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2016 // 2017

department of architectural science ryerson university


325 Magazine is a non-proďŹ t, annual publication produced and published by the students of the Department of Architectural Science. At the conclusion of each academic year, our committee curates a range of student submitted work – undergraduate and graduate – to be represented among the most innovative and intriguing projects. We believe that 325 Magazine is essential to the Ryerson architecture student community as it provides an opportunity for student involvement and serves as a vehicle for sharing our work with the AEC industry. With over a thousand copies printed and distributed annually, this review not only promotes our exemplary academic work internally to the student body, but also showcases student work within the local design community.


RYERSON UNIVERSITY Department of Architectural Science 325 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3 (416) 979-5000 Say hello! arch325magazine@ryerson.ca

Š 325 Magazine 2017-2018 Ryerson University Department of Architectural Science All rights reserved All photographs and drawings are courtesy of students and contributors unless otherwise noted. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this publication, and assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its ďŹ tness for any particular project. The opinions herein are the responsibility of the contributors concerned.


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editor-in-chief jennifer pham creative directors erik aquino jasmin (minji) kim +

copy team batoul al waadh andrea au marissa liu sahil saroy

325 team graphics team shengyu cai caitlin chin adrian chĂŽu jessica (zu ting) feng arash ghafoori daniel liu robin nong lynda (meng) ye marketing team batoul al waadh caitlin chin sponsorship team caitlin chin jessica (zu ting) feng yuri shin contributors michelle friesen tiffany (qiaochu) zhang


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chair of the department of architectural science dr. mark gorgolewski dean of the faculty of engineering and architectural science dr. thomas duever

special thanks

manager of student relations and development, feas zohair khan

vice provost academic dr. christopher evans special projects coordinator, office of the provost and viceprecident academic christopher visser financing coordinators jesse parish diane wong print coordinator alexandra berceanu faculty supervisors george kapelos yew-thong leong

photography arnel espanol arash ghafoori henry mai nazanin mirsharifi arifi marycarmen ortuno uno

butors

sketches he hes adrian chîu hîu kim-marie degenkolb olb enica (yuezhu) deng arnel espanol karen fang shengnan gao alvin huang henry mai sahil saroy louise shin


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This issue of 325 magazine is a compendium of dazzling ideas and vision. From the creative symbolism of “In Full Bloom” to the urban renewal of the Elm Street parklet, it is

words from dean of feas

clear that DAS students are breathing new life and meaning into this city and beyond.

The integrated and interdisciplinary curriculum that DAS is known for is on brilliant display in these pages. Truly, these students have come to understand every stage of their projects, from concept to completion, to the societal, economic and environmental impact. As Dean, I couldn’t be more proud.

Winston Churchill once said, “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” I can say with confidence that I look forward to the shape of many things to come, especially the achievements of the architects and building science professionals of the future.

Enjoy your copy of 325 magazine! -dr. thomas duever, P.Eng., FCIC dean, faculty of engineering and architectural science


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325 Magazine serves as our collective portfolio. With each annual issue we are taken back through the previous year, celebrating our accomplishments, commitment to innovation, and passion for design. Our work is diverse and

words from editor-in chief

ever-changing. Each of us approaches a problem from a different angle and in the solution, we raise questions and evoke new ways of thinking. We have been quite busy here at the Department of Architectural Science – from creating

moments in the public realm to working on a Frank Lloyd Wright legacy building, we strive to study and shape our

world through built form. As you delve into this latest

edition, we hope you find much to inspire and surprise you.

The 2016-2017 issue takes an interest in people - the element that imbues space with life, and enriches place

identity. There is a subtle and multilayered discourse between people and space, which is evident upon the user’s post-reflection. By making use of a variety of medium

the user conveys, both consciously and subconsciously, their emotions and experience. Whether it’s through a photo essay showing the streets of China, or a series of thought-provoking installations and design work, we as designers explore the vast human qualities of spatial design. In particular, a fascination with the power of the sketch peppers through the following pages – drawings gathered from faculty and students add a human touch, saying so much with so little.

We proudly invite you to take a look at our year at 325 Church Street. On behalf of the 325 Team, it was an absolute privilege to compile and showcase the talent and excellence of our department. Happy perusing! -jennifer pham


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thank you

325 25 Magazine is immensely grateful to the following uni un university groups, offices, and departments fo for their continued support over the years. Their encouragement and assistance has been instrumental to the success of this volume. We thank you for your dedication volu olu to the publication: arc.soc, Department of Architectural Science, Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science (FEAS), Ryerson Provost and President’s Offices, Student Initiative Fund (SIF).


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There are not enough words to express our deep gratitude for f the h generosity i off our sponsors. Your support for our students’ education and the future of the industryy is nothing short of spectacular. With the contributions butions made each year from our sponsors, 325 Magazine achieved the continued agazine has achieve success in providing a platform for student’s in our department to showcase their outstanding work and initiatives. We would like to humbly thank the following benefactors:

you y

altius architecture inc. gow hastings ontario association of architects PLANT raw design


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www.rawdesign.ca


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small banff medium kultour large interview x-large 12

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pe people.

people. p e p Architecture is people. Born initially out of necessity, the dialogue between a building and its user has since grown and evolved to encompass a plethora of challenges and considerations in our contemporary setting: economical, environmental, spiritual, cultural, and political - just to name a few. Whether through direct interaction or by implied gestures that touch upon some of the aforementioned needs, people are inuenced by architecture as much as architecture is directed by people. In this year’s edition of 325 Magazine, we are exploring this conversation between user and architecture; to reect on the intents, methods, mediums, and implications surrounding a design, and to review and critique its effect on people at both an individual and global scale.

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small. small . small

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servatory

Grotto Research Cabin LEH.z Ben Mor Assynt Trekking Shelter SnapSnare

all. mall illustrate the user can have e projects cater or demographic, to enhance the y routine. These projects

identify

and

address

individual

concerns or needs and because they tend to be smaller in scale, it offers a greater capacity for the design and details to be informed by its user(s).

small.

___________________________________________________________projects

25 26 28 30 32


s.

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observatory

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yr 4

+

amanda mota

01

02

03

captivates celestial objects, introducing a true sense of discovery The Grasslands Observatory is designed to fulfill the desires of curious minds by expressing the unknown world of natural phenomena, introducing a true sense of discovery. This observatory not only captivates celestial objects, but expresses them throughout the design by integrating astronomical elements within the structure itself. Built on slender pilotis, the observatory is expressed using a

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spiral shape that circulates the public through angular and perforated walls, illustrating various constellations. These images are expressed through perforated plywood that is illuminated by LED lighting placed within the wall cavities of the structure. The exterior of the observatory is composed of perforated plywood that displays an image of a starry sky. This star gazing station is designed to fit within the Saskatchewan landscape by utilizing natural materials to


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enhance its surrounding context. The building is composed of 4ft by 8ft plywood sheets curved to mimic the spiral galaxy. Using the Shou Sugi Ban technique, the plywood walls are charred to blend in with the dark skies. As observers enter the space, the angled walls slant outwards to increase the view of the sky, creating a more open environment. As they explore the structure, the walls gradually invert, creating a more enclosed space, directing the user’s line of sight.

ext. rendering concept diagram form generation east elevation exploded axo. perforated plywood LED lights in cavity charred plywood interior

01 02 03 04 05 a b c

site plan 06 section 07


s.

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furniture

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yr 4

01

+

michelle friesen laura herrera

02

Sway a multi-functional furniture transitioning between work and play The goal of the project was to design a multi-functional piece of furniture that could transcend between work and play. The design utilizes locking “T� joints to create a friction fit that holds each of the slats in place, and to provide lateral stability to the chair. The dynamic design of the curved backing provides a more ergonomic experience, with three different configurations depending on the activity. These configurations include a lawn chair, upright lounge chair,

and a rocking chair, all of which can be changed by the positioning of the chair’s orientation and locking system. The lock is attached to the bottom of each frame and can either be disengaged by angling it along the frame for rocking, or locked when it is angled downward as an upright chair.


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side elevations project at completion connection detail project at standstill project in motion process diagram axonometric

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s.

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pavilion [CISC competition] \\

yr 1

+

andrew lee

--

01

Canoe Pavilion

02

a resting haven and lookout inspired by origami folds The Canoe Pavilion functions as a modern haven and provides architectural experiences for canoers’ taking a break from their trek along the Maligne Lake. It also acts as a lookout, allowing for users to observe the beautiful landscape of Jasper Park. With the help of its structural properties, the pavilion seems to be lifting up from the ground. In addition, the “triangular

theme” is inspired by the ship shaped origami. More specifically, the craftsmanship invented by the Japanese has wonderful aesthetics through the folded angles - whether they are slightly or entirely folded. Essentially, the ends of the origami of a ship are angled and sharpened upwards, allowing it to cut through water and give more movement. Since the overhang of the pavilion is angled and very thin, as if it has been sharpened, the design was intended to display


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movement. However, origami can also have an intense fold, which can be displayed at the south side of the pavilion. Thus through the structural properties of steel, architects and designers are able to create intriguing forms like the origami of a ship.

ext. rendering form development int. rendering exploded axo. perforated steel sheets steel truss open web steel joists waterproof timber wide flange beam concrete column

01 02 03 04 a b c d e f

section 05


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product design

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yr 4

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jean-paul guay

-02

SW//TCH90 a sleek, technologically integrated, and retrofitted solution for the average modern bike With a higher than ever concentration of the population in urban centres around the world, many have been looking to switch to a quicker, greener, and more inexpensive mode of transportation. Bicycles offer this luxury and more, but however do not offer the practicality of compatibility within the urban context. The struggle to find storage for bikes have become more and more apparent with constantly shrinking living spaces that are available within the city.

Sw//tch90 acts as a retrofitted solution to allow for an average modern bike to become more versatile and fit for storage virtually anywhere. By re-imagining and reinterpreting the front handlebar stem of the existing bicycle, Sw//tch90 offers the ability to easily rotate the handlebars 90 degrees aligning them parallel to the frame. Reducing the overall width of the bicycle by up to 80%, users that would otherwise be struggling for space are now able


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a

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c 03

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to efficiently store their bike flat, whether it be in a narrow entrance way, mounted on walls, or within an overfilled public bike racks. The product extends it’s practicality directly from the factory when fitted on new inventory, by reducing shipping costs before the final user has even benefited. Planned to be offered as both a separate retrofit as well as a feature included on brand new bicycles, Sw//tch90 gives customers a choice whether to reuse their current bike, or upgrade if necessary. This adaptability and environmental awareness will be a key component to building and promoting the Sw//tch90 as an eco-friendly, smart-bike retrofitting tool.

project mounted experiential rendering LED headlight function close-up detail exploded assembly GPS indicator cap tech stem mid support stem handlebars fork shaft

01 02 03 04 05 a b c d e


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residential

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masters

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ladan arbabi matteo calisesi hayley cormick phu dinh matthew ferguson ryan fernandes jason gray tamo dembeck-kereke xavier mendieta roya nosrati christopher raghubar shivraj sagar greer stanier brandon wilbur kevin wu almanzar

01

-LaneZero

01

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transforming the laneway into a new opportunity for sustainable housing LaneZero proposes to turn the 250 linear kilometers of Toronto laneways into an opportunity for a new type of sustainable housing, one which meets the demand for affordable housing options in the downtown core. By encouraging current homeowners to become primary stakeholders in neighborhood development, net-zero laneway housing has the potential to foster sustainable communities which responsibly and organically adapt to the needs of a growing

city. LaneZero further promotes engagement of the laneway through architectural design, featuring local street art initiatives and careful design to make laneways desirable places to live. By promoting and regulating laneway homes, this incremental development strategy enhances natural community growth and sustainable neighborhoods in the city’s core.


23 20’ - 3 1/2”

9' - 0"

10’ - 10”

5' - 0"

b

5' - 11"

23' - 3"

a

c

04 UP

05

02

20’ - 3 1/2” 18’ - 2”

c

a

23’ - 3”

20’ - 8”

DN

b

06

d 03

Designed for Toronto’s hot humid summers and cold winters, LaneZero minimizes conditioning loads through carefully planned spatial organization, a high-performance building envelope, and passive design strategies such as solar heat gains, cross ventilation, and shading. The remaining loads are serviced by an efficient and comfortable active conditioning system. Furthermore, total energy consumption is offset by electricity production through the building-integrated photovoltaic array, resulting in net-zero annual energy consumption.

ext. rendering 01 second floor plan 02 bedroom a washroom b kitchen c ground floor plan 03 kitchen/dining a mech b living c patio d passive ventailation 04 diagram int. rendering 05 interior finishes 06


s.

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furniture

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yr 3

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katherine swainson

01

-02

Portable Step the step stool re-designed for easy portability 03 The portable step is designed to be lightweight, easily compacted and transported. The step was customized for an individual of short stature, intended to give assistance of height to the individual while giving presentations and lectures. The step is made of re-purposed solid oak wood (from the old DAS tables), with stainless steel hinges, and a fabric strap to keep the legs enclosed in an upright position. elevation 01 plan 02 collapsing sequence 03


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millwork

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yr 3

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erik aquino arnel espanol liam van steekelenburg

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03

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Grotto

module compartments providing the freedom of organization

01 02 03 04

project at completion custom locker panels instax panel diagram module storage units

The Digital Media Experience Lab in Ryerson’s Student Learning Centre is a designated space for graduate students studying Digital Media. Having ammased equipment and building components over the years - from arduinos and VR goggles to textiles and cables - the space needed a flexible storage solution to house both public and private material. Grotto is a storage wall assembly that utilizes an undulating, eggcrate shelving system to house approximately 200 unit storage containers. With module compartments, users of the space have the freedom in their method of organization. Complimenting the public storage, reclaimed locker units were refaced to to provide a customizable exterior for students.


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cabin

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yr 1 b

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c

sophie twarog

01

Research Cabin exterior columns create rhythm of light Located in the Don Valley Brickworks, a water ecologist lives his domestic life with the same ritualistic tasks. Using exterior vertical steel beams as the support structure, these elements cast shadows and highlight the used spaces based on the time of day. At first, this can be seen as a direct search for comfort but eventually, simple movements may be expanded in detail to express our feelings about life in a place. A space that runs north to south will

accentuate a daily rhythm of sunshine. When east-west and north-south space pierce each other, we can experience both time scales. The common volume intensifies both a seasonal and daily cycle when the two are combined, the result is a crossing in space that mirrors time.


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03

02

floor plan 01 bedroom a kitchen b lab c ext. rendering 02 site plan 03


s.

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furniture

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yr 4

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jean-paul guay bence sutus 02

-03

LE simplicity of form and the complex ergonomics of body Designed with the consideration of a child’s continual development, LEH.z redefines how a younger generation interacts with time and space in terms of seating. The minimalist design of the chair caters to small hands, being both lightweight and easily assembled. The LEH.z seeks to combine the simplicity of form around the complex ergonomics of the human body.

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The overall design of the chair is defined by the seating surface, curved to form an ergonomic series of bends, achieved using a method known as kerfing. As a result, the chair delivers the proper lumbar support to lower back while enabling the user to sit comfortably, without risk of injury due to slouching. As the name suggests, it is a chair that is intended for less formal activities such as reading, film watching, and relaxing.


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To respond to the firmness of the plywood colour customize-able felt pads were added in 3 key locations. Able to withstand up to 180lbs, LEH.z is able to be used throughout a child’s many stages of growing, up and through to adolescence. In addition to a proper seating element, LEH.z is also a low-cost solution to businesses, schools, and camps that require a multitude of children’s seats to be stored away, or built quickly, with the help of the young ones themselves. This was achieved by constricting various dimensions of the chair, resulting in the ability to construct 3 complete chairs from a single sheet of plywood.

rendering side elevation front elevation connection detail assembly diagram connection detail

01 02 03 04 05 06


s.

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trekking shelter

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yr 4

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jacob ragetli

01

Ben Mor Assynt Trekking Shelter relationship between the art of sculpture and architecture The project is situated on the side of a mountain in the northern Scottish Highlands. It is meant as a retreat from the elements for hikers that are traveling on the two-week long trip across the highlands. The project is an exploration of the relationship between the art of sculpture and architecture. I conducted investigations concerning how sculpture is created, particularly using fluid physical form-making, which incorporates the element of chance. Reversing the traditional

methods of sculpting from the ground up, the forms explored were considered as hanging objects. Employing an elastic fabric and variable structural elements, two extensive series of plaster models were formed and used as inspiration for the design of the trekking shelter. The resulting architecture is both organic and functional, despite the unlikelihood of it as a built project. It envelops


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the user in a womb-like membrane, only giving views upwards to the cliff face and to the sky. The structure is composed of a CNC wood form which is supported by tension cables connected to two large steel beams, which are in turn inserted into the cliff face, and held in tension to a supporting truss system at the top of the cliff.

section site plan elevation process model final model

01 02 03 04 05


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product design

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yr 4

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alex fown michael hankus

01

-02

SnapSnare an ergonomic, functional and optimized design of a portable snare drum SnapSnare can be attached onto any acoustic or classical guitar. It is mounted via a clip that seamlessly slides onto the edge of the sound hole, forming a firm attachment without damaging the surface of your guitar. Its small form makes it a breeze to carry around. Meticulously designed to be comfortable and non-obtrusive, its low-profile matches the height of your hand resting on the bridge. Regardless of its position on the guitar, it will always be within hand’s reach.

Like a traditional snare, SnapSnare features a mechanism that allows you to activate the snares with a simple switch. When switched on, hitting the drum will produce a sharp staccato sound and when switched off, a different tone is produced.


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03

SPECIFICATIONS

140mm

Drumming Surface 140mm

120mm Snare Wires + Toggle Switch 23mm High Strength Magnets

16mm 26mm 120mm

20mm

Non-slip Acoustic Padding

30mm

04

project at completion project in use mounted on guitar specifications

01 02 03 04


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ac a con a con a con

a conversation_banff national park pavilion


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banff national park pavilion: a conversation

-hitesh doshi yew-thong leong zaiyi liao paul poh ramani ramakrishnan kendra schank smith albert smith

conversation versation versation versation e ersat project contributors: enica (yuezhu) deng louise shin

words - sahil saroy photography - marycarmen ortuno

+

(SQTPIXIH MR  XLI 'ERǺ 3EXMSREP 5EVO 5EZMPMSR [EW HIWMKRIH F] +VERO 1PS]H ;VMKLX ERH I\IGYXIH F] LMW SRP] (EREHMER TYTMP +VERGMW YPPMZER 8LI FYMPHMRK [EW GSRWXVYGXIH EVSYRH XLI 'S[ 7MZIV [LMGL NYWX WS LETTIRIH XS FI WMXYEXIH E ǼSSHTPEMR &W MX MW [MXL XLI HERKIVSJPSGEXMRKEVGLMXIGXYVIRIEVFSHMIWSJ[EXIVXLI TEZMPMSR[EWGSRWIUYIRXP]HEQEKIHF]X[SQENSVǼSSHW FIJSVIMX[EWIZIRXYEPP]HIQSPMWLIHMR 8SHE]XLEROWXSXLIIǺSVXWSJWIZIR7]IVWSR9RMZIVWMX] TVSJIWWSVW[I QE] KIX XS[MXRIWW E VIWYVVIGXMSR SJ XLI 'ERǺ 3EXMSREP 5EVO 5EZMPMSR 8LMW QYPXMHMWGMTPMREV] XIEQ GSRWMWXW SJ E LMWXSVMGEP TVIWIVZEXMSRMWX ER EGSYWXMGW ERH HE]PMKLXMRK TVSJIWWMSREP WXVYGXYVEP ERH GMZMP IRKMRIIVW EVGLMXIGXYVEP LMWXSVMERW ERH ER I\TIVMIRGIH TVSNIGX QEREKIV &W XLI KVSYT GSQFEXW MWWYIW VIKEVHMRK ǼSSH QMXMKEXMSR HIWMKR IXLMGW HIGMTLIVMRK HVE[MRKW ERH MQTPIQIRXMRK QSHIVR HIWMKR WSPYXMSRW XLMW VIWIEVGL TVSNIGXMWWPS[P]QEOMRKMXW[E]MRXSFIGSQMRKEVIEPMX]

___________________________________________________________banff

\\


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give up my left arm for this opportunity.� -YT

a conversation_banff national park pavilion


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can you provide a bit of history on the project and how it was conceived?

It is a pretty interesting building that was originally based on plans from a tennis club in Chicago. Frank Lloyd Wright, at the time, had a young Canadian working for him named Francis Sullivan - he had a bit of a drinking problem. Francis came back up to Canada and figured out that they wanted FLW to build a building in Banff, so he called back to the office asking, “Would you like to do that?” Frank said, “Yeah, that’s fine, we’ll use the plans for this and you can spearhead this project.” The site for the pavilion is next to Bow River and I think Francis made a bit of a problem by building on a flood plain - he also had made a bit of a problem by being so young and not quite understanding how deep the foundations needed to go in an area like Banff. They re-used the plans from the River Oaks Tennis Club in Chicago and basically built it up there. The problem became that every year, it would freeze and thaw causing the building to tilt, the roof wasn’t quite structural enough for snow loads and it was in a flood plain. So, all of these problems are what we have been looking at. -AS

what sparked the motivation to enter in the bid competition?

Yew-Thong saw that there was a request for proposal online. The request was not necessarily to build the building - yet - but to take the drawings that they have [we don’t have real, accurate drawings, they were photographs from the archives] and redraw the drawings in a form that then can have the building re-built. -KS I would give up my left arm for this opportunity. Imagine forty years from now, your favourite architect designs a building in your city that doesn’t get built, but the drawings were available and someone asked for your help. What would you do? We pursued this project because it’s a once in a lifetime opportunity and it’s a Frank Lloyd Wright project. -YT

what was the team’s initial reaction to finding out they won the bid?

When I initially put in the proposal, I was actually very concerned because there were seven of us, I didn’t know how they would respond to [a large group]. The moment they received our application, I got a phone call from the CEO [of the Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative], Michael Miner, saying, “Can we talk? I need to understand this proposal a little better.” My conversation with him was about encrypting the proposal and that meant he already made up his mind. -YT We were excited - very excited! I’ve been here since 1984, and have never collaborated with any architectural faculty, so far. This was a very good opportunity; we have building science, project management and architecture looking at FLW in all these aspects, so I was very excited we got this project. -RR


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this is quite a large group. what are the roles and responsibilities of each member? There are seven of us, and all of us believe this integrated, collaborative approach is the best way. We’ve become quite friendly with each other and have been working well. We have representation from all streams in our department: architecture, building science and project management. I wish we could have more project management professors because when we get into this process of building, we need that structural management expertise. We have one historical preservationist, which is my role. As a preservationist, I have to use historics as a design tool, to look back in time and ask myself what they were thinking about when they designed this building. Of course, we need historians; Albert and Kendra have been amazing. Albert, my goodness, this guy came up with some brilliant ideas. He’d ask questions like, “Was FLW not thinking about the golden section?” and, “What about the squares that he uses?” That’s brilliant! Why didn’t I think about that? Both Albert and Kendra know FLW’s work very well. We’ve heard, anecdotally, that there are some issues with snow load. FLW basically took a building from Chicago and threw it into Banff. Hitesh, our structural expert, is going to look into that. There is also a building science issue because back then, they did not use double pane windows or insulation. We now have to rebuild buildings to meet modern standards. Of course, there are mechanical solutions to deal with that, so we have Zaiyi, our mechanical systems expert. Ramani and Zaiyi are our computational fluid dynamics experts and they can easily model ventilation systems. We now have modern materials that can span longer distances, but we are choosing not to use them. Instead, we need to decide if we are going to be inefficient [but faithful to the design] and use smaller members. This is where Paul is useful. How do you haul lumber long distances? How do you hoist it? He has a lot of expertise in this field and he will advise us with questions like these. -YT My role is three fold. First is participating in group discussions about FLW. Secondly, the owners want to use the pavilion year round as a performance space, possibly for weddings or concerts, so I’ll be designing the acoustics. Lastly, I will be designing the daylighting for the pavilion. A software called AGi32 will be used to create daylighting schemes and simulations. -RR

“We might need to relocate the building but finding its original location is what is important at the moment.” -KS

sketch by: louise shin

can you speak to the collaborative nature of this project? We have a lawyer who is working with us for free right now, there are engineers who have stepped in, and we have a construction company who is going to provide free services. By the time we are done, we’ll have had 10 to 15 students involved and who will become very well versed in at least one aspect of FLW’s spectrum of architecture. -YT

a conversation_banff national park pavilion


are there any stresses the group is facing, knowing that this a Frank Lloyd Wright building? Oh, yeah! Most of the pressure is in the unknowns because the drawings that we have are so skimpy. Some are not even properly dimensioned which takes us down the path of using geometries in re-creating some of the locations of elements. The second pressure is not working on this full time as a team. We all put aside one or two hours a day to work on it. It’s like a real job, you’re not working on just one project, you’re working on several. There are three items we have to complete: the main objective is to, of course, re-create the drawings, which is what is contracted [by the Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative]. The construction is not within our scope but of course nobody wants to design something and not see it get built. Next spring, we will be heading into construction, if everything goes well. As researchers, we also have to produce outcomes. We don’t just do research and experiments just for the sake of doing it, we have to publish our results. We took it upon ourselves to do two papers each, the objective is completing 14 papers. -YT

what are some of the challenges the team is facing with this project?

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what are some initial ideas to combat the site’s flood plain issue? Paul had this original idea of digging a trench that it is hidden and diverts the water but it turns out the amount of rain is equivalent to a torrential rainstorm. We were half joking about [implementing] a balloon system in a tube where, if it floods, we can blow up this balloon to provide a dyke. Silly idea, but it might just work. I’ve been working on a floatation system using buoyancy, like an air craft carrier, where when it floods, the system lifts up the building. However, the problem is I’m not an engineer. The Farnsworth House in Chicago uses a sub product for flooding. There was this idea of placing the pavilion on hydraulic jets and lifting the building up and down. By sheer coincidence, one of the engineers I have worked with has designed that product and he teaches at Tallahassee. He is very excited to work with us, so we might end up with a hydraulic jet system. -YT One of the strategies we are thinking is berming the pavilion up above the flood plain. The only problem when you berm is the issue of displacing the site. When you start berming in increments, the ratio increases, and we end up pushing the berm further away from the building. -AS

So far, siting the building has been the most challenging aspect. Where do we place it? Will the municipality give us the proper permit for that? If we can’t locate the building at the same location FLW did, will the people who approached us for this project be unhappy? -RR We’ve talked to a woman on campus who is an Egyptologist. She has some equipment that can x-ray the site and because there are these huge concrete slabs with fireplaces on top, we might be able to locate the foundations [based on the locations of the fireplaces]. We are hoping to travel there sometime in June to run this test or look for some lumps in the ground that might give us a feeling for where the fireplaces were. There are baseball diamonds over the site and so they would have probably raked it, added new dirt and gave it a new surface. We would have to recommend to the town council to move their baseball diamonds which may not be popular; that becomes an issue. We might need to relocate the building but finding its original location is what is important at the moment. -KS

how do you imagine the construction phase of the project unfolding? In the end, the township decides if the pavilion is built. If it gets built or not, I think that’s not the main point, the main point is to be able to put everything out there for them. Here is what the pavilion looks like in summer, autumn or winter, it will be very comfortable, we know how to build it, we know how much it costs and we have the options. -PP


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do you think making adjustments to the original design of the building still makes it a Frank Lloyd Wright building or does the architecture now take on a different meaning? Canadians tend to take a purist approach. If it’s not built the true way - no insulation and all those kind of things - then it’s wrong. We’ve done an exhaustive series of studies to suggest to the Canadian community that you don’t have to be [absolutely] pure in the approach. Looking at Europe, after World War II, almost all big towns and cities in Germany were destroyed. There is a plaza in Frankfurt called the Römerberg, and it means “the old part of the city’ and everyone takes pictures of it because they think it’s all historical. It was all recreated. It all looks historical but it is actually only 60-70 years old. The idea of replication is very much a part of historic preservation. Would you replicate something that you know is wrong and subject it to decay and deterioration? As long as we follow good practices, it is perfectly legitimate. -YT

“would you replicate something that you know is wrong and subject it to decay and deterioration?” -YT

FLW used old construction methodologies but we might have something better that still keeps the integrity of FLW. The aesthetics, the way the building looks and the overall size of the building will not change. I mean, why do I need to hire ten people to dig one hole when I can have a dozer come and dig it? We may be using better construction methods, but we are not changing anything. -RR

a conversation_banff national park pavilion


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do you have any special memory attached to Frank Lloyd Wright or his works? Oh, Falling Water! In my undergraduate civil engineering course we had a building science and architecture course with several lectures. In the architecture portion, we studied the Taj Mahal and Falling Water where a guest lecturer came in - I think it was about 1967 - to talk about what was so special architecturally about Taj Mahal and what was so intricate with Falling Water. -RR My legacy will be that I am the second Canadian to work with FLW; first one being Francis Sullivan and of course, it would be working with him virtually. In my blog called Working With Wright, it talks a bit about my exposure to FLW. I knew about him through Bob Greenberg, a guy from our program. Bob was crazy about FLW because of the geometries that he uses. Prior to him, during high school, Mr. McConnell, my English teacher, was the one who dropped the idea of FLW on me. I was in high school in grade 13 and I knew I wanted to be an architect because it was cool to sketch. But Mr. McConnell said, “No it’s a little bit more than that.” So, I bought myself a book, the kind with pretty pictures, and Falling Water was one of the buildings that I learnt about and dug into. These were the days before the internet so I literally had to go into the library and search, and search, and search.

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is seen in his studio and home in Talisien, Spring Green, Wis., on Aug. 16, 1938. (Associated Press)

I finished high school in 1980, and it has basically been a 38 year affair with FLW that started with learning his name and seeing Falling Water and today, I am now working with Wright. -YT

Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative

do you have any closing remarks on your time thus far working on the project? I think this is an interesting opportunity for us, the fact that we are able to be appointed for this job speaks volumes to the confidence that the [Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative] have in us. I think we got this job largely because we were the only people that offered a total solution. As a client, when you hire somebody, you want them to meet all of your needs rather than part of it. The seven of us, we complement each other very well! I think this also speaks to our department, not many departments have three different streams of disciplines. -PP I don’t worry about any name-fame thing, it’s the joy of doing this project that I care about. If people scream at us saying, “Oh, these seven people, who do they think they are!” that’s also fine, but the underlying point is we are working and the joy of doing this project is like a MasterCard’s commercial: priceless. -RR


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m . medium. medium.

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Residence Orchard Events Pavilion Mixed-Use InďŹ ll Presence PEIR365 Yard-1

um. are the interest age in common al function has entionally up to e projects differ pecificity of user with a broadened inclusion of occupants. These projects also differ in spatial and functional programming, often increasing to accommodate for the number of occupancy required.

medium.

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44

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spa [blue clay country spa competition] \\

yr 4

+

bence sutus hrishikesh tailor

-01

Remedium a dichotomy between remedy and active spaces Situated on the site’s luscious berm, the resort and spa overlook the landscape and its significant elements. As a spa resort which focuses on the health, beauty, and tranquility of the human body, the therapy rooms are introverted spaces where the users’ tactile senses are exaggerated. A dichotomy is established between ‘remedy’ spaces and ‘active’ spaces. The remedy spaces are placed in the center

of the building’s courtyard in autonomous forms which are lit solely by overhead natural lighting. The active spaces which surround the therapy courtyard are well-lit by windows which frame moments of the alluring context. To further emphasize their use as living spaces and contrast the therapy rooms, the active spaces are covered with gable roofs which also allude to rural Latvian vernacular architecture.


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To establish a low environmental impact, the structure is lifted off the ground plane by a timber post-and-beam-system, respecting the hill while enabling minimum architectural intervention. The materials are also inspired by nature and consist of various wood elements. Wood cladding is also commonplace in Latvian and Baltic vernacular architecture, making the material choice not only contextual to the natural site but also to the culture. A variety of passive and high-tech methods are applied to the design to create a building which values sustainability.

05

ext. rendering sectional perspective structure axonometric massing diagram remedy space

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m.

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performance centre

\\

yr 2

+

ernest wong

-01

A Performer’s transparency to alter a sense of atmosphere The Victoria Street Performer’s Residence is a mixed-use residential mid-rise. The objective is to design a living space that suit the needs of dancers and artists belonging to the performing arts community. By incorporating a multi-use theatre, the building integrates itself with the performing arts scene in Toronto. The theatre is meant to hold events and performances for

the public, in addition to being a private rehearsal space for residents. The concept of the design is to use varying levels of transparency to alter a sense of atmosphere within building, through carefully arranging openings and exploring the transparent and opaque properties of different materials. In the organization of space, the residential component is defined by its own tower, while at the podium, the second


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c 03 floor is used as amenity space with a series of dance studios projecting forward as a linear mass. By arranging the podium as a series of plateaus, it created the opportunity to have more outdoor space. The centerpiece of the design is the theatre which is embedded in the centre of the building.

3. Fully Closed

exploded axo. open theatre closed theatre experiential section diagram fully open transition fully closed

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pavilion

\\

yr 3

+

dan howell

01

-02

Orchard Events Pavilion bringing new life to the age old industry of agriculture A family owned and operated apple orchard in St. George, Ontario has expanded its business with the addition of an events reception hall and cider tasting pavilion. Located with 120° views of the orchard, the design was inspired by a connection to the outdoors. The events pavilion brings new life to the age old industry of agriculture and its tourism potential.

Architecturally, this space frames views and puts on display the re-purposed 200-year-old hand-hewn heavy timber post and beam structure. The pavilion’s 40’ x 80’ footprint was arranged to fit four 40’ clear span 12”x12” timber members, and to integrate a 12’ swing beam that runs across the main ceremonial entrance.


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This project is very much about its location, cultural history and orientation between the orchard and pavilion. By blending the boundaries between the interior and exterior, events can be sheltered from environmental conditions while still offering views to the orchard. Achieving this included the integration of a stamped concrete patio being apart off of the main entrance, polycarbonate roofing to allow daylight into the event space and its arrangement of programmatic design. With respect to the existing farm country vernacular, the design goal is to enhance its overall aesthetics of the pavilion with using clean and neutral finishes.

exterior view view towards orchard exploded axo. main event space

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mixed-use

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yr 1

+

jiaqi liu

-01

Mixed-Use InďŹ ll 02

the vernacular of the cultural enclave in little portugal The project site was used as a catalyst to explore the regional identity. The site is situated in a cultural enclave known as Little Portugal, and holds a lot of importance on the cultural impact on Toronto. Typologies prevalent in Toronto storefronts were analyzed and the vernacular approach to street fronts were taken into consideration while designing this building. The public’s negativity towards gentrification was noted and the integrity of the enclave was kept through

connecting the community with the building. The facade is a double skin, and created with perforated metal with intricate patterns alluding back to the Portugese Azulejos tile. The residential area was bisected by the fire escape stairs with light wells more prominent due to the lack of natural sunlight.


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ext. rendering formal diagram cafe studio residence sectional perspective 05

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m.

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trekking shelter [iceland trekking cabin competition] \\

yr 3 01

+

john benner alan guldimann dan howell katherine krolak

02

-Presence expressing the architectural, environmental and cultural heritage of Iceland The challenge of the design was to develop a trekking cabin for an environment that is as varied as it is isolated, while simultaneously drawing inspiration from Iceland’s rich architectural and cultural heritage. The ultimate goal was to develop a structure that would be safe, secure, and comfortable and create an architectural expression that would stand out as an icon of Iceland’s active outdoor lifestyle. The design is simple in form, but sensuous in

03

materiality. Easily constructed off-site, the structure is brought together on-site as a series of modules that would create a whole. The cabin consists of three main prefabricated components: sleeping pods, interior amenities, and the main living structure. The sleeping pods are constructed of a steel structure cladded with warm wood in the interior, and brass paneling


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on the exterior. The brass panels will eventually develop a rich patina over time, which will contrast the materiality of the surrounding structure, while still complimenting the overall weathered appearance we desired to achieve over the lifetime of the design. Earth-concrete tiles overlap and envelope the entirety of the main living structure. These tiles are developed to utilize earthen aggregates from each specific site the cabins would be placed in, therefore taking on the unique characters of the colours and textures inherent to each site the design is placed in.

form making diagram ext. night rendering short section ext. day rendering axonometric roof assembly rafters finishes light wood framing floor assembly floor joists grey water system helical piles

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m.

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pavilion [CISC competition]

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\\

yr 1

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martina cepic tatiana estrina

02

PEIR365 to assemble is to unify and connect a series of things, whether it be people or objects Created for the 2016/17 CISC Architectural Design Competition, PEIR365 is a re-development of the boardwalk, providing new possibilities of programmatic use, the gathering of people, and amalgamation of Ottawa’s breathtaking views by the changing of site variables. Through the use of kinetic steel assemblies, this urban intervention responds to changes in its environment, providing visitors to the Rideau Canal new levels of engagement seasonally.

In the summer months, due to the water levels rising, the structure is able to expand out into the sea. This allows users to interact with the canal on a different, more intimate level as well as providing docking mechanisms for canoes and kayaks. The canopy is expanded to hover over the structure to provide shade from the hot summer sun, while also acting as a light source at night.


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compressive force within canopy

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gravitational force leaning onto member compressive force within member

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In the winter the structure is rearranged into a more compressed state that mimics stadium seating. With many events being held on Dow’s Lake in the winter, the structure provides a seating arrangement for audiences. Two staircases descend towards the ice which allow skaters direct access to the frozen lake. PEIR365 won the Award of Merit.

overall structure 01 ext. rendering 02 free body diagram 03 winter a summer b grate sliding 04 mechanism grates a support b upper bridge panel c moveable lower bridge d spring connections e slider f section 05


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residential

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yr 4

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andrew falls ruslan ivanytskyy

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shifting of consumerist values towards environmentally-conscious semi-communal living The typical North American suburban home is created for its inhabitants to be highly consumptive of products, resources and space. Their design is often cut and paste, with little attention to the immediate context, proper siting or local environment. Despite the typically generous size of a yard, they are often used for further consumption such as the environmentally burdening maintenance of a lawn or pool.

YARD-1 proposes a shift in the values contained by a suburban dwelling from the dated hyper-consumer, to a denser typology with the ability for self-production and environmental neutrality. To explore this shift, two neighboring lots were adjoined, and densified by placing five dwellings within the site. These units all share a common ground floor plane where cooking and dining are experienced through a blurred threshold of private and public. This relates to the


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exterior rendering 01 isometric 02 owned single family 1 A income suite 1 B owned single family 2 C income suite 2 D garage suite E

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sloped community garden, which provides the ability for self-production within the realm of semi-communal living.

family kitchen/dining lower income suite kitchen garage income suite dining community garden chicken coop community shed/ bicycle storage parking (6) green roof photovoltatics

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concept diagram 03 west section 04 community garden 05 rendering


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words by: florence chu arnel espanol sora kim casey li clarice medina

beijing_great wall of china

\\

Stimulating curiosity and adventure, one of the best methods of learning is done through traveling. It is a process of seeking knowledge through experiential learning that creates a deeper understanding of the architecture and culture around us. In the spring of 2017, 23 students and one faculty member embarked on a month-long journey to I\TPSVI ERH I\TIVMIRGI ǻVWXLERH XLI XVIEWYVIW SJ (LMRE 8VEZIPMRK XLVSYKL XIR HMǺIVIRX GMXMIW participants were exposed to both the traditional and modern architecture of China - as well, the areas where old and new architecture merged. Participants share their thoughts and experiences on their journey through China, captured by photos and words.

___________________________________________________________kultour

photos os by: arnel espanol henry mai nazanin mirsharifi


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“The bustling nightlife of Pingyao; filled with delicious scents from open restaurants and shops amidst the incredible historical architecture and streets lit up by beautiful lights. It is definitely an atmosphere that I wish to experience again.�

pingyao_streets at night

-CM


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pingyao_restaurant at night

“The side roads are dimly lit at night but still packed with people nonetheless. There are businessmen heading home, children playing without a care, and from the food hawker’s cart, clouds of steam floating into the warm night air. You could walk these streets every night, and see something new each time - something you have yet to discover.” -CL


yichang_wedding dance

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“With every step alongside the river, I could see the character of ancient China through its preserved vernacular dwellings and beautiful natural scenery. At the end, the path revealed floating bamboo rafts and I was greeted by the peaceful sound of a flute with men and women dressed in traditional clothing. It was like I was watching an artistic film.� -SK

suzhou_humble administrators garden

suzhou_suzhou museum


yichang_three gorges

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xian_wild goose pagoda

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shanghai_cheng huang market

“For me, the most valuable experience of China Kultour 2017 was the cultural exchange we shared with the local students. Having the opportunity to share meals, conversations, and stories with locals enabled us to have a deeper appreciation and understanding of the Chinese culture. These interactions provided us a humbling experience as they made us realize the similarities and differences between our lives.� -AE


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shanghai_jin mao tower

shanghai_cityscape view from jin mao tower

“I had one of the most unforgettable birthdays as I spent it on an overnight train from Beijing to Datong. Thank you to all my Kultour buddies that sang happy birthday to me and the girl on the train who happened to share the same birthday as me. This was one of the warmest moments I remembered from our trip.� -FC


beijing_galaxy SOHO

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“This was one of the most serene places I’ve ever visited. The wooden pagoda that stood in the middle was an amazing construction of intricate woodwork that has been standing for more than 300 years. Looking back on the entire trip, it was definitely one of the most impressive pieces of architecture I witnessed.� -CM

datong_pagoda of fongong temple


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onciliation

ming Arts Centre PODS Podularity Intersection Davisville Junior School Centre for Cultural Arts

ge. strong focus on these projects es for a diverse ideas of culture, society and/ or religion, these projects are programmatically adaptable and can easily acclimate to the behaviours of its users. These projects often reflect a character influenced or adopted by the occupants of its architecture.

large.

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l.

70

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multicultural centre

\\ 01

yr 3

+

mitchell cairns-spicer mariam elzein

02

-Reveal 03

04

a space for artistic expression and enjoyment Reveal, Toronto’s new multicultural centre, is located on the west end of Moss Park, and replaces the existing armory building. The goal of the project is to provide the surrounding community with a space for artistic expression and enjoyment. The building includes a learning centre, artist studio space, community studio space, and galleries for both prized and local artwork. Aside from the art-based programming, the building includes a day care, performance

theatre, restaurant and a multipurpose community space for locally driven events. The a pproach to the design is to create two volumes to visually separate the programming, and through the use of a bridge, merge the third level spaces. The undulating Prodema wood board east/west elevations have a starkly vdifferent treatment than the high-tech and precise glass


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shingle LED facades on the south elevation. The undulations in the wood allow diffused natural light into the gallery spaces without damaging the artwork. The glass shingle LED system is dynamic in its expression; during the day due to reflections of the ever changing sky, and at night due to the ability to display vibrant and colourful works of art.

massing diagram ext. rendering museum section facade section exhibition space detail section detail elevation cladding detail led lighting strip annodized steel glazing hanger roofing membrane 50mm rigid insulation 89mm steel channel prodema panel 13mm glazing panel 200mm cast-in-place concrete 89mm steel channel

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religious building

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masters

+

catalina ardila bernal 01

02

Church of Reconciliation exposing the consequences of globalization on Columbia’s Guajira region The Church of Reconciliation is a project aimed at beginning a discourse between architecture, neo-colonization and the rural conditions in Colombia. The project is located in northern Colombia, in the Guajira region, where the largest open-pit coal mine, known as ‘El Cerrejon’, has been shaping the social and environmental context for the past 40 years. As of 2017, it remains a major coal energy source for European countries.

Away from romanticizing the fragility of the poor, displaced and marginalized communities, the Church exposes the dramatic consequences of operating with the land: a permanent ‘scar’, in where the ‘bona fide’ state will never return. In order to reach to the church at the bottom of the pit, there are a series of praying rooms/pavilions, following the Via Cruxis. This pilgrimage allows visitors to see, feel and interact with the negative consequences of globalization.


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Arriving at the bottom, the visitor will encounter a community centre, which works as the gate to the church and the final stations of pilgrimage. Upon entering the church, the bowl-like roof brings the ‘heavens’ down towards the people. Although the mine is dry, a few deposits create an ambivalence surrounding the symbolism of water as a source of life, and purity. Ultimately, the church at the bottom of the pit ‘sews’ together all the actors involved: the corporations, the government, the landscape, and most importantly, the locals.

plan & long section aerial view view from approach church interior

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l.

74

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multicultural centre

\\

yr 3

+

jasmin (minji) kim henry mai

02a

02b

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-Dialogue

03

creating moments of interaction and engagement to better address multiculturalism Dialogue is a multicultural centre that aspires to better address multiculturalism in Toronto by creating moments of interaction and engagement with users that pass through the space. Originating from the idea of a cultural mosaic, Dialogue focuses on the appreciation for separate cultures while celebrating and taking pride of one’s own culture. This is responded with a series of nodes that both visually and physically connect programs within the building to each

other, as well as to its surrounding site context. The four cardinal directions link Parliament Square park, a proposed public square to its East, and a proposed linear park to its West together to create a building that anchors the project as a bridge between old and new Toronto. The main linear atrium cuts through the building creating a bridge that connects users through programmatic spaces


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from all access points of the site. Combined with architectural elements which create a transparency between activity and event spaces, the interior and exterior relationships are blended seamlessly. Ultimately, a dialogue between cultures is achieved allowing for a heightened sense of community.

parti sketch 03 ground floor plan 04 senior lounge a multipurpose room b performance space c permanent exhibition d gathering space e east sectional 05 perspective


l.

76

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institution

\\

yr 4

+

andrew falls

01

02

SSA091116 building a new framework to coexist with an existing structure The John Deere building is an important cultural artifact with a wealth of industrial character. However, the existing building and a proposed architecture school present many conflicting qualities. In response, SSA091116 proposes a new framework to coexist with the existing building while never interacting or meeting it. To achieve this, a large superstructure is placed beyond the exterior of the building, providing vertical circulation while supporting a new suitable

environment placed within the extent of the building. The existing windows and doors will be removed, but all other elements of the building will remain untouched and unpreserved. A new building for the School of Art is placed to highlight and frame the existing building while demonstrating the inverse of the qualities proposed within it. A sunken courtyard


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preserves the west portion of the site as an important realm for the community, which joins the gallery and lecture hall shared by both faculties below grade. In time, the deterioration of the existing building will allow for judgments to be made that reflect the developing cultural values of the architecture community evolving within the proposed environment. The provision of a lack of prescriptive explicitly in intent allows for a confusion that incubates critical thought for the occupying students who are to become architects.

parti ext. rendering isometric section west elevation third floor plan

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l.

78

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performance centre

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yr 3

+

rachel luu

01

a

b

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02

Halcyon Performing Arts Centre rejuvenating aboriginal cultural practices and arts Halcyon Performing Arts Centre is a contextual community based building that encourages visitors to reflect and connect with nature. The centre situates itself on the existing Moss Park Armory Building, in hopes of introducing a new communal building to help rejuvenate Aboriginal cultural practices and arts. Through analysis, it was observed that many park users formed their own paths – creating shortcuts to nearby amenities, public transportation or towards

more scenic areas within the park. The visualization of the Halcyon Performing Arts Center begins at the integration of the proposed pedestrian pathway off Queen Street, north towards George Street. As the building mass considers a natural circulation route implemented by the community, the building form is easily separated into five main blocks of programming connected


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ext. rendering 01 parti diagrams 02 a natural circulation route b central atrium space c winter gardens through a central atrium space. The centre aims to create more intimate relationships between vast amount of community programs through the use of winter gardens. Each block is connected through their own individual garden, essentially acting as an interactive space for reading, medicinal gardening or active play space. The gardens hope to engage building spectators into participating in the various offered programs.

int. rendering 03 ground floor plan 04 atrium spaces 05 a multipurpose space b amphitheater seating c balcony east section 06


l.

80

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mixed-use

\\ 01

yr 2

+

michael evola

02

DeďŹ ne creating an artistic identity through the production of new culture Define is the creation of an artistic identity through the means of architecture. A typological collage of buildings surrounds the proposed site. The addition of a new typology must produce a culture, in order to produce clarity in the site. The process begins with a formal separation from the context. The present rectilinear forms of the site are sheared and skinned with layers of foreign materivals. The envelope allows natural light to enter the spaces while dis-joining the

public’s connection with the unrelated surroundings. A layer of glass seemingly isolates the building from its surroundings. The building provides spaces for the enjoyment and creation of the arts. Rehearsal spaces, workshops and offices provide spaces for creation, while a theatre, gallery and event space provide spaces for experience.


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schematic sketch ext. rendering fragment model circulation space rehearsal space section 06

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l.

82

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multicultural centre

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yr 3

+

erik aquino yuri shin

02

PODS celebrating the dynamism and eccentricity in multiculturalism Identity is a complex matter in a diverse metropolis like Toronto. Through decades of cultural conflict, resistance and tension, the city and its people developed a culture of tolerance which we call multiculturalism. Differences are accepted, and cultural interests are shared. We are individually distinct yet identify as one. As a whole, we are something entirely different, unconventional and progressive. PODS Multicultural Centre is an architectural

representation of its people—bold, dynamic, eccentric—and celebrates cultural identity at the historic heart of Toronto. On a linear site, PODS houses three programmatic volumes of a Performance Hall, a First Nations’ Aboriginal Centre and a Community Centre in three distinct organic forms. The three pods, cladded in a colourful mosaic of zinc shingles, unveils itself from behind a plane of glass, to attract visitors.


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05 Users experience an engaging journey through the den of the pods; travelling under, inside, on top and around the dynamic forms. The interior of the pods are finished with a neutral tone of local wood to create a calm contrast in atmosphere. The undulating ceiling volumetrically identifies programmatic areas within the same space. Light wells planted in conical forms deliver natural daylight to the interior of the pods. The tops of the pods, as if giant flower pots, hold interior gardens intertwined with lightwells and courtyards. PODS ultimately strives to accommodate a balance between character and pragmatism to serve for the growth of a healthier multicultural society.

ext. rendering long elevation partial elevation transverse section garden courtyard aboriginal services aboriginal museum offices reception

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glazed lightwell 05 detail 11.6mm oak finish a 50.8mm rigid b insulation 101.6mm concrete fill c p-306 steel decking d 6mm curved glazing e steel plates f universal beam g 356x127 open-web steel joists h hss. concrete i composite column


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institution

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masters

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joseph ball shea macdougall daniel petrocelli

01

-Podularity

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an expandable solution for the urban school typology Podularity is a response to the existing condition at the site of the Davisville Junior Public School. It expands on the vocabulary of the original 1960’s mid-century modern Davisville School by establishing a framework for natural expansion as the area densifies and more school area is required. This solution retains the existing building, which is at considerable risk of demolition. This strategy reverses the tradition of demolition and reconstruction on the site,

and sets a precedent for future institutional developments in the downtown area. The core elements of Podularity are: Systematic grid framework, Horizontally expandable system, Clusters of related programming, Glazed breakout spaces, Banded strips of solid form and open space. This design is an attempt to break the seemingly perpetual cycle of demolition and reconstruction on this site. It takes


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the vocabulary of the existing school and reinterprets it with the language of contemporary design. Using the precedent of the programmatic pod separated by glazed breaking spaces, a systematic grid is established that not only respects the original design, but provides a framework upon which future expansion can be built. The existing building is retained and repurposed as a community centre.

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multicultural centre

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tiffany (qiaochu) zhang

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Inte the intersection of two masses reflecting its contrasting neighbourhood The cultural identity of an individual is expressed as a unique set of traits, habits, beliefs, and rituals adopted from the influences of various factors such as religion, location, and race. The selected site for the multicultural centre is one that carries rich historical meaning and marks the intersection of five contrasting neighbourhoods. The resulting user

demographic features a mix of social, economic, and political influences as these neighbourhoods range from newly developing to well established, residential to commercial, and low to high income. These characteristics converge at the proposed center, resulting in a confluence of urban multiculturalism and heritage. The formal result is expressed as an intersection of two


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ext. rendering 01 neighbourhood digram 02 second floor plan 03 a boardroom b classroom c dance studio d lounge e gallery f cultural activity hall g daycare patio h aboriginal services elevation 04 section 05


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michelle ashurov sarah lipsit

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-Davisville Junior School ool oo conserving heritage and adapting to technology Our intention to conserve the heritage of the Davisville School is to extract the essence of the 1962 design; to keep the design intent and functional elements - whether tangible or intangible, that represented the era of midcentury modernism, and the identity of the school over the last 60 years. When a building loses its ability to adapt to the shifts in technology, it becomes a hindrance to the entire system - the Davisville School is found within this category.

The school is often referred to as a series of interconnected pavilions - implying that they retained an individual identity that also contributed to an overall scheme. The school, as it stands, is a linear structure that bisects the site into the north and south sides. Rather than expand in the perpendicular, the new design reorganizes the original concept of pavilion so that there is opportunity to grow outwardly or contract inwardly, accommodating the fluctuation in enrolment


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numbers. This configuration asserts a feeling of safety, necessary for schools, expressing a small scale, confidential environment for children to learn, explore and play. The pavilions retain the same formal roof qualities as the previous school, but they become organized radially, looking inwards and outwards, similar to the pinwheel organization of massing that was so prevalent in mid-century Modernism.

atrium space 01 site plan axonometric 02 cladding detail 03 davisville brick a 250mm air space b 2 layers, 25mm glazing c horizontal mullion & d beauty cap spandrel panel e steel anchor f steel lintel g steel c channel h steel anchor to mullion i threaded bolt j polished concrete floor k pendant lighting l brick facade diagram 04 int. rendering 05 elevation 06


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multicultural centre

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Centre for Cultural Arts a physical embodiment of sculpture and performance art The Centre for Cultural Arts, located adjacent to Parliament Park Square in Toronto, Ontario, houses multiple galleries and performance spaces that serve to educate visitors on the rich cultural diversity present in the Canadian context.

exterior. This movement also acts to guide visitors to the primary entrances of the building and is then carried along into the interior, to further guide the users through the internal performance and gallery spaces.

The massing of the building takes inspiration from sculpture and performance. As the form swoops, lifts, and bends throughout the site, it creates a visual performance on the

One of the biggest challenges throughout the project was the design and detailing of the undulating form. There were many iterations of the form, all to find the most idealistic


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way on how it would present itself as the main volume of the building. Therefore, finding an efficient way to digitally model this form was an essential tool in our design process. With the help of digital modeling software we could simplify the complications of the form and therefore apply these tools towards more finite design elements, such as the development and integration of structure, lighting, building M.E.P services, materiality, and finishes.

south ext. rendering sectional perspective int. rendering site plan daycare facility circulation gallery performance seating workshop studio open gallery cafe parliament square park

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installation and the people: a discussion

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LeuWebb Projects is multi-disciplinary arts and curation practice founded by Christine Leu and Alan Webb. Their work is concerned with storytelling and creating critical discourse, using their backgrounds in architecture and art as motivation for their projects. Their installations are executed in a wide range of scales and mediums ERH SÇşIV MQQIVWMZI IRZMVSRQIRXW 8SKIXLIV XLI] LEZI produced over 20 installations worldwide. Christine Leu has recently received the 2017 RAIC Awards of Excellence Allied Arts Medal for her body of work in bridging art with architecture.

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interview by: batoul al waadh


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your design practice has a strong emphasis on the senses: sight, touch and sound. in what ways do you think this has addressed accessibility and how different users interact with your installations? Architects tend to assume accessibility refers to barrier free, but our practice addresses it in broader terms. For example, age does not limit your ability to experience and enjoy our installations. In the past, we have noticed children respond more enthusiastically to our projects due to the sensory elements emphasized. Using light and sound in conjunction allows users to experience the installation regardless of their sight or hearing capabilities.

is there a reason why your works do not interact directly with the user, but rather, are a part of the setting? The lack of interaction is intentional, and is a reflection of our personalities. As introverted designers, we don’t intend to design installations that interact with the user in a direct manner. As a viewer, you can engage with it as much as you want, and as designers, we don’t want to be forceful with how that experience happens. The experience in the background using light, sound and colour blending seamlessly with the setting is the premise of our work. For example, “Reflections on Rotations” was intentionally placed in the ceiling so as not to constrict the space in the bar. We wanted to capture the narrative you see in older bars with the smoke rising up to the ceiling. The hanging mirrors is a visual experience lifted from the ground, playing on this narrative.

for many of your projects, the site is an integral component of the design. how has this influenced the methodology of the installations? We approach the site in a broader context - keeping in mind the views, history, social and economic elements that shape it. “Melting Point”, an installation for the Fort York National Historic site, was significantly influenced by the surrounding topography, changing shore line condition and history. The site was a resistance point during the War of 1812, and has resisted urban developments in the surrounding area to this day. When I initially approached the site, I researched this information to be conscious of the location and aware of my design intent for the event. “Melting Point” uses light and sound to evoke the presence of the canyons on the site. The lights change colour and respond to the sounds of waves, canons and harps. The orientation on the site, and intentional use of sound cultivate an experience that pays tribute to the site’s significant history. When we first get a project we visit the site, and similar to what you [students] do, we also do online research and look into the history of the site. With my practice I think about how can our artwork acknowledge history and reveal something about the history you may not know as the viewer. This brings me to a project I completed a few years ago for Nuit Blanche. Sam the Record Man was a very popular record store in the place where the Ryerson Student Learning Centre is now standing. At the time we made this installation, the building was already torn down and construction on the SLC had already started. It was truly a beloved place, and so we decided to commemorate it by creating a street installation with records. I remember standing there and some of the viewers would recognize and make the connection of Sam the Record Man from our installation. It was really great to hear that response from the public.

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can you elaborate on how your project “Just a Reflection” uses light to create a broken labyrinth effect where reactions are endlessly multiplied?

This project was located in the display box before the vestibule of an old store front on Dundas Street West. Our team was interested in the zone between the street and the interior of the store - the transitional zone. The installation acts as a transition between two thresholds; the exterior and the interior. The mirrors used for this installation were intentionally concave, in order for a reflection to be generated when visitors would glance at it. With physics in mind, the use of concave mirrors create a blurred reflection after a certain distance, creating a distortion of reality multiplied in space.

why was sound such an important aspect of the installation “seaclash” and how did it provide relief for those who experienced it?

In addition to us both being architects, Alan is a DJ and he used to DJ for events at the University of Waterloo and the University of Toronto. He has always been very interested in sound and how auditory environments can transport you to different places. If you’ve ever been to Nathan Phillips Square during the summer, you’ll realize it gets very hot and the concrete doesn’t help. Made with reclaimed speakers and recordings along the shore of Gibraltar Beach at the Toronto Islands, “Seaclash” is a movable cart of speakers that is meant to be an auditory relief transporting you to different places. Toronto is a waterfront city, but we often don’t feel this living here, so the speakers carry you there through sound.

were there certain projects that had an unexpected reaction from the public?

Generally, the public response has been good. Something that comes to mind is one of our installations, “A Touch of Light”, which was commissioned by the Canadian Music Centre for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2013. It was a visceral exploration of the intersection of sound and light. During the event, there were thousands of people observing our work as we were standing in between the crowd, not necessarily identified as the artists. We were listening to the reaction of our work and it was very lovely. Some will just stare for some time, while others will comment and discuss with other people.

what is the direction LeuWebb Projects is heading towards and are you open to exploring various different mediums?

We have been focused on creating temporary installations, and we’re now interested in moving on to permanent installations and products. Since we have looked into more permanent projects, we’ve realized there are many restrictions associated in terms of the materials you can use. Some of the materials we have recently been looking into include aluminum and steel.

are you working on any projects at the moment?

Yes, we have been commissioned by the Canadian Addictions and Mental Health Association to create a fritted pattern on their window, and we’re considering different options. The windows we’re using will be facing a garden, and the intent of this is to celebrate the outdoor natural space. I have been researching into the Arts and Crafts movement, more specifically William Morris’ floral patterns as an option. During his time, he strongly rejected industrialism. The floral fritted patterns on the window are meant to encourage a reconnection with nature - something we have been detached from in our modern world. For someone struggling with mental health issues, they may feel alienated from the world because of our detachment from nature, and the use of these fritted patterns on the window would help bridge this disconnect and alienation they feel.


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lisa boulatova liam hall jiayi zhang

-In Full Bloom celebrating canada’s 150th culture and identity through floral emblems Celebrating the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Confederation, Bata Shoe Museum’s window display showcases the country’s culture and identity by using 3D printed shoes to recreate Canada’s provincial and territorial floral emblems. The installation undulates beyond a multifaceted and multicoloured floral backdrop, composed of an array of 3D printed shoes arranged as pixels to form large flowers. Each floral emblem has a description of its origin, so those who pass by

the window can read about the adoption and history of the floral emblems across Canada. Over 2,000 three-dimensionally printed shoes aim to capture the transient beauty of the flowers, inspired by the floral embroidery found on silk shoes in the museum’s vast collection. The floral emblems, arranged from west to east coast, uniquely bloom together on this occasion. As symbols

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of celebration and confederation, these flowers echo the places we’ve been, the stories we tell, and the connections we share with one another. Using digital fabrication tools, such as computer modelling, CNC milling, and 3d printing, students explored the identity of Canada’s natural landscape through the joy of flowers and shoes; ultimately setting up the condition for the Bata Shoe Museum window to bloom.

provincial floral emblems exterior display detail shot panel assembly french cleats 4” braced backwall 2” poplar wood frame 3/4” mdf sheet 3” painted cnc’d foam painted wooden base wire 3d printed shoes

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monument

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yr 4

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ruslan ivanytskyy 01

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THAW exploring architecture’s ability to document changes in geological time Our planet is in a crisis. Carbon emissions created by humankind since the industrial revolution have caused a climatic shift, warming our planet. Currently, permafrost slumps in Canada’s North sequester massive amounts of frozen organic matter from the last Ice age. Mistreatment of the environment through pollutants has caused the greenhouse gas effect to create a rise in global temperatures by 2 degrees Celsius. This seemingly small shift is enough to

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make the Arctic permafrost slumps melt, releasing immense levels of methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, perpetuating global warming and accelerating geologic time. THAW explores architecture’s ability to document changes in geologic time, revealing an otherwise hidden truth. The state change that occurs once permafrost thaws is mirrored


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through the casting process. Permafrost thaws from solid to liquid at the slump, the active cross section of the permafrost mass. A concrete canvas is draped over top of the slump, and hardened from liquid to solid, recording the form, texture, and position of the slump at a singular moment in time. A light steel exoskeleton is erected to support the canvas through a series of tension cables. One year later, once the slump has receded, two pods are mounted to the concrete canvas. Each pod acts a camera obscura, projecting an image of the present thawing permafrost slump onto the concrete canvas, which stands as an image of the past.

ext. rendering 01 drawings 02 plan & section a elevation b section c exploded axo. 03 site axonometric 04


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pavilion

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michelle friesen

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Kanata Pavilion a meeting place that transitions between nature and the built environment The proposed theme of the 2017 Expo, Transition, is representative of the transition from nature to the built environment, and how a building’s transition through different weather and seasons provides various uses at different times of the year. The Kanata Island acts as the centerpiece island in the 2017 Expo, housing both the Canadian Pavilion, and an expansive

park space representative of Canada. The island is designed to represent the major geographical regions of Canada and encourage visitors to engage with nature. The building serves as a communal meeting place, an exposition hall, and a performance space. During the exposition, the building will welcome and transport visitors from the bridge to Kanata Island. From there, visitors can


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partake in various activities on the island, including biking, canoeing, hiking, and ice skating. The design aims to demonstrate various programs, or “ecosystems�, which can become sustainable resources within the building. The waste from one program would provide raw materials for another process, mimicking natural occuring processes like the conservation of water, soil nutrition, carbon, and energy. The building is meant to frame the surrounding landscape and emphasize the importance of the parkland for the Exposition, and later on for the community.

atrium 01 ext. rendering 02 ground floor plan 03 cafe a interior garden b reception c office d storage e parti section 04 longitudinal section 05


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installation [sukkahville competition]

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shengyu cai marissa liu keegan toscano garbo zhu

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re-imagining the sukkah The Oculus is as a modern take on the traditional sukkah while maintaining the use of naturally sourced materials. The dome arrangement allows natural light to penetrate in to illuminate the interior, while the cones allow artificial light to radiate outward. The frustums vary in size, creating a unique viewing experience while sheltering the inhabitants from the elements. The structure is primarily composed of trace paper and concrete form tubes. The base units, each composed of two frustums, are assembled to create the form. Following the original idea of a sukkah, this modular design allows for ease of construction and transportation from one place to another. The lightweight structure is self-supporting and flexible to any changes.

detail 01 finished construction 02 assembly 03 a trace paper + acetate cones b concrete form tubes c base


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emily allan rutuja arte dominique di libero kelly walcroft gloria zhou garbo zhu

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Pneu

an installation created for the Toronto Design Offsite Opening Party 01 02 a b c

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Pneu is an immersive pneumatic environment created from the exploration of form finding and continual air pressure. The geometric constraints and transparent properties of plastic sheeting reveal a convex mylar pillar. This inhabitable environment invokes curiosity from afar as they watch others place themselves within the installation. Properties of light, colour, and opacity combine to consume the individual in an unconventional spatial experience. With three components: a space blanket, plastic sheeting, and air, the installation brings people closer in the Holy Trinity Church. With the existing historic site in mind, the design made a contrasting statement by establishing a foreign form in a solid and static building.


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speculative future

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joseph ball

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Solitary: “A Speculative Future” a future society that discourages personal interaction The global capitalist hegemony is pushing society in a bleak direction. New residential construction in urban centres is largely high-density, high-rise, and the primary concern of its developers is profit - cramming as many small units into a floor plate as possible, with no concern for the social connectedness of the prospective occupants. The question of today is “How small a space will they buy?” Is this truly the direction we wish to go? The need for constant development,

growth, and expansion is usually at the expense of the wellbeing of individuals. What is the future of our global urban condition if social isolation continues its rampant progression? Are the small spaces we live in becoming prisons of our own making? Presented is a speculative reality that draws attention to


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this issue by leading it to an inevitable conclusion - a future society of social disconnection that discourages personal interaction, where the only meaningful connections are those of delivery networks and ethernet lines. People, separated by walls and floor slabs, communicate digitally, if at all. Why ever leave the home if there is no need?

tower delivery network diagram site rendering service drone residential floor plan automated delivery system floor plan section

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pavilion

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lauren kyle

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Expo’17: The Canadian Pavilion exhibition of historical, current, and potential transitions in Canadian landscapes Branching from the theme of transition developed for this Expo by the Port Lands Master Plan, the Canadian Pavilion intends to exhibit the historical, current and potential transitions in Canadian Landscapes. The balance of extraction versus preservation of Canada’s landcapes, ecosystems and natural resources. The circulation of the space takes the visitors on a fluid

journey through the landscape, exhibition space, and to the large Winter Garden. The exhibition space and the Winter Garden are connected alongside to allow visitors to meander between them and to be able to learn about the environment and then to experience it. The above-ground portion of the building is in the form of a shell, symbolizing protection. The turtle is a significant


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character among many North American First Nations groups within the creation story of Turtle Island, as North America. The Auditorium portion of the building is submerged in the landscape creating a mound adjacent to the water which resemble ancient aboriginal burial sites of local First Nations groups. The architectural design intent is to encourage the exhibition programme within the building to continue the predominant focus on Canadian landscapes through the perspectives of First Nations group by engaging in Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

int. rendering parti sketch south section axonometric ground floor plan auditorium outdoor gathering space exhibition space Winter Garden

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joana benin john benner jason glionna gregorio jimenez marissa liu tess macpherson diana sobaszek

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ParkletTO merging design and function on the streets of Toronto As Toronto continues to transform, so too have its streets. Increased demand for pedestrian-friendly neighbourhoods has sparked the creativity of city planners and designers alike to think outside the box. As a result, spaces that have traditionally been allotted for automobile parking can now take on a whole new meaning. Ultimately, this has led to the concept of a parklet: a public amenity that incorporates seating to act as an extension of the sidewalk.

ParkletTO represents a major step forward in the merging of design and function on the streets of Toronto. The design was developed by students from Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science, and was created in partnership with the Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area (DYBIA) with support from Upper Canada Forest Products. By repurposing existing street parking spots into a multi-use, people-friendly park space, ParkletTO has


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f 03 created new public spaces for the community while stimulating economic activity in the downtown core. Designed in 50cm modules, the parklet can be easily stored, reused, and reconfigured. The result is an inviting space for pedestrians to sit, relax, and enjoy their meal or the weather. ParkletTO’s glowing LEDS and light wood material fit in perfectly with vibrant Elm Street and it’s tree-lined sidewalk. Moving forward, ParkletTO aims to be the building block and inspiration for future parklets to come.

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H+abitat re-establish long term healthy ecosystems through deacidification In the nineteenth century, Jules Verne described the ocean as the “embodiment of a supernatural and wonderful existence... it is nothing but love and emotion; it is the Living Infinite”. Unfortunately, Verne’s “Living Infinite” is at risk of permanent decline in the twenty-first century due to climate change-induced ocean acidification; roughly 25% of the CO2 that is emitted into the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean and converted into carbonic acid, lowering the overall pH of

the seawater. However, even the slightest increase in acidity creates a huge impact on marine ecosystems, especially coral reefs. One major consequence of this acidification is the erosion and decay of the calcium carbonate that forms the coral skeletons, which has devastating impacts on the marine life that inhabit these fragile ecosystems.


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H+abitat skyscraper seeks to combat declining pH levels and reestablish a healthy ecosystem within its premises over the long term through the conversion of carbonic acid to bicarbonate to balance the acidity of the surrounding waters. The exposed structural elements allow for strong ocean currents to pass through without toppling the building and instead diverts them into powering the bicarbonate generator system at the base. These generators are complemented by the live/work research and data centres on the upper floors, which provide an optimal environment for further fieldwork to study the effects of ocean acidification.

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sustainable and healthy built environments with visual interest Due to the rapid development of technology and the push for more sustainable and healthy built environments, new green strategies are being implemented into construction. Technologies such as green walls, green roofs, permeable pavement all deal with strategies in rainwater mitigation and improved health for the surrounding environment. The task is to implement these sustainable strategies in key areas on the Ryerson University campus. From site visits, the

Image Arts Center presented an ideal location for a green implementation. The eastern study hall shows a possibility for green walls in terms of raising occupant health and visual interest as well as denoting a separation between the public corridor and the private study spaces.


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adaptive reuse

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+ carpet condo: anjli bhavsar adrian chiu paolo juan jabile noah gotlib ian limbaseanu rachel luu claire tam noeline tharshan

microcosm: joana benin john benner henry mai joanna oon elliot santos katherine swainson omar gandhi (architect)

pixelate: andrea au shengyu cai tanya gradyuk laura herrera marissa liu keegan toscano tiffany (qiaochu) zhang gloria zhou garbo zhu

eiri ota (architect) anya moryoussef (architect)

Luminato recognizing the potentials of untapped modern relics Luminato is Toronto’s annual festival wholly dedicated to the celebration of the arts. A vast range of events take place, ranging from design installations, to visual art exhibitions, to all forms of performance arts. For its 10th birthday in 2016, Luminato paired up with PARTISANS to convert the decommissioned Hearn Generating Station into a venue for the festival. This conversion would become the catalyst for creative thinking.

PARTISANS then organized a public design charette to discuss the future potential of the Hearn, and a public studio session took place in collaboration with DAS students and three Toronto based architects. Hearn’s monolithic framework had the potential to transform into an urban agricultural co-op community, a modular live/work microcity, or, in true Toronto fashion, a massive condo complex.


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Carpet Condos The decommissioned Heard Generating Station, at the time of its completion, was the largest enclosed space in Canada. Now that the station has been hollowed of the necessary infrastructure, the volume inside is reminiscent of the grandeur of roman basilicas. The distinct space is unique to architecture of the 20th century, making it an opportunity to express extraordinary design. The vision of Carpet Condo is to build around the Hearn in order to preserve the interior volume. The structure drapes across the island reacting to the existing site features. Its intention is to provide a blank canvas for communities to grow organically, and become the catalyst that will revitalize the Portland area and reshape Toronto’s shoreline.

int. rendering 01 site axonometric 02


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Microcosm

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int. rendering hyper loop system hyper loop diagram parasite program transit tubes integrated program

Microcosm proposes to transform the Hearn Generating Station into a micro city composed of modular multipurpose spaces. This conglomeration of spaces include artist and maker studios, live/work spaces, and urban agriculture. Along with the integration of ‘hyper loops’ and transit tubes, the Hearn will become a cultural megastructure that reconnects to the city of Toronto.


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In response to the ever-growing popularity of urban agricultural production, this proposal takes advantage of the Hearn Generation Plant’s colossal spatial volume and populates the dense steel framing with farm plots that stretch both vertically and horizontally. Supporting program, including a residential co=op and marketplace transforms the space into a selfsustaining community in addressing three fundamentals: living, productivity, and economy. The overall form is generated from the regularity of the structural bays, creating a kit of parts, or rather, “pixels� that populate this structural forest with activity.

site axonometric 01 pixelated facade a existing steel structure b residence units c greenhouse d public park/ market e public market 02


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passageway & observatory

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jiayi zhang

Echo creating an empowering space through constrasting detail elements This project is focused on creating an empowering space through contrasting detail elements. The structure extends from below ground to the surface above with the ground plane acting as a mirror; anything situated above ground acting as positive and below as negative. However, when discovering this hidden aspect of reflection, it will certainly create a few moments of awe.

The underground passage will be linked to the existing Dundas subway line and the underground parking currently below the square. Walking through this underground path will allow the users to look up and through the wooden structure to see the empowering cantilever above. The passage has a staircase that acts almost as a sculpture in the dark graced by light from above. The staircase will lead the users through the wooden structures and cross the plane

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that separates the old and the new. This transition point is also the exit point to Dundas Square, and serves as an opportunity to continue upward to the space within the cantilever. The cantilever will ultimately allow the visitors to arrive at a destination that provides an elevated view of the square.

diagrams 01 a enclosure b threshold c subway connection d circulation e transitional space f stagnational space sectional perspective 02 ext. rendering 03 int. rendering 04


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wayne (jiachen) bai joseph ball agnes cheng laura herrera michelle friesen jean-paul guay kelly (pin ju) lai louise shin

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one installation, many voices DELIGHT is an interactive light installation where visitors can experience dynamic movement and an ethereal environment correlated by noise within a space. Based on the frequencies of sound in a room, the movement from the suspended orbs will change. When an observer approaches DELIGHT from a distance, the shadows of the moving mechanisms, also known as camshafts, inside the lightbox give a glimpse of the working parts causing the suspended spheres to move.

The expressive movement of DELIGHT is primarily explored through the interaction with people and the frequency of sound they produce. This is seen from the illuminated frosted acrylic balls which move in the same formation as that of a sine wave, representing the frequency of the sound. The movement of the balls depends on the volume of ambient noise, and results in more intensive momentum and speed of the orbs the louder the sounds become, and


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axonometric conceptual rendering elevations ceiling assembly crankshaft assembly motor support shelf straws 3mm acrylic panel 1/2” plywood board 2” diameter acrylic ball

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vice versa, thereby creating expressive movement attuned to that of biomimicry and similar responsiveness found in nature. The resultant effect is a completely responsive ceiling condition of undulating movement that continuously evolves as users create various types of noise in the space. Through its utilization of user input parameters such as the number of people in the room and the sound levels that they produce, DELIGHT is the manifestation of an inclusive design ethos based on the maxim of “One Installation, Many Voices”, which represents the collaborative effort required to produce DELIGHT by both the installation designers and users.

crankshaft assembly 05 electric motor a motor-to-crankshaft b axle connection c standard crankshaft d component e crankshaft support f 1/2” mdf g project at completion 06


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Profile for 325 Magazine

325 Magazine | 2016 - 2017  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

325 Magazine | 2016 - 2017  

325 Magazine is a publication curated by students, to showcase the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University's Depar...

Profile for mag325
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