Page 1


RYERSON UNIVERSITY Department of Architectural Science 325 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3 (416) 979-5000 Say hello! mag325@gmail.com

Š 325 Magazine 2014-2015 Ryerson Department of Architectural Science All rights reserved

All photographs and drawings are courtesy of students and contributors unless otherwise noted. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this publication, and assume QROLDELOLW\IRUWKHDFFXUDF\RUFRPSOHWHQHVVRIWKHWH[WRULWVĂ€WQHVVIRUDQ\SDUWLFXODUSXUSRVH7KHRSLQLRQVH[SUHVVHGKHUHLQDUHWKHUHVSRQVLELOLW\ of the contributors concerned. Corrections from 325 Magazine 2013-2014 volume: Page 114 Marcus Parisi name missing from DAS Bees Night Market Cart design.


325 team

Editor-in-Chief Sarah Lipsit Creative Directors Michelle Ashurov Sarah Lipsit Graphic Design Editors Michelle Ashurov Sarah Lipsit Graphic Design Team Catalina Ardila Bernal Mariam El Zein Farah Elmajdoub Jean Paul Guay Jennifer Pham Nineveh Rashidzadeh Sponsorship Coordinator Nineveh Rashidzadeh Sponsorship Team Mariam El Zein Arnel Espanol Jean Paul Guay Pin Lai Jenny Pham Jacqueline Yeung Copy Directors Rachel Law Sarah Lipsit Anthony Yousef Copy Editors Elizabeth Chong Jean Paul Guay Naveed Khan Emily Mutch Adam Rosenberg Dana Salama Print Coordinator Sarah Lipsit Financial Coordinators Naveed Khan Sarah Lipsit Other Contributors Erik Aquino Mariah Cestra Dana Gurevich Laura Herrera Stefan Miller Robin Nong Lynda Ye Tiffany Zhang


special thanks

Provost & Vice President Academic Dr. Chris Evans Dean of the Faculty of Engineering Dr. Tom Duever and Architectural Science Interim Chair of the Department of Jurij Leshchyshyn Architectural Science IT Specialist Leo Roytman Assistant Print and Financial Nene Brode Coordinators Kathleen Sojor - Champlin Photographers Catalina Ardila Bernal Michelle Ashurov Younes Bounhar RĂŠmi Carreiro Farah Elmajdoub Sarah Lipsit Nahal Rahnamaei


letter from the dean

4UFWF +PCT PODF TBJE UIBU EFTJHO JT OPU KVTU XIBU JU MPPLT BOE GFFMT MJLF EFTJHO JT IPX JU XPSLT 5IBU DPVMEOhU SJOH USVFS GPS PVS BSDIJUFDUVSBM TDJFODFTUVEFOUT"U3ZFSTPO6OJWFSTJUZ PVSTUVEFOUTFOWJTJPOBOEEFTJHO XJUI QVSQPTF UP DSFBUF OFX BSDIJUFDUVSBM TPMVUJPOT UP DIBMMFOHFT JO UIF CVJMUFOWJSPONFOU5IFZUBLFNFBTVSFESJTLTBOEFYQMPSFOFXQPTTJCJMJUJFT JNBHJOJOH QSPUPUZQJOH GBCSJDBUJOH UFTUJOHBOEFWFOTUBSUJOHPWFSBHBJO 5IF SFTVMU JT QVSQPTFGVM EFTJHOT UIBU BSF OPU POMZ BSDIJUFDUVSBMMZ FYQSFTTJWF CVUBMTPFGGJDJFOU TVTUBJOBCMFBOEVMJNBUFMZXPSLGPSTPDJFUZBT UIFFOEVTFST 0WFS UIF QBTU ZFBS  PVS TUVEFOUT IBWF CFFO CVTZ JOWFOUJOH BOE SF JOWFOUJOH XJUI NFBOJOH 5IFJS QSPKFDUT BOE JOTUBMMBUJPOT IBWF CFFO GFBUVSFE JO /VJU #MBODIF  5PSPOUPhT BOOVBM BSU GFTUJWBM  BU UIF 3PZBM 0OUBSJP .VTFVN BOE BU WBSJPVT MPDBUJPOT BDSPTT $BOBEB  JO UIF 6OJUFE 4UBUFT  4QBJO BOE UIF 6OJUFE ,JOHEPN 5IFZhWF BMTP XPO B OVNCFS PG EFTJHOCVJME DPNQFUJUJPOT MJLF 5JNCFSGFWFS BOE 4VLLBIWJMMF "OE JG UIBU XBTOhU FOPVHI  UIFZhWF FWFO DIBMMFOHFE UIF DPNNVOJUZ UP DPOTJEFS UIF JNQPSUBODF PG XBUFS UP MJGF PO UIJT QMBOFU XJUI JOTJHIUGVM EFTJHO JOUFSWFOUJPOTUIBUCSJOHXBUFShTNBOZNFBOJOHTUPQIZTJDBMGPSN 5IF BSDIJUFDUVSBM TDJFODF QSPHSBN BU 3ZFSTPO 6OJWFSTJUZ JT LOPXO GPS FOTVSJOHUIBUTUVEFOUTDBOEFTJHO EFUBJMBOEEFMJWFSBOEPVSTUVEFOUTEP KVTU UIBU 5IFZ BSF UIF OFYU HFOFSBUJPO PG BSDIJUFDUT  CVJMEJOH TDJFOUJTUT  EFTJHOFST BOE QSFTFSWBUJPOJTUT  BOE XF DBOhU XBJU UP TFF IPX UIFZ XJMM USBOTGPSN PVS XPSME BGUFS HSBEVBUJPO 5IJT QVCMJDBUJPO JT POMZ B TNBMM TOBQTIPUPGXIBUhTUPDPNF&OKPZ %S5PN%VFWFS 1&OH '$*$ %FBO 'BDVMUZPG&OHJOFFSJOHBOE"SDIJUFDUVSBM4DJFODF


letter from the provost and vice president academic

Architectural science is vital to Canadians: as a leading sector in sustainable living and new technologies, in the creation of beautiful spaces, and in research on how our built environment affects behaviour, health, and innovation. I know that Ryerson DAS students will help shape the future of architectural practice. They make connections between design, green technology, and market demand. They take on the essential role of project management. And they understand human need. I’m proud of them for their alacrity when faced with unique challenges (e.g., a one-room shelter that can accommodate a medical exam) and for their interest in global concerns— while I admire their remarkable talent and skill. 325 Magazine gives us a glimpse into how they think; how they interact ZLWKWKHLUFKRVHQÀHOGKRZWKH\LQWHQGWRVKDSHDQLQGXVWU\,WDOVRVKRZV a wonderful collaboration between students and faculty. A simple yet elegant building rests on a thousand good ideas, unanticipated solutions, and many strong relationships. 325 helps bring the elements together. I am proud of our students and their accomplishments.

Dr. Chris Evans Interim Provost and Vice President Academic


This volume of 325 Magazine evolved over many exciting discussions these past months about what it means to design and create engaging architecture, and the ways we go about design interventions. We began to question how architects respond and react to the different sets of implications existing in a certain project; may that be site conditions, social and cultural sensitivity, material applications, forming and mass, the list goes on. We explored the ways in which we identify the many ‘forces’ acting upon a certain project, distill the information, and come up ZLWKDVROXWLRQWRVDWLVI\WKHFRQGLWLRQVZKLOHUHWDLQLQJRXURZQĂ DLUDQG interpretation of the assignment. In some way, we put these forces in a gradient of importance, choosing one or two to become the nucleus of our attention. For each project we receive the same syllabus and parameters as the rest of our class, use the same tools – pens, markers, trace paper, various books and references, and are consistently energized by something, whether that be Bulldog Coffee, Starbucks, or just the enthusiasm to design. Despite these similarities, we come up with drastically different solutions than our studio neighbour. And so, with the 2014-2015 installment of 325 Magazine, we celebrate the evocative power of individual creativity and the design processes we go through, whether that be a product, piece of furniture, or landscape - either rural or urban, untouched or densely packed. Enthusiastically paired with our customary showcase of excellent student work, photography, and editorials, our feature this year concentrates on Architectural Heritage Conservation, which in fact, may be our biggest design challenge as a new generation of architects: how to intervene in an already dense urban fabric or landscape, with an increasing number of forces. Shown in the following pages are personal insights on how to renovate, reform, rehabilitate, and restore that which already exists, and make it contemporary and able to serve the needs of our evolving daily OLIHVW\OHV7KHIXQGDPHQWDODSSURDFKLVWKDWLILW¡VEURNHQĂ€[LW,ILWLVQ¡W broken, improve it. We welcome you to take a look at what we’ve been up to this past year, and what we’ve accomplished here at 325 Church Street. We hope you enjoy it. Sarah Lipsit, Editor-in-Chief


section one


lily jeon diana koncan

a 01

snowcone

02

digital tools

03

04

b

c

Snowcone was designed to transform in response to the unpredictable Toronto winter weather. In sunny weather, it insulates by gathering sunlight like a greenhouse, and filters colourful light to create interesting shadows and effects like stained glass. In stormy weather, it collects snow in its petals and takes advantage of its insulating properties, like an igloo. The structure is all at once a colourful eyecatching peice of art, but also a warming hut for visitors at the beach. The public is encouraged to crawl into the structure, keep warm inside the cavity, and even interact with the lifeguard stand. Aside from physical warmth, the bright colours instantly evoke a warm atmosphere of play and whimsy. The aerodynamic, asymmetrical structure appears windswept, reflective of the windy beach climate. Petals are angled strategically to either provide further protection from the wind on the south-west, or to reveal pops of colour and offer views of the boardwalk on the north-east side. Using quick, recyclable materials, the installation reanimates the lifeguard stations, which are typically unused during the winter months. By extension, it encourages the community as well as visitors to the city to explore and celebrate our winter beach landscape. Snowcone was designed and fabricated for the inaugural 2015 Winter Stations Festival, showcased at Kew-Balmy beach.

diagram, exploded axonometric kormatex plastic leaves transparent acrylic panels 1/4 steel conduit tubes lifeguard stand

a 01 02 03 04

plan, top view

b

plan, ground level

c


13


mark de souza dennis dong kyu han mark eyk chris kayahara joshua minkyu jung john sirdevan chris zhu

Ă˜-zone

a

building science

b

01

e

d

03

04 05

06 f

03

04 05

06 g

02 c

future urban construction. This energy ready home is designed to be user friendly, requiring little to no occupant management whilst providing all necessities. Integrated systems help to achieve this common goal, fostering renewable energy for on-site use. Ă˜-zone achieves passive energy standards, at 115 kW/sq.m, just under net-zero site energy. This surplus in demand was offset by conscious design decisions, using environmentally friendly materials, which are recycled or re-usable, resulting in an affordable, eco-friendly home. This project was announced as a winner in the U.S Department of Energy’s 2015 Race to Zero competition, and was featured in The Globe and Mail.

elevation, north

a

elevation, south

b

detail, south wall balcony roof assembly: gravel ballast insulation, 101.6mm roofing membrane plywood sheathing, 15.4mm i-joist w/ batt insulation, 15.4mm gypsum, 15.4mm

c 01

wall assembly: wood siding, 15.4mm air cavity w/ wood furring strip, 25.4mm xps: joints sealed w/ tyvek tape, 152mm zip sheathing, 25.4mm gypsum, 15.4mm

02

section, transverse

d

section, longitudinal

e

plan, second level master bedroom mechanical room open kitchen, living room second bedroom

f 03 04 05 06

plan, basement level

g


15


suk jun kim

mistic escape

dakar temporary cinema competition

01

02

03

a

04

b 08 06 09 05 07

d

c

Senegal is suffering from a number of problems that challenges the lives of its locals on a daily basis. More than half of the population lives below the poverty line, with average daily earnings of less than $1.25, and 60.7% of people are illiterate. Poor sanitation is also a major issue throughout the country, and a lack of financial resources and corruption causes many students to discontinue their education. The World Happiness Report of 2013 places Senegal as the 147th happiest country in the world out of 156 countries. Mistic Escape focuses on providing a place of retreat for the local citizens of Dakar. By elevating the ground plane to the rooftops, it creates a new public plane where the typical viewing experience becomes one of fantasy. Two layers of reused fishing net are required; one to hold up the inflated balloons that become both the ground and seating for the theatre, and another to collect dew condensation that is used to produce mist. Mist would not only contribute to experiential qualities of the space but it will become the screen for film projections. Furthermore, the construction of Mistic Escape involves a great deal of community as it incorporates local skills in its construction. Similar to the way local fishermen pull up their fish nets, two fish nets are thrown and tied to several adjacent rooftops by the residents. The collaborative effort between neighbours keeps the intervention modest in its tectonics as it hopes to inspire the youth by suggesting a positive direction for the future.

diagram, previous street condition

a

diagram, new public plane

b

plan, roof

c

diagram, exploded axonometric screen theatre structural net dew collecting net mist generating space food and drinks area ticket zone projection space social zone

d 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09


17


ashley brooke biren

choreographing architecture

master’s thesis

a 01

02 03

b

c

Our bodies are in constant dialogue with our built environment: we move to experience architecture, and in turn, are moved by its presence. Movement is intrinsically linked to the way we experience our buildings, yet the body in motion has not been acknowledged for understanding and conceiving architectural form. In this thesis, the phenomenon of kinesthetic empathy is unleashed within the exploration of a choreographic architecture, where body, form and movement share an entangled relationship in the creation of an architectural composition. With the current technologies available for analyzing human movement, this investigation probes human kinesis as an external force for the formation of space, and thus, cultivates a new theory towards making architecture move. Exploring the concept of a spatial performance, the composition is designed to interact and respond to three distinctive environments that move the dweller, both physically and emotionally. These settings include the body being submerged underwater, positioned at the interface between water and air, and immersed within the sky above. The architecture underwater is fluid and open, responding to the resistance of the waters; allowing space to be explored freely, stimulating the inhabitant’s curiosity and imagination. At the interface of water and air, the design facilitates the convergence of both mediums, creating a tranquil environment for a moment of self-reflection and resting. Lastly, the summit of the structure opens up to the sky above, encouraging the dweller to daydream and wonder. In these three realms, the natural and built environments are choreographed to spur a resonance within one’s body when encountering the subtleties of change through space.

diagram, concept air air-water interface water

a 01 02 03

elevations

b

physical models

c

perspective, air

d

perspective, air-water interface

e

perspective, water

f


19

d

e

f


erik aquino john benner adrian chĂŽu

nexus

competition

01 02

03 04

b

08

05 a

09

06 07

10 c

11

12

d

13

14

15 e

With fluctuating water levels and unpredictable accumulations of water from extreme precipitation as well as melting snow, Toronto’s rivers can vary from minimum water levels to severe flooding. As a repercussion, litter becomes swept into the water and distributed along the river. The Don River is an example of said condition as it collects from several bodies of water up north, and empties into Lake Ontario. Nexus serves to resolve this littering issue. The structure is arranged underneath the Prince Edward Viaduct, recycling the existing unused space and implementing a socially and environmentally sustainable condition. The bottom of the structure diverts two-thirds of the waste moving downstream to the banks of the river into collectors for efficient removal. To accommodate for the fluctuations of the water levels, the central component of the bridge is connected to pontoons that provide support for the bridge during vertical movements in the water.

diagram, platform module assembly aess overhang to composite tee channel cleat bolted railing connection hss welded frame composite steel tee assembly steel cuff bolted hollow a.e.s.s

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

plan, ground

b

detail, platform/circulation space connection

c

detail, ramp to bridge connection

d

detail, steel pontoon and spring connection composite tee assembly welded angle cleats steel pontoon mounting plates spring telescopic hss steel cuff bolted concrete

e 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15

section

f


21

f


fontane ma

link house

design studio

CHEUNG X LEE X MA

a

01

b

c

02

05

03

04

05

d

e

f

06

g

Located in Toronto Burlington, The Link House is a townhouse designed as part of the redevelopment of a shopping centre area. This project focuses on providing accommodation for three young adults whose living alone without their family, bringing them together through programming and material choices. Programmed with ascending privacy, the ground floor and basement is dedicated for commercial purposes, second is a common area, third and forth floor is for residential, and lastly the rooftop is for entertainment. With a high end vintage store operating out of the front part of the house, and is separated into three aisles: a corridor to basement storage, browsing store items, and changing rooms. The kitchen on the second floor is open to the store below, so that the residents can maintain watch over the customers, while the living room allows for store meetings and relaxing.

h

i

elevation, south

a

elevation, north

b

section, transverse

c

plan, basement storage

d 01

plan, ground level store

e 02

plan, second level work space kitchen

f 03 04

plan, third level bedroom

g 05

plan, fourth level roof terrace

h 06

plan, roof

i


23


naveed khan sarah lipsit

traverse

integration studio

03 05

04 06 07

07 08

c a 01 10 09 11

02

12 13 d

14

16

15

17 18 14

b

This project called for the coming together of two very different programs; an office program and a traditional library. This launched an exploration into the many different thoughts and processes of what it means to share and trade resources, physical space, and collaborate in the pursuit of knowledge and imagination. This act of sharing in an act of joinery propelled a scheme in which the programs intersected at certain points to create a hierarchy of spaces which users from both sides could experience. These shared spaces, a cafe, digital resource centre, group work rooms, and a ‘living room’ esque reading area, act as a linking bridge between the CSI Office and Library and enable users to traverse between programs, dependent on level and security. The CSI office and library programs are separated, loaded in either the east or west volumes, but alternate locations on each floor. The main circulation of the building occurs at the intersection of these volumes, so that when traveling vertically, the user will exist in both programs at once, commanding attention to the act of moving from level to level. The conceptual background of the project has informed the main facade element. The undulations, a repeating ribbon-like structure of right tone of concrete panels, composed of marble aggregate and Portland limestone, expressed in the facade represent the give and take of the act of sharing resources and physical space, and allow the envelope to interact with the interior spaces, so that the depth of the envelope is more a dynamic boundary rather than just a skin.

e

diagram, program guided movement shared spaces to introduce connectivity

a 01 02

section, transverse

b

plan, ground parent-child drop in zone OTB: multipurpose room reception and waiting shared space: cafe classroom outdoor park

c 03 04 05 06 07 08

plan, level one csi office: hot desk group meeting tables shared space: digital resources library: stacks library administration

d 09 10 11 12 13

plan, third level balcony office: rentable cubicle office: permanent office shared space: ‘living room’ library: stacks

e 14 15 16 17 18


25


27

compare and contrast Words: Sarah Lipsit

Photographs:

Catalina Ardila-Bernal Michelle Ashurov Rémi Carreiro Sarah Lipsit Nahal Rahnamaei

Travel is an intrinsic part of life; whether the distance is 30 kilometers or 30,000, the new scenery informs your character, and the destinations transform your thoughts - perhaps lifestyle if you stay long enough. The imitable impression of having done and seen a million things in just a few short days in a new city allows you to discern time more fully and develop an enthusiastic infatuation or attachment. Particularly for future architects and designers, travelling, much less studios taught abroad are some of the most important tools and methods of learning, and can introduce a VHQVHRIFXULRVLW\DQGDGYHQWXUHWKDWFDQEHDGHÀQLQJFKDUDFWHULVWLFRIRXUZRUN7HVWLQJ your architectural boundaries and greatening your exposure to different cultures, cities, and lifestyles encourages experiential learning opportunities, and ways to solve real, immediate problems. We see travelling as a process of seeking knowledge and information through experiences. Through the lenses of those on Frankfurt Studio and China Studio, we look at how forces of vastly different landscapes and cultures have shaped architect’s design processes. We notice striking similarities, indistinguishable details, and comparable components, across distinct environments to make us think that maybe, despite coming to different conclusions, we’re not all so different in our initial approaches.


this page: weissenhof estate, stuttgart (top), museum tinguely, basel (bottom) facing page: fondation beyeler, riehen previous page: north sรถdermalm, stockholm


this page: arab institute, paris (top), luisiana museum, copenhagen (bottom) facing page: museum fßr moderne kunst, frankfurt (top), couple’s retreat gardem suzhou (bottom)


this page: zĂźrich university law library, zĂźrich (top left), allianz areana, munich (top right) messe basel new hall, basel (bottom left), friedrichstraĂ&#x;e 33, berlin (bottom right) facing page: gsw headquarters, berlin


this page: watercube, beijing (top), louvre museum, paris (bottom facing page: vitra haus, vitra design campus, weil am rhein


this page: musĂŠe des confluences, lyon (top), congress und messe, innsbruck (bottom) facing page: vm houses, copenhagen (top), waterfront congress centre, stockholm (bottom)


this page: huayan temple gate, datong (top), museum brandhorst, munich (bottom) facing page: grundtvigs kirke, copenhagen


Looking for your next (educational) escape, but don’t know what’s an available option? Let us at 325 help!

first, choose your (drawing) weapon.

orange gel pen

mechanical pencil

mouse

black pilot fineliner

favourite food?

fish and chips

schnitzel

mussels

pick a drink

dim sum

beaches and deserts

green juice

foster’s beer

coffee

the city

bohemien rhapsody

no scrubs

1000 miles

how do you feel about snow?

choose your palette

not happening

i could deal...

pick your corbusier

villa la roche

money, power, respect

weissenhof estate

palace of assembly

choose an animal in a sweater

what motivates you?

sunrises

tequila...!

which song would you sing at karaoke?

exploring is best done in...

forests

muji 0.25 pen

croissants are life

get the skis!


41

ENGLAND Welcome to the land of royalty, with lush gardens, parliament buildings and palaces throughout. Don’t worry about dressing too fancy all the time though, as you’ll be studying architecture at Coventry University, in the Architecture, Building and Construction sector. This 4 month exchange will teach you everything there is to know about the building and construction side of the profession, including project management as a large portion of it. You’ll have plenty of time to explore the multitude of historical landmarks of our English cousins on your breaks from school, so you better start planning! NORWAY Hallo! No, that’s not a typo! That is how you say hello in Norwegian. Although you wont need to learn the language, you’ll have plenty of time during your 4 month stay to learn to speak a few words of the local language. BAS - Bergen Arkitekthøgskole is the school that you will be attending, right on the coast of the water with plenty of space to build and create your architectural ideas. The school is located in Bergen, a smaller coastal city of Norway, and it couldn’t be more picturesque. With mountains, water, and smaller colorful houses it’s a great place to not only learn, but also to look into yourself and reflect. AUSTRALIA Welcome to the southern hemisphere where it is summer when we have our winters. This abroad program occurs during the 3rd year 2nd semester of the Architectural Science undergraduate program. RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia is where a few lucky students will be able to study by the water and sandy beaches. This abroad trip does not have a design studio course but is perfect for students in architecture who are intrigued by civil engineering and want to know more about the structure and construction process. This is a great experience to live and work in such a unique and different atmosphere. Talk to Prof. Paul Floerke for more information. CHINA You are legitimately on the other side of the planet. This opportunity to travel around China is also a studio credit for your 4th year 1st semester! The many cities and neighbourhoods that you are guided through on this trip will let you experience the many social, cultural, and architectural differences that will expand your knowledge towards other parts of the world. This 6 week summer program will give you an experience that you will never forget! Talk to Prof. Zaiyi Liao for more information! FRANCE Are you up to learning some new architectural methods as well as some French? Throw a little bit of love into the mix and you’ll be set taking your exchange in Paris, France at École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris la Villette. The 4 month exchange will allow you to fully integrate yourself into the French culture and get the most from it. Even though Paris is packed with history and amazing food, much of the city is revolutionized by 21st century architecture within. The vibe of the city is great to learn a thing or two from, so along with some new “amis”, grab yourself a coffee and sketchbook and get going! FRANKFURT Germany is the place for you! You still enjoy the city life, but why not try somewhere different than Toronto. This 4 week studio away experience will let you travel to many cities around Germany and experience the rich architecture in Europe. What a great way to complete your 4th year 1st semester studio credit! If you feel that 1 month is too long, check out Kultour, a one week credit that alternates each year between Canadian and European cities. Go see Prof. Yew-Thong for more information.


johnathan chan

ai wei wei museum

design studio

DN

UP

06

03

07

01

11

10

DN

UP DN

UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

DN

UP

UP

UP

UP

04

02

08

09

05 UP

UP

a

c

b

06 03

04

11 10

07

d

11 10

09

05

01 02

f

e

g

a plan, basement level library/multimedia space 01 multipurpose space 02 plan, ground level b workshop 03 ticketing 04 gift shop 05 plan, second level main exhibition space administration area seating cafe restaurant

The nature of the site as a Canadian landmark calls for a contextual relationship that parallels the exhibition space to the historical qualities of Canada. To introduce a Chinese artist who is dedicated towards social, cultural, and political issues into Canada would be influential for residents as well as bring about a surge in Toronto’s tourism industry. The work of Ai Wei Wei initiates important dialogues in the political realm, and act as a catalyst that invokes a more critical analysis of the current Canadian political system.

c 06 07 08 09

plan, fourth level d temporary exhibition spaces 10 art storage 11 diagram, program

e

section, north-south

f

section, east-west

g


43


chelsea campbell mark de souza mark eyk michael mazurkiewicz pritish pathak danielle van ootengam derek smart

a

01

synesthesia

02

03

04

digital tools

05

Synesthesia is a multi-storey hybrid musical instrument which harnesses the rigid framework of architecture to produce playful sounds in space. As an experiment in human scale, the architecture becomes the structure, neck, bridge, and resonator of an object held in place by tensioned piano wire, creating a tonal progression which reverberates through steel railing. Ascending or descending the stair, curious fingers find the pleasure of flooding space with a chordal resonance, while neon spun fibres, which parallel each wire, manifest the dispersion of notes played. The experience transgresses the auditory into the visual with lighting elements that are responsive to the pluck of each wire. The reverberation chamber was designed after testing and careful study of material properties to naturally project the sounds created by each piano wire without the need for digital amplification. When a wire is plucked, Arduino vibration sensors initiate a visual response. The body of the instrument is illuminated at night with each pluck.

axonometric, exploded detail backplate frame boarder front panel ridge

a 01 02 03 04 05


45


kenan elsasser

eco-courtyard

china studio

05 04 01 a

06

b

01

03

02

a

c

7

d f

e

Traversing through the neighbouring natural wetlands park, individuals explore the vast ecosystem of the wetlands which networks a variety of vegetation and wildlife. The elements of earth, water and living species merge to form a natural water retention and filtration system within the wetlands. The Eco Courtyard serves as a complex of varying educational facilities including a wet-lab, classroom, documentary theatre and ecological centre. The elevated arrangement of programs to the site provides the opportunity for exploration over the wetlands as well as wetland education within each respective architectural structure on-site.

g

section, through educational factility and wet-lab

a

section, taken through pavilion

b

section, taken through ecological centre

c

elevation, wet-lab and classroom

d

elevation, ecological centre

e 01 02 03 04 05 06

plan, ground level educational facility & wet-lab pavilion cafe/eatery ecological centre documentary theatre theatre ticketing elevation, documentary theatre

f g


49


michael mazurkiewicz pritish pathak

anchor brake

digital tools

a 01

02

03

04

05

b

Due to the high speeds longboarders can reach, safety is paramount in urban environments. Recent studies indicate an increase in severe head fractures, intracranial hemorrhages, and traumatic brain injuries among longboarders due to a lack of physical protection. Although helmet use is encouraged, few efforts have been made to reduce injuries due to uncontrollable speed. In narrow spaces between parked and moving vehicles, passing cyclists, and above-ground transit, there is a need for longboarders to control their speed more appropriately in urban contexts. The Anchor Brake fastens to any longboard. Adjusting to different board widths and depths, it is suited for both right-footed and left-footed riders. The rider steps on the pedal, causing the brake to lower and providing resistance against the ground. Friction between a rubberized rod and urethane brake roll allows for minimal, controlled rotation to prevent uneven wear, prolonging the lifespan of the roll. Two internal springs of different resistances keep the pedal in an upright position, and allow it to pivot evenly.

diagram, assembly instructions slide brake onto rubbarized steel rod slide steel roll with brake roll below board fasten adjustment clip in to pedal clip center brake roll along mid point of board push down on pedal mechanism

a 01 02 03 04 05

diagram, sectional exploded axonometric

b


51


jeff jang roger xu casey yuen

reverb

[r]ed[u]x lab

a 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

b

Reverb is an exploration of action and reaction; of light and touch translating into the human interchange of thoughts. Reverb draws in the individual with luminosity, engaging them to touch and interact to find the connections that join the diamond capsules. Designed and built with intention of establishing a greater presence of TEDxRyersonU on the university campus, the massing and colour were chosen to leave a bold impression in pedestrians, students, and citizens alike. While adhering to TEDxRyersonU’s logo in terms of font, scale and colour, an aspect of interactivity was introduced within the red X. Pixelated into diamonds, users are encouraged to push these buttons to observe another button emerge from the array of diamonds. This repetition of pushing and pulling of these diamond buttons produce a breathing surface – echoes of human ideas and presence. With the possibility for a night exhibition, an LED strip lighting was installed within the frame of the X, illuminating to give a bigger presence and vibrancy to the community – echoing TED’s mantra of “ideas worth sharing”.

diagram, exploded axonometric clear plastic tubes rear mdf panel 1/2” syringes (front end) side plywood panels 3/4” frosted acrylic 1/8” front mdf lattice 1/2” syringes (rear end) buttons 1/8” mdf and acrylic

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

sketch, concept

b


53


lucy yang

trinity bellwoods pavilion

communication studio

03

01

02

04

a

05 b

06 07

c

d

e

The site for this proposed pavilion is Trinity Bellwoods Park, located on the West end of Toronto. The majority of the park lies in the original Garrison Creek Ravine, which can be considered the founding landform of Toronto. The structure seeks to build a stronger relationship between the residential community, the park and Garrison Creek. The “pavilion bridge” rebuilds the formal connection between the residential street and the park, reviving the role of Crawford Street on the South face of the building in the summer. The heart of the building gives way to a multi-purpose room for community events. The organization of the pavilion into three smaller and defined programs, consisting of a café, an outdoor farmers’ market, and a skate change space, was crucial to the concept, naturally forming a long open connecting space between the street and the park.

f

diagram, structural

a

section b

b

elevation, north

c

section a

d

elevation, east

e

plan, ground level cafe kitchen mechanical, stroage multi-purpose space skate change room hockey change room outdoor equipment storage

f 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

diagram, concept development

g


55

g


mahan navabi

evolution

acsa competition

01 05 UP

02

03 OTA A

OTB UP

04 06 04

OTA A

OTB UP

a

UP

b

c

d

The project utilizes steel in order to redefine the library as a cultural agent in its community. The site, 60 Mill St, is located at a threshold between old, adaptively reused development: The Distillery District, and new construction sites of Toronto’s West Don Lands community. According to the West Don Lands Precinct Plan, the new buildings will be an average of 8 storeys high. The new community will eventually require a medium sized public library. The existing building on 60 Mill St is a brick rack house part of a group of three former rack houses located along Mill St. With the characteristic Toronto brickwork of the Distillery District to the South, and the new, steel and concrete mid-rise development to the North, there is potential to address not only the contrast between the old and new of the surrounding context, but also the contrast between the qualities of a traditional library versus those of a library for the “future”. Thus, the building is designed in section, as an evolutionary journey from a quieter, contemplative, library located in the existing building of brick to an open space for collaboration characterized by steel. As such, the building rises and cantilevers to the North in order to address the higher and newer context. The building’s use of steel displays the evolution from the historical to the futuristic.

plan, ground level patio cafe atrium book stacks

a 01 02 03 04

plan, level two digital innovation workshop private workspace

b 05 06

section, experiential

c

diagrams, massing

d


57


michelle ashurov naveed khan sarah lipsit filip tisler

foot[age]

design fabrication zone

06

01

07

02

08

03

09

04

a

05

b

The 20th anniversary window installation serves as a physical manifestation of the tools that move us: shoes. Derived from a formalized vector field geometry, the wall plays with depth, flow, and light to invoke a sense of movement that is both tangible and intangible. It seeks to serve both form and function, much like the shoes that we wear every day. The installation is composed of pocketed acrylic panels and MDF extrusions that create shoe forms. When backlit with LEDs, the components become inverted, resulting in an unexpected abstraction that transforms the physical into the ethereal. The interplay of depth and shadow together with the vast number of individual physical components allegorically represent both the immense volume of priceless history and content contained within the museum. Foot[age] was designed and fabricated for the Bata Shoe Museum’s 20th Anniversary as their celebratory year long window exhibition.

diagram, exploded axonometric mdf dowels white lexan sheet, perforated and pocketed fasteners and spacers clear acrylic sheet, pocketed mdf base mdf roof structural back wall led strips structural base to level floor

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

plan, full window

b


59


section two


63

heratige conversations A literary supplement

Photographs: Words: Rachel Law Sarah Lipsit Anthony Youssef

Catalina Ardila-Bernal Michelle Ashurov RĂŠmi Carreiro Farah Elmajdoub

Toronto is an exciting modern city that is very much in touch with its past. Original houses, buildings, and neighbourhoods that were built over a century ago are an integral part of our unique urban fabric and enrich our everyday life. Celebrating our perennial focus on our past, we’d like to share the dialogues we had with professionals in academics and the architectural industry, exploring the connection between Heritage Conservation to the broader considerations of urban design and city building, as well as the larger set of cultural values that provide perspective to our education.


Our panel: Masha Etkind, a professor at Ryerson’s Department of Architectural Science, whose specialization is within the framework of Heritage Conservation, and has many publications on its theory and practice. Philip Evans, a principal at ERA Architects and the founder of Culture of Outports and small. He enthusiastically leads a broad scope of conservation, adaptive reuse, design, and feasibility planning projects, and has an appreciation for working on a range of built environments, whether urban, rural, and suburban settings. Heather Campbell, a marketing director at ERA Architects, is involved in the planning and organization of Culture of Outports, and small, an online platform providing strategies for community renewal based on sustainable cultural practices and renewed economic interest. Marco Polo, a professor at Ryerson’s Department of Architectural Science, is an expert on Canadian Architecture, whether in the topic of Regionalism, our Architectural History since 1945, or the criticism of Contemporary Canadian Architecture. Nova Tayona, a professional who had worked for several years with architect Ian Macdonald before beginning her own namesake practice in 2012. Her work within Toronto and on the East Coast focuses on place and craft, and she has a particular interest in Canadian Architecture and the city.

 )LUVWO\ ZH¡OO GHĂ€QH WKH PRYHPHQW RI $UFKLWHFWXUDO +HULWDJH &RQVHUYDWLRQ DV DQDO\]LQJ WKH SURFHVV which the material, historical, and design integrity of our city fabric are prolonged through carefully planned interventions. Incisions and alterations here and there are made to renew the city – or rural or suburban areas- so that it functions according to current needs. The Ontario Heritage Act is a written legislation to govern different designations of the conservation of heritage buildings, sites, and properties. However, the system and decisions of when and how to engage in an intervention are critical to the overall movement. As a city, do you think Toronto has a good understanding of the importance of cultural heritage conservation LQWKHDUFKLWHFWXUDOĂ€HOG" Marco Polo: I don’t think there’s a clear understanding of what has value and what doesn’t. But, I don’t think that’s exclusive to Toronto; I think certainly in North America there’s a general disregard for the heritage value of early modern buildings, there isn’t a huge public affection for these buildings. People have very emotional connections to certain types of buildings. I think people are prepared to chain themselves to Victorian houses and a Victorian house of dubious quality versus a really amazing Modernist building, or Brutalist building, because it’s just not valued in that way. I think it’s hard to get people excited about the preservation of modern and mid-century architecture such as Brutalist buildings, buildings that are very robust but people hate. 1RYD7D\RQD:KHQ\RXFRPSDUH1RUWK$PHULFDQFLWLHVWR(XURSHDQFLWLHV\RXĂ€QGWKDWRXU FRQQHFWLRQ WR FXOWXUH DQG KHULWDJH LV QRW DV GHHS SHUKDSV EHFDXVH ZH GRQ¡W Ă€QG WKH FLW\ DV sacred as they do. And I don’t know if it’s because the value is not completely there or the weight of the architecture doesn’t resonate. We think a building that is a hundred years old is “oldâ€?,

facing page: corkin gallery, distillery district


which initiates the conscious mindset of “it’s old, let’s just put something new thereâ€?, so we just bulldoze everything all the time. In Europe, a Roman wall is old – it carries history. And, to them, a hundred years old is ‘new’. The roots are not that deep in North America, but it’s probably because we are pretty quick to wipe away those roots. Masha Etkind: Toronto should be compared to cities like Boston and New York and Montreal, cities of the timeline and scale that are similar to Toronto. But, I think Toronto doesn’t quite live up to those because, at the moment, we’re missing a bigger picture for the heritage master plan of the city. The goal for the 21st century to strike a balance between high density and a healthy pedestrian realm. They’re not necessarily mutually exclusive, nor are they necessarily mutually unacceptable. But, they are certainly two objectives that can inform development. Philip Evans: I think what’s missing is that we need to put the ‘use’ back in adaptive reuse. There are so many buildings with such interesting functions and programs, and we’re completely disregarding that. We’ve been so focused on adapting that we’ve kind of created a situation where we’re becoming a monoculture producing a singular economic thing - residential. We’re taking warehouses and turning them into residential, turning churches into condos. It’s like we Ă€QGDZRUGZKHWKHULW¡VÂśprotection’, or ‘preservation¡RUZKDWHYHUDQGWKHQZHGRWKDWIRUĂ€YH or ten years like it’s a trend. Then it’s like, ‘residential, let’s do that!’, and everyone follows because the new generations want to live in a church, a warehouse. It’s amazing how such narrowsightedness taints our vision. 2YHUDOOGR\RXWKLQNWKDW7RURQWR¡VFXOWXUDOLGHQWLW\LVVRPHKRZLQĂ XHQFLQJWKHSRVLWLRQRI+HULWDJH &RQVHUYDWLRQLQWKHDUFKLWHFWXUDOĂ€HOG" NT: Having been from Halifax, NS, for example, there’s a lot in the downtown core that has been preserved from a historic point of view. It’s very much an English military fortress town, and that’s the identity of the city. So, the collective memory of that city is the Citadel Hill, which was built to protect the harbor from invasions, and the city grew around it. Ironically, the City of Toronto started off as a fortress too, but we don’t quite feel that - Fort York is off to the side now, and we’ve moved away from that part of our history. In Toronto, you have a different set of the population with invested interests in different things, and they’re all just trying to get ahead. Everyone wants to have something new and shiny. Heather Campbell: I think one of the things that makes us different from the East Coast in terms of cultural heritage is that there isn’t much of a distinguished culture here. Toronto is such a melting pot, so your answer to the question ÂśZKDWLVFXOWXUDOKHULWDJH"¡ will depend where you came from. Yet, on the east coast, it may be more of a caricature, but you know what the intangibles are on a general scale. For example, there was a rural farmland that came into question of heritage status, but all that was kept was the farmhouse – but was that really the thing of value? Here, farming isn’t accessible to 80% of the people, it’s easier to communicate the value of the farmhouse rather than the site, because it’s more personal. We understand what a house is, but you may not understand what farming is. It comes back to a question of communication, and how to get across the message.

facing page: max gluskin house


'R\RXWKLQNWKDWHYHU\WKLQJLQWKHEXLOWHQYLURQPHQWLVVXVFHSWLEOHWRFRQVHUYDWLRQDQGSUHVHUYDWLRQ" ME: I think that principles which determine livable cities need to be preserved. The relationship of open space to built-form, the broken or permeable block, shared public open space; all of these principles should be preserved. This may, or may not, mean preserving built form, but it does mean preserving the principles of planning and development upon which the built form was based. When looking at historical landscape, one should ask œZKDWLVWKHPHDQLQJRIRSHQVSDFH" :KDWLVLWVIXQFWLRQLQUHODWLRQWROLIHLQWKHFLW\"¡we should examine not only the quality of a garden, botanical garden or a big park, but the quality of the street, the open space, the embedded history in that street. NT: Architect Ian Macdonald is a great example of this, actually. He has been the president of the heritage committee in his neighborhood, Wychwood Park, for about twenty years. It all started because he purchased a parcel of land in that area – that was quite an anomaly. That whole area was actually part of an estate with lots of large Arts and Crafts type houses. At the time Wychwood Park had their own heritage guidelines, and he was expected to follow them. However, he argued that we are in the modern age and while he would respect the lines of the existing 1950s house on his land, he should not be expected to replicate the Arts and Crafts style. And, he was successful in his argument. He also argued that the landscape of the ravine setting should also be considered valuable in terms of preservation. As a result, he joined this heritage committee, and this modern architect helped reshape the guidelines. He really advocated for the landscape to be included, which is rare. When we think about cultural and physical heritage, we normally think of buildings. But in this case, the architecture and the landscape go hand-in-hand. We always forget that the landscape was there before anything was ever built. MP: Aldo Rossi has an interesting take on this. He talks about two categories of buildings within the city. Of course, he’s talking about an Italian traditional city, but he talks about monuments YHUVXVKRXVLQJ7KHZD\KHGHÀQHVLWLVWKDWPRQXPHQWVDUHDOOWKHVSHFLDOEXLOGLQJVRIFKDUDFWHU that give the city its unique identity and housing is just a way for him to talk about the fabric, ÀOOLQJLQWKHVSDFH6R\RXFRXOGWDONDERXWLWLQWHUPVRIIDEULFEXLOGLQJYHUVXVREMHFWEXLOGLQJ or iconic building. His position is that fabric needs to be respected, but the individual buildings within the fabric can go, it’s just that the building that replace those have to respect the fabric, so you don’t just eliminate the character of the city all together. If you follow Rossi’s logic, new buildings should be of similar scale. The thing that is worth preserving is the bigger ensemble, not the individual pieces. 325: When looking to do an intervention on a site that’s designated as Heritage Status under the Ontario +HULWDJH$FWZKDWDUH\RXUSULPDU\FRQVLGHUDWLRQV" NT: It’s important to look at the conditions of the building, the environment, and see what’s missing in the community. Look at your new Student Learning Centre as a case study. Before, it was a busy, iconic corner, and people wondered what was going to be put there for the community – not just for the students. I was blown away by how that corner [staircase] was so activated by noon. Before, there wasn’t a spot where you could catch the sun anywhere along Yonge Street. Even at Yonge and Dundas Square, which is a very exposed and open bit of land, you get that

previous page: fort york historic site facing page: st paul’s anglican church


shadow at noon. The Student Learning Centre essentially became a porch – you’ve got the canopy, which is actually quite cozy funnily enough, and the green wall comes up and shields you a little bit from the street’s edge, but then you still have the open view of the streetscape. It provides something that wasn’t there already – that gray area between public and private space. There’s an ‘intervention’ in the downtown core that creates possibilities for how you might use that environment. It’s a place of repose in that intersection, where you are still interacting with the streetscape but as an observer and a player. I think that’s where buildings like that can be successful. ,VWKHUHDFRUUHFWZD\WRDSSURDFKDQLQWHUYHQWLRQRQDGHQVHXUEDQIDEULFRUDKHULWDJHVLWH" ME: I don’t think there’s a right way and a wrong way, but it’s about respect. Look at the two examples on Bloor Street: the Royal Ontario Museum versus the Royal Conservatory. In the Royal Conservatory, there’s such careful work in introducing a new performance hall, which is a black box of contemporary material, scale, and form of expression next to this Romanesque red stone, Filigree-like work of masonry. And then, adjacent to it, you see a brilliant architect coming in with a heavily built form that literally penetrates the existing building without any respect. I’m not saying you cannot contrast the new form with the old. But, contrast doesn’t mean disrespect and disregard of what is already there. Contrast is a strong statement which respects the previous formulation. However, there is no sensitivity in the interaction of the Royal Ontario Museum where the new steel comes right at the corner of the window and destroys the integrity of the facade, destroys the harmony of the elements that were carefully crafted together in order to make a statement of a contrast. So if we compare them, I would say the Royal Conservatory succeeds very well in this dialogue and informed development. Meanwhile, the other succeeds in destroying the integrity of the Royal Ontario Museum. It’s about how sensitive, sensible and respectful you are. You have to be respectful, otherwise you become destructive. 3(7\SLFDOO\ZHWU\WRHQFRXUDJHDYDULHW\RIDSSURDFKHVZKHUHZHVWDUWE\Ă€QGLQJVRPHWKLQJ of value, a piece of architecture or a unique neighbourhood, and we try to provide a light touch to them. There are some cases where it is quite compatible to take that approach, and the light touch brings in new and added value to that site. Sometimes the form of the building is kind of inconsequential, but the function and the use within those buildings were so tailored, you get part of the industrial artefacts integrated within the framework or envelope. And you can’t really take the artefact away without really modifying that building, so this ‘light touch’ won’t do. I feel like churches are in that zone, and in some cases, those kinds of buildings are not candidates for reuse. So, on one end is a minimal approach, and the other end of that spectrum is full demolition, and there are actually these moments in between. this is here where you have the opportunity to make new openings to accommodate new retail on the ground level, and a little further a long it’s adding two to three storeys to this building and making additions, and then it’s hollowing out the core to make new elevators, and then you go along and take off half the building, replacing it with a new self-sustaining structure, and then you see things like façadism, or rebuilt, replication and mimicry, and so on until demolition. So, this light touch is where we want to start, but at times, when you balance all the resident/community interest, stakeholder interest, government legislatures like the Growth Plan, the program performance of that particular new use, bringing added value‌ it gets really complicated. You need that kind of range to understand and evaluate what the opportunities are on the site, and how to best work with an existing resource.

facing page: residential, summerhill (top), royal conservatory of music (bottom)


:KDWDERXWWKHSXEOLF":K\LVLWLPSRUWDQWIRUSODQQLQJDQGKHULWDJHZRUNWREHDGHPRFUDWLFSURFHVV" PE : Heritage is one of the more of accessible acts within the planning framework because we can see it, it’s there, we have value associated to it right away, and we’re talking about change. But most people are uncomfortable about change. You don’t always have to convince them, but more so just include them in the conversation as part of the change. So, there is value in including community, because it’s their community. We are in this together, trying to problem solve together, it’s not an opposition. ME: I think the more democratic we can be, the better. More democratic means more ‘grass roots’ thinking, which encourages people to recognize and take part in preservation. It’s never good to be an autocratic, even in the cultural decision making process. What is important is to educate the public, to bring to the people of the place the chance to speak, to inform them, to bring back information to them. And, only then they will support and publicly defend their culture. Look at some areas like Parkdale, St. James Town; look at what’s happening in Regent Park. These are a few examples of very active, democratic communities. 325: Do you think academic curriculums are addressing these topics and the importance of Heritage &RQVHUYDWLRQDGHTXDWHO\" MP: Not robustly enough. We tend to focus on new buildings, and I don’t think we have a systematic way of addressing conservation, as it doesn’t seem to have really worked its way into the core of the curriculum. But, it’s interesting because I think it’s becoming an increasingly important dimension of practice but it’s not something that architectural education in general has dealt with. Columbia has a very well respected graduate program in preservation, and that tends to address it from more of a technological point of view like material chemistry and how to intervene to preserve a building in physical terms. I guess one of the reasons it tends not to be central to architectural education is because it’s hard to generalize. When you’re dealing with a VSHFLĂ€FSURMHFWLWKDVLWVRZQYHU\SDUWLFXODULVVXHVDQGLW¡VVRPHWKLQJWKDW¡VUHDOO\GLIĂ€FXOWWR deal with in the short time frame of semester-long studios. PE: Education is so relevant! The form of where and how it’s delivered, the manner of examination and learning, so we have to ask, is education a traditional, bricks and mortar thing? Or is it an intangible thing in which it lives in practice? It’s a question of what the form of education should be, and who participates in it. There is a practice side of it, but more importantly, it’s about working through and trying to learn to problem solve in a situation. Like Evergreen Brickworks, which integrates play and learning. Like Farm Starts, like Culture of Outports - I think a lot of learning about working with conservation is grounded in practice. HC: I think, in post-secondary education, you see a lot more corporate involvement, which is often taken negatively. But, when you look at the degree of growth in P3 partnerships in all kinds of industries, or co-op programs in education, you’re learning the values of those companies because you’re working with them to a large degree. You’re going to get the education that an institution or individual can give you in practice, and that’s a responsibility of the student as well. ME: Education is addressing this fact by addressing issues of values: social, cultural and moral values. It is not only about a particular block or particular development but it about our collective understanding of preservation and the re-use of buildings.


above: royal ontario museum


'R\RXWKLQN+HULWDJH&RQVHUYDWLRQLVVLPSO\DSK\VLFDODFW" PE: In most people’s minds, it is mostly physical because that is the easiest way to understand; we’re not doing taxidermy here, that’s not something of interest to us. It’s more about how can you leverage the assets of a community, a site, a program, and put it towards a relevant use. We JHWUHDOO\À[DWHGRQWKHSK\VLFDOEHFDXVHZH·UHVRFRQFHQWUDWHGRQÀWWLQJLQWKHSK\VLFDOQHHGV within a larger development. It’s obvious there’s a building there, but what about communities? What about the people that are using these buildings? What about the businesses that are evolving and then creating the need for building shells. We see this all over the country, where buildings and architecture are often just byproducts of really interesting uses and functions, and it’s dangerous to get overly focused on just the physical. ME: I think preservation is a very multi-dimensional process and phenomenon. Most of it is intangible but a good part of it is tangible. The tangible part of it is built form, and cultural landscape and, so to speak, preserving the stones and memory instilled in the stones. But then there is a big part of preservation is what our relationship with the built form is and what the role of the built form is in the bigger context. This is more an interpretation of the collective memory and this is the grass root of preservation in society. :LOOWHFKQRORJ\HYHQWXDOO\WDNHRQDQLQFUHDVLQJUROHLQFRQVHUYDWLRQDQGSUHVHUYDWLRQ" MP: I’m sure it will in some way, whether that means we preserve things digitally or virtually. I hope we don’t go that route - I believe the physical object is extremely important because it forms part of the experience of the city itself. You could argue that we’ve got lots of great photos of these buildings, why do we need to preserve them? Well, because a photo is not a building, a virtual 3D model is not a building. It becomes too much of a museum artifact at that point and it’s no longer part of the fabric of the city.  :KDW GR \RX WKLQN WKH IXWXUH RI +HULWDJH &RQVHUYDWLRQ ZLOO EHFRPH" :KDW LVVXHV GR \RX WKLQN RXU JHQHUDWLRQFDQH[SHFW" ME: Your generation will certainly deal with everything that the 20th century created. It was relatively easy for the earlier generations to create because there was a greater timeline attached to the building stock. Buildings had a certain stylistic characteristic, a personality and individuality – they were regarded as objects. But coming into a 20th century urban setting, you’re no longer dealing with single objects. The 20th century brought “new” materials like concrete, glass and steel and therefore mass production, so that we’re no longer dealing with objects but larger blocks. If we start bull dozing 20th century cities then what are we going to do with all of that rubble? We need to understand how to work with it, integrate it and how to inform that development with the history of the place. PE: In Toronto, I think we’re focusing a lot on the urban realm, and people are going to be VKRFNHGZLWKWKHDPRXQWRIUHYLVLRQWRWKHXUEDQIDEULFLQWKHQH[WWHQWRÀIWHHQ\HDUV:KDW attracted us to the city was to live where we worked, and now it is kind of the opposite, and I think it’s becoming frustrating for people who are all over the place. What is so rich about the


city, and the urban realm, is that it’s constantly doing this furniture arrangement in the living room [downtown], but, there’s the bedroom upstairs, and the bathroom over here. Let’s check out these other spaces and focus on areas that have potential. We seem to be very focused on the urban environment, even in the heritage conservation community. I wonder, why aren’t we talking about the suburban realm? It’s so connected to the urban community, with people commuting into the city day in and day out, and there’s only really been one or two passes at designing the suburban realm. I think the big challenge for your generation is the suburban realm, and how to use the rural – how are we going to be resourceful? Might we integrate or understand the rural environment, so that we can adapt them, occupy them, and invest in them? Are they going to become our villas to our condos in the city? There’s a variety of lifestyle opportunities out there! It’s limiting in the city, so the questions about the future are going to be about how we are living – what are our lifestyles.

facing page: evergreen brick works


elaine chau shannon clayton ramoncito espino adam hall

bell island

culture of outports

a

b

Bell Island’s mining history stretches back to the 1890s, with the identification of major deposits of iron ore on the island. Mining substantially drove the local economy, and by 1923, Bell Island was the second largest community in Newfoundland, behind St. John’s. However, global competition from producers who could extract ore cheaper led to a decline in the market value of Bell Island’s product, and the last of the mines closed permanently in 1966. Bell Island’s No. 2 mine closed in 1949, and the site now hosts a museum. Opened in 2000, it features a walking tour of the underground shafts of what was once one of the world’s largest submarine iron ore mines. The Culture of Outports team worked with the Museum to undertake a Community Build on the Museum grounds to help celebrate both the island’s mining heritage and the Museum’s role as a hub for the local community. The result was a path and resting place for visitors and group meetings. Using iron ore deposits from the surrounding tailings, we filled gabion baskets 1m x 1m x 4m and depressed them into the ground to create benches. When walking through the path visitors are fully aware of their surroundings, able to see the museum grounds and panoramic views out onto Conception Bay. However, when sitting, one feels submerged below ground; sheltered from wind and noise, limiting the view to your immediate context. This narrative is reminiscent of life in the mine, and the move from above to below ground.

sketch, site plan

a

initial models to derive form and circulation

b


81


nathaniel mendiola

allan gardens revitalization

architecture studio

23 01

19 03

02

24

11

13

07

20

21

24

21 22

08

05

17 09

12

22

16

06

04

19 10

14

25

16

15

a 26

27

28

c b

d

Toronto’s St. James Town neighbourhood has been the subject of gentrification over the past few decades. The Allan Gardens Conservatory is in much need of revitalization as well as an assimilation of the park setting into the surrounding urban context. This proposal seeks to expand upon the conservatory by complementing existing programs with new horticultural activities. The functional form of the heavy timber structure alludes to the historical context of the previous structures on site, while efficiently harvesting sunlight and collecting rainwater to be redistributed on site. Programs such as the horticultural library, research greenhouse, and banquet hall cater to the various users and stakeholders. The design promotes awareness and the importance of food production, while providing a setting for after-school education programs, institutional research for Ryerson’ Biology Department, and a farmers market.

site plan horticultural library multipurpose/banquet hall outdoor garden teaching kitchen composting feature wall artist’s garden welcome centre composting area administration 24-hours washroom research garden offices children’s playground service lot parking lot outdoor seating outdoor ampitheatre/performance sculptural gardens community growing plots water feature skating rink/pond great lawn

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

diagram, massing

b

diagram, typical structure photovoltaic panels roof assembly curtain wall system with operable windows structural columns cross laminated timber core concrete stub wall foundation

c 23 24 25 26 27 28

section

d


83


ivana digirolamo anne kwan dana salama alvin yonatan tanoko stephanie tung

danforth east

a

01

the human world

02

03

08

04

05

06

07

09

07

10

11

12

08

13

14

12

15

16

20

11

10

21 09

22

14

19

23

17

03

18

05

07

04 06 06

Conceived in collaboration with the Danforth East Community Association (DECA), and faculty experts, this project aims to further the vibrant community endeavors, provide services doe local residents and business owners, and respect the heritage of the historical site. Employing a minimal, light touch to enhance the community hub and become a valuable amenity that people will want to protect and develop over time. The plan leaves room for growth, a large black garden with temporary structures which can become anything once the soil is remediated with the benefit and sustainable process of phytoremediation to naturally rejuvenate the streetcar yard through vegetation. This was the last project done in collaboration with Dr. Ian Macburnie in his PLx 599 course.

plan, site danforth avenue crossing zone retail lobby town square community gallery and cafe urban grocers public lane multipurpose community space CSI office space loading private lane coxwell ave skating rink

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14

axonometric, phytoremediation on site modular steel scaffolding elevated boardwalk plant species for decontamination soil

b 15 16 17 18

axonometric, program library coop housing circulation scaffold garden live-work studios

c 19 20 21 22 23

elevation, north

d


85

25

d


87

in memory: an open letter Words:

Emily Mutch Adam Rosenberg

(YHU\VRRIWHQLQRXUGD\WRGD\OLYHVZHDUHLQà XHQFHGDQGLQVSLUHGE\SDUWLFXODULQGLYLGXDOV Unbeknownst to us at the time, these individuals can come to play an integral role in our lives and future development. While some may not have had a direct relationship to Ian, it goes without saying he played a vital role in all of our academic careers, and the success, and future endeavours of the students here at Ryerson’s Department of Architectural Science. Dr. MacBurnie was passionate about design, and it manifested itself through his teaching, the development of the Masters of Architecture program, and the accreditation of the program via the CACB. Those of us who took his second year undergraduate studio found that he was vehement about challenging us to consider the future of Architecture and Urban Design. The idea of connectivity was prevalent in his teaching methodology as well as the content itself. Connect to the city; connect to the needs of the client; learn more. Dr. MacBurnie brought international precedents into the classroom and exposed us to histories and theories we had not yet encountered. His projects were challenging – they pushed our academic boundaries, and introduced us to new principles and manifestos we previously did not comprehend. Personally, Ian’s lectures will always stand out as a particularly enjoyable experience within my time at Ryerson. He was adept at capturing students’ attention, and engaged us in a way we hoped for. His interactions with students in lectures kept us intrigued. He would call upon an unassuming student to answer, meeting them with an open mind — provoking them to think about the content. He was always willing to listen and gain the perspectives of students, whether right or wrong. His courses were full of independent learning and challenging readings. These were meant as tools to bring out the best student in each of us and to help us become better professionals. Dr. MacBurnie was always available for students should we need him. He adhered to a strict VFKHGXOHRIÀFHKRXUVDQGGHDGOLQHVWKDWDGYRFDWHGWKHGLVFLSOLQHUHTXLUHGWRÀQGVXFFHVVLQ RXU ÀHOG +H KDV KHOSHG XV WKLQN FULWLFDOO\ DQG UREXVWO\ DERXW WKH FDSDFLW\ RI GHVLJQ DQG WKH DELOLW\IRUXVWRQRWRQO\LQà XHQFHDQGDIIHFWWKHIXWXUHEXWFKDQJHLWIRUWKHEHWWHU,I,KDYH learnt anything from Dr. MacBurnie, it is that good architecture has the power to transform FRPPXQLWLHVEXWWKHRQXVLVRQRXUJHQHUDWLRQWRGHÀQHZKDWJRRGDUFKLWHFWXUHLVWRXVDQGWR our societies. And with this responsibility, we must strive to be better professionals and challenge the purpose and impact of our projects at every imaginable scale. Thank you, Ian, and for the invaluable lessons you have taught us. You will most certainly be missed.


section three


robyn thompson

museum: olafur eliasson

design studio

04

02

03

05 c

01 06

07

08

a

d

09

e

10

11 f b

Olafur Eliasson, a Danish/Icelandic artist, who worked across mediums, connected much of his work by exploring different perceptions of spaces and the deconstruction of systems (natural, societal, mechanical). He seeked to break down the barriers between objects and symbols, and create art which functions as a system or environment to be experienced. In much the same way as his art breaks down the boundaries between the physical and conceptual divide, forged between the environments we create and the natural, the museum built under his name blurs the lines between natural and artificial; societal and inherent; interior and exterior. The museum was conceptualized as an object containing these systems - a neutral enclosure that places an emphasis on the content of the building more than itself. The massing for the museum plays a key role in highlighting this concept: a form that could be read as both 3 stories or 6, by creating a ‘break’ in the massing that aligns with the buildings along Church, yet remains undaunting to the parkette. A ‘natural’ system is formed by the linear atrium cut through the lower mass, and is aligned with to blur the perception of interior/exterior. Whereas the ‘societal’ system is found in the upper mass, which contains the administrative components of the museum, as well as rentable office spaces. The art, displayed in galleries throughout the rest of the museum, was conceived of as the glue between these seemingly opposite processes, and was carefully sequenced so that the viewer would fluidly circulate between galleries.

plan, gap rentable gallery

a 01

section, longitudinal

b

plan, ground level gift shop art classroom lobby and reception restaurant

c 02 03 04 05

plan, second level photo galleries sculpture galleries rest room

d 06 07 08

plan, third level open galleries

e 09

plan, fourth and fifth levels rentable rooms offices

f 10 11

diagram, connectivity

g


91


provenance lane

tiffany cheung mark de souza jacqueline foot sivan glazberg caeleigh kinch jeffery kwong cameron laidlaw nikolay tikhovsky

building science option studio

a

OPEN TO ABOVE

UP

OPEN TO ABOVE

UP

42" HIGH WALL WITH LEDGE

42" HIGH WALL WITH LEDGE

d

b

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

DN

c

e

Provenance Lane promotes the development of laneway housing in Toronto and aims to establish a framework for new sustainable neighbourhoods within the existing fabric of the city. It serves as an archetype, with high applicability to other, similar locations. As condominium development fundamentally changes the character of the city, Provenance Lane offers a sustainable alternative which responds to human scale. For a house to become a home, it should be flexible, able to adapt and change alongside its residents. Provenance Lane resulted from a desire to generate a design that allowed for growth within a space. The exterior structure enables interior partitions to be reconfigured in the future as residents’ needs change. Privacy, shadowing, and overlook are oft-cited concerns in laneway development. To this end, building height in Provenance Lane is limited to two storeys with window placement that does not affect the privacy of residents of adjacent streets. Energy and resource efficiency are driving design factors of Provenance Lane, which boasts significant reductions in resource consumption, while delivering a home that is flexible, comfortable, and aesthetically pleasing. The design transforms laneways into more compelling, vibrant community spaces, creating a template for similar development in Toronto, and any North American city with underutilized laneways.

section, traverse, ventilation

a

plan, ground level

b

plan, second level

c

elevation, east

d

elevation, west

e


93


lydia liang nineveh rashidzadeh

visitor centre

integration studio

04

03

02 01 a

b

05

13

12 08

09

06

11

07 10

c

The Innovation Park Visitor Centre or “Think Tank” has been designed to embrace the idea of workplaces of the future and to demonstrate the opportunities for sustainability by establishing a relationship between the building and the resources needed to sustain it. The form was developed primarily through the organization of the program and its relationship to the constraints and conditions of the site. The idea of the “Think Tank” was enforced through the introduction of a programmatic hierarchy, in which private, enclosed workspaces are centralized, while the boundaries of the public educational environment is defined by the dynamic space surrounding it. Breaking away from the static form that was developed, the hierarchy of the central program was later thought of as a system of layering, in which spaces and their boundaries would be defined not by solid barriers, but rather loosely defined by scattered partitions of differing materials that would reflect the varying degrees of transparency or privacy of the program. Finally, in order to integrate the form with its surrounding environment, the solid skin was broken up to reflect the movement and organic form of the layered interior program, dispersing the solid walls to interact with the plants and landscape, while offering glimpses of what the interior holds through transparent surfaces.

d

diagram, concept

a

diagram, materiality landscape carbon cure concrete block shoji partition frosted glass

b 01 02 03 04

plan, site visitor centre archetype house

c 05 06

plan, ground level reception gallery office space presentation space classroom exterior exhibit hiker outhouse

d 07 08 09 10 11 12 13


95


steven de boyrie pritish pathak

pretzel chair

digital tools

a

The Pretzel Chair is designed as a childrens chair that can be implemented throughout the course of a childs developmental life. This includes daycares, early classrooms, bedrooms and playrooms amongst others. The playfulness is further found in the Pretzel Chair’s multi-functionality. When in the upright position, the chair is a fun and recognizable form. However with a simple child’s push, the chair becomes a recliner specifically designed for their size. At the same time, the curvature of the back rest slats promotes good posture in young children. The developmental stage of a childs life is extremely important, not only for mental learning, but for physical growth as well. Thus, promoting good posture at a young age will lead to better physical health over a lifetime. The Pretzel Chair is an exciting, flexible and customizable chair designed for children to play, learn and live.

b

diagram, assembly steps

a

diagram, exploded axonometric

b

diagram, use

c


97

c


gary luk

centre for green buildings

a

01

02

design studio

03

04

05 UP

09

UP

06

07

08 10

UP

11 UP

b

c

12

13

DN

d DN

Exit Stair 25 m²

MECH

e

The philosophy behind this design is to protect the built heritage and revitalize a past crucial transportation artery of Toronto (Old Eastern). By designing architecture that respects traditional, cultural, and social values of the new community, future generations can not only learn to be respectful of the sensitive historic context of the Don Valley River, but can also be educated in how emerging building technology can protect both the past and future of the City of Toronto.

f

diagram existing mass elevated path unite masses and add extension push/pull conditions

a 01 02 03 04

plan, site

b

plan, ground level auditorium banquet hall temporary art exhibit computer archives/library restaurant/cafe outdoor patio heritage museum

c 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

diagram, heat recovery ventilator dry air in warm moist air out

d 12 13

section

e

plan, second level and elevated path

f


99


calvin fung

floating city

master’s studio

CRUISE SHIP

THE FLOATING CITY

VENICE

TOURISTS

RESIDENTS

LOCALS

[ mediator ]

a

b

}

c

}

d

of Venice and its tourists, reframed to provide value and support to the continuing care complex and to the larger context of Venice. Inspired by Archigram’s Walking City, the ships that sit idle in the port terminals would instead plug into the city via new canals to augment the health program amenities and provide, through its visitors, an exchange of energy and cultural experience to a largely immobile population found within the health care complex. A lighter, dispersed intervention is made possible through a new form of thin, linear sky bridges that float above the historic City of Bridges and allow sunlight and air to permeate through the site. The final conception is an architecture that mediates: physically, between the massive ships and the urban fabric, and socially, bringing together the tourists, users, and locals to create a new mutual relationship between Venice and the world.

sectional perspective

a

diagram, mediating strategies

b

view, entering city from mainland

c

diagram, parti

d

view, master plan

e

view, assisted living within sky bridges

f

view, sky bridges

g


101

e

f

g


charles bennett daniel rosati

sea saw

competition studio

ENTER

PREVIEW

a

b

The temporary cinema proposed for the city of Dakar embraces the cultural and social ethics of an urban settlement established through trade and community. SEASAW is a contemporary interpretation of cinema which physically responds to user engagement, promoting principles of community and identity through shared experience. The counterbalanced structure changes position as the weight of users is continually applied in anticipation of the film showing. Accompanied by a series of guidewires, the rear “fin” of the structure gradually touches down on the shoreline, allowing the front “fin” to be situated within view as a display screen. The wave-like structure, composed of a series of glulam beams, is suggestive of a beached ship. Primary and secondary structural members feature lap joints to allow for ease of construction, while forming a rectilinear grid to accommodate a variety of seating options. The six primary structural members are substantially weighted at one end, acting as a counterbalance for the remainder of the structure. Voids formed between overlapping members are filled with an indigenous canvas material which actively filters incoming natural light as the design shades from southern sunlight. As a result, the cinema functions as a prominent social destination and landscape viewing device during hours of inactivity.

plan

a

diagram, use

b


103


ailsa craigen tiffany cheung rachel law kevin pu matthew suriano filip tisler

stomata

[r]ed[u]x lab

01

a

02

03

04

05

b

06

c

Stomata is named after the Greek word for “mouth” which is also used to describe pores found in the epidermis of botanical organisms that control gas exchange. A metaphor where changing apertures respond to the proximity of human interactions in a similar manner to how stomata pores respond to oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, Stomata is an interactive installation that responds to the engagement of the public through their proximity and senses. Within voids created by the undulating surface, two “lungs” inflate and deflate to mimic the human respiration system. Effectively addressing visual and tactile senses, air blows through individual pods sporadically placed in the lattice-work. Stomata was designed and fabricated for the 2014 Nuit Blanche Festival, showcased at Bata Shoe Museum

diagram, clip one diagram, axonometric diagram, exploded axonometric

a 01 02

diagram, clip two exploded axonometric axonometric

b 03 04

diagram, exploded axonometric form space

c 05 06


105


107

a sense of space Words: Sarah Lipsit

Photographs:

Catalina Ardila-Bernal Michelle Ashurov RĂŠmi Carreiro Sarah Lipsit

We study architecture and design to change. Tangibly, by physically reinventing our surroundings, and intangibly, to change the way we experience the built world. We aim to make architecture perform the unexpected, to design experiences that are engaging, interactive, accessible to a diverse audience, and ultimately to create memorable moments. The goal of architecture and public spaces are to serve people, and this goes beyond just a means of shelter or enclosure. It must give us a sense of belonging, a spot for basking in the sun. It creates opportunities for social activities and lets us pause for a moment in RXUGD\3HUKDSVQRWDOZD\VXVHGIRULWVPDLQSURJUDP²SDUNRXULQJJUDIÀWLHWF²LWKDV always engaged a social dynamic, and provided a medium for art, activity, and everyday life. And so, we always found it a little peculiar that most architectural photos rarely have people in them – they’re treated like a smudge on the page. Here we show the social side of architecture, with people engaging and interacting with some of our favourite buildings and spaces we’ve come across this past year around the world.


this page: passerelle simone de beauvoir, paris (top), bibliothèque nationale de france, paris (bottom) facing page: museum fßr moderne kunst, frankfurt (top), pinakothek der moderne, munich (bottom) previous page: factory building, vitra design campus, weil am rhein


this page: pinakothek der moderne, munich (top), yungang grottoes, datong (bottom) facing page: marie elisabeth lĂźders haus, berlin


this page: paul lรถbe haus, berlin (left), radhuset subway station, stockholm (right) facing page: topography of terror, berlin


this page: stuttgart city library, stuttgart (top), solomon r. guggenheim museum, new york city facing page: grande arche de la dĂŠfense, paris


haya alnibari elisaveta boulatova tim fu lily jeon diana koncan

ripple

digital tools

a

b 01

02

03

04 05

Ripple is a playful, poetic installation that illustrates how we can achieve more together than when we act alone, and that every action creates a ripple effect. This collaborative installation features a collection of individual drops lit with LEDs, which when pulled on by users, sound individual notes. When two or more users pull on the drops, the individual notes resound in a dynamic musical arrangement. The more users engage with the installation, the greater the ripple effect. The installation encourages users to move and occupy a shared space. Whether choreographed or chaotic, together users create a composition of sounds, lights and movement. The installation embodies what its artists feel is at the heart of Scotiabank Nuit Blanche – dynamic, whimsical, user-created experiences. Ripple was designed and fabricated for the 2015 Nuit Blanche Festival, as a Special Project sponsored by Subaru. It was also installed at the Gladstone Hotel as part of the Toronto Design Off-Site’s, Come Up To My Room festival.

section

a

axonometric, singular element exploded vacuum formed 2mm clear acrylic, frosted with spray paint clear fishing wire 10 mm diffused cool white LED CR2032 3V lithium coin battery hex nut

b 01 02 03 04 05


117


winterlude pavilion

victor hyunh dimitri karapoulos tim melnichuk rebecca tsang sandra wotjecki

competition

a

01

03

07 b

08 03 02

05

03 04

06

c

There is something brewing in the heart of Confederation Park. Conversations among strangers and friends erupt as laughter and play echo through the trees. Art has spurred a child like sense of novelty, adventure and interaction in the park grounds. The proposed design challenges our predefined notions of placing meaning onto recognizable elements through altered function and scale. The project extracts the form of a soccer ball and turns it into a pavilion of exploration and interaction. The form is accentuated by surfaces created with a fastened frame. The frames are divided into ten sections, acting as anchor points through which white and black plastic wire are woven into. The surfaces created are an amalgamation of frame and plastic string which which define the walls of the pavilion and when fully assembled are reminiscent of childhood forms of play imbued with new meaning and purpose.

diagram, axonometric assembly inner aluminum frame aluminum corner plates outer bamboo frame chalk line wooden foundation foundation structure fully assembled pavillion LEDs on aluminum frame

a 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

perspective elevation

b

connection detail

c


119


townhouse

brant york

design studio

e

02

01

f

b

03

a

04

c

g

05

06

06

h d

The heart of the design was driven from ideas taken from the home owner’s career as a music producer. The spatial organization and layout of the design not only aimed to create comfortable living and working spaces, but were designed to play an active role in controlling sound and music. Significant research in acoustic opportunities ultimately informed the formal movements of the design. Minor bends and angles in walls were used to direct and blend sounds together to achieve richer tones. This can be seen in the recording studio as well as the main feature wall of the atrium space. Another main driving idea behind this proposal was to create an open living component that would contrast the enclosed nature of a recording studio. The atrium, open to all three floors, explores this idea which is then further emphasized with the use of large glazing. An operable exterior wood shading system was used to manipulate the degree of visibility and sunlight entering the space.

elevation, east

a

elevation, west (shutters closed)

b

elevation, west (shutters open)

c

section, longitudinal

d

diagram, parti for sound room

e

plan, ground level bedroom recording studio

f 01 02

plan, second level deck kitchen and living room

g 03 04

plan, third level master bedroom secondary bedrooms

h 05 06


121


deena jahmoka

ryu house

design studio

up

09

08

07

06

04

06 05

c

02 01

03 10

12

11 up

14

15

13

a

d

up

14

16

17

14

b

The Ryu house has two important roles, one being a home and the second being a business. This house connects the private and public realms and can be differentiated by their circulation patterns. In a home, the circulation is dynamic and free. In a commercial setting, circulation is typically linear and direct. The house’s facade’s most prominent feature is the accentuated main staircase. The roof features a Japanese garden and serves as a private area for the family to enjoy. This townhouse incorporates a martial arts school which is full of movement and circulation. The Ryu House celebrates this movement and circulation both within the interior and exterior.

e

sectional perspective main circulation family area training floor

a 01 02 03

sketches, concept

b

plan, ground level threshold coat rack change room office front desk training floor

c 04 05 06 07 08 09

plan, second level living room dinning room kitchen therapy bedroom library

d 10 11 12 13 14 15

plan, third level master bedroom walk-in closet

e 16 17


125


daniel bassakyros nivin nabeel louise shin

cloud & light

sukkahville competition

01

03

05

02

06 04

a

b

As a physical manifestation of God’s presence in the desert, the pillar of cloud and light embodies the sukkah’s significance of guidance and protection. The unique properties of the sukkah’s exterior demarcate it as a pillar of cloud by virtue of the sun’s presence on its surface. Four amber-filter light shelves, placed at incremental levels, wash the interior with a golden glow at night that indicates the phenomenological aspect of the sukkah as a beacon of light. The roof becomes an extension of the wooden structural frame, becoming a lattice for the greenery above, which adds another layer of light filtration, complimenting the translucent Tyvek façade. The façade panels are linked by a network of modular flexible elastic connections, allowing for flexibility in construction.

section

a

Cloud & Light, as a contemporary interpretation of this traditional dichotomous manifestation, is able to unify, thus transcending time. This is the ultimate discourse the contemporary sukkah has with its setting in an urban environment. Just as the modern city never sleeps, Cloud & Light is able to utlize difital light as the “new fire”, allowing the sukkah to remain awake eternally.

diagram, exploded axonometric 38 mm x 38 mm dimensioned lumber 38 mm x 89 mm dimensioned lumber 12.7 mm wood board translucent tyvek copper-plated sheet metal entryway cover

b 01 02 03 04 05 06


127


kenan elsasser samuel vandersluis

himalayan mountain hut

competition studio

a

01

02 03 04

02

05 b

c

d

While the sport of mountaineering through the breathtaking Himalayan Mountains may be a very challenging and dangerous activity, numerous rewarding moments throughout the journey define this thrilling experience. Upon trekking through the Himalayas, a climber will require the warmth, food and rest necessary to continue. The prospect of arrival to a place of shelter becomes a an important aspect highlighting their adventure. The Himalayan Hut is a continuation of this journey and sequentially accommodates a climber’s needs while providing an experience conducive to the sport of mountain climbing. The Himalayan Hut’s design features three modular prefabricated components, each separately flown in and adjusted to sit level atop the uneven Himalayan contours. The three components are sequentially organized in order to accommodate for the necessary process of unpacking, washing, and eating. Once in place, a tent structure is erected between the components, creating two communal sleeping spaces that allude to the experience of a traditional Himalayan base camp. In addition, the tent fabric connecting the components doubles as a water and solar collector in order to functionally sustain the equipment needed for the hiker’s survival. The transitional spaces are constructed using adjustable steel cable connections and create dramatic details implicative of the gear that will be used by hikers along the Himalayan trails. Altogether, the spaces within the Himalayan Hut provide a communal setting which highlights the key moments anticipated by the climbers throughout their journey.

plan, first level

a

diagram, program distribution hut storage/mountaineer lockers hammock bedding mechanical and electrical washroom and showers kitchen and common room

b 01 02 03 04 05

section, transverse

c

section, longitudinal

d


129


andrew aziz

trinity bellwoods pavilion

communication studio

a

h

b

c

i

d

e

-

---

f

j

g

Trinity Bellwoods is one of Toronto’s most prominent parks, playing host to a variety of activities throughout the year. The main design intent was to connect with Garrison Creek, and celebrate the surrounding topography of the park, aiming to incorporate a connection of the natural landscape to the built, human pavilion. The building form was shaped from drawing lines that tangent from the edges of the creek, forming a diamond shaped building around the existing skating rink on the site. This diamond shape contrasts the subtractive space of the creek with additive space, and ‘lifts’ the diamond up at the corner, elevating the roof closest to the creek’s edge. With this form, the building is able to provide a walkable green roof with the peak height of the building offering a unique view of the park, as well as relieve flooding problems of the area.

plan, site

a

elevation, north

b

elevation, south

c

elevation, east

d

elevation, west

e

section, transverse

f

section, longitudinal

g

diagram, parti

h

plan, ground level

i

plan, structural

j


131


photography credits

section one

Page 8, 10, 28 (bottom), Michelle Ashurov 29, 30 (top), 32 (top right and bottom left), 33, 34 (bottom), 35, 36 (both) Page 12 (all), 32 (bottom Rémi Carreiro right), 37 (both), 38, 41, 35 (all), 59 (all) Page 26, 28 (top), 30 Sarah Lipsit (bottom) 32 (top left) Page 31 (top), 39 (bottom) Nahal Rahnamaei Page 31 (bottom), 34 (top), Catalina Ardila-Bernal 39 (top)

section two

Page 60, 66 (all), 68-69, Michelle Ashurov 76, 86 Page 62, 72 (top, both), Catalina Ardila-Bernal 79 (both) Page 66 (all), 72 (bottom, Rémi Carreiro both), 75 (both) Page 71 Farah Elmajdoub Page 81 Sarah Lipsit

section three

Page 88, 106, 108 (top), 110 Michelle Ashurov (top), 111 Page 105 (all), 109 Rémi Carreiro (bottom), 112-113, 115, 117 (all), 133 (all) page 108 (bottom), 109 Sarah Lipsit (top), 114 (both), page 110 (bottom) Catalina Ardila-Bernal Page 119 Younes Bounhar


thank you

The publication of this collection of works would not have been possible without the support of our generous sponsors. Their dedication to promoting the success of our students and the profession of architecture is immeasurable, and for that, we graciously thank them


Supporting the future of the profession

ontario association of architects The Ontario Association of Architects represents, regulates, supports, and promotes the profession of architecture in the interest of all Ontarians, and leads the design and delivery of built form in the province of Ontario


office from the provost and vice president academic


Thanks, until next year:Say hello!

mag325@gmail.com

Profile for 325 Magazine

325 Magazine | 2014 - 2015  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

325 Magazine | 2014 - 2015  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

Profile for mag325
Advertisement