are you as you explore the city by foot? See how many of the public spaces on the opposite page you can identify! (An answer key is located at the bottom.)

78

U RBAN E XPE DI T I ON


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

a b c d e f g h i

Distillery District Queen’s Quay Promenade Corktown Common Berczy Park Bloor Street Maple Leaf Square Four Seasons Hotel St. James Cathedral Sony Centre for the Performing Arts

Answer key: a-8; b-4; c-1; d-7; e-9; f-2; g-3; h-6; i-5 URBAN E XPE D I T I ON

urban expedition

URBAN E XPE DI T I ON

79


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

a p o c a l y p t i c a s t u d i o

01

02

03

a

created by

04

b

r e s i d e n t i a l

magdalena krawczyk dan soberiaj gregor tratnik

The client is a band originally from Finland seeking to expand their home into thriving Toronto. The program was to include both recording and performance spaces for the band. The proposed design uses a combination of tradition and technology to create high performance amenities for the use of the band. Focusing on the introverted aspects of the building, the main concentration became the informal rehearsal space where the band can relax, brainstorm, and practice. This sacred space therefore became the heart of the building. Nordic and Canadian influences with heavy timber were used expressively in building massing. The site was chosen for the apocalyptic feel of the post-industrial landscape. Net zero aspects include warmboard radiant floor heating, a heat recovery ground-source pump, and solar panels.

46

c

3R D YE AR ST UD I O


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

d

OUTD

DECK

UP

OOR

REHE

RSAL

REHE OPEN TO RSAL BELO SPACE W

D

DN

RMAL

SPAC E

DN

INFO D

TECH ROOM . SOUN

OFFIC

OFFIC

D LO

E

E

CK CONT RO ROOM L DN UP

UP

RECO

RDIN

BAR

G SP ACE

BACK STAGE

MEC

H.

PERFORMANCE SPACE

STOR

AGE

OFFIC

E

OFFIC

TECH MEZZANINE ABOVE

DN

E

OUTD

OOR PART DECK Y AR AND EA

LOBBY

MEC

H. OFFIC

VOCA BOOT L H

E

DN

FRONT DESK 3 PI UP

A

ECE

ENTR Y

W.

MECH.

REPA SPAC IR E

CLOS

ET

MUS (CLI ICAL ST MAT E CO ORAGE NTRO L)

MALE W.

PARKING GARAGE

A

PRIV LOUN ATE GE

MANAGER’S OFFICE

KITC

HEN

FEMALE W. B

B

C

e

C

f

a b

parti diagrams axonometric structural diagram 01 timber roof joists 02 roof truss structure 03 timber floor joists

c d e

04 concrete foundation and timber framing detail at roof joist to column connection night rendering ground floor plan

f g

2nd floor plan longitudinal section

3 RD YE AR ST UD I O

r e s i d e n t i a l

g

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

b o t a n i s t r e s e a r c h c a b i n

b

a

created by

r e s i d e n t i a l

julie guevara

This research cabin was designed for two botanists to grow and classify plants, compose academic papers, and conduct experiments at the Evergreen Brickworks. The building is placed in a secluded, forested area of the park; it fits into a clearing between two lines of trees, weaving its form between the trees in an attempt to be as non-invasive as possible. Aside from the lab/office space, the cabin includes two bedrooms, a full washroom, and a kitchen, in order to house the researchers for several weeks at a time. At the south end, a fully glazed facade allows for an abundance of light to nurture the plants growing in the lab. The design is reminiscent of a hollowed boulder with its many-faceted exterior and cavern-like interior. The intent was an organic form that blends into its forested setting. This integration with nature is also seen in its materiality (in the heavy use of wood), and the rawness of the exposed structural elements.

46

c

1ST YE AR ST UDI O


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

d

g

e

a b c d e f g

r e s i d e n t i a l

f

process sketch rendering - approach plan south elevation north elevation east elevation process sketches

1 ST YE AR ST UDI O

46


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

e a s t e r n p i n e

a

created by

r e s i d e n t i a l

mark flynn stacy sun sadaf mansour madison dozzi-perry katherine lishak vadim novik umer khan mahsa hatefi shahrzad soudian dami lee christopher marleau xavier mendieta

46

The goal of the True North Design team is to create a truly holistic ecoconscientious environment at all levels of consideration, through innovative design that enhances connections between inhabitants and their home, community, and the natural world. This design of 3-storey multi-unit, infill urban housing project targets new families on the edge of a post-industrial area close to the urban core, making location efficiency a vital component to this project. It is close to public transit, existing schools and community centers, shopping, and the biking trails and recreational facilities of Lake Ontario. Community and health are also vital components. The presence of green space can promote physical activity, stress reduction, cognitive restoration and increased social interaction and cohesion along with providing passive cooling, shading and improving air quality. As well, the design is meant to make users more conscious of their environment and how their habits influence the natural world. This is part of our goal to create a design that enhances the user’s ecoconsciousness and that amplify the reciprocal relationship the humans have with that environment.

b

R AC E TO ZER O ST UD E N T DE SI G N COM PE T I T I ON


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

c

8 6

7

4

5

5 3

3

3

1

3

1

1

2 2 5

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4 1

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3 1

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1

1

d

e

f

g

h

a b c d

axonometric wall section exterior rendering basement floor plan 01 bike storage 02 storage 03 living room

e

04 kitchen/dining 05 bathroom 06 bedroom 1 07 bedroom 2 08 basement walk out ground floor plan

f

01 foyer 02 kitchen 03 dining 04 living 05 bedroom second floor plan 01 living room 02 kitchen / dining

g h

R AC E TO ZER O ST UD E N T DE SI G N COM PE T I T I ON

03 bedroom third floor plan 01 bedroom location in streetscape

r e s i d e n t i a l

2

1

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

S t r o n g h o l d S t u d i o O n B e l l I s l a n d

created by

r e s i d e n t i a l

ramoncito espino

46

Located in a dense field, looking off a cliff on Bell Island, Newfoundland, Stronghold Art Studio was intended to act as a reprieve from the immense sensory stimuli found around the site. It is the product of the designer’s personal experiences and afterthoughts following his visit in the summer of 2015. Nearly five months later, he chose to do his final undergraduate studio project on the island that left him with such animated memories and visceral experiences. It was not the original intent to design a bunker-like typology. The unique hidden landscapes, dark narratives of the island miners, and eclectic weather all made for a studio that only seemed right to be so defensive. Once realizing how important his past memories were to the design, the project soon became about how to represent those memories and how to engage the viewers in creating their own interpretations. A wide frenzy of mediums were explored, but eventually led to a series of hand-rendered drawings and physical models in an attempt to convey the drama and intense sensations of the site.

b

d 4T H YE AR ST UD I O


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

a

c

02 04

03

a b c d e

site photo sketch through exhibition axonometric physical model groud floor 01 entry/living room 02 studio space

03 exhibition space 04 washroom

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

e

r e s i d e n t i a l

01

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

r e v e r b

created by yuri shin

Located in artistic Corktown, Reverb is a coop-housing complex for musicians. The location of the project is suitable as the neighbourhood houses multiple small-scale musical businesses but lacks a large venue for rehearsals and performances. Reverb aims to bring opportunity for social gathering and enhanced living for local musicians. The design, which is strongly influenced by the lively atmosphere of King Street’s commercial activity, aims to bring the energy and vitality onto Power Street. The angular characteristics of the property creates a dynamic façade, forming stepped terraces along the face of Power St. The saw-tooth form of the building gives each unit visual distinction and increases privacy from each neighbouring unit. Apartment units configured on the southern portion of the site are designed as flow-through units to provide generous natural ventilation.

a

public amenity semi-public amenity private amenity bachelor unit one bedroom unit two bedroom unit

r e s i d e n t i a l

three bedroom unit

46

2N D YE AR ST UD I O


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

b

c

a b c d e

e

r e s i d e n t i a l

d

building matrix outdoor performance space rendering east elevation north elevation north section

2N D YE AR ST UD I O

46


12TH

SION

CES

CON

B

r e s i d e n t i a l

4

EXISTING TRUCTIO L CONS

²

000m

N

400

TIA RESIDEN

n e t z e r o h o u s e TY PROPER VACANT ST FORE LOPED UNDEVE

1019350

ED A TO FE E YEAR ON UIRED REQ R FOR AREA OF FOU 4M² ILY 6 18 1 M FA

73400 124530

a 196090 OSPREY ARTMES

399920

LINE

IA TOWN

created by marcus parisi

The Net Zero House is located on a rural lot in the Town of Eugenia, within Grey County. The house is designed specifically to be operated off-grid without any municipal infrastructure intervention, following the goal of reaching Net-Zero status according to EnerGuide. This project responds by organizing spaces to leverage the thermal energy of the sun and require little or no purchased energy. Spaces used primarily during daytime hours are located along the southern exposure while night-time living spaces and utilities are found along the northern face. Opaque walls with the greatest solar exposure are used to store the potential thermal energy of the sun’s radiation. Photovoltaic panels offset the electrical consumption of the house by producing approximately 11 600kWh annually.

1

2

3

11580

2530

4

2960

W2 2450 DN TO OUTDOOR COLD ROOM

3630

3530

04 PANTRY

3690

W2 W2

C

C W2

W2

2610

3890

W2

W1

3600

1200

2070

W3

MASTER BEDROOM

01 OFFICE

W1

02

W# 2580

2450 1750

4370

4700

W/C 15850

W1

W1

3890

B

07

4400

2170

B

10210

W1 1270

W3

W1

2040

MECHANICAL ROOM

06

4900

W3

03

BEDROOM 4460

05

BEDROOM

3320 1550

2720

03 4140

W1 W2

2580

4900

UP TO LOFT

5200

LIVING/FAMILY ROOM

2400

W2

STRUCTURAL COLUMN BEAM SUPPORT

BUILT-IN SHELVING

FIREPLACE

BUILT-IN SHELVING

W2

W2

A

A

HATCH DENOTES THERMALLY MASSIVE WALLS. REFER TO WALL SCHEDULE FOR ASSEMBLY COMPONENTS

FIRE WOOD BUNDLE

DN

EXTERIOR MECHANICAL ROOM ENTRANCE

2160

WING WALL MEAT TO DEFLECT WIND AND SHELTER WOOD STORAGE

MAIN ENTRY PORCH/PATIO

ROOF ABOVE 400

11230

5590

9950

450

27620

1

2

3

4

MAIN ENTRANCE

b

OVERHANG

4

3D

3C

3B

3A

3

2

1

r e s i d e n t i a l

ZINC ROOFING

46

ZINC ROOFING

SECONDARY ENTRY BEYOND

CEDAR WOOD SIDING

CEDAR WOOD SIDING

4

3D

3C

3B

3A

3

CONCRETE VENEER FINISH

CEDAR WOOD SIDING

CONCRETE CAST IN PLACE STAIRS

3990

4800

4800 CURTAIN WALL GLAZING

2

1

c

B UI L DI N G SCI E N CE ST UD I O I I

CEDAR WOOD SIDING 3580

CEDAR WOOD SIDING 9200

26380

d


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

CONCRETE FLOOR THERMAL MASS THERMAL STORAGE RE-RADIATION THERMAL STORAGE CAPACITY AS A FUNCTION OF THE FLOOR AREA, SOLAR HEAT GAIN AND THE SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF THE CONCRETE SLAB

15000 FOLIAGE HEIGHT

BEDROOM

38740 SOUTHERN CLEARANCE

LIVING ROOM/KITCHEN

BEDROOM

e

1

2

CONCRETE WALL WITH A HIGH THERMAL MASS ABSORBS SOLAR RADIATION DURING THE DAY

CONCRETE WALL WITH A HIGH THERMAL MASS ABSORBS SOLAR RADIATION DURING THE DAY

3

3A

3B

3C

3D

4

CONCRETE WALL WITH A HIGH THERMAL MASS ABSORBS SOLAR RADIATION DURING THE DAY

CATHEDRAL CEILING

CATHEDRAL CEILING

MECHANICAL ROOM

CONCRETE FLOOR STRUCTURE CORK INSULATIVE SEPARATION LAYER SECONDARY FIREPLACE

EARTH

1

2

3

3A

3B

3C

CONCRETE FLOOR WITH FINISH USED TO STORE AND RADIATE HEAT DURING WINTER MONTHS. 3D

4

f

a b

site plan floor plan 01 office 02 master bedroom 03 bedroom 04 pantry 05 mechanical room

c d e f g

g

06 living/family room 07 kitchen/dining room east elevation south elevation site section section exterior approach view

B UI LD I N G SCI E N CE ST UD I O I I

r e s i d e n t i a l

ENERGY IS DISTRIBUTED ACROSS THE MASS BY THE FIREPLACE, SOLAR RADIATION AND OUTDOOR WOOD BURNING FIREPLACE.

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

p a n d o f o r m a

a

created by

r e s i d e n t i a l

matthew ferguson

46

Inspired by the fluid embodiment of motion and time found in the work of Jean Arp, Pando Forma is conceived as a sculptor’s retreat, one which celebrates the oldest and largest organism on our planet. Pando Forma questions the relationship between permanence, impermanence, and the memory of a constantly evolving context. The year of its construction, the retreat sits on the edge of the Pando forest. Running perpendicular from the forests edge, the modules lie dangerously close to the 10-year growth range of the forest organism. After 100 years, the forest has expanded beyond the limits of the building. A few of the quaking aspens begin to grow within the void left behind between the weathered steel screens; the occupied glass volumes have moved along with the edge of the forest. These trees will provide a gentle memory of the space once inhabited by the transparent spine of the rhizomatic building. 1000 years into its lifespan, the original building is flanked on all sides by Pando forest, but rather than be consumed, the building lives on. By building additional flanking steel walls, the building’s spine can be towed further, not only allowing existing modules to move forward, but creating a void behind it for the forest to crawl into, a memory of the building which once inhabited it.

b

4T H YE AR ST UD I O


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

03

02

01

04

05 c

d

f

a b c

parti drawing process sketches stages of growth 01 stage 1 02 stage 2 03 stage 3 04 thousand year

d e f g

g

r e s i d e n t i a l

e

snapshot 05 parts in motion night rendering bedroom pod plan and elevation end of hallway

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

m o d u l a t e

created by

a

r e s i d e n t i a l

mitchell cairns-spicer

Modulate is a mixed-income coop located on the corner of Power St. and Richmond St. in downtown Toronto. Modulate was designed with the understanding that communities and their needs are rapidly evolving. Programatically this is addressed though creating flexible spaces that can either serve the co-op independently or the surrounding community. Formally, the massing of Modulate follows a strict rhythmical pattern of extruding and recessing volumes. There are two main cladding components, each of which is used to disrupt the consistent rhythm of the massing; A curtain wall system incorporating privacy screen panels and Corten steel cladding with varying sizes of narrow multi-storey windows. Corten steel was chosen for its ever changing appearance, drawing a parallel to the nature of communities.

46

b

2N D YE AR ST UD I O


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

d

c

e

02

02

04

03

01

a b c d e

east elevation west elevation exterior rendering bedroom rendering living room rendering

f

r e s i d e n t i a l

f

seventh floor plan 01 living room 02 bedroom 03 kitchen / dining 04 terrace

2N D YE AR ST UD I O

46


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

w o o d i n o n e a p o c a l y p t i c a

a

created by lauren chan jonathan chan laura herrera chris pin

UP

b

Grounded in the idea of raw emotion and precise technicality, this building embodies their musical approach in the exposed structure, contrasting materiality and dynamic form. The shifting of the two masses can be compared to the two distinct music genres coming together while logically ordering the building. Where the two shifted masses meet, a performance space occupies the ground floor and the recording studio sits above, two centers for making music. ** serves as the home away from home for this unique quartet.

4

46

3

7

5 2

3 6

1

r e s i d e n t i a l

UP

Located in the Portlands,Wood in one apocalyptica attempts to recreate the sound of One Apocalyptica in the built form. Based in Sweden*, this group of four classically trained musicians synthesizes heavy metal music with traditional string techniques. As a space for collaboration and experimentation, the heart of this building is located on the second floor where the three programmatic spaces of rehearsal, lounge, and kitchen meet to create an environment for the band to thrive.

c

4T H YE AR ST UD I O


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

d

f

e 1/2” - Charred Oak Wood 2mm Steel Flashing @ Base 1/2” Oriented Strand Board Sheathing 2” x 12” Wood Stud @ 400mm O.C. Roxul Comforbatt Insulation Super Six Vapour Barrier 3/4” Plywood Sheathing 1/2” Cherry Wood Finish

350mm x 400mm Glulam Column

a b c

Perspective from boardwalk longitudinal section main floor plan 01 reception 02 kitchenette 03 mech/electrical rm.

d

04 back of stage Prep. Rm. 05 stage storage 06 performance hall 07 visiting back rm. w/ washroom section n-s

e f

Galvanized Steel Pin Connection for Construction Tolerance Galvanized Steel Plate Bolted to Concrete Footing Concrete Footing Footer (1300mm below grade)

perspective towards the lobby perspective towards the Toronto skyline

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

r e s i d e n t i a l

2” x 12” Base Plate Joist Hanger 12” x 20” Glulam Beam Galvanized Steel Pin Connection w/ Steel Plate to Glulam Column

Galvanized Steel Bracket sandwiched to Steel Plate w/ 2mm Tolerance

46


r e s i d e n t i a l

4

H O U S E

a

created by

r e s i d e n t i a l

michelle ashurov

46

b

The philosophies of filmmaker Gaspar Noé informed the unorthodox configuration of this home. His films, which attempt to capture a spectrum of realistic instances in a human’s life, provide viewers with an intimate lens to view the workings of the body and mind. By ridding corridors, spaces are intimately connected through a central void. The central circulation space becomes the spectator’s primary platform, providing a partial view into every room & every exhibition space. Breaks in solid perimeters defining each space form visual connections to opposite ends of the house. The intention is to slowly reduce shyness and anxiety that occupants experience when faced with exposure. Moments in life that are not commonly exhibited to those around us are potentially revealed depending on two individuals’ position in space and time. This house is an exploration in psychology and voyeurism, beyond sexual connotation. It questions the occupant. Will you feel waves of stress just from being in the comfort of your own home? Will you hide in a closet for a single moment to be really alone? Will you make attempts to be clothed at all times? Will you configure furniture to create spaces of concealment? Will you engage in unique, unusual or intimate acts in ‘solitude’? Will you move in different ways? Will you act or will you be?

c

4T H YE AR ST UD I O


4

r e s i d e n t i a l

09 08 07

05 06

04

01 03 02

d

view into bedroom view through living axonometric view into study section e-w (a) section e-w (b) ground floor plan 01 living room 02 study

h

g

f

h

r e s i d e n t i a l

a b c d e f g

e

03 kitchen/dining 04 courtyard 05 powder room 06 master bathroom 07 sitting room 08 bedroom 09 master bedroom section n-s

4 T H YE AR ST UDI O

46


3

c o n c e p t

a r b o [ r e ] s c e n c e

storm drain inlets

collection tank contaminated runoff water

01

contaminated runoff water larger debris screened metal screen

water trail

02

a

contaminated runoff water smaller debris settles

created by farah elmajdoub hrishikesh tailor

water trail

The City of Toronto sits on a watershed, where water always tends to drain, causing runoff. In order to be able to re-use this water, the design of the Arborescence path proposes filtering urban runoff water in addition to giving Toronto residents the opportunity to take part in the experience. Due to its flexible design, the concept can be applied anywhere, such as the Don River, or even the Humber River. The path offers to not only connect two elevations, but also educate the public by allowing them to observe first hand the five steps included in the filtration of this water runoff.

sandbed 03

run off water plants absorb contaminating elements water trail plant growth matter

04

metal deck

clean water

plants at the termination of water trail support pond habitat

pond

05

c o n c e p t

b

46

NXT C I T Y PRI Z E COMPE T I T I ON


3

c o n c e p t

c

a b

process sketches water purification process 01 collection 02 initial screening 03 sedimentation 04 absorption 05 ex-filtration

c d e

night time render sectional perspective day time render

NXT C I T Y PRI Z E COMPE T I T I ON

e

c o n c e p t

d

46


3

c o n c e p t

a : v o i d a n c e

a

created by rachel law

Situated in the heart of downtown Toronto, “A:VOIDANCE” describes the subtle interplay of the emotional tension and physical suspension manifested through this spatial discovery. This project disrupts the placelessness of Yonge-Dundas Square through complete disorientation of the user’s psyche. The cycle begins with the yearning for the familiar, then a dissipation of one’s understanding of their personal truth, until finally, a reinvention and reinterpretation of reality takes place into an entirely new perspective. This process of exploration is more than a commentary of the existing state of what we know as development, urbanism, community -- what we know as architecture. It is a call to action. Louis Kahn notes that “the whole motivation of presence is to express”. Where the current state of architecture lies stagnant is in the abandonment and neglect of this world of spaces in construction and light. They are but only in existence, not expression. The expressive, fluid, unruly forms is a merging of the physical and the ontological, fully personifying humanity in all aspects.

c o n c e p t

b

46

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O


3

c o n c e p t

e

f

d

g

process sketches digital model video still 1 video still 2 video still 3 video still 4 video still 5

c o n c e p t

a b c d e f g

c

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

46


3

c o n c e p t

~

m a r a c a n a

a

created by

c o n c e p t

zohra akbari

46

Despite Brazil’s growth into an economic superpower, it ranks high on inequality indexes and social development has been slow. This project explores the stark dichotomy between the rich and poor, and the formal and informal, in Rio de Janeiro. It is a response to current issues of inequality and gentrification as a result of nationalistic violence, where favelas are being expropriated for land prioritized for Olympic infrastructure. Residents are displaced to suburban slums, which lack transportation, infrastructure, and are socio-economically poor environments. Amidst these tensions, the stadium becomes the symbol of that conflict, and thus becomes an allegory of Rio’s broken society and contested lands. Historically the stadium was an important civic space, and through the dynamic of people and society, they have been appropriated and transformed to different uses under changed circumstances, providing insight into a country’s politics, history, and economy. This project transforms the stadium to create a unique space that reframes the relationships of Rio de Janeiro. With themes of symbolism and appropriation, the proposal brings the two homes together to renew communal bonds into a physical casa, rua, and outro mundo. It extends the tradition of appropriating the stadium where the evicted favelas are reborn in the Maracanã. The result is a charged space of fusion, the idea setting in which to engage dualities. b

STUDI O I N CRI T I CAL PRACT I CE


3

c o n c e p t

c

d

e

e

parti sketch map of Brazil, conflict drawing favelas and stadium fusion (1) map of Rio de Janeiro, favela expropriations favelas and stadium fusion (2)

c o n c e p t

a b c d

STUDI O I N CRI T I CAL PRACT I CE

46


3

c o n c e p t

s e r o t i n a e

a

created by

c o n c e p t

adrian chîu arnel espanol katherine swainson

Serotinae is a zip-line course near Webster’s Falls consisting of two steel pods suspended within the forest by thin tension rods. This creates a sense of suspense, as the structure ostensibly floats among the trees. The weight of zip-liners entering the pod causes the panels to open, revealing the surrounding environment akin to serotinae plants that only release their seeds due to environmental factors rather than the seasons. With one of the pods at the top of the falls, and the other at its base, the reveal creates a sense of disbelief as the zip-liner sees the zip-line move across Webster’s Falls.

46

b

SSE F COM PE T I T I ON


c o n c e p t

3

c

02

01

01

01

03 02 02 03

04

03

04

05 04

06

a b c d

kinetic operation diagram site section exterior render panel detail 01 perforated corten panel 02 composite tee assembly arm 03 welded aircraft cable guide

e

e

04 panel hinge rod panel exploded axonometric 01 perforated corten panel 02 composite tee arm assembly 03 bolted pod framing connection plate 04 circular HSS pod frame

f

SSE F COM PE T I T I ON

platform exploded axonometric 01 steel grate platform 02 076 circular HSS pod 03 c channel floor girder 04 rectangle HSS joist 05 c channel with roller connection 06 spring surrounding telescopic HSS 07 movable steel composite cuff

07

f

c o n c e p t

d

46


3

c o n c e p t

f l u i d a r c h i t e c t u r e

不a

created by

b

c

c o n c e p t

calvin fung

In architecture, the ability to traverse scales is key. It is here, with such system as a model, we can reconceptualize architecture’s basic components— the potential to “rethink the brick.” Synthetically designed granulates can produce a fluid architecture—a unique system that exhibits properties of a liquid through its reconfigurability, but is capable of self-stabilizing structurally, forming a solid-like state. Through a phenomenon called “jamming,” these metastable configurations are far from equilibrium and actually sit at “the edge of chaos.” It is this key concept that gives these systems great potential to evolve and adapt to natural and social pressures. The proposed construction system is accessible, 3D building blocks were digitally fabricated from wood materials requiring few tools to assemble. The relationship between the local elements and the global system is special in this case as the exact outcome cannot be planned. For an architecture to react requires that architecture adopts uncertainty in its formulation and materialization. A fluid architecture challenges conventional architectural practices and the foundation of permanence on which architecture was built.

46

L AK A COMPE T I T I ON 20 1 5


3

c o n c e p t

d

e particles formwork formwork organization 1 organization 2 morphology

c o n c e p t

a b c d e f

f

LAKA COMPE T I T I ON 20 1 5

46


photo essay

PH OT O E SSAY

112

PH OT O E SSAY


PH OT O E SSAY

photo essay

k u t l o u r

PH OT O E SSAY

113


PH OT O E SSAY

photo essay

c u l t u r e

114

PH OT O E SSAY


The following is a collection of thoughts and moments from the participants of Kultour 2016. One of the longest running architectural exchanges in our program, Kultour provides students with the opportunity to experience cities and cultures abroad. This past spring, 24 students embarked on a week-long journey through Germany and Italy, visiting 7 cities and numerous landmarks along the way. Suddenly we were treking through buildings and plazas we had only seen from the last row of a lecture hall. From getting lost in the back alleys of Venice to

caressing Tadao Ando’s concrete, this trip imparted lessons you’d be hard-pressed to find in any textbook. Without a doubt, this trip enriched our view of the world, and gave new substance to our understanding of the built environment and its associated cultural context. And what better way to learn about architecture than in Europe with your fellow archies? - Laura Herrera For more stories and photos, please visit: https:// issuu.com/lauraherrera4/docs/kultour_2016_3

PH OT O E SSAY

“I was equally excited for Italy’s famed hanging laundry as I was for Scarpa’s details.”

photo essay

PH OT O E SSAY

115


PH OT O E SSAY

photo essay

s p a c e

116

PH OT O E SSAY


PH OT O E SSAY

Casa della Memoria - Milan The Casa della Memoria translates to ‘House of Memory’. The building is a representation of the Milanese civilians’ experiences during the Fascist period in Italy. It offers a place for the public to record and share their experiences in an unfiltered manner. When visiting the building, we were given a personal tour by Pier Paolo Tamburelli, one of the principal architects of Baukuh. He claimed that there was no motive for the yellow staircase other than to evoke playfulness and warmth. When inside the building the lightness of the space brings relief and a sense of serenity, where everything is left exposed and there is nothing to hide. The building brings the intangible idea of memory into physical form and represents the solidarity of the Milanese people. Sana Kadri

“There is no reason behind the yellow staircase.” Housing Gallaratese - Milan

photo essay

Grand concrete sheer walls frame, characterize and distinguish Aldo Rossi’s addition to the Gallaratese II Housing Complex. His bold moves are expressed through construction techniques that subtly retain classical styles of order and symmetry. The ground floor highlights a space surrounded by these concrete walls which seamlessly blend into the context. You feel enclosed and curious - even shrouded - by a veil of grey. It is a long walk from beginning to end making you question the purpose of such a space. There are clues along the gutters, wet stains and bicycle racks, square uniform windows that cover the façade, and traces of red and green detailing that form pieces of a puzzle. Perhaps this space was filled with people, acting as a marketplace for the post-war Milanese inhabitants. Now it sits calm, quiet, empty, and showing obvious signs of time. Anthony Baduria

PH OT O E SSAY

117


PH OT O E SSAY

photo essay

d

e

t

a

i

l

118

PH OT O E SSAY


PH OT O E SSAY

Olivetti Shop - Venice The act of opening the door disrupts the motif; the user’s circulation through space becomes monumental.

The Brion-Vega Cemetery - Possagno Scarpa was deliberate in developing an architecture that embraces both life and death in its temporality. He conceived a meandering pathway through an isolated garden, and awakened a language through his careful ornamentation and layering of forms. Cast concrete and carefully crafted natural stone converse with one another. The sense of permanence within the built form is intentionally contrasted against the softness of the natural elements introduced and intended to further enhance the design throughout the passage of time. Krystine Kontos

photo essay

Stadel Museum - Frankfurt

PH OT O E SSAY

119


PH OT O E SSAY

photo essay

check our instagram! @ryersonkultour2016

p.102,109 Jean-Paul Guay p.105 Briana Zitella p.105 Amelia Phagoo p.107 Emily Phagoo p.107, 109 Sahil Saroy p.104, 106, 108, 109 Laura Herrera

120

PH OT O E SSAY


photo essay

PH OT O E SSAY

PH OT O E SSAY

121


46


46


CON CE PT

a r b o [ r e ] s c e n c e

storm drain inlets

collection tank contaminated runoff water

01

contaminated runoff water larger debris screened metal screen

water trail

02

a

contaminated runoff water smaller debris settles

farah elmajdoub hrishikesh tailor

water trail

The City of Toronto sits on a watershed, where water always tends to drain, causing runoff. In order to be able to re-use this water, the design of the Arborescence path proposes filtering urban runoff water in addition to giving Toronto residents the opportunity to take part in the experience. Due to its flexible design, the concept can be applied anywhere, such as the Don River, or even the Humber River. The path offers to not only connect two elevations, but also educate the public by allowing them to observe first hand the five steps included in the filtration of this water runoff.

sandbed 03

run off water plants absorb contaminating elements water trail plant growth matter

04

metal deck

clean water

plants at the termination of water trail support pond habitat

pond

05

concept

b

124

NXT C I T Y PRI Z E COMPE T I T I ON


CON CE PT

c

a b

process sketches water purification process 01 collection 02 initial screening 03 sedimentation 04 absorption 05 ex-filtration

c d e

night time view sectional perspective day time view

NXT C I T Y PRI Z E COMPE T I T I ON

e

concept

d

125


CON CE PT

a : v o i d a n c e

a

rachel law

Situated in the heart of downtown Toronto, “A:VOIDANCE” describes the subtle interplay of the emotional tension and physical suspension manifested through this spatial discovery. This project disrupts the placelessness of Yonge-Dundas Square through complete disorientation of the user’s psyche. The cycle begins with the yearning for the familiar, then a dissipation of one’s understanding of their personal truth, until finally, a reinvention and reinterpretation of reality takes place into an entirely new perspective. This process of exploration is more than a commentary of the existing state of what we know as development, urbanism, community -- what we know as architecture. It is a call to action. Louis Kahn notes that “the whole motivation of presence is to express”. Where the current state of architecture lies stagnant is in the abandonment and neglect of this world of spaces in construction and light. They are but only in existence, not expression. The expressive, fluid, unruly forms is a merging of the physical and the ontological, fully personifying humanity in all aspects.

concept

b

126

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O


CON CE PT

e

f

d

g

process sketches digital model video still 1 video still 2 video still 3 video still 4 video still 5

concept

a b c d e f g

c

4 T H YE AR ST UD I O

127


CON CE PT

~

m a r a c a n a

a

concept

zohra akbari

128

Despite Brazil’s growth into an economic superpower, it ranks high on inequality indexes and social development has been slow. This project explores the stark dichotomy between the rich and poor, and the formal and informal, in Rio de Janeiro. It is a response to current issues of inequality and gentrification as a result of nationalistic violence, where favelas are being expropriated for land prioritized for Olympic infrastructure. Residents are displaced to suburban slums, which lack transportation, infrastructure, and are socio-economically poor environments. Amidst these tensions, the stadium becomes the symbol of that conflict, and thus becomes an allegory of Rio’s broken society and contested lands. Historically the stadium was an important civic space, and through the dynamic of people and society, they have been appropriated and transformed to different uses under changed circumstances, providing insight into a country’s politics, history, and economy. This project transforms the stadium to create a unique space that reframes the relationships of Rio de Janeiro. With themes of symbolism and appropriation, the proposal brings the two homes together to renew communal bonds into a physical casa, rua, and outro mundo. It extends the tradition of appropriating the stadium where the evicted favelas are reborn in the Maracanã. The result is a charged space of fusion, the idea setting in which to engage dualities.

STUDI O I N CRI T I CAL PRACT I CE

b


CON CE PT

c

d

e

e

parti sketch map of Brazil, conflict drawing favelas and stadium fusion (1) map of Rio de Janeiro, favela expropriations favelas and stadium fusion (2)

concept

a b c d

STUDI O I N CRI T I CAL PRACT I CE

129


CON CE PT

s e r o t i n a e

a

Serotinae is a zip-line course near Webster’s Falls consisting of two steel pods suspended within the forest by thin tension rods. This creates a sense of suspense, as the structure ostensibly floats among the trees. The weight of zip-liners entering the pod causes the panels to open, revealing the surrounding environment akin to serotinae plants that only release their seeds due to environmental factors rather than the seasons. With one of the pods at the top of the falls, and the other at its base, the reveal creates a sense of disbelief as the zip-liner sees the zip-line move across Webster’s Falls.

concept

adrian chîu arnel espanol katherine swainson

b

130

SSE F COM PE T I T I ON


CON CE PT

c

02

01

01

01

03 02 02 03

04

03

04

05 04

a b c d

kinetic operation diagram site section exterior render panel detail 01 perforated corten panel 02 composite tee assembly arm

e

e

03 welded aircraft cable guide 04 panel hinge rod panel exploded axonometric 01 perforated corten panel 02 composite tee arm

f

assembly 03 bolted pod framing connection plate 04 circular HSS pod frame platform exploded axonometric 01 steel grate platform 02 076 circular HSS pod

SSE F COMPE T I T I ON

07

03 c channel floor girder 04 rectangle HSS joist 05 c channel with roller connection 06 spring surrounding telescopic HSS 07 movable steel composite cuff

f

concept

d

06

131


CON CE PT

f l u i d a r c h i t e c t u r e

不a

In architecture, the ability to traverse scales is key. It is here, with such system as a model, we can reconceptualize architecture’s basic components— the potential to “rethink the brick.” Synthetically designed granulates can produce a fluid architecture—a unique system that exhibits properties of a liquid through its reconfigurability, but is capable of self-stabilizing structurally, forming a solid-like state. Through a phenomenon called “jamming,” these metastable configurations are far from equilibrium and actually sit at “the edge of chaos.” It is this key concept that gives these systems great potential to evolve and adapt to natural and social pressures. The proposed construction system is accessible, 3D building blocks were digitally fabricated from wood materials requiring few tools to assemble. The relationship between the local elements and the global system is special in this case as the exact outcome cannot be planned. For an architecture to react requires that architecture adopts uncertainty in its formulation and materialization. A fluid architecture challenges conventional architectural practices and the foundation of permanence on which architecture was built. For the built application, see ‘Flow’ on page 70

b

c

concept

calvin fung

132

L AK A COMPE T I T I ON 20 1 5


CON CE PT

d

e particles formwork formwork organization 1 organization 2 morphology

concept

a b c d e f

f

L AK A COMPE T I T I ON 20 1 5

133


134


135


2

0

1

6


+

+

70

36

58

0

1

6

_

2

18

88

76

88

28

116

325 Magazine | 2015 - 2016  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

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