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RY E RS O N U N I V E RS IT Y

Department of Architectural Science 325 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3 (416) 979-5000 mag325@gmail.com

Š 325 Magazine 2012-2013 Ryerson University Department of Architectural Science All Rights Reserved All photographs and drawings are courtesy of students and contributors unless otherwise noted. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this publication, and assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. The opinions expressed herein are the responsibility of the contributors concerned. ISSN 1923-7774-04


TEAM Editor-in-Chief

Naveed Khan

Managing Editors

Kate Gonashvili Sarah Ives

Graphic Design Directors

RĂŠmi Carreiro Kate Gonashvili Sarah Ives

Graphic Design Team

Nicholas Ager Stephen Baik Victoria Chow Chris Chown Margot de Man Laurel Dorfman Jaspall Gill Dorothy Johns Gerald Karaguni Rachel Law Sahel Tahvildari

Sponsorship Coordinator

Heather Breeze

Sponsorship Team

Michelle Ashurov Jessica Chen Victoria Chow Margot de Man Jaspall Gill Min Jang Dana Gurevich Jamie Tong Stephanie Tung

Copy Director

Sarah Lipsit

Copy Editors

Dorothy Johns Jessica Walker

Events Coordinator

Jessica Walker

Print Coordinators

Kate Gonashvili Sarah Ives

Financial Coordinator

Naveed Khan


SPECIAL THANKS Interim Provost & Vice President Academic

Dr. John Isbister

Interim Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science

Dr. Sri Krishnan

Chair of the Department of Architectural Science

Professor Colin Ripley

Undergraduate Program Director

Professor Marco Polo

IT Specialist

Leo Roytman

Assistant IT Administrator

Ukeme Noach

Assistant Print Coordinator

Nene Brode

Photographers

RĂŠmi Carreiro, Arthur Goldstein Kate Gonashvilli


SELF

self–re•flex•ive [self-ri-’flek-siv] adjective

making reference to its own artificiality or contrivance; self-referential

A means of delivering and procuring an architectural education remains as elusive as navigating the physical world which we seek to create. With rapidly evolving technologies, increasing resource demands, and socio-cultural melding, defining a benchmark is becoming nearly impossible. As ever, we perpetuate our understanding of architecture with architecture; an over-arching meta-strategy contingent on precedent. Such self-reflexivity

lends itself towards treacherous selfappropriated, -appointed, and -applied theologies, nurturing an architecture that is paradoxically grounded in narcissistic philosophy. Then, perhaps, it is only through varied lenses of autonomous selfreference that we may begin to unravel the discourse of our discipline: we design and are designed; we are created, therefore we create. But, why? What amorous lust for the (in)tangible, (a)spatial, and

(a)temporal leads us headlong into the hedonistic incursion that we call ‘design’? What manner of selfinflicted obligation compels us to pass judgment on our human condition, what sense of ego imbues us with such holy sententiousness that we sanctimoniously engage in the act of ‘creation’? And though we may surreptitiously justify our esoteric right to architecture, the burning question still remains: how do we proceed?


F-REF


Dr. Sri Krishnan P.Eng. Interim Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science

The Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science at Ryerson University is committed to excellence in education and research. We are pleased to support 325 and its mandate of showcasing the creative excellence of our architectural science students. These brilliant, creative students continue to attract attention and turn heads with their designs. In the past year, our students completed an extreme makeover of a twostorey row house, transforming it into a fully accessible living space, and also travelled to Port Union, Newfoundland, to design

and construct a new waterfront area complete with playground, boardwalk and harbour. What’s more, our students recently won an Urban Design Award from the City of Toronto for a collaborative project where they imagined a better city and created solutions to civil challenges at 16 sites across Toronto. Our students of today are the architects of tomorrow. We can’t wait to see them leave their marks on the world. This publication is a snapshot of what’s to come. Enjoy!


Colin S. Ripley B.Eng., M.Sc, M.Arch., OAA, MRAIC Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of Architectural Science

Socrates’ well-known statement on the importance of self-reflection applies not only to the lives of individuals, of course, but also to the lives of institutions, professions and practices. It is a constant provocation and reminder of the dangers of acting by rote, that received wisdom is really not wisdom at all, that we need to act intentionally and from principle, and that intention and principle are not constants. In this context, it is remarkable – although not surprising - to me that the students who have

organized this volume of 325 have chosen self-reflexivity as their theme. In the past few years I have, more and more, seen a renewed determination among students to question the fundamentals of the professions in the building industry. In an age of climate change and significant humanitarian issues, how can we be clear about the goals of our work, both as individuals and as an industry? In a time of massive technological change, how can we re-imagine the roles of our professions, and to what end?

In an increasingly digital world, what value can we place on traditional concerns such as form, material, function? These are, of course, big questions with no easy answers. They are the type of question that I believe we should all be considering not only as students, but throughout our lives. Please join me in looking through the projects in the following pages, seeing how our students have taken up this task, and – maybe – finding a few answers.

The unexamined life is not worth living. attributed to Socrates


CONTENTS Autopoieticism 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

Chrysalis | 001 Quartarius | 003 Best Foot Forward | 007 Creative Office 2020 | 009 Textegrity | 013 Office 2020 | 017 Interview with Court Sin | 021

Hylomorphism 08 09 10 11 12 13 14

Night Market 2013 | 025 Limb Share | 029 The Good Neighbour | 033 Linking the Parallax | 035 Oakville Office | 037 Heavy Light | 041 Sound | Shape | Space | 045

Materialism 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Velo-City | 051 Culture of Outports, Brigus | 057 Conspicuous Consumption as Architectural Proxy | 061 The China Collection: Architecture as Jewelery | 065 Weighted Fragility | 067 T.O. Nature | 069 Manufactured Infrastructures | 071 Interview with Ulysses Valiente | 077


Idealism 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

r.EVOLVE | 081 Geometer’s Studio | 085 Aliyah | 087 Submerged | 089 Gardens of Suzhou | 095 Dexter M. Feral Elemantary School | 101 Interview with Nwamaka Onyenokwe | 105

(In)determinism 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Gardens of Suzhou | 109 Synapse | 111 Contemplative Space | 115 Church of Transcendence | 119 High Park Arts Centre | 123 Sorrento Centre | 125 Cloud Tower | 131

Deontologism 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

Symbiosis | 137 Sustainability + Durability | 143 Graduate Residence | 149 Oxygen Apartments | 153 Andokope School | 163 RUHSB | 167 An Architecture of Civility | 173


AUTO au•to•po•ieti•cism [aw-toh-poh-eete-ciz-uh m] noun

from the Greek (auto-) for “self”, and (poiesis) for “creation” or “production”, literally means “auto(self)-creation”, and expresses a fundamental dialectic between structure and function

The practice of architecture has been relentlessly subject to endless flux, and now more so than ever. New theories and expanding technologies are rampant, and the overlapping of so many apparently transparent dogmas has muddied our vision. Blind in a labyrinth of parametricism, we are losing

our connection to the ontological primitives which have served as the crucial standards upon which our discipline is founded. Yes, evolution is inevitable. Truthfully, it is encouraged, it is expected, it is necessary, it is an obligation. However, the integrity of architectural physiognomy is

incumbent on multi-tier efforts to selfaddress and self-maintain ideologies, structures, and organizations. Only through a dedication to an adaptive intelligence that communicates internal complexities coherently can we begin to bring clarity to the system, be it selfsustaining or all-encompassing.


OPOE


CHRYSALIS Warming Huts Competition 2013 01 Inverted Skid

02 Platform Structure

04 Grade Connections

05 Member Assembly

03 Boards + Skirts

Tiffany Cheung, Antonio Cunha, Dadin Duldul, Jason Ramelson, Matthew Suriano Chrysalis: a natural emergence of development; a microcosm of nature itself; constantly adapting and evolving in accordance with

the conditions at hand. Architecture often seeks to avoid ephemeral natural conditions in pursuit of a consistent interior environment. 06 Panel Installation

Construction Sequence

01

Axonometric Member + Panel Detail

02 03 04

07

06

05

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

2” x 2” Eastern White Cedar 2” x 2” CNC Milled Cedar Connections 18 Ga. Perforated Steel Gusset Plates 25 Ga. Perforated Steel Panels 1/4” Tension Rod Turnbuckle Braided Steel Cable


WARMING HUT COMPETITION 2013

Elevations

002


QUARTARIUS Ryerson Graduate Residence Ariel Cooke Zamora

Panel Assembly

Quartarius is born out of a merger between a residential building that fosters community, an open workspace with privileged spaces, and an inviting and enjoyable public space on the ground level. As the building curves gently towards the south, it widens the sidewalk to ease pedestrian traffic into the heart of Ryerson University from Yonge and Gould street, while allowing natural light to enter into public spaces. The west faรงade faces Yonge street, affording all three programs a common desirable view. Quartarius was designed through the marriage of program relationships and aesthetics,

exemplified by its structure and use of sustainable technologies. Program spaces such as offices and apartments are located along the north and south face of the building, while service spaces are arranged in the back. These spaces are more private and achieve a degree of opacity from a series of hyper-insulated composite panels. The panels undulate parametrically in relation to the privacy of the spaces on the north face of the building. Furthermore, the panels are held on a series of 3D trusses arrayed along the side of the building, following the structural gird. These trusses function as columns, thus allowing the building to have an open and flexible plan.

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

Acrylic Composite Panel LED Lighting Spider Connections Waterproofing Membrane 75 mm Extruded Polystyrene 100mm Roxul Vapour Barrier Interior Finish: Steel Panel (DMZ Spaces) Plaster on Lathe (Residential)

Axonometric Section


DESIGN STUDIO III

004


QUARTARIUS Design Studio III Diagrams 01 02 03 04

Structural Grid Structural Diagram Program Split Based on Grid Program


West Elevation

North Elevation

006


BEST FOOT FORWARD Stantec Window Gallery

RĂŠmi Carreiro, Naveed Khan, Mike Stock


[R]ED[U]X LAB

Technological advances have accelerated methods of fabrication that have been instrumental in manufacturing the most ubiquitous of objects. “Best Foot Forward” adopts contemporary fabrication techniques in contrast with its historic context to draw attention to this condition. Playfully deconstructing the

building’s heritage through the iconic McGregor Argyle sock, the design showcases the range of contemporary design tools used in design and production. The configuration and material palette of the components serve to draw attention to the window gallery as the shadow and lighting conditions continuously change

over the course of the day. The synthesis and contrasts among these elements highlight the innovations and shifts at play in Toronto’s Garment District that embrace the history and context of design yet continue to step out into a larger spectrum of contemporary creative industries. 008


CREATIVE OFFICE 2020 Office of the Future

Alykhan Neky

Situated at 40 Temperance St., in the heart of Toronto’s financial district, Creative Office 2020 is designed to reflect the social, economic, and technological values of the creative workplace of tomorrow. Office culture today continues to distance itself from standardization and uniformity, moving towards diversity and creativity. Therefore, Creative Office 2020 features ‘office landscapes,’ characterized by shared group work settings, temporary ownership of settings, and adaptable work spaces. This futuristic office seeks to redefine the term ‘efficiency,’ thus promoting a vision of office space that is no longer assessed simply by ‘rentable floor area,’ but instead by its response to programmatic

requirements and contribution to employee wellbeing. Furthermore, the contemporary diagrid system allows the building’s primary structure to be pushed to the perimeter of the floor plate, allowing a ‘free floor plan.’ This generates a barrier-free workspace that can be constantly reconfigured and updated over time to respond to the needs of different occupants. Strong vertical connections allow for easy interdepartmental collaboration and inter-storey visual connections. The diagrid system is structurally efficient, using 20% less steel than traditional high rises. The immense scale of the diagrid members creates a unique occupant experience while offering a bold structural expression on the façade.


INTEGRATION STUDIO I + II

010


01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Typical Wall Section 11 12 13 14 15

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15

Typical Office Floor Plan

Poured Concrete Steel Decking Perforated I-Beam Angle Bracket Steel Plate C-Section Spandrel Beam Primary Diagrid Node Panelised Steel Diagrid Cladding Primary Diagrid Member Diagrid Structure Centerline Split Structural Triangulated Mullion Mullion Tolerance Spacing - 30mm Mullion Angle Bracket (anchored to diagrid-prefab) Triple Glazed Curtain Wall (triangulated) Exterior Decorative Grid Member (shown beyond)


012


TEXTEGRITY: TEXTILE TENSEGRITY AND COMPLEX ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Cody Loeffen, Elijah Karlo Sabadlan

Tensegrity has been widely explored in contemporary architectural discourse as a result of the desire to achieve and express structural complexity in architectural design. Analysis began with an exploration of biomimicry that informs its application in emerging complex architectural engineering, followed by looking at architectural and/or non-architectural precedents

configuration into another, without losing its integrity after returning back to its original form, was assessed. Material explorations led to a focus on a particular form in Pena’s paper, “Application of the Tensegrity Principles on Tensile Textile Construction”, which illustrates the elastic potential of the material, allowing for the compressive struts to have a configuration that opens up the interior space. Tensile textile tensegrity systems provide a fascinating opportunity for promoting complexity in achieving that use the principles of tensegrity structural integrity in architectural systems. design and construction. The use of Numerous sketch models allowed fabric contributes to the aesthetic for the exploration of different quality of the architectural design, as forms, configurations, materials, it provides a certain organic quality and lengths of compressive struts to the space that it encloses. Fabric as a way to determine a stable also allows for more dynamic and structure. Black nylon pantyhose interesting spaces due to the variety was used to generate different of forms and colours that can be forms, and the ability of the tensile created. textile structure to fold from one


ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION CASE STUDIES Tensegrity has been widely explored as a result of the desire to achieve and express structural complexity in architectural design.

4 3/4� Compression Bars PTFE Membrane

Materials

014


TEXTEGRITY Advanced Construction Case Studies


016


OFFICE 2020 Office of the Future

Nikita Yakushev

As the workplace of today moves rapidly into the digital era, humanity must not forget the reality of things; thus the office of tomorrow must reflect and facilitate both.

Integrating Human Needs in a Physical Domain

Water, Nature, and Human Interaction are amongst the primary elements for the mental, physical and spiritual wellbeing of an individual. The site, surrounded by a river dock, two pedestrian access routes, and an abundance of vegetation including an adjacent parkette, provide a unique design opportunity to tap into all of these elements in the least intrusive way possible. The first two storeys of this mix-use office are therefore designed to embrace the adjacent assets and different programs

are integrated to work with the surrounding conditions. The ground floor provides easy access to retail facing the street (a); the two-storey restaurant bar benefits from private separate patio and an adjacent scenic access path (b); the coffee shop on the second level (c) holds direct view to the river docks, as well as publicly-accessible patio `pods`; and the ramp (d) connects the city core with the entire site, providing universal accessibility to all.


INTEGRATION STUDIO I + II

018


OFFICE 2020 Integration Studio I + II


Systems Integration

Window Detail

020


Court Sin architect | designer | instructor | author | artist Its been a while since I last saw you! Having recently attained your license, I’m sure you’ve been keeping busy? Staying active is key. I began the year by taking on a position as a Senior Architect at Forrec Ltd. I’m currently leading design on several very exciting international mixed use masterplans and looking forward to doing some more local work as well. Prior to that, I was the project architects for four adaptive reuse projects while leading the intern talent acquisition team at Quadrangle Architects Ltd. If that wasn’t enough, I’m also collaborating with the Agents of Urban Change (AoUC), writing articles related to my book and research, thesis advising, guest critiquing, painting whenever I can, and balancing all of it with a new family. Nothing short of dull. That’s definitely a change from the countless days you spent in studio learning architecture.

“Our role is to empower the value of design through cross collaboration and to inform decisions that benefit the greater community.” Interviewed by Naveed Khan

Intrinsically, the challenges you face in school and in the workplace are similar; it’s just a matter of your evaluation skills and the problem solving techniques that differ. There are a lot of things you learn in the workplace that simply can’t be learned in school. It really comes down to experience, reading the

situation, and countering with the appropriate reaction. But, certainly your education in architecture prepared you for the professional work environment to some extent? To tell you the truth, I have always been more of an artist than an engineer. I applied to the architectural program at University of Waterloo as a shot in the dark and I chose architecture because it offered a balance of design creativity and practical precision. Years later, my beliefs remain steadfast with some additional social sustainability insights, and my education continues to anchor me in design studios and cultural iconography. With some luck and a lot of hard work, my resume before Masters included experience working in boutique interior design firm, a municipal urban design department, an internationally acclaimed design firm based in New York, a respected architecture firm in Toronto, and a construction company where I was on site every morning at 6am to build a Saucier + Perrotte masterpiece. In other words, education in the classroom is one thing, but experience in the work environment is where you truly learn about the practice of architecture in totality.


understanding what is best for the team, the client, the project and the firm. Through real world experiences, the team realizes that it must work together towards a common end goal – a safe and well constructed, occupiable building or urbanconscious masterplan. Nowadays, I find myself endorsing the dream team studio and much like the Broken Social Scene or the Wu Tang Clan, the teams at Forrec Ltd. and the AoUC are an assembly of talents who choose to work together. And, it is like magic when we put a project in motion; everyone is in tune and good decisions are made quickly. How do your experiences within the professional setting compare to those in school? Looking back, I may not have been the keenest team player in school. I was used to being a lone gunman or part of a dynamic duo/ dream team of my choice. Assigned team work meant I had to balance my abilities with the abilities of the other members. There were times when the team didn’t mesh well and we would scramble work together the day before critiques, while other times it was a really good studio project and team experience. In school, the end goal is purposely unclear; studio is and always will be, an experiment. The professional environment is a lot more cut and dry; it’s either sink or swim. This creates an intrinsic respect when taking on projects and

How has your understanding of the built environment evolved since you left school and entered the professional realm? During my own education and recently as a guest critic, I recall how certain building codes were never a top priority in school. However, now I find myself reciting clauses verbatim. Architects have a responsibility to construct sound buildings that will survive our climate, and generally keep the public safe - no matter the style of design. Once you realize

that, it becomes clear why some designs never get past the stage of sexy paper renderings as they simply cannot be built to the realities of budgets and timelines. Did your education help you decipher the urban/rural context around you, and prepare you for producing architecture? I grew up on the east side of Toronto, and then moved out to the ‘burbs’. It freaked me out. Where were the people? In a way, it forced me to find new places and determine what resonated with me in a living environment and as an individual, rather than an architect. This experience impacted my Third Place realm research and developed the design work at the AoUC to create socially, environmentally and economically sustainable communities. It has also influenced my project specialization in adaptive reuse and retrofit architecture that utilizes existing buildings by breathing new programs into them. Do you feel like the city in which a student is educated influences their professional work in some way? Architectural knowledge is gained through experiencing spaces and understanding the memory associated with places. The city, as Aldo Rossi believes, has a genius loci that is a collective cultural memory, unavailable in the rural context. With the AoUC, we understand how and why developments are

conceived. For example, being mindful of existing communities and the vernacular as opposed to the formalist “alien space-ship” approach leads to municipal approvals, resident associations support, and the positive public reactions, producing responsible architectural interventions. As an instructor, what is your approach to teaching architecture? Architecture is an occupation that is historically built on knowledge bestowed from master to apprentice. Educators need to recall their own education order to encourage students to stay creative. A focus on symmetry and pattern is well and good if architectural research is your end goal. However, it emphasizes postulation more than implementation, which is ultimately what we are entrusted to do. Independent research and case study is important. Knowing what can be and has already been done encourages students to push their designs further. 022


HYLO O hy•lo•mor•phism [hahy-luh-mawr-fiz-uh m] noun

the doctrine that physical objects result from the combination of matter and form

Matter and form. Architecture presents an extraordinary kind of physical authenticity, nestled quietly between idealism and realism, existing between the conception and confirmation of the phenomenon. It invites a world of possibilities and opportunities rather than one of singularities or actualities.

Body and soul. We pursue the birth of something supernatural. With teleological intents, we carefully assemble matter, imbue it with form and administer it purpose. We coax it repeatedly, bolstering it iteration after iteration, until it breathes, animated and seeking self-fulfillment. It is a construct representative of our desires.

The reality is this: that which we seek to create is as alive and purposeful as we are. It is only once we accept this that we can begin to blur the lines between human and non-human into a system of endless potential.


OMOR 024


THE STOP’S NIGHT MARKET ‘13 Tiffany Cheung, Ailsa Craigen, Sarah Ives, Naveed Khan, Ray Kim, Rachel Law, Gary Luk, Aris Peci, Glearda Sokoli, Mike Stock, Ariel Cooke Zamora

The 2013 [R]ed[U]x Lab design proposal for The Stop’s Night Market cart embraces the notion of change over time. Despite the brevity of the event, many variables evolve during the evening including the ambient light, volume of people, and food availability. The design serves as both a vessel for the display and serving of culinary works, but also an artifact accentuating the event’s dynamics. Using a digitally fabricated framework, the design serves as a lattice supporting a tessellation of components that may be removed or altered by attendees, ultimately transforming the cart into a

transformable lantern by nightfall. The premise is that upon coordination with the assigned culinary organization, [R]ed[U]x Lab would design the components to create a suitable taxonomy of units ranging from serving containers or utensils to small lights or keepsakes. The design intent is that the cart begins the evening as a monolithic mass that, over the course of the event, is dismantled and disseminated throughout the crowd casting a wide network of illumination while simultaneously transforming the cart into an illuminated focal point as the night draws to an end.


[R]ED[U]X LAB

026


NIGHT MARKET ‘13 [R]ed[U]x Lab

The design serves as both a vessel for the display and serving of culinary works, but also as an artefact accentuating the event’s dynamics.

FROM PROCESS

TO PRODUCTION


028


LIMB SHARE Digital Tools 01

Justin Oh, Elijah Karlo Sabadlan

Addressing the needs of children in developing countries around the world, this design proposal provides an affordable and adaptable rehabilitation prosthetic that a child could use as their limbs and muscles continue to grow. The proposal is a redesigned prosthesis

with changeable parts, particularly with a pylon that can be passed on from one child to another in need. It can be made using recycled materials, and efficiently packed for delivery to post-conflict areas.

02 04

Assembly Detail

Composed of recycled materials, the prosthesis can be efficiently packed for delivery to post-conflict areas.

01 02 03 04

Steel Pylon Socket* Front Plate* Back Plate*

*Recycled plastic material

03


DIGITAL TOOLS 01:

02:

03:

In Lebanon and Columbia, survivors are only entitled to free replacement prosthetics after 2 and 5 years respectively - a time period not adapted to the needs of a growing child.

Recycled plastic can be used as the material for making more affordable prosthetic limbs for amputees.

+

+

[

=

]

=

The prosthetic can be disassembled into smaller pieces, all of which are replaceable to accomodate the changing size of a growing child amputee

030


LIMB SHARE Digital Tools

4191

casualties were recorded due to mines and other explosive remnants of war [ERW] in 2010

44%

70%

of mines and ERW victims are civilians

68%

40%

of these survivors suffered traumatic injuries causing limb amputations

of all civilian casualties were children under the age of 18

of casualties occurred during livelihood activities


032


THE GOOD NEIGHBOUR Design Studio I Ruslan Ivanytskyy

Massing and Site Negating areas of the original block of the site, a void was created in the centre to create a usable and light filled space throughout the building. This courtyard provided a break in the continuous street front where pedestrians could relax in a park-like atmosphere.

Angled street walls towards the opening of the void encourage movement into the building’s core and the outdoor patio. A large exterior staircase sweeps up traffic to the second level, creating a more direct link to upstairs amenities.

Raised atrium and glazed active spaces create the essense of lighter spaces, creating larger active spaces with more access to light Shaded area is used a roof terrace, includes exercise and leisure space for a holistic health centre and natual remedy.

Terraced areas (shaded) provide well lit, usable outdoor circulation and leisure space, and provide sunlight into the patio + ramp area during key parts of the day. The glass atrium and greenery helps to diffuse sharp direct sunlight.


DESIGN STUDIO I

034


LINKING THE PARALLAX Ryerson Students Residence

Haya Alnibari

The Ryerson Students Residence of Photographic Preservation for graduate students sits on the vivid corner of Bay and Dundas, in the heart of downtown Toronto. Similar to photographic preservation, this project borrows the idea of revealing the origin of the photograph/design and identifying its evolutionary process. That is, the project began as a pavilion advertising the developing Students Graduate Residence, and later expanded into form and geometry, responding to the needs of the student residence program. As a result, an asymmetrical building was created; a rectilinear facade in the northwest leads gradually into a curved surface

with irregular repetitions of glazing which permit a variety of views and allow sufficient exposure of daylight while ensuring that the privacy of the apartments is maintained. The program is divided into two sections, one designated for student dormitories and the other for student workspace. The residence embraces thirtyfive units, varying from bachelors to two-bedroom units; each floor includes a study lounge and a laundry room, and one floor is designated to amenities that house a gym and an outdoor terrace. The workspace includes a library, labs, galleries and a bar. The building also has an underground parking and an outdoor courtyard.


DESIGN STUDIO III

The project offers a visual link between typological differences of two adjoining buildings with different functionalities.

036


OAKVILLE OFFICE Office of the Future Lydon Whittle The design intent for this Oakville site is to create an architectural expression that responds to the contrasting levels between the 16 Mile Creek waterfront, village, and park. The design seeks to revitalize the adjacent creek area and transform the current parking lot site into an iconic architectural

expression that rejuvenates the urban fabric of Oakville’s downtown core, while facilitating a working environment suitable for creative industries or service oriented office types.


INTEGRATION STUDIO I + II

…creating a memorable and iconic impression that resonates as the centerpiece…

038


OAKVILLE OFFICE Integration Studio I + II

The form of the building responds to the change from low-rise to mid-rise residential buildings. The angled portions of the facade draw attention to the park, representing a natural progression of time. Similarly, the quick, sharp opening to the bridge highlights the multiplied circulation above and below the bridge. The 9m-cantilevered slab provides an overhead shelter around the entire building, an extension of the public domain at the retail ground level. A pure monolithic articulation of the mass was intended to draw attention to the building while creating a memorable impression that resonates as the centrepiece of Oakville’s core.

Interior

01

02

07

08 Facade Detail 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Reinforced Concrete Slab

Double Glazing Panel Drop Ceiling Space 600 mm Spandrel Panel Horizontal Mullion Double Glazing Panel Maintenance Catwalk 600 mm Maintenance Catwalk Slab Anchor Wood Slats 350 mm

03

04 05

09

06 Exterior


01 Skin SKIN Vertical Wood Fins VERTICAL WOOD FINS Glass Curtain Wall GLASS CURTAIN WALL

02 Circulation

CIRCULATION

Primary Circulation Seconday PRIMARY CIRCULATION Circulation SECONDARY CIRCULATION ELEVATOR CORES Elevator Cores

03 Spaces

SPACES

Rentable Office Space RestaurantRENTABLE LevelOFFICE SPACE MechanicalRESTAURANT LevelLEVEL MECHANICAL LEVEL AccessibleACCESSIBLE Rooftop ROOF TOP Retail Space RETAIL SPACE

Exploded Axonometric

Structural Composition

Circulation Concept

040


HEAVY LIGHT Michael Suriano

While the Heavy Light installation is decidedly not a work of architecture, it can be viewed as embodying many prominent issues with which architects engage on a daily basis. These issues, inherent to the physical manifestation of a designed artefact, can be paralleled (albeit at a much larger scale) to architectural decisions which occur during the

process of design including issues of form, materiality, aesthetics, structure, and constructability. These architectural concerns when engaged with and understood through a corporal means aid the designer in forming a bodily understanding of and relationship with them. Most notable within the Heavy Light installation, both in

the finalized artefact and within the design process, was the opportunity to think through craft and materials as well as engage with the unavoidable notions of chance and failure in design. Critical in bridging the theoretical and physical divide in architecture, thinking through materials and craft allows one to make design decisions in real time,

ad hoc and in situ, drawing direct correlation to the material affects each architectural gesture entails. These issues, which are inherently applicable to the physical realm of architecture, necessitate that one is able to accept and design with them in mind.


MASTER’S THESIS

042


HEAVY LIGHT Master’s Thesis


PROCESS Digital Fabrication | CNC Milling and Construction of Formwork

044


SOUND|SHAPE|SPACE Sean Robbins

This work seeks to embark on a radically different understanding of space that sheds its preconceived attributes. Born from a criticism of the imbalanced approach to architectural design, which focuses on “form”, Sound|Shape|Space aims to redeem ‘space’ as the inextricable, once forgotten partner

of form in the design process. Space is reframed in an ontological manner as it relates to architecture, that is, as having to do with “being”. To accomplish this, sound becomes pivotal, constituting a catalyst in the reaction with form that brings ontological space to life within architecture. Sound is

a spatial hermeneutic – a tool we use to understand space – and for this reason acts as the starting point and lens through which the radical recalibration of space is to be understood. By using sound in reaction with form, the work engages in the design of space in a metaphysical sense, as it relates to

being, namely, that of human social practice. At its heart, this work is not about sound or space, or even architecture for that matter. It is about designing the way in which humans exist.


MASTER’S THESIS

046


SOUND|SHAPE|SPACE Master’s Thesis

By using sound in reaction with form, the work engages in the design of space in a metaphysical sense, as it relates to being, namely, that of human social practice.


048


MATE ma•te•ri•al•ism

[muh-teer-ee-uh-liz-uh m] noun

the theory that regards matter and its motions as constituting the universe, and all phenomena, including those of mind, as due to material agencies

Long before our minds could have considered consciousness, our bodies were busy seeking a means to shelter ourselves from the world. With soft, unpracticed hands, we scooped up the primordial dust from which we were born and began to create. We built primitive huts. We erected glorious temples. We laid out sprawling cities that implausibly rose up from the earth.

With empathetic tenderness, we manipulate our world into realized, tangible, conceivable forms, ultimately shaping the way we think, feel, and exist. While such feats may seem remarkable, are they really that surprising? We are, after all, fundamentally one and the same with the universe. With every novel material exploration, we discover some hidden

reality about ourselves. Architecture is, and has always been, a product of matter acting upon matter; an elemental amalgamation manifesting that we and the universe are one in the same. Surely, there could not exist a more intimate process to comprehending the truth of who we genuinely are.


ERIA 050


‘VELO-CITY’ Frankfurt, Munich, Berlin, Paris

The inaugural Frankfurt Studio 2013 focused on two academic objectives: Examination of postwar reconstruction in an urban and historic context, and the concept of a Transit City and how to design 21st century architecture in this new urban context.


OPTION STUDIO: GERMANY

Founded and led by Professor Yew-Thong Leong, 12 Architecture Option students were located within the studios of the Fachhochschule Frankfurt am Main’s architecture school during the month of June 2013, examining the transit infrastructure of Frankfurt am Main and designing a multi-use bus terminal adjacent to the Frankfurt (Main) Hauptbahnhof, one of the busiest central railway stations in Europe and the busiest in Germany. Extensive predesign studies were conducted prior to travels, and post-travel documentation included an exhibition and a comprehensive project document.

052


VELO-CITY Option Studio: Germany

Frankfurt Studio 2013 represents a new iteration of architectural studies cooperation in the 21-year history of academic exchanges between Ryerson’s and FHFFM’s architectural programs.

In addition, the four weekends during the month-long tenure were spent in Frankfurt, Munich, Berlin and Paris to examine the varying urban context of each city and to study how the process of infill construction and reconstruction has shaped, and continues to shape, these evolving historic cities.


054


VELO-CITY Option Studio: Germany


Knowing something is very different than experiencing something. Frankfurt Studio aimed to place a student into Germany’s (and possibly one of EU’s) largest and most important city for thirty days to eat, sleep, live, travel, study, work, and experience what the city has to offer in the context of her architectural and city planning traditions. By all accounts, this experience was transformative for the students.

056


THE LOOKOUT Brigus 2012

Tricia Arabian, Calvin Evans, Philip Evans, Joanne Gust, James Munroe, Andrew Pruss, Byron Rodway, Michael Rosada, Wayne Rose, Miles Rees Spear, Andrea Vettoretti, Alana Young

Culture of Outports is an initiative that uses cultural planning and architectural thinking to contribute to communities in Canada’s historic outports. In 2012, a “community build” project was led by students in Brigus, Newfoundland, a historic fishing community looking to develop new, sustainable strategies for its postfisheries culture and economy. In this project, students worked with Brigus residents to study the history and significance of the town and to build a small-

scale intervention on a historic lighthouse trail. This intervention, a bright red deck on a rocky outcrop, has inspired increased use of the trail and various programming initiatives for locals and tourists. Modest interventions like this can be the first step in stimulating local cultural and business activity. During the research phase, the lighthouse trail (despite its cultural history and rich possibilities) had become underused and difficult to identify. In consultation with the community, the team

decided it was important to bring more awareness to the trail, to encourage its use and stimulate local and tourist engagement in this important cultural resource. The site we selected is nestled in the trail’s rocky terrain; it affords views of the ocean and town, and is surrounded by low-lying bushes and berry patches. The constructed decking denotes a destination point, a gathering place, a lookout, and a visual reminder of the trail itself. Its design plays off local wood

construction such as docks, boardwalks, and piers, and incorporates the use of traditional dry stack stone-walls, while the bright red colour refers to the red of the lighthouse and allows visibility of the deck from many points on the trail and across the bay. Since the structure was built, the Brigus community has taken the initiative to further develop the lighthouse trail, allowing greater accessibility and awareness of a significant cultural resource and heritage landscape. http://cultureofoutports.com/brigus/


CULTURE OF OUTPORTS

The bright red deck on a rocky outcrop has inspired increased use of the historic trail.

058


Exploded Axonometric

Plan

Section


060


CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION AS ARCHITECTURAL PROXY Razmig Titizian

North Elevation

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2.5

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MASTER’S THESIS

Retail Showroom Clay Production Area Design Studio A Design Studio B Workshop A Workshop B

Drying Area Buffing and Polishing Illustration Glazing Kiln Support Spaces

Contemporary architecture in emerging economies is at risk of losing rich cultural identity in their built environments, since much of today’s reaction is driven by a fixation on superlative ostentatiousness as the normative design process. This thesis asserts that there are several attributes of architectural consumption that emerging economies could adopt, in order to sustain their cultural identity through architecture. This will be achieved through the inclusion of both past cultural traditions and current global trends; both will be demonstrated in the thesis project in Guangzhou, the centre of China’s

industrial market and growing urban centre. The Guangzhou Porcelain Factory is an architectural response to the current consumerist lifestyle that has imbued the profession. Too often, architecture reacts to spectacle, revelling in unorthodox and extreme forms for the sake of attracting attention and competing amongst economies on the international stage. The design of the factory flows with the growing consumerist lifestyle while simultaneously integrating aspects of past rich, cultural identity. In this manner, architecture is able to advance in the natural progression of societies and their resilient environments. By formulating three 062


CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION AS ARCHITECTURAL PROXY Master’s Thesis

critical strategies that respond to several of the concerns brought about through conspicuous consumption as architectural proxy, the factory features aspects of overt detailing and finishes, while the design is very much driven by the cultural lineage of industry. It is focused on the functionality and efficiency of porcelain production, and includes traditional Chinese architecture elements, thus communicating the remarkable culture of industry from the past to the present. The Guangzhou Porcelain Factory is only one instance where the sensitive issue of cultural identity and the way its foundations are steeped in architecture are shaken and readjusted according to the demands of the time. In fashioning a uniquely polemic, contemporary work of architecture, this thesis presents an instance where one is able to rethink architecture in the context of socio-

cultural and technical imperatives of modernity – reformulating architecture according to formal, progressive, and contextual factors. The Guangzhou Porcelain Factory is suggestive of a return to built environments that are responsive to the unique culture, site specificity, and lifestyle of societies everywhere. The overall goal is to communicate cultural identity and “worth” in the built context rather than just producing symbols of obsession, power, and status.

Ground Floor Plan

B South Entrance

Show Window

Shipping and Recieving

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01 North Lobby 02 South Lobby 03 Retial Showroom 04 Sales 05 Sales with POS 06 Floor Manager’s Office 07 Packaging and Parcel Room 08 Clay Production Area (Outdoors) 09 Clay Storage 10 Generator Closet 11 Garbage and Recycling 12 Storage 13 Custodian’s Room

14 15 16 17 18 19 MR 20

Design Studio A Design Studio B Workshop A Plaster and Bronzing Room Large Supplies Storage Garbage Room Mechanical Room (below Workshop B)

Ground Floor Plan 01 North Lobby 02 South Lobby 03 Retail Showroom 04 Sales 05 Sales with POS 06 Floor Manager’s Office 07 Packaging and Parcel Room 08 Clay Production Area (Outdoors) 09 Clay Storage 10 Generator Closet

11 Garbage and Recycling 12 Storage 13 Custodian’s Room 14 Design Studio A 15 Design Studio B 16 Workshop A 17 Plaster and Bronzing Room 18 Large Supplies Storage 19 Garbage Room 20 Mechanical Room (below Workshop B)


The Guangzhou Porcelain Factory is a response through architecture to the current consumerist lifestyle that has imbued the profession.

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

B

B

up

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down down

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Workshop B Wedged Clay Storage Large Storage Transfer Cart Storage Garbage Room Drying Area Outdoor Workshop

Second Floor Plan 21 Workshop B 22 Wedged Clay Storage 23 Large Storage 24 Transfer Cart Storage 25 Garbage Room 26 Drying Area 27 Outdoor Workshop

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27 28 29 30 31 32 33

VIP Showroom Private Sales POS and Safe Room Office Staff Room Garbage Room Large Storage

Third Floor Plan 28 VIP Showroom 29 Private Sales 30 POS and Safe Room 31 Office 32 Staff Room 33 Garbage Room 34 Large Storage

064


THE CHINA COLLECTION Architecture as Jewellery

Razmig Titizian

The China Collection is a response to our current consumerist society and its impact on the field of architecture. The three pieces in this collection are a satirical reaction to the glorification of many contemporary works of architecture that have served no need, other than that of competing with one another on

the international stage, especially between emerging economies. The CCTV Headquarters, The Beijing National Stadium, and the Beijing National Aquatic Centre are all examples of ostentatious architecture in China that have not been able to serve their intended program. Instead, they showcase inefficient spaces, rely on spectacle

and aesthetics, extreme forms, and have become commodities, much like jewellery. As such, the Bird’s Nest ring, Watercube Bangle, and CCTV Necklace have been appropriated, taking these “iconic” buildings and over-glorifying them into commodities.


CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURAL PRAXIS

066


WEIGHTED FRAGILITY GEOMETER’S STUDIO Dorothy Johns

In response to the properties of the materials themselves, this small studio space in the forest emphasizes the force of gravity acting on the heavy concrete, while exaggerating the weightlessness of wood in comparison. These qualities are then exemplified by hiding connection details, allowing basic geometrical forms to take visual precedence. Privileging the subtlety of joints also reveals the insinuation of dynamic movement, formally creating a sliding effect, extruding the

wood to become cantilevered forms hovering above ground. Sliding the cubic geometries also creates clerestory windows allowing for deeper invitation of natural light, while vertically and materialistically dividing interior programming and spaces. Juxtaposing heavy and lightweight materials, while maintaining streamlined detailing and invisible connections created this modest, yet seamlessly dynamic and contemplative studio space.


MATERIALS AND TECTONICS

068


T.O. NATURE Office of the Future Jessica Walker

The inclusion of nature harmonizes increased social interactions and improves functional space. This combination of elements establishes intellectual benefits and improved living conditions within architecture. T.O. Nature recognizes the need for improved working conditions within dense urban areas: in doing so, an office tower has been derived to create a physical and visual contact with nature. Nature, in this case, can be defined as trees, shrubs, owers, and other forms of vegetation, fresh air or water. The project addresses primary,

secondary and tertiary levels of green interactions; O20 looks to create a healthier, more sustainable community within the office environment. Natural elements such as trees and plants are integrated throughout the building by acting as spatial separators in three different ways; the first are atria; primary green spaces, which exist on every oor. Secondary elements are walls that incorporate greenery, such as green walls or vine-clad walls, while the third tertiary element is furniture, which itself includes greenery.


INTEGRATION STUDIO I + II

The faรงade began as a functional and sustainable shading element, but progressed into a signature for the structure, allowing the green interior to be expressed externally. It finally developed into large coloufully printed panes

of glass of varying transparency, which was dependant on its placement to protect different levels of privacy, and ultimately became a defining feature of the building. 070


MATURED INFRASTRUCTURES Karl Sarkis

Serving the movement of people and goods, infrastructures of mobility (e.g. roadways, expressways, railways) guide city growth by framing and connecting sites to accommodate new developments. For decades, infrastructures of mobility have inspired architects to explore how forms of maturation could be achieved in architecture. This thesis project strategizes how architecture can (i) emulate, (ii) hybridize with, and

(iii) liberate from typical types of infrastructure, as a means of serving a more prioritized role in guiding the progression of urban planning. These strategies are tried in a design proposal that uses architecture to reconnect two divided precincts in Toronto’s Don Lands by extending the recreational activities of a new park space over an existing railway infrastructure, ultimately maturing the role that new infrastructures can play in growing the city.

By emulating, hybridizing with, and liberating from types of infrastructure, architecture serves a more prioritized role in guiding city growth.


MASTER’S THESIS

072


MATURED INFRASTRUCTURES Master’s Thesis


(i) emulate a. connect physically Architecture establishes physical connections between sites to serve the movement of people at an urban scale. b. support changing uses Architecture supports the change of seasonal activities throughout the year.

(ii) hybridize with a. diffuse the figure-ground Architecture mediates the traditional divided relationship between itself and infrastructure. b. activate the void Architecture introduces new public activities to the terrain of infrastructure; i.e. infrastructure as destination.

(iii) liberate from a. encourage active mobility Architecture prioritizes active forms of mobility (walking, jogging, cycling, etc). b. bridge divides Architecture offers pedestrian dedicated physical connections where other infrastructures create divide.

074


MATURED INFRASTRUCTURES Master’s Thesis

Section at Gym/Skatepark

01

01 Metal mesh guard 02 Wood decking

02

Section at Pool/Pond 03 Water surface

03

(frozen in winter) 04 Mosaic floor

04


076


Ulysses Valiente architectural science graduate | blogger Why did you select architecture as your field of study? I have always wanted to be an architect since I was a kid; I was fascinated by it since I was in grade 6. My parents always saw a creative spark and sensibility in me, and encouraged me to pursue this field. What have you been doing postgraduation? I have decided to share my architecture experience via blog. I wanted to show students that even if you are not the best, you can still persevere and succeed. It got a lot of attention beyond my Facebook friends, including architecture students across the world and other bloggers. What have you learned from architecture school? Can you share any details of insights gained from your experience at Ryerson?

�Architecture has to break past social boundaries. It has to empower communities and benefit everyone...� Interviewed by Diana Schembri

Architecture school has taught me how to apply things in different ways; most importantly that architecture is not limited. I go to comedy clubs, just to see the relationship of how architecture can be created without the built form. The actors have to create the scene,

the mood, and the setting they are in. Architecture has taught me to explore and always be open to the world around us. During my degree I was highly involved in AIAS, which gave me the chance to travel and meet other architecture schools across America. It gave me a chance to see architecture outside the city. With the rigor and challenges that come with architecture school, it built in me a strong sensibility, taught me to be strategic and resourceful. How does the working industry compare to studying at Ryerson? There is a big divide between the real world and the working world. School provides you with an architecture base, and firm ground to stand on. It should teach you to pick up tasks quickly. It does not directly prepare you for the workplace but the proficiencies in completing day to day tasks. If you had the chance, is there anything you would add to the curriculum or put more emphasis on? Currently we are in an age where the market doesn’t have a great job availability; it is a


competitive market. Today we should have courses on management and entrepreneurship so that people can use their architecture training for business opportunities. Also, the recent implementation of a co-op program is a benefit for every student. I think that learning a little bit from the workplace and coming back to school will be able to teach students how to be a better designer, how to be strategic, how to cope under pressure and how design ideas are applied in real world constraints. If anything, sustainability should be taught as natural as breathing. It should be taught, as the simplest of things can be incorporated first hand. How is Ryerson’s academic approach to learning about architecture influenced by its placement in the city? The city is your playground. Toronto is a city of different neighborhoods stitched together. The buildings that your professors will talk about are just few walks away. It really enriches the learning experience. You get to explore the city and see new developments. What trends do you feel are important in architecture? We need to care about sustainability, especially in cities where we waste a lot of resources. Understanding energy flows and how to make it integral to

comprehensive building is crucial. Public interest is also important. Architecture is known for being elitist; it is more associated to the wealthy. How do we make design beneficial and accessible to those who are not so affluent? Architecture has to know how to empower communities and benefit everyone!

themselves from the world and it is not the best way to promote the profession. There needs to be a way to help raise awareness to the public about design. We walk through and amongst buildings wherever we are. If we want to stay relevant in the 21th century, we designers need to reach out to the rest of the world.

“Architecture is a lifestyle and a passion. If you really want this, then despite all the crap you’ve been through, you kind of love it. Love what you learn.“ What would you recommend to someone studying, and/or starting their undergraduate degree in architecture? I have learned a lot form the architecture school. Don’t be afraid of failure. Although it is brutal and bitter, it makes you a little more aggressive and makes you more of a fighter and a resilient individual. How do you foresee your role within the profession of architecture? As an individual, I would like to brand myself as a person who wants to mediate architecture to the world and the world to architecture. Architects and students of architecture tend to isolate

078


IDEA i•de•al•ism

[ahy-dee-uh-liz-uh m] noun

the doctrine that asserts that reality, or reality as we can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial

We are all concurrently noetically engaged, our hearts and souls yearning for affirmation that what we are, what we hope and will and believe, is significant. Despite this, we continue to remain blissfully unaware of the infinite opportunities our

consciousness presents us. We see, touch, hear, smell, taste, but the very senses that guide us deceive us all the more. It is not the tangible that compels us, rather the structures constructed within our consciousness that make the immaterial palpable. It is our lust for the phenomenological

that evokes us; it transports the spirit and mind, it influences the emotions, it shapes our space and time. The mind creates our world. In reality, our truest world is a fantasy. Making the fantasy a reality: that is architecture.


ALISM


r.EVOLVE SSEF Design Competition 2013 2013 Award of Merit Recipient

Gary Luk

The mission of r.Evolve is to act as a catalyst for the evolution of Toronto’s cultural scene. The r.Evolve pavilion is a focal point where people may come together to celebrate Canadian festivals, with the fundamental goal of transforming the way in which viewers understand the world through motion picture.

ACSource Source A/C

The design was conceived to support temporary yearly festivals, and centres around the concept of ‘adaptability for change’. r.Evolve is designed to be manipulated to fit almost any site, provide a medium for film broadcasting and branding, while also welcoming the arrival of guests to the pavilion.

A temporary steel pavilion that celebrates Canadian culture and arts.


DESIGN STUDIO III

082


r.EVOLVE SSEF Design Competition 2013

r.Evolve pavilion is a threshold for people to come together and celebrate Canadian festivals with the goal of transforming the way people see the world through motion picture.

Public gathering space

Emphasized circulation

Outdoor booths Sheltered space

Media promotion

The structure is entirely composed of lightweight hollow steel members and allows for easy transportation of components. Modularity of the component systems suggest adaptability, sustainability, affordability, and

ease of construction. The use of tensioned steel cables and a mechanized pulley/track system allows for the rotation of the roof structure that features waterproof LED panel media boards for innovative communication.

Public gathering space Accessibility Media production Festival activities

Public gathering space Information Media promotion Media board/film screen


01 05 Tension Cable/ Tension Cylinder Detail

02

06 Tensile Cross Brace Connection 03

04 07 Pin Connection Detail

Assembly Detail 01 02 03 04

Print LED 50 Panels Stretched Fabric Steel Trusses Prefabricated Perforated Floor Panels

08 Girder to OSWJ Detail

084


GEOMETER’S STUDIO Materials and Techtonics

Christopher Chown

...the condition of the joint is one that is not mass-produced but represents the condition of layers...

Exploded Axonometric

The idea shaping this small studio was to extend beyond simple geometries and mathematics to embody a layered approach, where a multiplicity of factors are considered in a holistic sense. Site, structure, light, materials, program, footprint and circulation serve as the method of computations to define adjacencies where the definition of one factor

is not in and of itself, but rather encompass all additional elements as well. In this sense the condition of the joint is one that is not mass-produced but represents the specific condition of these layers in itself, where the studio determines a relationship between matter and force, ultimately reflective of the overall concept and approach. Section

Elevation


MATERIALS AND TECTONICS

Plans

Section

086


ALIYAH Sukkahville Competition 2013 Christopher Chown, Rachel Law, Gary Luk, Ariel Cooke Zamora

The single sweeping motion evolves into the walls and ends as the schach, guiding the dweller’s eyes up to the stars.

This sukkot is a reflection on trials and tribulations, on faith and beliefs and on God’s provision and celebration. Aliyah serves as a physical manifestation of this time not as something to dwell upon but to be conscious of and rejoice. Wrapped into an organic form, Aliyah embodies this journey that can be paralleled to the historical wanderings of the Israelites as a reflection of God’s provision in this time. As a solid entity the pavilion originates from the ground, reinforcing the inextricable ties that the life of the Jewish people

have to the Land. As it begins its ascension to the Heavens, the single sweeping motion evolves into the walls and ends as the schach, guiding the dweller’s eyes up to the stars. The users are led into a phenomenological spatial experience as the form ascends and wraps into itself, creating an intimate space of shelter, contemplation, and reflection. This dynamic procession from a public, profane space to one of spiritual importance is, in itself, a journey, a reminder, and ascension.


SUKKAHVILLE COMPETITION 2013

088


SUBMERGED The Ontario Water Centre Damineh Dehnadfar, Aaron Henderschott, Chanhoo (John) Kim, Pegah Rategh, Dorian Resener, Sean Robbins 01

HSS WELDED CATWALK SUSPEND FROM ROOF STRUCTURE

02

PREFABRICATED HSS WELDED FRAMIN

LIGHTWEIGHT STEEL FRAMING

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300 x 600 MM WWF STEEL

310 x 50MM STEEL JOISTS @ 1500MM OC

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HEAVY STEEL FRAMING

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CONCRETE SUBSTRUCTURE

10 11 12 13 14

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01 HSS welded catwalk suspended from roof structure

02 Prefabricated HSS welded framing 03 300 X 600mm WWF steel beam @

300 x 600M

300 x 3

columns 04 310 X 50mm steel joists @ 1500mm O.C. 05 300 X 600mm WWF steel girder 600 x 600 MM S 07 06 300 X 300mm WWF steel column 07 600 X 600 mm spread footing 08 200mm reinforced concrete slab 200 MM R 08 09 200mm concrete shaft 200MM CONC. SHAFT 10 Cast-in-place monolithic stair 11 300 X 600mm concrete footing CAST IN PLACE MONOLITH 12 300mm concrete bearing wall600 X 300 CONC. FOOTING 13 300 X 300mm reinforced concrete 300MM CONC. BEARING WALL perimeter beam 300 X 300 MM REINFORCED CONC. PERIMETER BEAM 14 300mm concrete foundation wall 300MM CONC. FOUNDATION WALL


STUDIO IN COLLABORATIVE PRACTICE

To be submerged means to cover or overflow with water; to immerse and to mix by descending beneath the surface, therefore becoming deeply involved with the layers beneath what is apparent only from above. This proposal for the Ontario Water Centre seeks to address the concept of submergence in three main ways. The first is by plunging users into the experience of water using formal and spatial considerations; floating forms, a sunken gallery, shimmering materials, and clean geometry all work to build the feeling of being submerged.

The second is to merge and mix public and private programs so that the centre not only serves its daily gallery functions, but also its wider community. When the main gallery is not in use, the space becomes a useable venue for presentations, social functions and more. The last is by immersing users in the experience of water’s three states of matter via direct contact with them. The principle of “playand-learn” drives this interaction, so that a fun, educational experience is created as users delve into the scientific, cultural, and inspirational values of water.

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SUBMERGED Studio in Collaborative Practice


MA

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Foundation Detail 01 Floor Assembly Cedar decking Waterproof membrane XPS insulation (89mm, 2% slope) 200mm reinforced concrete slab Light gauge steel framing (varies) 12.7mm gypsum wall board

Skylight Detail 02 Foundation Assembly Drainage plane 50mm XPS insulation Air/vapour barrier 300mm foundation wall

03 Roof Assembly Water Waterproof membrane 89mm XPS insulation 200mm reinforced concrete slab Light gauge steel framing (varies) 12.7mm gypsum wall board

092


A

SUBMERGED Studio in Collaborative Practice

FROM EXTERIOR: 100MM GROWING MEDIUM FILTER LAYER 25MM ROOT BARRIER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 80 XPS INSULATION VAPOUR BARRIER 150MM COMPOSITE DECKING 600MM PLENUM SPACE 310 X 50MM STEEL JOISTS SUSPENDED METAL CEILING PANELS HAND RAIL FASTENED TO VERTICAL MULLION TYP. LAMINATED GLASS PANEL

02

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TRANSLUSCENT GLASS SPANDREL

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WOOD DECKING

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600 X 300 STEEL BEAM STRUCTURAL SILICONE MULLION

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AIR DUCT AT PERIMETER TYP.

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SUSPENDED METAL CEILING TRANSLUCENT GLAZING AT INTERIOR

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INSULATED GLAZING UNIT AT EXTERIOR

CONCRETE BEAM AT GRADE

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CONTINUOUS WATER CHANNEL AT BUILING PERIMETER

GROUND LEVEL 0 FROM EXTERIOR: 100MM WATER CHANNEL WATER PROOF MEMBRANE 89MM XPS INSULATION 200MM CONC. SLAB 13MM GYPSUM BOARD STEEL FRAMING (VAR.) INTERIOR FINISH

Skylight Detail 01 Roof Assembly

100mm growing medium Filter layer 25mm root barrier Waterproof membrane 80mm XPS insulation Vapour barrier 150mm composite decking 600mm plenum space c/w 310x50mm steel joists Suspended metal ceiling panels

02 03 04 05 06 07 08

Insulated glazing unit Thermally broken aluminum frame 200mm roof curb 200 x 100mm HSS Tempered glass Bolted steel connection Glass point connection

STRUCTURAL SKYLIGHT SYSTEM (SEE DETAIL)

300MM CONC BEARING WALL

FROM EXTERIOR: DRAINAGE PLANE 50MM XPS INSULATION AIR VAPOUR BARRIER 300MM CONC. FOUNDATION WALL INTERIOR FINISH

GALLERY LEVEL -4000 DRAIN TILE AT FOOTING POLISHED CONC. FINISH 200MM CONC. SLAB VAPOUR RETARDER 100 XPS INSULATION COMPACT GRANULAR FILL UNDISTURBED SOIL

CONCRETE STRIP FOOTING (CONTINUOUS)


To be submerged means to cover or overflow with water; to immerse and to mix.

094


GARDENS OF SUZHOU Option Studio: China Arthur Goldstein, Ron Noble


OPTION STUDIO: CHINA

The Suzhou Garden is a sequence of different scenes separated by walls, screens, doorways, and vegetation; it is an unfolding of revelations.

The classical gardens of Suzhou are built and designed using a variety of compositional tools to focus on the harmonious relationship and arrangement of different elements. In essence, the Suzhou Garden is a sequence of different scenes separated by walls, screens, doorways, and vegetation; it is an unfolding of revelations influenced heavily by Chinese philosophy. Duality is a project that captures the essence of the classical Chinese garden with

a modern interpretation and a Western perspective. A white wall encompasses the garden with an ever-changing zig-zag pattern, dividing the garden into two sections. Within this zig-zag is a different sequence of spaces, which reveal various spatial qualities, and provide the experience of dualities found within nature and the Suzhou Garden. Transition spaces between each set of dualities offer framed views out into the gardens on both sides. 096


GARDENS OF SUZHOU Option Studio: China

Landscape Shamshui

Compression/expansion

Straight/Zig-Zag

Light/Dark

Soft/Hard

Up/Down

Stillness/Motion


098


GARDENS OF SUZHOU Option Studio: China COMPRESSION/EXPANSION

VOID/SOLID

HARD/SOFT

UP/DOWN


DARK/LIGHT

NATURE/MAN

MOTION/STILLNESS

100


DEXTER M. FERAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School Design Project Brad Miles

Seeking to pay homage to context and site, the design concept of this school is a super-imposition of a series of programmatic blocks which have been scattered over the site and then ordered by the contextual points, lines, and planes of the earlier school previously demolished by the City of Detroit. Each of the contextual elements is a manifestation of a context that once existed and the intention of the design is to bring these ideas into the proposed school design to establish a new community. Points reference circulation nodes that previously existed, while lines reference internal corridors

and external paths throughout the site. The planes are made up of the adjacent property lines around the site to create a contextual grid overlay, that includes the footprints of the former school and those from the gym and auditorium.


GRADUATE SUMMER STUDIO

Points, lines, planes... each of the contextual elements is a manifestation of a context that once was...

102


DEXTER M. FERAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Graduate Summer Studio

This can be seen where the main educational program anchors are grounded by referencing the old footprints of the school, gym, and auditorium. The proposed elementary school is subdivided to insert the classrooms between the points, in which those points will evolve into new stairwells. The adjacent property lines create a grid for the modular buildings, while the entrance of the school’s predecessor becomes a spine to connect the entire block to the fragmented buildings, with a common plaza to join the school and kindergarten with the gym, library, and cafeteria.

Exploded Axonometrics


Scatter Forms

Point Lines Plane

A composite has Abeen composite used ofhas the Abeen composite used of hasthe been used of the two; scatter distribution two; scatter of volume distribution and two; scatter of volume distribution and of volume and program and the “points program lines andplanes” the “points programlines andplanes” the “points lines planes”

104


Nwamaka Onyenokwe Do you feel like your educational experiences prepared you for this kind of work? Do you feel defined by your educational experience at Ryerson, and in Toronto (As if you have some other advantages or limitations compared to studying in a different city/urban setting)? I’m grateful for the experiences I had at Ryerson, and believe it prepared me for the real world to the extent any form of education can, but you definitely learn a lot on the job. I’ve come across a few surprises with how the industry works, and I’ve learnt to open my mind and accept the challenges and experiences. I took an independent study course in 2009 where we travelled to Italy and Israel. We encountered different sides of architecture and urban scenery, where we interacted and worked with international architecture students. Ryerson’s architecture program allows us explore other urban fabrics - I cannot define my experience as limited.

“Context and architectural design go hand in hand and cannot be talked about or discussed without the other.” Interviewed by Sarah Lipsit

Do you feel that the city in which a student is educated in defines and/or influences their later professional work in some way? How?

designer | technologist

Yes, your city of education does influence your professional work to an extent, but it becomes a personal decision on how you choose to develop your career and profession. Coming from Nigeria, as I am not originally from Toronto, I believe I’ve successfully merged my experiences from the places I’ve lived and visited and I can say that Toronto’s platform has contributed, positively, to the place where I am today. Do you feel your approach to architecture has been influenced by your architectural learning in a dense urban context? How did the education you receive help you decipher the urban context around you, and prepare you for producing architecture? The urban context plays a key and important part in approaching architecture. Context and architectural design go hand in hand and cannot be talked about or discussed without the other. I think the fact that we were encouraged to visit sites, work on case studies as precedence, and do site analysis helped us understand the urban context, especially since we worked on varying sites. Learning in an urban context is and will obviously be slightly different


in comparison to this being done in a rural setting. This is because of what you’re surrounded by. In both contexts or settings, there is no limitation in terms of solving problems; as problems come, its up to your knowledge of using built form and design concepts to solve issues. How do your experiences within the professional setting compare to those in school? What is the biggest contrast of setting for you? In school, you are working for

the fast paced, competitive industry. Is there anything that you felt unprepared for when entering the professional world?

produce work while doing so. I did a few months of interning, which I find helps a lot to ease into a professional career. Also, asking questions is crucial; don’t be afraid to continuously The fact that clients are the ask questions, as you are still in a number one priority and need to be learning process - even when you’ve satisfied on the regular was not much been there for a year. It doesn’t of a shock for me, but the reality stop with your education, you are of the requests and time frames constantly learning in life. they demand can sometimes be ridiculous. In the profession you have Is there any advice you can give to learn to be respectful, you have to current architecture students? to deliver and find the best way to make the client happy without letting Learn as many design programs them know how much stress you are as you can, stay connected and build under. relationships with professors and try

“Coming from Nigeria... I believe I’ve successfully merged my experiences from the places I’ve lived and visited and I can say that Toronto’s platform has contributed, positively, to the place where I am today...“ grades, wherein the real world, you are working to deliver to actual clients - strict deadlines need to be met, and repercussions are more detrimental to your professional career. In school, you are learning, there is more of a window for error, where you have a bigger time frame to learn from the mistakes you make; but when you learn in the real world, the time frame for learning is slim to none. What you are offering to the company is replaceable by any other equally qualified candidate. Therefore, you are forced to learn as quickly as humanly possible to keep up with

At an educational institution, you only get a “textbook” glimpse of how things work. In the real world, you get to actually experience things first hand in terms of built form and construction.

to do some interning during holidays. These tools will definitely pay off once you join the professional world full time.

What were some of the challenges to overcome when transitioning into a new setting? Was there anything that aided you in the transition? My biggest challenge I would say would probably be learning to deal with other peoples’ methods of working and finding a way to

106


(IN)D in•de•ter•min•ism [in-di-tur-muh-niz-uh m] noun

the doctrine that human actions, though influenced somewhat by preexisting psychological and other conditions, are not entirely governed by them but retain a certain freedom and spontaneity

“Cogito ego sum: I think, therefore I am.” - Descartes “Ego sum ego creo: I am, therefore I create.” - the Architect

That is the power vested in us by all the chance and fate in the universe. That is the burden hurled upon our shoulders. Overwhelming though it may be, we fervently welcome the test of our being. We are always searching for the truth, forever seeking the sacred,

endlessly obsessed with becoming the divine. Our work is an allegory of the syzygial dance of fate, will, and humanity, a spatial exegesis that will either lead us to ascension or destroy us completely.


DETER


REDEFINING THE SUZHOU GARDEN Option Studio: China

Jennifer Bai, Advita Madan

Suzhou is home to many ancient gardens, all of which are carefully thought out and aim to bring people closer to nature. Designers have tried to recreate what could only be seen in ancient Chinese paintings – a place of peace, serenity and quiet reflection. However, it is important to note that these gardens were privately owned and such gardens are not constructed anymore. Gardens today are designed for public activity and are meant to facilitate interaction between different individuals. This project seeks to tap into the spirit of a Suzhou garden and place it in a more contemporary setting. Gardens create a world of their own and thus can be placed anywhere within the cityscape.

Taking into account the needs of the 21st century, this design utilizes all the fundamental elements of a traditional Suzhou garden in a structure that will serve as a haven for people who wish to get away from their busy lifestyles and become one with nature. The density of Chinese cities has increased exponentially over the past. There is no longer a need for, or the space to construct large, privately owned gardens. For the purposes of this project, elements that were considered essential to a Suzhou garden were layed out and then stacked one on top of the other until they created a structure. This idea of a vertical garden can be placed anywhere within the urban fabric and recreates the feeling of nature amidst a concrete jungle.

Gardens create a world of their own and thus can be placed anywhere within the cityscape.


OPTION STUDIO: CHINA

110


SYNAPSE Digital Tools Karen Chan, Michael Defina, Joanne Gust, Rachel Hooshley, Ilona Korotkevich, Danny Porthiyas, Sean Robbins, Dejan Tasovac

Synapse is an architectural endeavour that seeks to explore the potentials for direct dialogue between buildings and their users. Preliminary small-scale prototyping was performed in order to develop parametric formal expressions and physical modules, which could act as the scaffold to facilitate such communication. Simultaneously experimenting with available technologies, such as Arduino microcontrollers and various sensors and peripherals, it became obvious that Synapse could act as a representational object that merges tectonics and technology together, much like contemporary building praxis. The challenge then became the nature in which they would merge. Connections were

consolidated to bring structure, sub-skin and cladding together in a blurred system used to house the reactive “guts” of the installation. The sub-skin, a poly-spandex fabric, was used to delicately array 120 LEDs connected to six ultrasonic sensors around the periphery of the installation. As users approach Synapse it immediately awakens from its slow, surging, ignorant state and flickers violently to warn them of their proximity to it. The result is an architectural object that is seemingly aware of one’s presence, engaging in a form of dialogue through sensory interaction. Special thanks to Danny Porthiyas for his gracious assistance with coding and electrical circuitry.


DIGITAL TOOLS

Synapse acts as a representational object that merges tectonics and technology together. 112


SYNAPSE Digital Tools


114


CONTEMPLATIVE SPACE Small Buildings Karl Sarkis The capacity in which architectural expression gives meaning to contemplative space is challenged when contextualized in our contemporary multicultural society. Traditionally, contemplative space finds meaning in its literal architectural expression – its formality, symmetry, materiality, and treatment of light. However, when cultures of diverse values

outside

demand a multi-faith space, the approach to bringing meaning to such a space must undergo reevaluation. Unquestionably, it is unjust to assume that a specifically designed form, composition, or material treatment can speak to all cultures and beliefs in a manner that is equally interpretable. Therefore, it is only through sincere thought and effort that architectural

inside

With the use of an operable metal screen, the outside user can manipuThe city is the setting within expression can be capable of late the level of sound penetration into the interior auditory space. The all cultures co-exist. In reaching an objectiveness thatreceives is interior user the which sound waves of different outside sources simultaneously for a heightened contemplation of the auditory sense. Toronto, it is precisely these impartial to all faiths. The interior space’s wall and ceiling are clad in corrugated metal to allowarchitecture for several points of cultures sound deflection. In the winter,that the metal and their faiths shape In this respect, the screen may serve as a heat scoop to guide escaping heat from the interithe city and give it meaning. of the contemporary multicultural or, offering outside users a warm retreat point. Therefore, the contemplative space society’s contemplative space encourages the individual user becomes extroverted. The architecture seeks meaning beyond to find meaning by engaging in a dialogue with the city. its inherent physical qualities and encourages a dialogue with the surrounding environment: the city.


SMALL BUILDINGS

02 01 03

02

N auditory (ground) level 1:100

Auditory (Ground) Level 1. interior seating 01 2.Interior exteriorseating seating mechanical room 02 3.Exterior seating 03 occupancy: Mechanical 19room

02

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walkway level Walkway Level 1:100

01 Elevator lobby

1. elevator lobby 02 Mechanical 2. mechanical shaft

shaft

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Visual 1:100Level 01 Seating 1. seating 02 Barrier-free W/C raised 2. barrier-free w.c. withwith raised vanityvanity occupancy: 31

* building is designed with one exit, as per sentence 3.4.2.1 of the OBC: one exit is permitted for a building of 2 occupied storeys with an occupancy not more than 60.

116


CONTEMPLATIVE SPACE Small Buildings

concrete block wall metal studs

ray-foam insulation

erior rated plywood metal track

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tal wheels and rods 06 wood battens IPE wood cladding operable insulated metal screen

07

east elevation 1:100

East Elevation

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Auditory Level Bay Detail 01 Concrete block wall 02 Metal studs 03 Spray-foam insulation 04 Exterior rated plywood 05 Metal rack 06 Metal wheels and rods 07 Wood battens 08 IPE wood cladding 09 operable insulated metal screen

itory level bay detail

North Elevation

north elevation 1:100


In contemporary multicultural society, the architecture of contemplative space seeks meaning beyond physical qualities and encourages a dialogue with the city.

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CHURCH OF TRANSCENDENCE Sacred Studio Setareh Shams, Sandra Wojtecki 0

Site Plan

Site Plan

The Church of Transcendence is a representation of heaven on earth through the manipulation of light, form, and experience. One’s everyday environment is a reflection of the human functions we perform on earth. In a sacred space, our everyday existence is uplifted into the presence of the holy spirit, representing the manifestation of heaven on earth. The Church of Transcendence creates an environment where the relationship of one’s body to the space is a sacred correspondence

to the relationship of the body and the blood of Christ. Architectural theology is the study of God and religious belief. The architecture that is manifested as a reflection of the mind of God must become a foretaste of the heavenly liturgy, and must be a place of interaction between man and God. The architecture must have the ability to reveal the omnipresent, omniscient, and omnipotent nature of God while exposing the sacred relationship between Earth and Heaven.

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OPTION STUDIO

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CHURCH OF TRANSCENDENCE Option Studio

05 06 CONCRETE ROOF

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Steel structure Rigid insulation Concrete panels Ground plane Concrete roof Steel decking Open Web Steel Joists Concrete ceiling panels Concrete floor


03 CONCRETE ROOF 04 INSULATION RIGID 05 WEB OPEN STEEL JOIST

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COPPER PANEL

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COPPER Copper is used for its light and reflective qualities to represent the sacred and to create various lighting condtions.

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CONCRETE Concrete is used to contrast the light copper by grounding the building to earth.

Wall Section Detail 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Copper panel Mullion Concrete roof Rigid insulation Open Web Steel Joist Concrete Concrete floor Rigid insulation Steel decking

GLASS Glass is used to create transparency and interesting lighting conditions.

02 07 CONCRETE FLOOR RIGID INSULATION 08

03

STEEL DECKING 09

01 Copper

Copper is used for its light and reflective qualities to represent the sacred and to create various lighting conditions.

02 Concrete

Concrete is used to contrast the light copper by grounding the building to earth.

03 Glass

Glass is used to create transparency and interesting lighting conditions.

122


HIGH PARK ARTS CENTRE Bringing the Urban Environment Into Architecture

Stephen Baik

Exploded Axonometric

Located on the periphery of Toronto’s downtown, the High Park Arts Centre acts as a natural retreat, offering a place of residence which encourages creative, intellectual and personal growth for performance artists. The design aims to merge inside and outside by creating transparencies through material layering. Clean, crisp voids on the exterior wall are sandwiched with mirrored glass, resulting in a physical structure that disappears into the natural park

landscape while providing views into and out of the building. To further promote the inclusion of nature, the building engages the use of a green roof with trees planted within. Through the thoughtful layering of naturally sourced materials and effective use of natural elements, the lines between interior and exterior are blurred, thus creating an environment suitable for peaceful living and creative discovery.


CENTRAL GLASS INTL. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COMPETITION

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SORRENTO CENTRE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DINING HALL, BC Dreaming of Utopia Betty Vuong

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Sorrento Centre’s 50-year campaign is proof that the establishment has become an integral part of its community, and will require significant growth. As a charity organization with sensitive financial parameters, it seems appropriate to pursue a design that is vernacular in form to match both its modest environment and its need for spatial flexibility. The playful stacking of barn-like buildings creates simple rectangular spaces that can be partitioned, allowing for occupants to easily move or “overflow” their program into any of its adjacent spaces. Each space has a unique quality of light and an array of possibilities on how it can be occupied, making this multifunctional dining hall a built manifestation of the centre’s mission statement: “[Sorrento Centre] is a holy place of transformation for learning, healing, and belonging.”


OPTION STUDIO

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...sensitive financial parameters demand a design that is vernacular in form to match both its modest environment and its need for spatial flexibility...

diagram

PRIVATE DINING

ADMINISTRATION

Massing massing

COMMUNAL DINING KITCHEN

Levels levels

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SORRENTO CENTR MULTIFUNCTIONAL DINING HALL Option Studio

The multifunctional dining hall is a built manifestation of Sorrento Centre’s mission to be a holy place of transformation for learning, healing and belonging.


130


CLOUD TOWER Office of the Future Kate Gonashvili

Massing and Site

Situated in the heart of Toronto’s business district, at the intersection of Yonge and Richmond Street, Cloud Tower is a commercial high-rise building with a focus on integrating amenities and green spaces into the office environment. The proposed building site is located adjacent to Cloud Gardens, a small urban park. Drawing from the natural landscaped features of the park, the tower provides a unique experience by elevating conventional features of green spaces through the use of ramps and stairs. Working further with the site, the concept of terracing is explored and carried out in the design of Cloud Tower.

The terraces can be experienced as a prominent feature of the building, on both interior and exterior of the building, and on different scales. A large public staircase off Richmond Street escorts one up to upper-level outdoor patios, borrowing the landscape of Cloud Gardens, and creating multiple levels of public realm that can be accessed both through the building as well as from the street, depending on the level of elevation. Meanwhile, private terraces on the higher levels act as enhancement to amenity spaces of the office, as well as flex spaces by inverting the green space into the building itself.

liated+enfi.eR

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INTEGRATION STUDIO I + II

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CLOUD TOWER Integration Studio I + II

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The terraces can be experienced as a prominent feature of the building, on both interior and exterior of the building on different scales.


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Level 1: Retail

Restaurant Outdoor Green Space

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Custom concrete columns Curtain wall glazing Mullion system Aluminum shading devices

134


DEON de•on•tol•o•gism [dee-on-tol-uh-jiz-uh m] noun

the doctrine of ethics concerned with duty, moral obligation, and right action

The context within which we study or practice the endeavor of architecture is resolutely subject to an ever-fluctuating global landscape. Advances in technology, evolving sociocultural customs, and shifting perspectives on philosophy and theology are all leading to an utterly entropic system spurred on by a

humanity that is obsessed with constantly reinventing itself. It seems, then, impossible for us unify our modus operandi in an increasingly tempestuous world. How do we cope? What possible thoughts or actions can we employ to bring even a modicum of peace to our world? If anything, it is the

virtue of our intentions that ultimately defines our inimitable purpose. Our charge is that of preserving humanity, sheltering it from the irrepressible, indestructible, and inevitable, in the hopes that it may realize that it is indeed as remarkable as the glorious world within which is exists and the kingdom that it seeks to create.


NTOL


A

SYMBIOSIS Office of the Future

B

Dami Lee

E

Speculations of the world’s inevitable end are no longer illusive predictions but visible warnings that people are beginning to feel and experience in their daily lives. The office tower, as an economic generator and symbol of society’s stability, must embody in itself a self-sustaining relationship that allows it to exist naturally in its surroundings, regardless of the instability of the economic, environmental, or social climates.

In order to achieve true sustainability, the Office of the Future must create mutually beneficial relationships between its occupants, allowing for dynamic possibilities in use. Furthermore, it must form a symbiotic relationship with its surroundings in order to achieve maximum efficiency and creativity, in turn providing maximum benefits to its users and community.

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INTEGRATION STUDIO I & II

High income, mid-sized firms High income, small firms Mid-income, large firms

Mid-income, mid-sized firms Mid-income, small firms

Continuously changing size of atrium throughout the building

Changing size of atrium space alters the usage of regular floorplates

A variety of firms can choose a floor that is best suited to their functional and economic needs

138


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vibrant urban park Compost is used for indoor garden Transfer Floor Blackwater and waste compost Mechanical Floor Transfer Floor Solar Chimney Mechanical Floor Photovoltaic Panels Indoor gardens condition fresh air Water Cistern Winter Condition - acts as greenhouse Summer condition

01

140


SYMBIOSIS Integration Studio I + II

South-West

North-East

05

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South - West

North- East 03

02

01

ATRIUM

Atrium Section 1. Fresh air is admitted into the atrium

01 Fresh air is admitted into the atrium

2. Fresh air is warmed and cleansed inside the interior garden

02 Fresh air is warmed and

cleansed inside the interior garden

3. Displacement floor ventillation and operable windows permit pre-conditioned fresh air into office spaces

03 Displacement floor ventilation

and operable windows permit pre-conditioned fresh air into office spaces

4. ETFE fresh air controller is closed on the Southwest cavity, heating it up faster

5. Convection carries return air into the Southwest cavity, which act as a solar chimney

04 ETFE fresh air controller is

closed on the southwest cavity, heating it up faster

05 Convection carries return air into the southwest cavity, which asks as a solar chimney


Office towers, as economic generators and symbols of society’s stability, must embody a self-sustaining relationship that allows it to exist naturally in its surroundings, regardless of the instability of the economic, environmental, or social climates.

142


‘DURABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY’ Beijing, Xi’an, Yichang, Suzhou, Shanghai

Option Studio: China 2013 builds upon the previous success of four prior Architecture Option Studios that have taken place in China under the direction of Dr. Zaiyi Liao. The focus of the 2013 iteration of “China Studio” was directed towards issues concerning

durability, sustainability and their links to Chinese Vernacular Architecture. The trip and the studio would last 43 days beginning at the end of April 2013 and would immerse its participants in China’s culture, traditions and physical landscape.


OPTION STUDIO: CHINA

As a group, we travelled from Beijing to Shanghai and a great number of other cities, monuments and structures along the way; in total a distance of over 3000 kilometers was covered. In the broadest sense, the studio was divided into two components: documentation and application. Initially, we were concerned with the exploration of various architectural sites throughout Western China. During this phase, we observed the fundamental principles of durability that can be found in the vernacular tradition of Chinese Architecture. During the latter portion of the trip we visited two Chinese Universities: CTGU and Soochow University. At these institutions we partnered with local archictecture students to analyse, dissect, and apply what we had learned, documented and experienced to our studio projects. Remedial strategies combating the deterioration of envelopes were put forth in Yichang at CTGU and the Classical gardens of Suzhou were reimagined at Soochow University. In a technical capacity, the experience of working with contemporaries from a foreign culture was truly unique. Looking back, China Studio 2013 was a transformative experience for its participants as emerging professionals. 144


DURABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY Option Studio: China

With advances in technology and communications figuratively shrinking the planet, our careers will undoubtedly cross national and continental borders. In this reality, China Studio can be seen as a primer for a group of young architects who will face a changing global community.


146


DURABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY Option Studio: China


The unknown can have a truly profound impact on the individual. In this sense, adversity and uncertainty have the capacity to bring out the best in us. China Studio 2013 was an experience that required one to engage in something that, in many ways was outside of the known. Most of the participants of the trip were stepping into a vastly foreign world and on more than one occasion felt like they were a long way from home. This feeling and the onslaught of an alien language, culture and customs could be seen as a burden to overcome, but in the end proved to be more of a new perspective, a board horizon.

148


RYERSON GRADUATE RESIDENCE Design Studio III Dimitri Delean


DESIGN STUDIO III

1

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In accordance with its Master Plan, Ryerson University seeks to expand its academic boundaries further into the city. Intending to house graduate students and create a prominent presence in the public realm, the Graduate Residence located on the corner of Yonge and Gould Street embraces both public and private lifestyles. The design promotes transparency, fluidity, and interaction between the social community and the Digital Media Zone on the ground level, yet maintains a communal lifestyle

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throughout the residential levels on the upper levels. As a whole, the design was an investigation of a separation between the residential core and its inherent functional utilities. These two cores, divided by a continuous light well, are connected via transparent bridges, enhancing verticality and allowing for an engaging visual connection linking each floor. This gesture serves two purposes: it liberates the residential plan, while creating captivating and alluring spaces throughout the structure.

Conceptual Diagram

North Elevation

West Elevation

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RYERSON GRADUATE RESIDENCE Design Studio III

The interconnected floor plates create a sense of community throughout the whole building.


Parapet Detail 01 3D perimeter steel truss 02 Steel decking w/ conc. cover 03 Rigid Iisulation 04 HVAC 05 3D truss 06 Curtain wall 07 Perforated metal screen 08 Screen support bracket 09 Steel HSS column 10 Gypsum board 11 Perimeter gravel w/ drainage 12 Aluminium panel parapet 13 Steel HSS beam 14 Intensive growing medium Residential Floor Detail 01 3D perimeter steel truss 02 Steel decking w/ conc. cover 03 Rigid insulation 04 HVAC 05 3D truss 06 Curtain wall 07 Perforated metal screen 08 Screen support bracket 09 Steel HSS column 10 Gypsum board Overhang Detail 01 3D perimeter steel truss 02 Steel decking w/ conc. cover 03 Rigid insulation 04 Metal soffit 05 3D truss 06 Curtain wall 07 Perforated metal screen 08 Screen support bracket 09 Steel HSS column 10 Steel HSS beam

Sectional Perspective152


OXYGEN APARTMENTS Passive Air Filter Apartments Hannah Hyder


STUDIO IN COLLABORATIVE PRACTICE

O CO

Capillary Capillary Oxygen Oxygen

Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide

CO2

2

O2

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Carbon Dioxide and oxygen are exchanged in the tiny air sacs known as Alveoli which are surrounded by capillaries.

Sequestration through plants

When a person inhales, oxygen moves from the alveoli to the surrounding capillaries, then into the blood stream

Air Sequestration Through Plants

Located in proximity to prominent highways, Oxygen Apartments is a midrise residential project situated in an urban environment. Statistics suggest that poor indoor air quality is of great risk to human health since 80-90% of individuals spend most of their time indoors. Human health is of great concern as the exposure to different types of toxins generated within various living

Alveolus Alveolus

At the same time, CO2 moves from blood stream, into capillaries and then alveoli. CO2 leaves the body when exhaled.

spaces can have adverse affects to the human body. In efforts to reduce air contamination, a diverse range of plant species recognized for their natural air filtration capacities are used in the design of a wide range of spaces which not only filter the air but enhance the overall indoor living experiences.

In the lungs, carbon dioxide and oxygen are exchanged in the alveoli which are surrounded by capillaries. When a person inhales, oxygen moves from the alveoli to the surrounding capillaries, then into the blood stream. At the same time, CO2 moves from the blood stream into capillaries and then alveoli, exiting the body as it is exhaled from the lungs.

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OXYGEN APARTMENTS Studio in Collaborative Practice

Air quality Air Qualityindex Index(AQI) (AQ)

100 100

50 50 shower

0 0 bed room

Kitchen

Unit A air quality diagram

Passive Summer Cooling

Passive Summer Cooling

Passive Winter Heating

Passive Winter Heating


...air within homes and other buildings can be more seriously polluted than the outdoor air in even the largest and most industrialized cities, posing a significant risk to human health...

ance 156


‘KULTOUR 2013’ Vancouver, Portland, Seattle

Anchoring the 21st year of academic exchange between Ryerson University’s and the Fachhochschule Frankfurt am Main’s architectural programs,

KulTour 2013 traveled to Vancouver, Portland and Seattle in May 2013 with 40 students and 4 professors from both universities.


PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE

Averaging an intensive 6-7 sites and buildings a day over the course of 10 days, the architectural and planning traditions, cultures and practices of the northwest were examined and studied; eventually to be documented in the form of photography, sketches and essays were collected within a book (colloquially called the TAB by past KulTourists). Co-led and co-founded by Professor Yew-Thong Leong, KulTour is an architectural study tour alternating between Europe and North America each year to study the architecture and planning of European and North American cities. This exchange with FHFFM is Ryerson’s oldest academic exchange still in existence.

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KULTOUR Professional Elective


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KULTOUR Professional Elective


In the field of Medicine, cadavers are brought into the institution to be dissected and examined so that students get first hand lessons on the human body. In architecture, we go to the bodies of architectural work instead. First hand examinations such as these allow the student to see the nooks and crannies in real life that textbooks and lectures can, at best, only approximate.

162


ANDOKOPE SCHOOL K-8 Ghana

Dr. Ian MacBurnie Design Team Coordinator and Lead Designer: David Campbell Design Team Members: James Heusser-Kowell, Sarah Ives, Dami Lee, Nicola Rutherford, Helen Xie, Carrie Groskopf, Tricia Arabian, Kara Green, Andrea Vettoretti

Orphan’s Heros (www.orphansheros.org) Jennifer Millett-Barrett, President ARUP Toronto (www.arup.com) Jennifer McArthur, Paul Paquet Malcolm Wallace, Ahmed Ghazi, Evan Ma, Dejan Srbulovic Spatial Dimension (www.spatialdimension.net) Albert Agbemenu, Eddie Yawson

The project addresses three issues affecting quality of life for the people living in the area: unsafe drinking water, difficulty accessing clinical care, and primarily, lack of an adequate school facility.


COLLABORATIVE DESIGN-BUILD Initiated by Orphans’ Heroes, a New York-based charity, the Andokope School is a collaborative, design-build project involving faculty and students from Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science (www.arch. ryerson.ca), the Toronto office of the award-winning design firm, Arup (www.arup.com), and the Accra, Ghana-based architecture, engineering, and project management firm, Spatial Dimension. Situated on a relatively flat and treeless, one-and one-half-acre site located not far from the rural community of Andokope in the Volta region of eastern Ghana, the school project provides classrooms for some 300 students in grades K-8, as well as related amenities including a library, a sheltered lunch area that doubles as a performance space, various learning grounds, several hygienic, compost toilets, a clinic, and living accommodations for a half-dozen of the school’s teachers. Linked by a sheltering arcade, ten passively ventilated classrooms are arranged along the perimeter of a central courtyard. Envisioned to be “off the grid”, the

passively-designed facility features rainwater collection, groundwater recharging through percolation trenches, and solar heating for cooking purposes as well as for sterilizing utensils. The design seeks to address three major quality of life concerns for people living in the wider area: the lack of educational facilities, the problem of unsafe drinking water, and the difficulty accessing medical care. Andokope School is intended to serve as a community anchor, one that is premised on providing a safe, accessible, and inclusive educational experience for children. During all phases of the work, the Ryerson team collaborated fully with Arup according to an Integrated Design Process (IDP) model, where all aspects of the design, from conception, to plan, to section, to materials, to structure, to passive design strategies and systems, were explored. The IDP process enhanced the creativity of all members of the collaborative, ensuring that the design and design development process was one of refinement rather than reconception.

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ANDOKOPE SCHOOL K-8 Collaborative Design-Build

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Plan 01 Jr. S.S School Classroom 02 SW Latrines 03 Exit from facility (interior access only) 04 Exit from facility (interior access only) 05 Primary School Classrooms 06 Latrines (kindergarten) 07 Latrines (instructors) 08 Dormitory 09 Uncovered Garden Area 10 Underground Cistern 11 Shower (instructors) 12 Rainwater Collection Tank 13 Kindergarten 14 Uncovered garden Area 15 Depository Storage 16 Depository 17 Headmaster’s Office 18 Library 19 Percolation Trench 20 Solar Heating on Raised Platform 21 Kitchen


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The project is currently in the fundraising stage, with phased construction anticipated to commence in late 2014. For more information about the Andokope School project, please visit: www.orphansheroes.org/Orphans_Heroes/Ghana__Andokope.html 166


RUHSB Ryerson University Health Sciences Building Justin Oh

Ryerson University is an exclusive community to students and faculty. Situated 15 minutes from the downtown core neighbour to the Eaton Centre and bordered by several of Toronto’s largest streets - the campus occupies a significant amount of

the city’s footprint, but returns very little to the public realm. This proposal envisions an architecture that demonstrates design principles to benefit not only the university campus, but also the city of Toronto.


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Campus Morphology “The Village”, Church street @ 7 PM 168


RUHSB Architecture Studio

STUDENT RESIDENCE 24 x Studio Unit 48 x 2 Bedroom Unit 12 x 3 Bedroom Unit 24 x 4 Bedroom Unit

HEALTH SCIENCES TOWER Health Science Resource Centre Health Sciences Faculty Offices School of Occupational + Public Health School of Occupational + Public Health Labs Department of Midwifery Academic Studio School of Nutrition Academic Studio School of Nutrition Labs School of Nursing Academic Studio School of Nursing Simulation Labs

Seating Area RSD Restaurant / Cafe RSD Kitchen / Storage / Office Food Service Kitchen / Demonstration Lab Additional Restaurant Seating Area Admin/Reception Computer Lab Study Area / Quiet Reading / Lounge Digital Media Zone Laboratory Lecture Hall 10 Seminar Rooms 2 Conference/Meeting Rooms


+58.00 STUDENT RESIDENCE AMENITY +58.00 STUDENT RESIDENCE TERRACE 896m2

+54.50 STUDY AREA +51.00 280m2

+17.50 HEALTH SCIENCES RESOURCE CENTRE +17.50 TERRACE 602m2

+54.50 STUDY AREA +32.50 420m2 +11.50 SEMINAR ROOMS, LABORATORY, +3.00 COMPUTER LAB 1003m2

+8.50 DIGITAL MEDIA ZONE +5.50 702m2

+11.50 MEETING / CONFERENCE ROOMS 118m2 +3.00 ADMIN / RECEPTION 58m2

+0.00 GROUND LEVEL 547m2

+5.50 STUDY HALL +3.00 240m2

Circulation + Public Space Relationship 170


RUHSB Architecture Studio

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...the tower anchors Ryerson University’s presence on Church Street. With public and active program at street level, the Health Sciences Building contributes to the city’s mixed-use environment.

172


‘AN ARCHITECTURE OF CIVILITY’ Collaborative Exercise 2013


*Congratulations to Professor Kapelos, his team of GAs, and all the students who participated in Collaborative Exercise 2013 on receiving the Award of Merit from Toronto Urban Design Awards 174


‘AN ARCHITECTURE OF CIVILITY’ Collaborative Exercise 2013

In the winter of 2013, I was pleased to lead our architecture students in an intensive one-week charrette to consider civility and the role that architecture may play in nurturing a civil society. Architects have long embraced the social agency of their discipline. As Michael Benedikt so modestly and humbly admonishes, “… the

first rule of the architect should be to preserve, honour and promote life on earth” through the enhancement and enrichment of all forms and instances of life. With this in mind, students were invited to participate in a design experiment and propose designs that would address the following questions:


What is an architecture of civility? How can it be constructed? What are the opportunities that may arise when rights of individuals to a civil society converge with architecture, new technologies and public space?

Based on the premise that Toronto was planning to introduce new public facilities and amenities on municipal properties near major transportation interchanges, the project saw the creation of a new municipal infrastructure and public realm that would be visionary in form, content, intent, meaning and use of nascent technology, all to enhance the everyday life of Toronto’s citizens and visitors. Proposed spaces would support cultural, social and community activities, and answer basic public needs. Diversity, equity and inclusion were to be the watchword of designs, and specific aspirations were articulated including refuge, comfort, safety, security, social interaction and

connectivity. Further, facilities were to allow for the vagaries of Toronto’s climate, on a yearround, 24 hour-a-day basis, and to accommodate the mix of the City’s multi-cultural population, all while promoting equity and inclusion for Toronto’s citizens, irrespective of means or ability. It was also proposed that new facilities would make full use of advanced technologies for communications, information exchange and way finding. The hope was that these new facilities would become meeting spots, community beacons and places of identity within Toronto’s neighbourhoods, a kind of ‘clean, well-lighted place’ within a sea of urban activity.

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AN ARCHITECTURE OF CIVILITY Collaborative Exercise 2013

Site 16 sites were identified and teams comprising of approximately 12 students each proposed designs for assigned sites: Bathurst TTC Station, Berczy Park (near King Station), BloorBedford Park (near St. George Station), Broadview Station, Chester Station, Christie Station, Downsview Station, St. Patrick

Station (Dundas and University), Eglinton West Station, Harbour Square Park, High Park, Lawrence Station, Main St. Station, Queen’s Park Station, Rosedale Station and Runnymede Station.

Approximately 400 students worked in teams of 12 – 14 students, acting as ‘Citizen Architects’


The Program A range of elements that support the idea of civility and civic amenity were identified. Program elements to be incorporated into this civic amenity were to create a free-standing structure, which may to be designed as an integrated system of components and have the capacity to vary in the number of elements contained (required versus optional), depending on the site and community needs. Proposed structures were to be

visible from the street and be accessible by at least one public sidewalk. In addition, a larger area of the site was to be considered as an ‘area of influence’ on which a number of activities that would be seasonal, temporary or spaceconsumptive in nature could be located.

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AN ARCHITECTURE OF CIVILITY Collaborative Exercise 2013

The Participants Approximately 400 students working in teams of 12 – 14 students in all years of the Bachelor of Architectural Science Program in the Ryerson Department of Architectural Science acting as ‘Citizen Architects,’ under the direction of George Thomas Kapelos, Associate Professor, with Master of Architecture and Building Science students acting as ‘Community Voices,’ ‘Team Facilitators’ and Project Coordinators, and faculty members of the Department acting as ‘Design Champions.’

Commentary The project took off on the first day of the winter term and the outcomes produced only five days later reflected the students’ enthusiasm and depth of engagement as they took on the complex question of civility in architecture. Five schemes were selected by students and faculty as exemplary in the way they addressed the program brief and are presented here. The Collaborative Exercise is a great way to start the New Year and new term. When the curriculum was revised in 2006, I convinced my colleagues that

our program required a moment when students across the years would work together on a project of consequence. In the past seven years the Collaborative Exercise has developed to the point that it is an important (and fun) part of our program. This past year Master of Architecture and Building Science graduate students joined in too, making the Collaborative Exercise truly a school-wide learning experience. I am delighted to have led this year’s exercise and am extremely pleased to present the outcomes to you.

George Thomas Kapelos FRAIC MCIP Associate Professor Department of Architectural Science


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CLOS

closing remarks While it may seem that we are predestined to succumb to the allure of creativity, ensnared by its beauty and complexity, the truth of the matter is this: we are willing. Despite the insurmountable weight of the challenges we face, we remain fearlessly compelled by the task at hand, obsessed with proving our worth. We tirelessly build up our world from nothing. We brazenly destroy it, tear it down and build anew, improved iterations of what once was.

As with any worthwhile pursuit, we strive for a progression towards perfection. However, the way forward unrelentingly results in an inevitable return to the point of origin, the moment of conception. It is here where we find the crux of our intention, our purpose existing as an ephemeral projection of our triumphs and regrets in the twinkling pool of human existence. It is this salient, timeless reflection that perpetuates our desires, and though we may pause to revel in its beauty, we

remain obsessed, obliged, enslaved by our yearning to shape matter into form, to mold time and space into perceptible phenomena. We are designed, and therefore design; we create, and so are we created. If nothing else, architecture is representative of that which sets us apart from all else in this universe: the indomitable, ceaseless creation of the self.


SING


with sincere gratitude The publication of this collection of works would not have been possible without the support of our generous sponsors. Their dedication to promoting the success of our students and the profession of architecture is immeasurable, and for that we graciously thank them.


Supporting the Future of the Profession The Ontario Association of Architects represents, regulates, supports, and promotes the profession of architecture in the interest of all Ontarians, and leads the design and delivery of built form in the province of Ontario.

Ontario Association of Architects


www.oaa.on.ca


Congratulations to the Architectural Science students whose remarkable achievements are displayed throught these pages and to the team of students whose leadership skills and dedication fuel the continued success of this publication. Your academic and creative excellence contributes greatly to the Architectural Science program’s solid reputation as well as Ryerson’s reputation for high quality innovative architectural work. Your vision and perspective pushes boundaries, and you will no doubt shape the future of architectural practice. Ryerson is proud of your accomplishments! Dr. Mohamed Lachemi Provost and Vice President Academic

Office of the Provost and Vice President Academic


INSPIRING COLLABORATION THROUGH ARCHITECTURE

Perkins+Will Canada is proud to be the designers for Ryerson’s new Church Street Development.

perkinswill.ca


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325 Magazine | 2012 - 2013  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

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