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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016

a publicat

youth & lust ISSUE NO. 16


mad sounds a publication for the young and daring

Giselle Melendres Editor-in-Chief, Creative Director, & Designer madsoundsmagazine@gmail.com Staff Writers Zoe Allen, Brindy Francis, Emily Zheng, Justin Tilton Staff Photographers Sheridan Dyches, Willow Greene, Arvin Rusanganwa, Aidan Doyle, Rai Utomo, Riley Donahue A Special Thanks To.... Pamela Lau, Sam Weir, @eatglitter, & Olivia Bossert

ON THE COVER Photography by Pam Lau Featuring Taylor Farquhar


stay rad, stay mad @madsoundsmag www.madsoundsmag.com @madsoundsmag


contents contents

photography by STEFAN TROTMAN featuring TATIANA VARCHOLA


introduction 004 mad sounds staff & contributors 011 a letter from the editor photo journals 010 i'll see you in my dreams by KATE OPRE 030 are you in a film or in reality? by SABRINA WINGATE 044 we try but we don't fit in by RILEY DONAHUE 056 when she's looking at you by SHERIDAN DYCHES 072 nobody does it like you do by WILLOW GREENE 086 heavenly, celestial, ethereal by RAI UTOMO editorials 086 an old soul living in a modern world by BRINDY FRANCIS 088 changing the stima against creative careers by EMILY ZHENG 088 thoughts on fear by JUSTIN TILTON interviews 104 PAM LAU 122 OLIVIA BOSSERT 132 @EATGLITTER x FETE 150 SAM WEIR x 80mercer.com


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YOUTH & LUST

PAM LAU

TAYLOR FARQUHAR Within our August/September issue of Mad Sounds, we're highlighting four incredible creatives whose work I am so grateful to be featuring in our magazine. I chose these creatives for a few reasons, mostly comprising of their amazing talent, but also their ability to capture moments, culture, and instances of youth within all of their creative outlets.

These creatives are talented in unique and incredible ways, but share the commonality of expressing themselves and identifying who they are through this process of creating. The theme of this issue is Youth and Lust, and I think these four have encompassed this idea of youth and culture through inspiring methods of design, art, and creative thinking.

In this issue we're featuring Olivia Bossert,: editor-in-chief of Atlas Magazine, Sam Weir: founder and creative director of 80mercer.com, @eatglitter: the designer of our favorite intimates line, Fete, and lastly Pamela Lau, a commercial and lifestyle photographer whose photos of youths have seen the face of her own self-published photobook: "Bbblue".

I'm so excited to be sharing this new issue of Mad Sounds with you, and to be featuring these artists whose work I've admired for so long, and I hope you fall in love with these artists the same way I have. Stay creative, inspired, and ever-curious, and enjoy this month's issue of Mad Sounds! Giselle Melendres Founding Editor-in-Chief & Creative Director

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photography by KATE OPRE featuring MARIA ALVAREZ & RILEY DONAHUE


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photography by KATE OPRE featuring MARIA ALVAREZ & RILEY DONAHUE


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are you in a film or in reality? photography by SABRINA WINGATE featuring SUFIA AHMAD


photography by SABRINA WINGATE featuring LUNDY ANNE


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photography by SABRINA WINGATE featuring @SABWEENS


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we try but we don’t fit in photography by RILEY DONAHUE featuring REDDEA MCMILLAN

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photography by RILEY DONAHUE featuring REDDEA MCMILLAN


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photography by SHERIDAN DYCHES featuring LEXI B (@belexib) makeup by RACHEL STEPHENS

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photography by SHERIDAN DYCHES featuring LEXI B (@belexib) makeup by RACHEL STEPHENS


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photography by SHERIDAN DYCHES featuring LEXI B (@belexib) makeup by RACHEL STEPHENS


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nobody does it like you do photography by WILLOW GREENE featuring WILLOW GREENE & MICHAEL C. TYLER


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photography by WILLOW GREENE featuring WILLOW GREENE & MICHAEL C. TYLER


photography by RAI UTOMO featuring SOPHIE BELL & KRISTINA LEGGAS


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photography by RAI UTOMO featuring KRISTINA LEGGAS


photography by RAI UTOMO featuring SOPHIE BELL


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an old soul living in a modern world

editorial by BRINDY FRANCIS

photography by KATE OPRE featuring

MARIA ALVAREZ


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Of course you’ve noticed the trendy vintage clothes lately. Everyone’s trying to time travel back to the 70’s. Even record players and film cameras are coming back. Is your heart still in the old days when mom jeans first arose, but stuck in the modern days? Are you yearning to be another Penny Lane?

less amount of bands now and we can download them in just one click. Technologyhas reached a very high peak. It’s all at our fingertips. We want to have to work for it. It takes the creativity out of everything. Yes, we are so lucky to have what we do now, but doesn’t it take away the fun? Kids don’t have to search around the neighborhood to look for their friends anymore. They just Facebook message them. We no longer have to sneak cameras into concerts. We just take our phones out and snap a picture. The world has lost their sense of communication.

You can be that old soul and still live happily in this day and age. I know you wish we could go back to a time when social media wasn’t even a sparkle in someone’s eye and when all your news was found through the newspaper. I wish that, as well, but media has helped ustremendously and, in all reality, will never go You’re probably wondering what I am even away. It will only grow, so you have to take rambling about. My point is, the world is tryadvantage of that. ing so hard to be “vintage”, but all they’re doing is buying old things. To be an old soul, live You can still do a lot that you could have in, like one. When you see someone you slightly say, 1981. You can buy film cameras and get know in public, don’t ignore them and text them developed very easily. Typewriters and them later that you saw them. Go up to them records are still being sold. We can still live and talk to them. I am not trying to tell you to life with little technology and old technology dress in old clothes and listen to Pink Floyd on at that, but I believe the thing we thrive for the a record player. I’m telling you to not let the most is the revolution from the 60’s-70’s. media take advantage of you. Disconnect every once in awhile and go on big adventures. In the 60’s, big changes were being made and everyone was fighting for rights and for what No matter what, the world will keep spinning. they believed in. Music took a big leap and Do not try to live in the past, but do try to not became something the entire youth commu- let the modern world consume you. You don’t nity began to lean on. Rock and roll began to need a Twitter unless you want one. Nothing take its toll. Bands like Led Zeppelin and The is holding you back from talking to that cute Ramones turned the world into something barista or telling that pretty girl at a concert completely new. that you want to be her friend. Yes, the aesthetics of the 1970’s were to die for, but the That’s what we are yearning for, right? We best part of the era was the fearless attitude want the time when everything was new: mu- the world had. sic, technology, speaking out. There are end-

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fighting the stigma against creative careers

editorial by EMILY ZHENG

photography by KATE OPRE featuring

MEGHAN OPRE


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Sorry mom, I'm just not a doctor. Or a lawyer, a scientist, a mathematician, any profession you could possibly want me to pursue. This is when you look at me with your furrowed brows and fearful eyes. That's right, I want to be a writer. The confusion of my peers when I tell them this is practically tangible. I hear, "But you're so smart," implying that only rash, senseless people go after creative careers. I am fully aware that I could easily pursue a job for the "successful" and make lots of money. I'm just not going to. We're taught to chase our dreams. Do what makes us happy. When we actually follow that advice though, we're berated, "Oh, but not that dream. Choose this one to pursue." I grew up believing that I could accomplish anything I put my mind to. Now, as I'm applying to colleges, I'm being conditioned to believe that my aspirations are worthless, a barren desert amidst everyone else's lush rainforests. I recently scheduled an introductory meeting with a college counselor (I have now decided that I will not be getting one). I told her that I want to pursue writing and she replied, "I think you should starting looking at other options. Never expect your art to pay you." I frowned. But why shouldn't I? Yes, I would write regardless of a paycheck, but I spend hours at my computer dreaming of ideas. I practically bleed stories. I shouldn't anticipate a future on the streets, struggling with basic necessities, just because words are my choice of weapon. We want movies to watch, books to read, paintings to hang in our houses, but we don't expect to give these creatives any compensation. We scoff at prospective artists, but we still want to consume their work. I tell my peers, "I want to be a writer." They laugh,

"Good luck" as they rave about their favorite TV show, written by a screenwriter. I was talking to one of my friends about career goals and she told me, "So I may not end up loving my job, but I care more about money. I like nice things, you know?" I gave her a concerned shrug at the time, but her words have stuck with me. The most expensive currency is time. I don't intend to spend mine pining for a job that will leave me wondering, "Is this all my life will ever be?" I understand that making money is a valid concern, but I don't want to be 65, about to retire, and realize that I have not truly lived. Creatives may not save lives with surgery but we save lives through hope. I know how important basic necessities are, but as someone who used to think that better days would never come, I recognize how powerful hope can be. When it comes down to it, I'm a storyteller. I share stories that have been hidden in the dark, that have yet to be told. I'll write eon long, stream of consciousness emails to my friends about anything and everything to articles such as this one, that have been edited and rewritten countless times. Sometimes, poetry will just hit me - in the shower, in the middle of class, in a grocery store - and I'll excitedly pull out my phone to jot down my thoughts. Sometimes, I'll spontaneously decide that I'm tired of writing and stop mid-sentence. There is no rhyme or reason to how I create my art. All I know is that writing is everything to me, my fire on a cold, lifeless night. Tell me that I'll be broke someday. Joke about how I'll work at a fast food restaurant until death. Roll your eyes when I discuss my creative projects. But do not, for even a second, think that I will stop chasing after what you are too afraid to even consider.

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thoughts on fear

editorial by JUSTIN TILTON

photography by

SHERIDAN DYCHES featuring

LEXI B (@belexib)


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As long as I can remember, I’ve always been overtly aware that there will be a day when my existence ceases. For whatever reason that thought has never scared me. Rather, it’s been an instrument to challenge and a fuel to help me work for a life that I’m proud of. I figure I’m about a quarter of the way through my life. The recognition of that has led me to realize one thing: I do not want to live any portion of my life trapped by fear. Instead, I am determined my only guide will be my lust for experience and my determination to be able to look back on a life that I have pride and satisfaction in. I can’t imagine a concept as counterproductive as that of fear. Essentially, this occurs when the idea of a worst case scenario consumes the mind and paralyzes it into a standstill. As can be imagined, when this occurs, that scenario which was so dreaded usually ends up playing out in front of you for no reason other than that fear enabled it. Fear’s a demon. It’s for that that reason I’ve determined I will never say no to an opportunity or an occurrence that appeals to me because of fear or uncertainty. I will say “yes” without knowing the outcome or where it lead me. As someone who enjoys the concept of certainty, saying “yes” without a guarantee terrifies me. I grew up with the idea that “dreams” weren’t attainable. Rather, they were a youthful novelty that would end up leading to nothing but disappointment. As someone who is too rational for his own good, I would always put my dreams to the back of my head as a kid. It’s not until recently that I realized dreams are not a form of naivety. I've noticed that as everyone around me has been growing older they have slowly pushed their dreams to the back of their heads for the sake of comfort and the fear of failure. I’ve realized we find replacements for our dreams and ways too numb our minds into contentment. The sad part is we typically only realize what

we’ve done once we’re so committed to our numb lives to ever change them. As cliché as it is, I know I only have one life. It’s scary, and it’s passing by more quickly than I could have ever imagined. I don’t know a lot, but I do know I don’t want to be forty-five and wish I had done more as a youth. Luckily, I’m the only person in charge of making sure that doesn’t end up being the case. I plan on doing what I desire and living in the moment without any knowledge of where it will take me. The only thing that is enabling me to mentally be able to do that is the abandonment of the idea that not having an established plan in counterproductive to being a responsible adult. Instead, I’ve learned it is a way of living that will lead me to grow up more quickly than anything else. I do have a few conditions for myself: I will grow, I will learn, I will work hard, I will make my parents proud, I will make myself proud, I will challenge myself ,I will do well for myself, and I will do it on my terms. I will not accept anything else because I know that each day that passes will never return. I don’t know where my life is leading me. As a college student graduating in just a few months, I have never felt that the world has been so accessible, but I have also never felt more temptation to avoid my lust for the world. There is so much temptation to be “responsible” and make a good use of the education I’ve been given. The only question I have is whether or not my education would be better served by following the lusts that have been engrained in my heart. I don’t know, but I’m determined to find out.

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PAM LAU interview by GISELLE MELENDRES photography by PAM LAU

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photography by PAM LAU featuring ILONA FIDDY


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Meet Pam Lau, a Toronoto based commercial lifestyle photographer and content creator whose photos have seen the face of Nike, American Express, and many more. When I discovered Pam's photography, there was a captivating sense of honesty within her photos. She wasn't just any commercial photographer. From the clean lines, to the open spaces, her photos dripped with a particualr rawness that we often lose within perfectly curated advertisements and commercial photos. Today, we sat down to talk to Pam about her journey into the photography world, and her advice for aspiring for photographers and creatives. Read on to learn more about our new favorite photographer: Pam Lau. HI PAM, THANKS FOR SITTING DOWN WITH US HERE AT MAD SOUNDS TODAY. TO START OFF, TELL US ABOUT A DAY IN THE LIFE OF PAM LAU: I divide them into “In” or “Out” days. On “In” days, I bike over to Lunchroom in the morning, a space I work out of. I skim through my log of every project I have (about 10-20 at a time in various stages of completion) and jot down a to-do list for the day. Then it’s headfirst into researching and writing proposals, preparing call sheets and planning upcoming shoots, invoicing, and lots of editing. On “Out” days I’m travelling to a location or studio for a shoot. I’m shooting about 2-5 times a week, sometimes two jobs in one day. I’ll also be meeting with clients or potential leads, scouting locations, and making frequent trips to camera stores to develop film or rent equipment. YOU’RE CURRENTLY BASED IN TORONTO, CANADA: HOW DO YOU LIKE LIVING THERE? I really like my city. Despite the growing cost of living and long winters, it’s still home. There is a good energy here of young people who are community-minded, who are going after what they believe in. I look around and many of my

peers are making moves in art, film, design and music. HOW DID YOUR FIRST GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY? At the beginning of high school I found my dad’s old film camera rummaging through my house one day. I started fooling around with it, taking pictures of my friends. I’d take the film to Walmart to get developed. Those early images were probably pretty blurry, but I was so proud of them. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO DO FILM PHOTOGRAPHY AS OPPOSED TO DIGITAL? I still do most of my client work on digital. There’s an ease, efficiency and practicality to it. For personal projects, I opt for film for a number of reasons. I work well within its limitations. When travelling I found that I used the tools most mobile and accessible (being film and my phone camera) and I stopped lugging around my more-heavier, more-cumbersome DSLR. I find that I don’t have to do much post-processing with film; it already has the colours and grain that I want. That way I don’t feel guilty editing personal work at times when I’ve got so much client work on the docket.

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photography by PAM LAU featuring MIKA ZHANE


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“Too much inspiration can be immobilizing. You feel like every concept’s been done to death. Or worse, that there is no point in trying because you feel that there are so many people who are doing it better than you.”

WHAT DREW YOU TO FASHION AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY? Fashion and advertising are industries where experimentation is not only applauded; it’s expected. I feed off of the energy of those around me and I like to collaborate with people who are enthusiastic about what they do, both on the client and production side. I’m most excited and in my element on set. TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE ROLE OF FASHION IN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY, ARE YOU INVOLVED IN STYLING AND CURATING THE CLOTHING USED IN YOUR PHOTOS? If I’m shooting fashion I’ll send out a moodboard as a starting point for the model’s poses, the MUA’s hair and makeup and the stylist’s looks. If there isn’t a stylist on the team, I’ll be involved in picking out the model’s fits and adjusting on set. When I shoot for brands I try to make sure there’s at least some cohesion between my style and how they want their products to be portrayed.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION FOR YOUR PHOTOS?

YOU’VE SHOT FOR NAMES SUCH AS NIKE, AMERICAN EXPRESS, AND PEACE COLLECTIVE: WHAT WAS IT LIKE WORKING WITH SUCH BIG COMPANIES?

I used to draw a lot of inspiration from photographers I admired that I found through art blogs or Instagram. Now that I have a bit more of my own style that comes out more naturally I’m starting to distance myself from using too many direct references and limiting the amount of media I consume in general. Too much inspiration can be immobilizing. You feel like every concept’s been done to death. Or worse, that there is no point in trying because you feel that there are so many people who are doing it better than you.

Big companies tend to have specific international style guidelines for what aligns with their brand. There are also more agency people involved and since there are more touch points of communication, they value flexibility and fast turnaround. Clients are usually on set. It’s a prerogative to keep them informed and ask for feedback throughout the process so that they’re not surprised about what they see when you send the end product. Smaller clients will lean on you more to provide direction and take on more roles if they don’t have anyone

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photography by PAM LAU featuring TAYLOR / PEGGI LEPAGE MODELS


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“I was looking for rawness in the portraits of these young women. I wanted it to be more about a window into the personality of each of the girls, which is why each of the images are labelled with the subject’s name.”

HOW DID YOU DECIDE UPON THE MODELS FOR BBBLUE? I found most of them on Instagram, through other users and photographers I follow. A lot of them had never modelled before, which worked for this project because I was looking for rawness in the portraits of these young women. I wanted it to be more about a window into the personality of each of the girls, which is why each of the images are labelled with the subject’s name. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT TO USE? My trusty Pentax K-1000. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOSHOOT COLLAB YOU’VE DONE THUS FAR? Can’t say - I’m most excited about what’s next.

in-house to do tasks like art direction, location scouting, casting, styling, etc.

I ALSO UNDERSTAND YOU SHOT YOUR OWN PHOTO BOOK, “BBBLUE”, A PHOTO SERIES OF 24 GIRLS SHOT WITH 24 ROLLS OF FILM. WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO CREATE THIS PHOTO BOOK? Outside of work and occasionally documenting parts of my personal life, it never actually occurred to me to orchestrate shoots purely for myself until about two years ago. I wanted build up a series. Something that would keep me focused in between doing all my short-term commissioned jobs as a freelancer.

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“Try to be true to your personality and values. Over time you will start to shoot more of what you like and less of what you don’t like and a style will emerge naturally.” WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO EVOKE TO YOUR VIEWERS WITHIN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? To see and understand the world as I see it. To show a diverse perspective in Western media as a female and visible minority.

IN YOUR OPINION: WHAT MAKES A GOOD PHOTO? It has very little to do with what type of camera or gear you use. At the end of the day, it’s a form of communication. If you have a photograph that was created just for the intention of being technically perfect, that’s all that it will ever be. I tend to gravitate towards images that feel like they are an honest product of its creator. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO ASPIRING PHOTOGRAPHERS AND CREATIVES? Talent is just one component of being a photographer. It’s a balance of being playful and pragmatic. How you treat others will come back to you. And yes, “doing what you love” also involves sometimes doing mundane tasks. Popularity on social media is not an end goal. It’s a platform. If you want to make a living from your art you need to be business-minded. Consider your audience and how you can provide value to them. Having a style becomes lost if it’s too objective and calculated. Rather than trying to emulate famous photographers, try to be true to your personality and values. Over time you will start to shoot more of what you like and less of what you don’t like and a style will emerge naturally.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN FIVE YEARS? I have a few checkpoints on my bucket list. I’d like to do a residency in a different country, to direct a music video, to put out more products, to do more mentoring…

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photography by PAM LAU featuring CHETHI


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photography by PAM LAU featuring CHLOE SUGAR

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photography by PAM LAU featuring ALEXA STEELE


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photography by PAM LAU featuring TORI MARTYN


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OLIVIA BOSSERT interview by GISELLE MELENDRES featuring OLIVIA BOSSERT

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photography LIZZIE CHURCHILL featuring OLIVIA BOSSERT


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Meet Olivia Bossert, a Cornwall based fashion photographer, blogger, and the editor-in-chief of international fashion publication: Atlas Magazine. I first met Olivia in San Francisco at the issuu Generators Camp and fell in love with her publication, Atlas Magazine. Today, I’m sitting down with Olivia to discuss the founding of Atlas, and her creative inspiration behind both the publication and her lifestyle blog, oliviablogs.com. Read Olivia’s interview to learn more about Atlas Magazine, and her journey into the world of fashion and publishing. HI OLIVIA, THANKS FOR SITTING DOWN WITH US HERE AT MAD SOUNDS TODAY. TO START OFF, TELL US ABOUT A DAY IN THE LIFE OF OLIVIA BOSSERT: Hey! Thanks so much for having me, I’m excited! Well, a day in my life is never quite the same day to day, but somethings remain pretty similar. One, I’ve always got Atlas on my mind. Two, there’s always a lot of fashion photography involved. And three, I hate sitting still. Ironic when you work on a mainly internet based business, but hey ho, I make it work! YOU ARE THE CO-FOUNDER AND EDITORIN-CHIEF OF ATLAS MAGAZINE, CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HOW ATLAS CAME TO BE? Atlas was founded just over four years ago by myself and Megan Breukelman. Megan and I are both fashion photographers, and at the time were students in university. Megan was in Florida at the time, and I was in Cornwall. It was the summer holidays, and we were both bored, and somehow became really close friends thanks to Facebook. We bonded over our love for photography, magazines and everything creative in general.

We threw some names around, Atlas sounded best, and before we knew it we’d put a call out for submissions. We had no idea what we were doing, and didn’t have any real expectations for it; we were just having fun. In September 2012 we released our first issue, and from that point on we’ve released at least 4 issues a year ever since. AS THE EDITOR-IN- CHIEF, WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES, AND WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART ABOUT RUNNING THE PUBLICATION? As Editor in Chief, I’m in charge of making sure that everything to do with the magazine is running smoothly. Whether that’s ensuring that the content goes out on the blog every day on time, or that we’ve got great work within the pages of the magazine, or that the team know what they’re doing, everything goes through me. My favourite part is obviously anything to do with the imagery. I’m obsessed with fashion photography, and that obsession is what keeps me excited about running Atlas ever day. We receive so much incredible work every day, that I find myself inspired by my own publication. I love that!

One crazy day, we were chatting and thought it would be a really good idea to start a magazine!

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photography OLIVIA BOSSERT featuring ATLAS MAGAZINE


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“Knowing that all of our hard work has paid off, and that people have been able to pick up a copy of the magazine anywhere in the world… nothing feels better than that.” DO YOU HAVE A ‘DREAM’ CITY WHERE YOU COULD SEE YOURSELF WORKING? Honestly, no. The closest I could ever dream of living in a city would be Geneva, in Switzerland, where I’m from originally. I’m too much of an outdoors-ey person to see myself being able to cope with the life of a big city. WHY DID YOU AND MEGAN BREUKELMAN DECIDE TO PURSUE FASHION AS THE FOCUS OF YOUR MAGAZINE? Purely because of our love for fashion photography. It’s what interested us the most, what we were most drawn to, and what we felt we knew best.

HOW DO YOU COLLABORATE WITH PHOTOGRAPHERS AND DESIGNERS ON PHOTOSHOOTS AND EDITORIALS FOR ATLAS? Atlas is 100% submission based. That means that all the work that you see in the magazine and on our website is imagery that we have been sent by photographers and designers from around the world. When we first started out, we would reach out to a lot of our photographer friends, telling them about our project and ask them if they were interested in submitting. Thankfully, people did! Slowly but surely, word has spread. Now we receive thousands of submissions per issue! WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION FOR THE ISSUES OF ATLAS MAGAZINE? The inspiration is always drawn from the themes, which we come up with ahead of time. Then we’ll chat as a team and come up with a few ideas of what that theme means to us, and how we could interpret it. As for how we come up with the themes.. it’s a lot of random word generators and then we write down the words we like the most, and choose the themes as a team from there! ATLAS IS NOW AN INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ONLINE AND PRINT PUBLICATION--WHAT WAS IT LIKE TO SEE YOUR PUBLICATION ON SHELVES AT POPULAR BOOKSTORES SUCH AS BARNES AND NOBLES, ETC.? It’s been the most incredible feeling in the world. Knowing that all of our hard work has paid off, and that people have been able to pick up a copy of the magazine anywhere in the world… nothing feels better than that.

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photography OLIVIA BOSSERT featuring @yasminandleela


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“I wanted people to know that there was more to me than just the magazine. That might sound crazy, but it was how I was feeling at the time.” WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE PUBLICATIONS? Oh god, hard question. So many! I spend too much money on magazines each month. I love the classic, commercial magazines such as British Vogue, Elle, and Glamour. I love Women’s Health, purely because I love to live a healthy lifestyle. But then I also adore Lula, Violet, Cereal, So It Goes and In Clover Magazine. I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT YOU HAVE A BLOG SITE: OLIVIABLOGS.COM, WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO START A BLOG?

started blogs hundreds of times throughout my life, but they’d never stuck. For some reason, this one has, and I’ve enjoyed it so much so far. I love the freedom to be able to write about whatever I want, whenever I want. I was finding that due to Atlas’ success, that I was getting a bit lost. I was becoming Atlas and I wanted people to know that there was more to me than just the magazine. That might sound crazy, but it was how I was feeling at the time. YOU’RE ALSO A FASHION AND WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER: WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE TYPES OF PHOTOGRAPHY TO SHOOT? Atlas was started because at the core, I’m a photographer. I first picked up a camera when I was 15, and it was love at first sight really. I adore shooting anything fashion related, but recently I’ve discovered the bridal editorial world. I don’t know quite how I missed it, but it turns out that there has been a bridal editorial scene for years, and I had no idea! I’ve got such a love for anything feminine, romantic and pretty. Bridal editorial lets me go all out with my princess fantasies, while keeping my fashion hat on. Similarly, I adore wedding photography because of my romantic, lovey dovey side. I love watching people from a distance, and capturing their happiest moments (that sounds creepy - I swear it’s not!). Photography allows me to freeze time, and it makes me feel a bit like a magician! The couples whose weddings I photograph will be able to look back on their happiest day, thanks to me.

Yes, I do! I started my blog in the summer of 2015, mainly because I had so many other passions and interests that had nothing to do with Atlas, and that I wanted to share/talk about. I’d

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“The best advice I could ever give you is to just do it. If I had thought about how much work would have been involved, or how ‘I couldn’t do it’ for a second when we started Atlas, I never would have.”

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR ASPIRING EDITORS, HOPING TO CREATE THEIR OWN ONLINE PUBLICATIONS? The best advice I could ever give you is to just do it. If I had thought about how much work would have been involved, or how “I couldn’t do it” for a second when we started Atlas, I never would have. Also, don’t put too much pressure on yourself. Make sure that you’re doing it because it’s fun, not because you’re hoping to be a famous editor. If those are your reasons, you’ll never manage because you won’t have the drive that fun brings you. Just do it, and have fun!

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN FIVE YEARS? WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO BE DOING? In five years, I’d really love to continue working on Atlas, with a bigger team, helping fashion creatives to be discovered even further. I’d also love to be shooting big bridal campaigns for some of the most beautiful wedding dress designers. If I could be doing both of those things, whilst still living in Cornwall, I’d be the happiest girl alive. OUTSIDE OF BLOGGING AND ATLAS, WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE THINGS TO DO? I love exercise. I know that’s a huge cliché, but as I said earlier, I hate sitting still for too long. I’ve been a horse rider all my life, and I try to workout at least 5 times a week. I do a mix of boxing, spinning, running, weight lifting, yoga, and stand up paddleboarding!

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KEEP UP WITH OLIVIA: Instagram: @oliviabossert @theatlasmagazine facebook.com/oliviabossertphotography facebook.com/theatlasmagazine oliviabossert.com oliviablogs.com theatlasmagazine.com


champagne for breakfast interview by GISELLE MELENDRES featuring @EATGLITTER styling by FETE


photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS


photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS


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Meet @eatglitter, the designer and ‘dauphine’ of dreamy intimates brand, FETE. Based in sunny Los Angeles, Fete’s goal is to inspire your personal style, with convertible staples made for staying in bed all day or partying all night long. Today, we sat down to talk to @eatglitter about the creation of Fete, and her inspiration behind her enchanting designs. Read on to learn more about the creative mind behind xfete.co, and her journey into the world of fashion and design. THANKS FOR SITTING DOWN WITH US HERE AT MAD SOUNDS TODAY. TO START OFF, TELL US ABOUT A DAY IN THE LIFE OF @EATGLITTER: Wake up, take a bath, a few minutes of kundalini, make an acai bowl. (Please don’t talk to me before coffee). After that every day is different but usually - emails, meetings, then come back to the office and work until evening. Then I love cooking a fancy dinner and spending time with my boyfriend Michael and my dogs! YOU’RE CURRENTLY BASED IN LOS ANGELES, WHAT IS IT LIKE LIVING THERE? The weather is great here. and the sunsets are totally magical. But the culture is soul-sucking; you really have to work hard to make it a safe, inspiring place for yourself, and surround yourself with the right people. I think that’s true just about anywhere though in one way or another. My home is my favorite place to be, I don’t leave often. HOW WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED INTO THE WORLD OF FASHION? I had a hard time in school socially - maybe one or two friends. Went to an all-girls school and got a lot of shit, and home life was really rough.

Clothing became my outlet--if I was feeling down, I just put on something that made me feel amazing and it gave me the confidence I needed to get me through the day. I participated in a student run fashion show that benefitted “Suited for Change”, an organization that helps women in tough situations get dressed for interviews to better their lives. That’s when I realized, “I could really help someone with this!”. So at 16 I started interning for Neiman Marcus. They didn’t know I was under 18...and didn’t figure it out until after they had already hired me! WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO START A CLOTHING BRAND OF YOUR OWN? I came to this planet to inspire self-love in women. Right now, my way of doing that is through clothing. I’ve discovered for myself a sort of luxury in wearing something fancy when I’m all alone. It’s that feeling of freedom, of confidence and femininity, of feeling completely yourself-it’s the sexiest feeling in the world! And I want to give that to other women. I feel that a big part of why we experience things is so that we can help others learn them, too. Plus, I’m not someone who can effectively work in an office, or for someone else. Just ask any of my previous bosses! Ha. It’s just not me: so I set myself up for success by creating my own job.

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“We keep them close to our hearts, displayed in our closets…It’s the only means we have of external expression of who we are to those we can’t speak to. How who we are, or who we want to be, translates visually.” HOW DID THE NAME ‘FETE’ COME TO BE? Fete is “party” in french. It’s the perfect name for our little dresses and knickers! The brand is inspired by the “fete champetre”, or garden party, popular in the time of Marie Antoinette and baroque artists like Fragonard. HOW HAS LIVING IN L.A. INFLUENCED YOUR CREATIVE WORK? Living in L.A. has definitely changed the way I think about clothes. It’s casual, kind of grab and go. On the one hand, it’s summer forever, so I tend to design with that in mind. On the other, girls wear fur coats when it’s 60 degrees-- so warm fluffy things are pretty essential too. Creatively, it’s drawn my attention to the superficial, and how that translates in a more spiritu-

al way. Like, we get to experience the world in these clothes that we wear, yes they are material things, but we keep them close to our hearts, displayed in our closets…It’s the only means we have of external expression of who we are to those we can’t speak to. How who we are, or who we want to be, translates visually. AS A DESIGNER, WHERE DO YOU FIND YOUR CREATIVE INSPIRATION? Dreams mostly, day dreams, I’m usually thinking about some really beautiful place on this planet I would like to visit, and then I think about what I would wear there. Little details are what inspire me, I’m always staring at the sky or finding tiny birds or butterflies or flowers and I think that translates in the way I design. WHO IS YOUR PERSONAL STYLE ICON? I don’t have style icons or things like that. I do really love yoko ono, but more for who she is than anything else. WHAT WAS THE MOST CHALLENGING ASPECT OF STARTING YOUR OWN BRAND? I think that changes every season. As you grow, bigger and more difficult issues arise, and you just have to tackle them head on and sometimes you figure it out as you go. I think the biggest lesson I have learned is that I really can make this work on my own. For a while I was convinced I NEEDED external help, whether it was money or advice or consulting or whatever. Ultimately though I realized that when I think creatively, choose to be resourceful, I surprise myself by how well I can handle things alone. So… trust yourself. If you want to make it happen, you will find a way.

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“There’s a sort of luxury in dressing up fancy just for yourself, home alone. It’s a self-love thing, something special you do just for yourself… and I want to give that feeling to women.” WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE FROM YOUR LINE?

This is a hard one!! It changes every season. Right now I would have to say the Love Angeles playsuit (this is the ultimate Fete piece!), the Little Bubble Dress from our first season, or the Brigita Dress from fw16. I’m also freaking out over the things I’ve been working on for next spring, I’m so excited to wear them. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LOOKBOOK THAT YOU HAVE DONE FOR FETE THUS FAR?

WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION BEHIND “STARCHILD” FOR FETE SS15? The range was inspired by an angel friend of mine. I’m always inspired by ballerinas and Versailles. I’m in the business of making you feel fancy! CAN YOU GIVE US A PREVIEW OF WHAT’S TO COME FOR THE NEXT FETE SEASON? FW16 has a really special silk fabric with little rainbow metallic sparkles, it’s amazing. Looks like unicorn silk! DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR ASPIRING DESIGNERS AND CREATIVE MINDS HOPING TO BREAK INTO THE INDUSTRY? Be aggressive, go after what you want--you will find a way to make it happen so believe in yourself and get as much practice as possible. Learn everything inside and out (best advice is to work for a company you respect similar to one you’d like to start)... stand by your morals, your integrity will keep you going mentally. AS A DESIGNER, WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO EVOKE THROUGH YOUR WORK? My job on this planet is to inspire self-love in women, to help them feel confident and beautiful and fancy! There’s a sort of luxury in dressing up fancy just for yourself, home alone. It’s a self-love thing, something special you do just for yourself… and I want to give that feeling to women.

I really loved Starchild, our second season. that’s probably my favorite. Or La Dolce Vita, because that’s the first one I shot myself.

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KEEP UP WITH @EATGLITTER: Instagram: @eatglitter / @fete xfete.co


the white rabbit photography by KIMBERLY GORDON

starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS


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photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS

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photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS

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photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS

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photography by KIMBERLY GORDON starring JUJU IVANYUK styling by @eatglitter/FETE beauty by JULIE BROOKS

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SAM WEIR x

80mercer.com interview by GISELLE MELENDRES featuring SAM WEIR


NO. 16 — YOUTH & LUST

Meet Sam Weir, a New York based creative who is taking the world of fashion and editorial by storm. She's the founder and creative director of 80mercer.com, the expanding online platform innovating unique and high-quality editorials, inspired by clothing that is accessible to all. Each editorial is both directed and styled by Sam, and today, we had the opportunity to talk to her about the inspiration for her creative ideas, her YouTube Channel, and her tips on how to break into the competitive world of the fashion industry. Read on to learn more about Sam, and the creation of 80mercer. HI SAM, THANKS FOR TALKING TO US HERE AT MAD SOUNDS TODAY. TO START OFF, CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT A TYPICAL DAY FOR SAM WEIR? Of course. Thank you for having me! Well, it’s always different depending on which platform I am creating for on that specific day. If it’s my website, I am usually on set, running around New York City with huge garnmet bags of clothes. If it’s a video project, I am in front of the camera, teaching people about brands or specific sectors of the industry. Whatever I am doing, it’s in pursuit of creating something new. YOU’RE CURRENTLY BASED IN NEW YORK CITY: WHEN DID YOU MOVE THERE AND HOW DO YOU LIKE THE NY SCENE? I officially moved to New York City a little over a year ago but I’ve lived 30 minutes outside of New York my entire life so it’s always been a second home to me. Honestly, everyone should move to New York once in their life. It’s the most amazing, inspiring and fast paced home. I work harder here then anywhere else but I also have the most fun. I’ve traveled the world and there is nothing like New York City.

HOW DID YOU FIRST START YOUR WEBSITE, 80MERCER.COM? I had the idea brewing for a while. I waited months until actually acting upon it because I wanted to make sure I had my vision defined. I then created the website with WordPress or some platform like that and did a few shoots before I launched it and now I’m here. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CATEGORY TO CREATE CONTENT FOR? I know this isn’t the answer you wanted but I love all my categories! Fashion is probably my favorite because it’s where most of the work goes into and seeing the product is the most amazing feeling. But I also love sharing my current favorite art pieces and creating short films! WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION FOR YOUR POSTS? I can get an idea from the littlest of things. A specific location, a lifestyle, a color. I love looking at past decades or films. I try to open my eyes to all forms of creation and I often find what I’m looking for.

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“I’ve learned a lot from trial and errors. So indirectly, I’ve learned a lot from myself. But I have done a few internships and worked with stylists I look up to. Each job I do I try to learn something new. It’s a process.” WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE STORES TO SHOP AT WHILE CURATING OUTFITS FOR 80MERCER.COM? I love using up and coming designers which you are about to see a lot more of on my website. As an up and comer myself I wish to support those who are going through the same struggle. I also love shopping at vintage shops or stores such as & Other Stories.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE AND LEAST FAVORITE TREND AT THE MOMENT? I don’t pay attention to trends but I love a great skinny scarf. Hmmm… I don’t know I hate that people all dress alike now a days. That’s not a trend but I don’t like how people follow trends so closely. CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS? HOW DO YOU AVOID CREATIVE BLOCKS? It’s really organic and fun. I have all my ideas for shoots in a book. I filp through and pick out which one I’m feeling. I look at inspiring images and flip through editorials from lets say the 70s. I let my eyes do the work when I am pulling clothing. I then line up all the clothes I pick for my shoot on clothing racks and spend 3-4 hours trying on outfits until I find my final product! If I’m ever feeling stuck I just look at images that inspire me and I know will bring my mind back to life. WHO HAVE YOU LEARNED THE MOST FROM IN YOUR CAREER THUS FAR? ANY MENTORS? I’ve learned a lot from trial and errors. So indirectly, I’ve learned a lot from myself. But I have done a few internships and worked with stylists I look up to. Each job I do I try to learn something new. It’s a process.

WHO IS YOUR PERSONAL STYLE ICON? I don’t have one. I appreciate people’s style but I don’t have an icon. I honestly don’t see the point.

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photography by CALLUM HUTCHINSON featuring SAM WEIR


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“If you want it badly work your ass off to make it happen. Use social media to your advantage and market yourself. Get internships and learn the ins and outs of an industry. If you are good, people will notice!” I ALSO UNDERSTAND YOU HAVE A YOUTUBE CHANNEL-- WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO CREATE A YOUTUBE CHANNEL IN ADDITION TO YOUR WEBSITE?

WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION BEHIND YOUR FASHION FILM, “FILM AT THE MUSEUM”? I think it was a play on the question ‘Is fashion considered art?’ which has been asked so much lately. I also loved the idea and contrast of us wearing sneakers in front of a classical Monet painting. It was really cool. ARE THERE ANY UPCOMING PROJECTS WE SHOULD BE ON THE LOOK FOR AT 80MERCER.COM? I have a lot of more editorials coming that are bigger then I’ve ever done before. More artistic I would say. A ton of new brands, models and amazing images. DO YOU HAVE ANY LAST ADVICE FOR ASPIRING CREATIVES HOPING TO BREAK INTO THE FASHION INDUSTRY? If you want it, make it work. I’m not trying to be blunt but it’s true. If you want it badly work your ass off to make it happen. Use social media to your advantage and market yourself. Get internships and learn the ins and outs of an industry. If you are good, people will notice!

I love the high fashion world, I really do. But I also love interaction with people who watch my videos or like my editorials, which is different for someone in fashion. Fashion rarely opens up to people who aren’t in that circle. I want to be in that circle but I also want to talk about it. Youtube is just another way I can interact with the people who like my stuff. I’ve also always loved videography so I decided why not.

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KEEP UP WITH SAM: Instagram: @80mercer YouTube: 80 Mercer 80mercer.com


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photography by JACK MAFFUCCI featuring SAM WEIR


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photography by CALLUM HUTCHINSON featuring SAM WEIR

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photography by JACK MAFFUCCI featuring SAM WEIR


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STAY TUNED there’s more mad sounds on the way! DO YOU WANT TO BE FEATURED? email madsoundsmagazine@gmail.com with a cover letter & link to your online portfolio not all submissions will be featured for publication

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Mad Sounds Magazine - Youth & Lust  

The 16th issue of Mad Sounds Magazine featuring interviews with FETE, Sam Weir, Pam Lau, and Olivia Bossert.

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