ALDILA' Official CATALOGUE

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C A T A L O G U E


Curated by Art Directors Carlo Greco and Alessandra Magni

Critical texts by Art Curators

Alessia Perone Alessia Procopio Alessia Ventola Alice Gaglio Alice Scaffai Beatrice Rabassini Camilla Gilardi Carola Antonioli Chiara Isella Chiara Rizzatti Claudia Sferrazza Elisabetta Eliotropio Erika Gravante Federica D’Avanzo Federica Schneck Flavia Montecchi Francesca Brunello Francesca Catarinicchia Giorgia Massari

Ilaria Falchetti Irene Delaude Karla Peralta Malaga Letizia Perrieri Lisa Galletti Manuela Fratar Mara Cipriano Maria Matilde della Pina Marta Graziano Martina Lattuca Martina Stagi Martina Viesti Sara Giannini Silvia Grassi Sofia Ronzi Valentina Valentini Vanessa viti Viola Provenzano


"What no one has ever dared to think of the afterlife is that it could be absolutely identical to where we are now." (Adam Phillips)

Aldilà. The other side of things, situations, places. Aldilà. An unknown place, a place that can only be accessed with the mind. Aldilà (beyond) is on the other side, on the other side of the wall, of an obstacle that must be overcome or as Schonehauer intended it is a world hidden by the deceptive veil of Maya. According to the philosopher, the human perception of reality is distorted, due to the veil presence, which does not allow man to see the true reality. In a passage of his essay entitled “The world as will and representation” he states that “It is Maya, the deceptive veil, which envelops the eyes of mortal and makes them see a world of which it can neither be said that it exists, nor that id does not exists; because she resembles the dream, resembles the reflection of the sun on the sand, which the pilgrim from afar mistakes for water, or it also resembles the rope thrown to the ground, which he takes for a snake”. This term should also be understood as rebirth, as change. It is the overcoming of an obstacle that leads to the abandonment of a previous situation and the beginning of a new adventure. The term “beyond” therefore presupposes the existence of two worlds, two elements, two places, two concepts and two opposing symbols. This leads us to ask ourselves: “What if the borders weren’t so clear? What if good and evil could be on one side of the barricare and on the other side there was a stranger beyond?”. This concept leads us to consider the essay “Beyond good and evil” by the Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In the second part of the essay the philosopher speaks of“Free Spirit”: for Nietzsche free spirits are thosewho investigate reality in such a profound way as to be almost cruel because they seek the truth even in something painful, so curious and implacably prosthetic with the heart towards the elusive.


In this sense it is interesting to consider the Socratic myth of the cave in which people are chained and do not have the possibility to turn their gaze to the light, condemned in this way to consider reality what the shadows project on the wall. But if one of them were able to free himself and look at the light, not only would he feel pain because his eyes are not accustomed to the light, but he would feel dismay and terror at seeing for the first time the cause of the images projected onto the wall and probably feel the visceral urge to return to darkness. At the same time, a man who has become aware that he has believed in a reality that he was not, and finally aware that he has freed himself from the chains of ignorance, will never be able to turn back, and although he is faced with an impervious and infinite road, will give up the temptation to return to darkness. The Socratic myth touches on a fundamental point: is the world in which we live real or is it just a wall that does not allow us to see the real reality? What if there’s a fantasy world we can’t access? And if there is, what does this world look like? Would it be possible to identify the afterlife with the concept of virtual? In the common sense the real is opposed to the virtual and if instead what is virtual is part of reality? As if the latter could not exist without the first. Virtual is all that is possible, reality is a manifestation of the possible, and with it also the afterlife. Husserl, founder philosopher of phenomenology, designates the study of phenomena in the philosophical sphere as they manifest themselves, in their appearance, to the intentional knowledge of the individual, regardless of external physical reality.


According to phenomenology no reality ever presents itself before us devoid of the abstract characterization provided by its virtuality. Many artists had asked themselves the same questions distorting reality and creating utopian worlds. First of all Surrealist who have make of their dreams their artworks: Salvador Dalì in “Dream caused by the flight of a bee around a pomegranate” that represents an irrational and unlikely world. Magritte with his paintings allows us to go over the visible seeing-through his subconscious as in “The false mirror” by means of the eye here represented or even in the most famous “La Trahison des images (ceci n’est pas une pipe)” in which the pipe is a representation of an image that goes over his appearance inviting us to a deep reflection. An additional movement that evolves in line of the same thought is the one followed by the Dadaism who used quotidian and objects to create their artworks cancelling their real essence. It is possible to affirm that art itself is beyond place. Its aim and the one of the artist too is to represent the world and its creation not as we can see it but in a personal interpretation. So we can say that art represents the artist’s reality; his truth; the world beyond the thin layer and that each of us want to reach. M.A.D.S. asks the artists who will participate in the event, to do the same, representing their imaginary world whatever they see it: a happy place or a perdition one; a place where they can meet their beloved or a place of renaissance. The duplicity of the word ‘beyond’ corresponds to a subjectivity meaning: every artist will explain the concept in a personal and fictional way thinking about parallel words. M.A.D.S. asks its artists to drop the Maya veil and show the public what it hides. Concept edited by Art Curators Massari Giorgia - graduated in Cultural Heritage Sciences Stagi Martina – graduated in Cultural Heritage Sciences Viesti Martina – graduated in Communication and Marketing


Special Guest Adriano Lombardo presents Consciousness in synchronization

Adriano Lombardo creates a multidimensional and sensorial work in which feelings, emotions and moods emerge energetically, capturing the observer's attention. In all this, it is clear that every expression, either of the artist or the viewer, blends with the forms present in the time-space continuum. (Alessia Perone) Everything is energy, atoms and molecules are in continuous movement, Adriano Lombardo’s art answers the questions that everyone is asking about the universe that surrounds us, he represents the thread that connects and keeps everything in perfect balance. (Alessia Procopio) Coloured lines, concentric circles, cerebral and cardiac pulsations, electromagnetic shocks: these are the distinctive features of Adriano Lombardo's art, as well as of his soul. (Alessia Ventola) Human and machine. Standstill and movement. We move in an eternal connection, unconscious of the space around us. Where are we? In the empty? In the blank? What are we when we move? The visionary artist Adriano Lombardo extends his philosophy in his art: science and spirit melt, human and machine think together, with one mind and one soul. We feel the energy of life flow through us and into us. (Alice Gaglio) Adriano Lombardo, a multifaceted artist with a great visual impact, his art touches the limits of the imagination and touches the surreal. Art for him means: knowledge and expression. (Alice Scaffai) We are agents in the world, we create from the matter that stays already in front of us. Adriano Lombardo feels the power of universal energy, showing it in his art, putting no limits in the choice of the media he uses. That’s the freedom of the Universe in a human body. (Beatrice Rabassini) The light illuminates the Space. Space captures the light and envelops us. The light of Space, therefore, passes through us. Adriano seeks his light, explores it and gives it shape. Capture it and grasp the essence. (Camilla Gilardi) As an avant-garde artist, Adriano analyzes our essence by digging deep inside. The human being in his complexity and the world he inhabits are the main interests, but even more important are the methods of communicating his thoughts: art as reflection, as teaching and as sharing. (Carola Antonioli) Power. Wisdom. Memory. Immortality. An elephant, in all its majesty, imposes its presence within a constantly moving cosmos, surrounded by constellations in the form of geometric elements and by filaments with purple hues that almost resemble the ribs or veins of the human body. Adriano Lombardo, through his Consciousness in synchronization, expresses the personal conviction that everything we see is nothing more than energy modeled in form through light, but also the inevitable relationship that has been taking place for years between man and technology. A female figure (a sort of bionic woman) goes to meet the elephant, expressing a contrast between nature and technological power, which is almost transforming us into machines destined perhaps to lose the uniqueness of our souls. (Chiara Isella)


Adriano Lombardo

Consciousness in synchronization


Adriano Lombardo The creation of Adriano Lombardo transports with an irresistible attraction in a suspended, dreamlike time. A dialogue between beams of light, which emerge from the darkness, an ineffable symptom of the awakening of a long-dormant conscience. From an incessant whirlwind of stars, kosmos, order, triumphs, breaking the rampant power of kaos. (Chiara Rizzatti) Soul and electromagnetic energy are the poles of attraction of the suggestive art of Adriano Lombardo, a young emerging Italian artist, permanent guest of MADS art gallery. Between philosophy and art, to discover the vital light in the cosmic space of existence towards talent and mesmerizing artworks. (Claudia Sferrazza) Outside of us, means inside us. It is a long trip to go into Aldilà. You have to be strong, courageous. Go beyond the boundaries of reality, entering in the imagination. Only if you go inside of you, you can find the real Aldila. You can stay outside. This is what the artist Adriano Lombardo is able to do with his Consciousness in synchronization. He wants to show us what it means to stay in a in a distant place, looking inside himself. Aldilà means inside us. (Elisabetta Eliotropio) Lombardo's art is an non tangible art but has the ability to see the future, to sense it, to perceive it. He tells us a story that goes “Aldilà” the possible, making us understand that we are digital, this is us in this precise moment in time. With emotional effects he creates a space for reflection on the irrationality of each spontaneous act and powerfully caresses the body, crossing boundaries and creating interconnected contexts. (Erika Gravante) The viewer in Lombardo's works lands on an original and creative view. A suspended condition, with an ever-changing temporary temporality, born to be “infinite”. An insubstantial vision of incorporeal presences that take shape thanks to the use of digital. The virtual containers with a primary shape transform and alter the geometry of the shapes, multiplying functionality beyond measure in a space that repeats itself and changes incessantly. The sound effects hypnotize the spectator bringing him into a non-dimension, losing any perception that conforms to reality (Aldià). (Federica D’Avanzo) Adriano Lombardo is poetry, the concrete and mental realization of a new and intimate space accessible only with the mind. Colors, shapes and manifestations of ideas and sensations populate the immense galaxy of his artistic poetics and we are the travelers destined to explore his soul. (Federica Schneck) Art elevate us to an ethereal state where everything becomes possible, where the eternal and impalpable become close to reach for interpretation. Not only visual artist Adriano Lombardo beautifully achieves to capture the fleeting ephemeral moment, but also the everlasting dynamic energy that flows inside and outside the mortal body. In an outstanding and continuos discovery of subtle connections that bound one another, suddenly mysterious invisible charts are unveiled before us as a thin layer of spiritual conscience that wrap all the universe together. (Flavia Montecchi) A fluorescent union of distant worlds flows incessantly, pulsating with energy in an ecosystem of powerful visual anatomy. Parallel universes unfold before the eyes, linking new forms of life and enveloping contemporary bodies in vestments woven of unpredictable futures. (Francesca Brunello) The artist manages to transport us aldilà, beyond, in a universe in which the electromagnetic energy is the protagonist and, admiring his work, we can dance amazed along with it. (Francesca Catarinicchia)


Adriano Lombardo

Consciousness in synchronization


Adriano Lombardo Adriano Lombardo seeks the "aldilà" in its purest form. His gaze is turned to heaven, space and its mysteries. Space is us, it is our essence. It encloses within itself the infinite forms that the human being can reach. Through the digital Adriano Lombardo makes a journey to discover what goes beyond human knowledge, bringing observers to reflection, stimulating their curiosity. (Giorgia Massari) Timelessness, innovation, astonishment. Art is inexorably evolving and the artist lets himself be carried away by this continuous flow of ideas and technologies. A timeless and spaceless universe that sees art in a transversal and non-unique way. (Ilaria Falchetti) Art goes beyond art itself if the artist will use emotions to mould it. What is a shape, what’s its meaning for an object. This is what we should ask ourselves when feeling the impact a sensation leaves on us, changing who we were, defining who we will be. Strenght. Weakness. Chaos. Silence. The four cardinal point of our existence and of art. (Irene Delaude) Compelling forces, in order to develop collective memory and convert them into private reminders of how our imaginary acts in our reality. Witness the figures as main actors. (Karla Peralta Málaga) Limits of human mind can't imagine illimitate concepts. Only art can represent these concepts beyond time and space, thanks to what it has always been: avant-guard. (Letizia Perrieri) Matter as pure visual manifestation. Luminous snakes approach each other, get closer and dance in unison driven by the same dark force. It is not possible to escape the electromagnetic field, subtraction from the great design of the cosmos is not contemplated. (Lisa Galletti) When the artist Adriano Lombardo lets himself be inspired by the cosmos and the universe, his artistic research becomes capable of involving and materialising the infinite particles of space around him. The final result can only be a powerful artwork in which are mixed the fundamental pillars of Adriano Lombardo's art: Creativity-Science-Love-Innovation-Magic-Emotion. (Manuela Fratar) Being is and cannot not be, non-being is not and cannot be" so said Parmenides, one of the pre-Socratic philosophers. He explained that the only way man can take is that of being, of evidence: he couldn't be more wrong than that. He hadn't come to terms with art, and especially with Adriano Lombardo who manages to create harmony between different layers of reality. (Mara Cipriano) Once again M.A.D.S. Art Gallery proves to always keep up with the times: the new entry ADRIANO LOMBARDO, exhibition after exhibition, will accompany us with his creations in the magical world of our artistic reality, introducing professionalism, creativity and even a bit of healthy madness… as well as M.A.D.S. is! (Maria Matilde Della Pina) In a scenario that defies the rules of space-time, multitudes of luminous filaments chase each other and mix in a chaotic and vital whirlwind. In the form of an agile trail of light, the vital energy that animates all living beings flows freely, highlighting the indissoluble relationship that binds the universe and its inhabitants. (Marta Graziano)


Adriano Lombardo

Consciousness in synchronization


Adriano Lombardo Halfway between art and science, emotions and technology, creativity and cosmic energy. Adriano Lombardo’s art refers to a reality where nothing is separated and everything constitutes an indivisible and synchronised whole. What if our consciousness is not only ours? (Martina Lattuca) The human being is surrounded by Art; Art belongs to humans. This conception of Art as something Universal is the polyhedral artist, Adriano Lombardo' system of beliefs, that encourages him to his creations. His digital videos are a whole of magic; innovation; technology and science in which is not missed the human and environmental part, generating emotions and expressions. Influenced by his artistic essence, Adriano Lombardo realises almost futuristic landscapes in which the main subject is the light, producer of positive emotional energies. (Martina Stagi) Adriano Lombardo is an innovative and avant-garde artist. An artist with a strong communicative power with the ability to investigate the essence of the human being and make it visible to the eyes. (Martina Viesti) Every atom of energy from which every creature is constituted collides at every moment with the mystery of the history of life and generates stimuli. (Sara Giannini) Adriano creates a Universe of energy that overwhelms the observer. In the immensity of the Universe, two so different souls meet, their energies interact, giving life to a single vortex of overwhelming energy. (Silvia Grassi) Who are we? What are we made of? In what consists our soul? Adriano Lombardo's approach to the art is the one of a continuous research for the truth of what liesbeneath our mind, a cosmic light that connects us to the external space and billions of constellatios. (Sofia Ronzi) Adriano Lombardo is an artist who participates with his art in a meaningful way in the change, describing, starting from technological instances, a search for new symbolic forms in which we can recognise ourselves and consolidate our collective belonging. In the wake of the new wind, generated by ideas such as the energy field, the artist takes the original technological cue and translates it at a high level, developing in this way an ideal parallel with her marvellous artistic elaborations. (Valentina Valentini) Lines that move in infinite space creating spirals. Vortexes of energy that infuse life. In a place where past, present and future meet, the spirals appear as the alpha and omega, beginning and end, in a continuous and infinite repetition. (Vanessa Viti) Energy. Darkness. Lights. Luminescent colors. Adriano Lombardo creates an ever-changing cosmic reality in which everything is sort of up in the air, he offers us a one-minute journey through the mysteries of the becoming of the universe. Everything seems to find a meaning in the relationship and in the link between different life forms. A meeting at the rise of a new star. A new beginning, or the last goodbye. (Viola Provenzano)


Adriano Lombardo

Consciousness in synchronization


0xq “Ablution represents the transition from one state to another, from secular to pure, from life to death.” (0xq) The art is the reality of the artist, his own truth. 0xq represents his world, with this artwork he tells us about the religious Shindo Japanese tradition, his multicultural upbringing and his concept of Aldilà. “Ablution” portrays a young woman who is swimming, maybe to go on the top of the water. She is moving through the water, nevertheless near her feet there is a silhouette reminiscent of the shape of a paper airplane, symbol of travel and of play and fun. The girl has her face covered by some lines that let you see her somatic features and near it you can see flowers, the only colored element of the work apart from the blue background. The flowers seem to be connected to the swimmer’s face, they almost seem to come from her mouth, as if there were her voice or her breath. Flowers represent life, birth, sprout. Near the flowers you see a bunch of arrows, as if they indicate the energy that is necessary to face life, the fight against the problems and the obstacles that life puts on our path. The girl, however, also has a flower near the hand and it seems that this was let go, free to sink and get lost in the water. At this point it is natural to wonder if the flowers do not represent the time of our life that passes and that we let go. In the other hand, the girl has an anchor that seems to weigh her down. Finally, who looks at this work can see the complexity of the swimmer’s soul so close to that gear that is then her heart. The gear is normally inside the machines, it run the machines but, in this case, no, the swimmer is not a machine, it is a much more complex creature, made of flesh, blood but also feelings and thoughts that drive her soul. She is a person portrayed during a journey, her life path that goes from her birth to her death. 0xq collects all these symbols and unites them to create his personal vision and to make these symbols assume a new meaning.

Art Curator Sara Giannini


0xq

Ablution


Adriana Sicobeanu

Maria Adriana Sicobeanu is a Romanian abstract artist that creates significative and captivating textures by repeatedly coating the canvas with thick layers of acrylic paint. Her inspiration comes firstly from her need to release her feelings, almost raw, on the canvas. In occasion of the M.A.D.S Art Gallery exhibition, entitled “ALDILÀ”, Adriana presents “Principium”, an acrylic paint on canvas that instantly captures the viewers' eyes for its wide landscape format: an abstract monochromatic panorama straight from the artist's mind and emotional sphere. The predominantly use of white and black, despite the exception of some additional colour shades in the corners, gives a graphic aesthetic to the piece which enhance the textural differences between the layers and remind of an interrupted television signal. The horizontal and vertical coatings of paint overlap on each other, breaking the repetitive pattern in favour of a more unpredictable, segmented texture. The artist consciously reflected upon the change within and out of ourselves, in particular on the obstacles and emotional contradictions that we experience every day. “We may feel different emotions every day like ripples of water. We see reflections of love, joy, fear and sadness. Sometimes apart. Sometimes all at once. At times we may feel stable and secure and yet we sometimes feel unconnected and unbalanced.” Each day is, for Adriana, a new beginning full of opportunities that can guide us in different and very distinctive directions. Scraping meticulously the acrylic paint, the artist weaved a textile of emotions and colours, unveiling with each stroke of the knife palette a different state of mind, a feeling juxtaposed to the other. Like Gerhard Richter's abstract artworks, which are truth-telling devices in the way they reflect upon the creation and dissection meaning, “Principium” resulted from Adriana's methodical building and deconstruction of layers: the manipulation of the acrylic paint in vertical and horizontal movements ultimately scatter the viewers' gaze across the painting and pleases both their visual and tactile senses through hypnotic ripples and tides of paint. The coexistence of multiple layers, in the same canvas as in the same person, reminds us of the versatility of life and of how complex it is for the artist to frame a precise state of mind. Each day and each artwork is a beginning, a chance of renewal, but also of acceptance of all the contradictions that coexist in each one of us.

Art Curator Flavia Montecchi


Adriana Sicobeanu

Principium


Ajit Gadekar

Ajit is an emerging artist who is a paediatrician by profession. Inspired by his surroundings and by the beauty that nature gives us every day, he creates mostly evocative and suggestive landscape artworks. Making art is his passion, his hobby. Gifted with a very strong artistic manual dexterity and a taste for combining colours, Ajit reveals himself to be a talented creative personality. Art turns out to be an escape from the daily stress of work. Ajit escapes with his mind, finding refuge in dreamy landscapes where peace and tranquillity reign. In "Aspen bank", the colours enchant the viewer with their intensity and expressive power when combined. An autumnal natural landscape with a clear stream running through the middle. Oil painting allows different textures to be created, and this is also the case here. The poplars are the real protagonists of the work, together with the stream. The poplar is the tree that symbolises victory, the ability to regenerate and get back up after every challenge that life throws at us. The work is intrinsic to strength, hope and energy. A landscape of brilliant colours that Ajiit uses skilfully. A place where the viewer is able to recharge and take from nature all that it has to offer. A riot of energy, a hymn to life. The artist invites the viewer to look at this landscape and to treasure all the strength it conveys. Every detail is rendered to the smallest detail; Ajit is skilled both in the rendering of each individual detail and in the rendering of the whole, which appears harmonious, quiet. In "Golden Grassland" it is decidedly more autumnal. The wider perspective and the more horizontal cut of the canvas give greater depth to the landscape. The horizon is marked by the contrast between the grass and the forest of bare trees in the background. The grass looks like a soft golden carpet and the water is so viscous that you can feel its freshness. Ajit is very good at creating different textures with oil paint. The field of grass stretches as far as the human eye can see. The humidity is perceptible, as is the slight rustle of the wind moving the bare branches of the trees and the blades of grass. The viewer is called upon to be an integral part of nature's spectacle. The body of water flows quietly and creates a path that the eye is invited to follow. Everything suggests an atmosphere of reflection where man is invited to establish a close and intimate relationship with the nature that surrounds him. In "Green Field" the colours change and become more intense and cold. Once again the meadow gives a sense of softness. The intense green colour symbolises life, energy and hope. A small road guides the viewer through the painting. The landscape is isolated, the horizon line very low to give space to a very suggestive mid-afternoon sky. On the right is a small group of trees with bright green foliage following the wind. The clouds create movement and depth. Impressive is Ajiit's ability to create highly suggestive and immersive images that push the viewer into deep reflection. He is placed before landscapes devoid of human presence that encourage contact with pure unspoilt nature. It is impossible not to be fascinated and struck by how simple yet complex such landscapes are, because they contain within them a multitude of emotions, a whirlwind of feelings.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Ajit Gadekar

Aspen Bank


Ajit Gadekar

Golden Grassland


Ajit Gadekar

Green Field


Alan Brown “What does a mirror look at?” (Frank Herbert)

A profound analysis of the unconscious, linked to a metaphysical expressiveness, characterize the work by Alan Brown, a contemporary American artist. Surreal landscapes inhabited by inanimate characters and objects seem to stand still in a suspended time, waiting for a distant and dystopian future. Metaphysical painting was born in 1917 with Giorgio De Chirico and Carlo Carrà, with the aim of representing what goes beyond physical appearance, the intimate essence of reality beyond the sensory experience. Metaphysical is everything that is detached from the environmental logic to which we are accustomed. And that is how an ordinary object is placed in a foreign and unfamiliar context, distorting the sense of vision and opening the eye to new possibilities. This pictorial current is of fundamental importance for the art by Alan Brown, who is extremely attached to the need to escape from visual rationality and open up to a search for new spaces and concepts. In "As Far As The Eye Can See", a work exhibited on the occasion of the international exhibition "ALDILÀ" at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Alan Brown transports the observer into a dreamlike vision, where our gaze crosses that of an eye floating in the air, hanging from a balloon. Behind it, three more distant eyes look towards an unknown horizon, almost hypnotized and anxious to reach their destination. In the background, a mountainous landscape stretches out, reminiscent of the geological formation of the Grand Canyon. There are many meanings that this work can convey. The fact remains that the large eye in the foreground leads the observer to question himself and, attracted by what he sees, he finds himself studying every detail of the work in search of a meaning. Alan Brown seems to open a window onto an impossible world, which reveals itself to us as something magnetic and seductive. These eyes, then, are nothing more than a reflection of our own eye which, enchanted, waits to see further.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Alan Brown

As Far As The Eye Can See


Alessandra Di Ronza "It is not difficult to change because what happens in life, it is difficult to preserve the positive sides of ourselves despite the events” (Alessandra Di Ronza)

Alessandra Di Ronza is a professional photographer born in Italy and based in London. Her photographic project is deeply influenced by her home region’s landscapes which host lowlands that connect seas and mountains: “Landscapes are the subjects of my art and I use them to externalize what is inside me, my thoughts, my point of view”, the artist says. At "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Alessandra presents" The Sublime ", a beautiful photograph that portrays one of the countryside landscapes of her hometown, Pordenone. With it, the artist not only wants to capture a bucolic scene that often appears before her eyes, but also to convey to the viewer an important as well as profound message regarding the awareness of the environmental issue and the passage of man on it. In fact, if today we are used to thinking that Nature is our guest, in reality we are its guests, but despite this, it resists our interventions, to our badness. In the eighteenth century, when there was not yet this aversion against Nature as is the case today, the sublime was a feeling that brought questions to the painter about his existence, his value in front of the greatness of nature. And in this project the sublime made Alessandra questions like: “What are we doing? Does everything have a limit? How majestic can Nature be that shows us its grandeur despite our interventions?”. So the sublime is not only the feeling of fair about human hands but it’s also something astonishing towards nature and its resistance. To increase the need felt by the artist to go "aldilà" what we are facing, this project is made with infrared lm because it was used to go over the visible and in this case is used to see the daily themes we don’t notice easily, making her capable to express her inner feelings towards the scene.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Alessandra Di Ronza

The Sublime


Alex Kosyak “Nature is a temple in which living columns sometimes emit confused words.” (Charles Baudelaire)

Lines and urban spaces are the focus of interest for the contemporary Ukrainian photographer Alex Kosyak. Indeed, it is architecture that becomes the main subject of his images, confronting man with itself. His aesthetics, very close to the language of graphics, make the geometries created by the architectural structures act as a frame for man's life, who uses them unconsciously. Always perfectly embedded within them, it moves automatically as if along a predetermined path. A perfect labyrinth with no way out where, in some cases, shadows and reflections take on a profound meaning, showing us a hidden sky or an apparently distant and forgotten nature. Surfaces on which even man itself is reflected, revealing a higher consciousness, as if in front of a window opening onto a distant, perhaps known past.


Alex Kosyak

In "Strange Sky", a canal of stagnant water becomes a mirror of a distorted reality, showing us the silhouette of a man standing against a barely cloudy sky, partly dirtied by the green of the algae. Nature is shown here to be constrained and contaminated, imperfect compared to the total utopian perfection of urban architecture. Most of the Alex Kosyak's photographs, place the relationship between man and architecture in the foreground, transforming the inhabitant into a small element who, unaware, lives surrounded by immense structures that almost annihilate him. The photographer compares the human soul with artificiality, opening a door to a new interpretation of reality. An entirely contemporary romantic vision, where it is no longer Nature that engulfs man, but man itself through its own creations.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Alex Kosyak

A second before waking up


Alex Kosyak

Electric dreams tribute


Alex Kosyak

Snail


Alex Kosyak

Strange Sky


Alexander Vselensky “My artworks are created in different techniques - graphics, painting, video art, animation. I try to convey the message of global understanding of life and the world we all live in. I believe our conscience is linked to overall life and our imagination is a part of reality. That is why my artworks contain symbolic images of the real visible world as well as the imaginary world” Alexander Vselensky The international exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S gives a warm welcome to Alexander Vselensky: a digital artist, director of animated films, multimedia artist. Member of International Association of Art, member of the Moscow Union of artists, member of the Union of Cinematographers of the Russian Federation. Russian State University of Cinematography named after S. Gerasimov (VGIK). Couple in the tree is the first of the three artworks. It represents two birds of the same species met in the tree that both of them found preferable and are watching the appearance of an enormous planet in the sky. The atmosphere is between the real and the otherworldly. The elements of the work belong to reality but the setting belongs to a surreal, almost dreamlike dimension. The protagonists of the masterpiece are two small birds that seem to assume a behavior typical of the romantic man in front of nature. The current of Romanticism touches the artist's thought. In fact, the creatures represented are small compared to the greatness and magnificence of nature and they cannot help but admire it. Night road takes up the theme of nature, it represents the mystery of existence that people strive to solve during their lives. People’s souls get closer and closer to the true knowledge the way moths are attracted to light. The artist's thinking here is clear. The road traveled by man during his life is the one that goes from darkness to light. The naturalistic setting represents the soul of the human being in continuous progress and evolving. The path is that of the path of the soul. Thoughts represents the influence of our inner world and the world around us. Reality keeps changing. Every person is a creator of their own world, and thoughts are the beginning of any new reality. The representation of the inner world that emerges from the protagonist's mind is emblematic. Man colors his surroundings with the colors of his thoughts. He projects his thoughts outward, permanently changing reality.

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Alexander Vselensky

Couple in the tree


Alexander Vselensky

Night road


Alexander Vselensky

Thoughts (celestial realm)


Alexandra Schartner “The most beautiful in the world is, of course, the world itself.” (Wallace Stevens)

Alexandra Schartner is a Russian artist who currently works between Germany, France, and Luxembourg. In her works art and architecture merge to create urban landscapes that come to life thanks to the combination of energetic brush strokes and bright colors. The work "éternel été" was created in 2021 with mixed media on wood. Space and time change their face, reveal new meanings: distances are deleted, and cities are immortalized in an eternal moment. The dark sky is illuminated by the lights of the lampposts, by the signs of the shops, by the headlights of the cars whizzing by at full speed; silent moments are interrupted by traffic noises, by the chatter of the crowd that walks without stopping. Cold colors such as green, blue, and black dominate the work, but are sometimes enlivened by bright colors such as yellow and pink. Alexandra offers both a contemporary vision of the city and her own personal interpretation of the urban world. And you, what do you see? Art is powerful because everyone with their own eyes can look at it in different ways and each way can conceal millions of shades within itself. City as a nest in which to take refuge, as a home where you feel safe; city as a place governed by trouble and movement; city as a synonym for fun, but not for peace. Alexandra invites the viewer to immerse themselves completely: may the "éternel été" be a starting point for an extraordinary journey of beauty, emotions, but also reflections.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Alexandra Schartner

éternel été


Aliona Dyegtyarova "It is delightful to be immersed in this kind of liquid light that makes us different and suspended beings." (Paul Claudel)

The work of the artist Aliona has two characterizing elements: dark and light, defined by dark colors such as gray and brown and by brighter shades that move from yellow ocher to white. The bright colors break the darkness, the light pierces the darkness and becomes the protagonist and center of the work. The work "Champagne night" is the synthesis of opposites that coexist and create a perfect balance, where one cannot exist without the other. Colors play a fundamental role, intense and fluid, dark and light, they are the real subjects of the composition. Aliona represents a moment, something magical and unique, in her work she condenses all the energy she possesses. A totally abstract work, in which something mystical and spiritual lives, it is not possible to see or touch, yet the viewer is totally involved. The bright colors that dominate the center of the work somehow represent the energy that the artist is able to unleash. A force that guides emotions and feelings, which take the observer by the hand and put him in direct contact with the soul of the artist, in fact the work is like a bridge between us and Aliona. Aliona's work is clearly of abstractionist inspiration with references to "pouring art", color moves freely in space, there are no borders and signs that outline the figures, the strength of colour finds extreme freedom and manages to express itself without doubts. The great value of the artist Aliona consists precisely in the great expressive capacity only through the use of color. Getting in touch with Aliona's artistic work means discovering and getting in touch with something transcendental and enchanted, the artist gives us the gift of the magic that lives in her art. Artists have always had the task of arousing emotions or making the observer reflect, this is the role that works of art possess, in fact Aliona succeeds perfectly in this task. The viewer, in front of the artist's work, is captured by the abstract and the emotions connected to it, remaining suspended between magic and reality driven by a strong power that the work itself emanates. Definitely, Aliona's work possesses a surprising energy that allows us to get in touch with the soul of the artist.

Art Curator Vanessa Viti


Aliona Dyegtyarova

Champagne night


Alita Chandra Wig “Painting is just another way of keeping a diary.” (Pablo Picasso)

Alita Chandra Wig is an artist of London origin based in India. Daughter of artist parents, she has always breathed and cultivated a passion for painting. Experimentation, technique, and instinct merge in Alita's works: skilful color matching and a perfect combination of lines and shapes tell her experiences, emotions, and sensations. Sometimes you don't need words to tell your existence, just a sheet and a brush. The paper becomes the map of her life: it is a confidant who listens to her, it is a sincere friend, it is a refuge in which to give vent to her pain without fear of being judged. The artist has created a series of works in which the word RHAPSODY is repeated in the titles. They are symphonies that speak to our soul: a jazz rhythm dominated by improvisation; a blues rhythm that reminds us of old memories; a dance rhythm that gives us a charge of energy; a passionate rhythm that becomes a hymn to love and feelings. Lines that cross the paper going in different directions; warm colors and cold colors that meet: the contrasts that we see in her works are metaphors of the diversity of human life: joys, pains, satisfactions, and disappointments run in a circle, alternating throughout the day, months, and years. COVID LIFELINES is a work created in 2020 during the pandemic, a global tragedy that has completely revolutionized people's lives. This period has severely tested mankind but at the same time loneliness was the key to discovering oneself better, understanding the real importance of fundamental values, starting with a different vision of the world. Art does not only mean beauty, but also reflection and meditation. Alita's works do not leave viewers indifferent: the artist invites them to enter her world, to get to know it and to give a personal interpretation of what their eyes see, and their hearts feel.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Alita Chandra Wig

COVID LIFELINES


Alita Chandra Wig

RHAPSODY BLUES


Alita Chandra Wig

RHAPSODY DANCE


Alita Chandra Wig

RHAPSODY JAZZ


Alita Chandra Wig

RHAPSODY PASSION


Amanda’s acrylics and oils "I wanted freedom, open air and adventure. I found it on the sea.” (Alain Gerbault)

Amanda Polyviou alias Amanda’s acrylics and oils is an artist who was born and grew up in Melbourne, Australia. Since she was a child, the brush has been her best friend: painting for her is a way to express herself, to give shape and color to her deep and magical inner world. The landscapes that surround her are the source of inspiration for her abstract works; ocean and sunset in all their facets and shades are among her favourite subjects. "Calm Waters" was created in 2021 with the acrylic on canvas technique. An endless blue ocean and pure white sky form the backdrop for a peaceful winter day. Amanda, thanks to the use of knives and a brush with thin bristles, creates delicate movements on the canvas, which make the work alive, energetic, and intense. A pleasant glance is given by the strong chromatic contrast between the two cold colors. We belong to nature and nature belongs to us: a strong bond unites the artist to it and for this she honours it by making it the protagonist of her works. Let's get away from the hustle and bustle, from everyday noises and stop; nature speaks to us, and we should listen to it: we take its suggestions, we learn from its teachings, we capture its essence. This is what the artist does before painting: observing, reflecting, and then letting herself be carried away by the whirlwind of emotions. Amanda's works are the mirror of her soul: she invites us to reflect our image on it, to know her world while giving a personal interpretation of what we observe. What do your eyes see? Art is free and without borders, just like the ocean is infinite. Travel far with your imagination, you will be able to see places that you would never have known otherwise.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Amanda’s acrylics and oils

Calm Waters


Andrea McCartney In my work I integrate lyrical abstraction with a cellular abstract world. I go in and out of my microscopic world which is undeniably feminine. I also like to paint the ocean in what I call Inward Travel, and soak into my painting when I cannot travel for real.” Andrea McCartney

Andrea McCartney has studied art at The Art Institute of Chicago, University of Iowa, and Drake University. She also has a Pharmacy degree from Drake University. Her science educational background emerges into her work and her vision of human being. She loves the microscopic world of human but she also creates diversified paintings, from portraiture to abstraction to pop culture art. At the international exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S she brings her inner, artistic world. The first artwork, Costa Brava, belongs to a series of paintings of the ocean, she uses bright colors and organic lines and shapes. Andrea represents a rather realistic image of the outside world, however the colors, the outlines make the atmosphere almost dreamlike. His way of painting, while approaching reality, retains the otherworldly dimension that allows the viewer to enter the mind of the artist, on his journey. Not surprisingly, the representations of the ocean are, for Andrea, a reason for escaping reality. The sea welcomes the thoughts of the artist and the viewer and captures and preserves them as if it were a casket. Teen spirit is the most abstract work among the three presented at the October event of the M.A.D.S. The choice of the palette is very similar to the other two representations, the colors are bright, almost as if it were a distinctive feature of the painting of this talented artist. There are many references to female intimacy and there is a call of the ocean. Almost a parallel between the freedom of the sea and the free youthful spirit. Zoospermia is a clear representation of male intimacy. The work is linear with the artist's style. Vivid colors, representations between the real and the dreamlike, lines and decisive shapes. Here the interest in the biology of the human being emerges but mixes with the artist's fervent imagination. The viewer manages to get in touch with Andrea's mind as she reveals her very personal vision of things.

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Andrea McCartney

Costa Brava


Andrea McCartney

Teen spirit


Andrea McCartney

Zoospermia


Angela Kushchyk A luminous body will appear more brilliant in proportion as it is surrounded by deeper shadow. (Leonardo da Vinci)

Angela Kushchyk presents “Shadow - Karo” for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. It is a “portrait of a girl from the Karo tribe. The Karo live on the east banks of the Omo River in south Ethiopia”. The artist, born in Kyiv, moved to Africa three years ago, which lead her to reflect on her perception of the culture around her. Angela Kushchyk portrays a detailed feminine figure surrounded by a silent background revealing a strong stroke as a shadow, as an illusion to create a third dimension to render the character real in its own space. Leonardo da Vinci on his “Trattato della pittura” wrote about shadow and light focusing on its behavior as a spiritual power, an immaterial force of our vision of reality. The shadow portrayed by Angela is a very strong silhouette, therefore is experienced during a very bright day. Near objects are surrounded by sharp boundaries while smoky shadows mean the object is far away. Angela represents the striking light as a very dynamic spiritual power and states a bold silhouette, which brings relevance to the character. It is a strong statement to bring realness to the feminine subject surrounded by a silent and compelling “Aldilà”. Her gaze is a powerful silence.

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Angela Kushchyk

Shadow - Karo


Angela Su Angela is a self-taught artist based in Southern California, United States. She began to paint abstracts in 2021 but immediately her artistic sensibility was clear. Angela exhibits at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery three abstract works that do not have a clear title but are precisely "untitled" probably to leave free will to viewers and therefore allow them to interpret and live freely, without being conditioned by any type of title. The works are made of acrylic on canvas and have the same setting. The brushstrokes are free, fast, they are clearly the result of an emotional transport by the artist, who is lulled by colors, is carried away by feelings and seems to enclose this well-being within her canvases."Untitled 17" the first work analyzed here is the one that appears as the most tormented: the colors are cold, blue and straw yellow are the protagonists. These cold colors carry the spectators in a dance of contrasting feelings, almost digging into their innermost. More lively are instead "Untitled 47" and "Untitled 52" which have respectively yellow and purple as dominant colors. "Untitled 47" is definitely the liveliest, the feelings become clearer and more relaxed. It is interesting how every single person can be "lulled" by these works and draw their own conclusions. The artist undoubtedly approaches the Informal artists of the post II World War who, especially the American ones, focus more on the strength of the gesture and pictorial charge rather than on the subject. Among all, Angela Su seems to take inspiration from Jackson Pollock regarding the apparent representation of chaos, although Angela Su does not use the dripping technique but rather uses instant brushstrokes as in the case of the Impressionist painter Claude Monet. In a certain sense, if we think of his "water lilies", there is a correlation from the point of view of the brushstroke technique. Angela Su then creates a unique style, in which art acts as a meditative tool, to channel emotions and thoughts that are reflected and involve viewers.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Angela Su

Untitled 17


Angela Su

Untitled 47


Angela Su

Untitled 52


Anita Dalen Johansen

Anita Dalen Johansen and her paintings tell us a lot about society’s discrimination and the thoughts in front of the ‘different’. In the same time the artist herself is able, with her paintings to go over and beyond, to express herself showing her vulnerability, being proud. << Then again, we are forced to wear these masks to "fit in". Feeling unhappy, sad, frustrated. Overexcited, happy, chatty. All these normal bursts of emotion and basic human feelings have become inconvenient. They need to be regulated to fit this norm>>, this is how Anita introduces her artworks presented at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery during the ‘ALDILÀ’ exhibition. The two titles themselves are the verbal representation of the same concept of the scene drawn, “I am fine, thank you, how are you?” is something that everybody should ask, before commenting, caring about the real feelings. The piece is created with the use of acrylic on linen canvas and, although it represents a rough scene, it is quite shiny, thanks to the use of a special thin and ivory black that comes through in a warm way. This particular use of the colours permits one to see the light coming from the background while zooming the piece, that is also a symbolic matter: the glimpse of light caught can be considered the success of the artist’s aim.


Anita Dalen Johansen

A vertical group of shouting humanoids is the central scene of the piece while all around, small figures are enjoying the moment. The cold atmosphere is accentuated by the dark and deep gaze of the heads on the low foreground, as to highlight the absence of feelings and emotions that touches the society. This situation of incomprehension is felt also in “We don’t speak of it” title that refers to the taboo arguments that we are supposed to keep closed in us. This piece, colourful and full of symbolic details confers to the viewers a deep emotion that transpires from the tearful woman’s gaze. Scared from life, the female subject shows a marked face that the artist perfectly draws, underlying the difference between the right side of the face, resembling a zombie and the left side, still ‘alive’ and vivid, hopeful. In these pieces, Anita expresses herself, her emotions and her feelings going beyond the appearances, giving an expression to her interior, helping herself with the use of a colours’ palette in which each colour represents an emotion and each sign an expression of what she feels.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Anita Dalen Johansen

We don't speak of it


Anita Dalen Johansen

I am fine, thank you, how are you?


Anne Turlais “If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” (Nikola Tesla)

Majestic visions, where colours pulsate with energy manifesting a spiritual connection with Nature. Vibrant landscapes made of light and sinuous lines that envelop the viewer, transporting him into a metaphysical state. This is how we could describe the art by Anne Turlais, a contemporary French artist, whose paintings find a profound source of inspiration and analysis in the ancestral world of Nature. Her artworks, in fact, are not simple photographic descriptions of the elements that characterize the vegetation, but are true tales of energy, tending towards an abstraction of the subject. Magical swirls of colour break up the reality in order to unhinge it from the material and, by blending together, hypnotize the viewer until they lead him into an otherworldly dimension. In "Mother's Heart", one of the artworks exhibited at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery on the occasion of the "ALDILÀ" exhibition, pinks, reds, whites and golds come together to describe a flow of lines that seem to be dragged towards an unknown point


Anne Turlais

The whole resembles the heart of a calla lily, a flower symbolizing purity and heavenly bliss. In the work by Anne Turlais, the natural earthly element thus becomes a place of mystical connection with an elevated world and a meeting place with the Divine. Her paintings are like en plein airs, which aim to exalt and describe the energy of Mother Nature, which is hidden from the eyes of those who do not observe with their soul. The artist has a profound experience of creation, managing to tell what she feels and thus imbuing her works with pure spiritual energy. She captures a palpitating, enveloping and seductive light that accompanies the spirit into a state of harmony and tranquillity.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Anne Turlais

Asteraceae


Anne Turlais

Fresh Shelter


Anne Turlais

Golden Instant


Anne Turlais

Mother's Heart


Anne-Gaëlle ELIE “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music.” (Joan Miró)

Colors speak to us, they have the power to excite us; colors do not have a universal meaning: each of us can give a free interpretation to them. The French artist Anne-Gaëlle ELIE has made color her strength, the hallmark of her art. Cold and warm shades merge, bringing to life forms that, crossing over, tell us the artist's personal stories and experiences. The works analysed were made with mixed media: Anne used acrylic, archival ink and markers on paper. “French Cancan” (2020) from the “Modern Bestiary” series is a tribute to the famous dance which, challenging political and social conventions, represented a hymn to freedom. Stylized dancers move their bodies with elegance, facing prejudices and bringing light and color into the dark. In "Le combat des Anges" (2018) of the series "Fireworks and masked balls" the protagonists are angels, subjects painted by the artist on several occasions. The angels are in heaven, playing together and hiding. They observe from above our lives which seem funny to them; they laugh at us, but sometimes they are also envious. We often look at the sky in an inattentive way but observing the shape of the clouds and the twinkling of the stars we could grasp important messages. "Rhinocéros" (2021) is part of the same series as “French Cancan.” Through the work, the artist asks herself and at the same time the viewer: “how to remain human today?” It is a continuous challenge between good and evil, between rationality and instinct. Man was born free, but nowadays what use does he make of freedom? It should be the starting point to seek beauty, to feed our knowledge, to delve deep into our soul. Anne through apparently simple works offers the viewers a magical key to interpret the world around him: it is up to him to understand the meanings and reflect without forgetting to give free rein to his emotions.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Anne-Gaëlle ELIE

French Cancan


Anne-Gaëlle ELIE

Le combat des Anges


Anne-Gaëlle ELIE

Rhinocéros


Antokhin Pavel

“Everybody else needs mirros to remind themselves who they are. You’re no different." (Jonathan Nolan)

It is intrinsic in the human imagination to interpret the mirror as a very thin boundary between two dimensions: the real and its specular. The mirror is the protagonist in both the works exhibited by the artist, inserted in a game of roles almost perverse, which allows us to see what is not present in the work. The artist shows us the reality through a mirror game inside the mirror that by mathematical logic could last and stretch to infinity. Nothing is left to chance, everything is studied in detail, showing a mind not only refined and attentive to social issues of great relevance, but also great connoisseur of physical/ mathematical schemes not trivial. The study of light and its reflection is also important to fully grasp the greatness of the exhibited works. The mirror shows us the other side of the coin, poses puzzles, fragments and unites space, leaves us puzzled, but invites us to reflect.


Antokhin Pavel

Together with the human body, an object without a soul becomes the undisputed protagonist, it animates itself, reveals secrets, leads us into a fourth dimension that is at the limit between reality and beyond. Antokhin Pavel thus leads the observer to the investigation of the relationship between man and world, which is almost never direct, but filtered through the image of our image. Moreover, the mirror does not deceive, sees us, our faces, but also sees our shoulders through a play of reflections. It gives a true figure of us, beyond the appearances with which we show ourselves, the masks we wear, the image that others have of ourselves. In front of our reflection we return to be one, we strip ourselves of the thousand faces that are given to us by those who look at us externally, we are naked, defenseless, often frightened even us to discover in a moment all our fragility and weakness of human transience.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Antokhin Pavel

Recursion # 1


Antokhin Pavel

Recursion # 2


Astrid Hutengs “Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine to the mind.” (Luther Burbank)

Delicacy and tenderness are the feelings we feel in front of the work on show “Rainflower”. A large flower, recreated

through watercolour and fineliner on paper, seems to protect us from a gloomy, humid day, not only from the atmospheric point of view, but also emotionally. The flower, with its sweet old pink petals becomes a protective blanket, a hug, a safe and comfortable place, our live umbrella, which transmits human warmth. The shelter is so secure that we can afford to close our little red umbrella. The artist through her work leads us into her heart and her soul, shows us the world with her eyes emotions, she lays bare for us, we can penetrate her comfort zone and enjoy it with her. Sunflowers is a poem for images, a story that reminds us of childhood, the warm arms of a grandmother, the fireplace on a cold winter day. The hermeticism with which Astrid tells us this tale of life is musical, made up of a few words, a few strokes, but of a biancone filled with a sweet melody, comparable to an orchestra of white voices. Simple colors and sweet tones, delicately expressive are the protagonists of the work. This expedient highlights the particular propensity of the artist towards a surrealism fairytale but also particularly playful and that induces every spectator to let himself be carried away by the fantasy and tenderness that flows from it. A truly exceptional artist.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Astrid Hutengs

Rainflower


Atsushi

There is something fascinating about Atsushi's works. Something that touches and resonates with our nature as beings existing in this universe. We are attracted - enchanted - by the cohesive and multi-colored space that the artist presents to us; we are bewitched by the quantity and quality of the material that fills the entire compositional space. At first we seem to recognize those works, they seem opaque and dense like the matter that makes up the earth and the universe. In Ripple there is the density of liquid water, of atoms of hydrogen and oxygen that, combined together through a rather delicate bond, form a humid matter without constituted form. We can see it arching, we can observe it in its undulating, iridescent motions of sunlight. We can feel it under our fingertips, we can see inside it and sink into the deepest and most absolute blue. Water is the basic element for life, the attraction for Ripple is inevitable. The human being, although arrogant towards nature and haughty towards other animals - even though he is one himself -, looking at Atsushi's works returns to the origin, to that soup of primordial archetypes that we jealously guard in our minds and in our evolutionary past. We are part of this earth and, as such, we are made of the same atoms that make up all the other things that are part of the universe. As timeless warnings, as atavistic warnings, the artist's works connect us directly with the matter that makes up the visible and the nonvisible. The peculiar wave-like motions of the lines represented, the circles of light that inflame the composition, the vivid but never exaggerated colors tell us the true reality of things, the pure vision of a universe so large composed of infinitely small elements. Beyond the opaque matter of things, beyond the veil of Maya of Shopenarian memory, beyond that hard and impenetrable blanket that matter places before our eyes, there is the world of the infinitely small, a universe formed by particles having their own nature and their own peculiarities. Let's go into this world, let's push our mind inside Lines. Having overcome the initial vision of cohesive matter, we are immediately catapulted into a universe of lines and colors that overwhelms our eye. Our soul - or our mind - at first astonished, wants to go further and further into that tangle of colored matter. It is aware that what it is looking at is what it composes itself, it is what composes the universe. The eye is lost in this digital reality that is nothing but a mirror of the real nature of our world. The threads move sinuously along the entire composition and the space in which they move appears infinite: a play of perspective induces us to think that what we see has no end and continues indefinitely in a tangle of lines and matter. Archetypes of the composition of the universe, atavistic announcements of what we really are, Atsushi's works vibrate together with our consciousness, making the music of the entire universe resonate within ourselves. The human being has come down from the pedestal of arrogance and recognized that he is interconnected to the infinite cosmos.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Atsushi

Lines


Atsushi

Meta Mandala


Atsushi

Ripple


Audrey Dananai Butau

After studying at Coventry University, Audrey Dananai Butau is a visual artist who explores subjectivity in our humanity: she is very interested in Post and Transhuman art as it allows the human being to think and visualize beyond the limits of our humanity as, through an integration of nature, art and technology, our understanding of ourselves in relation to the world around us becomes clearer, given our entry into the Anthropocene epoch. The artist explores themes and subjects of our current era in which our effects on the world are becoming more and more irreversible: to this end, she presents ceramic sculptures of abstract shapes that represent the collective anxiety of humanity, in order to understand better ourselves and the future. At "ALDILA'" exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Audrey Dananai Butau presents “Body Drift”, one of her typical ceramic sculptures, with the aim of leading the viewer to a reflection on the historical moment we have lived and are living. Referring in particular to Zimbabwe (a former British colony) which between 1903 and 1928 underwent a radical cultural change through which language, people and spirituality were convulsed, redefined and remixed, the artist reflects on the modalities where indigenous civilizations and ancestral places are made to perish by our modern civilizations, through changes and habits that devastate them. "Body Drift" is therefore an illustration of the drift of the body resulting from a forced amputation of one's own spirituality and language; it is no coincidence that it almost assumes the appearance of a fossil, as a trace left by history and the passage of time which aims to remind us of a distant past, devoid of any contamination and belonging to a pure period. “Body Drift” exists as a glitch from the past towards a certain future in which the body is an amalgam of changed ideologies and spiritualities.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Audrey Dananai Butau

Body Drift


Auti Skye <<Let your soul roam freely and carry yourself light heartedly. The solutions to all your problems are already within you. The only way out is in.>>

The quote that introduces Auti’s painting’s review comes from the artist herself and it perfectly describes the meaning of the piece. For the first time at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Auti joins the exhibition with a colourful scene, composed with the use of shine colours that called to the viewers’ attention to every single element drawn. Simple and pure forms, symbols of something that is beyond their physical essence, are what the artist wants to share with the viewers. While her work looks fun and bright, it hides a deeper meaning that pushes to go over the surface, the appearance, in search of something deeper that involves the whole society. The main subject of the scene that suddenly stands out to the viewers’ look is the big clock at the centre of the canvas, a light blue object with a big eye at its centre. Connected with the five planets surrounding it, it refers to the time passing by, and it can be considered as a sort of reprimand to the society: also, if it seems there is no escaping from the constrictions imposed, there are so many creative ways to be free. Reconnecting with her inner child, Auti plays on the canvas just as the Surrealists’ artists of the avant garde movement did, focusing on finding meanings and giving attention to every single element that composes the scene.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Auti Skye

Soular Eclipse


Beatriz Lumbreras "Free spirits are those who investigate reality in such a deep way as to be cruel because they seek the truth even in painful things, so curious and with a heart bent toward the elusive." (Nietzsche) Beatriz Lumbreras, Spanish artist, investigates all possible and imaginable facets of reality by being guided by the power of art. Through her artwork “Untitled” she transmits and tells about an energy that can take shape like this, with a type of language that goes beyond words. The artist uses dynamic brushstrokes, strong colours that generate the form of a struggle on the canvas. Everything we see on the canvas of “Untitled” is pure, strong, alive energy. Black shapes and beige shapes evoke the silhouettes of fighters who collide and originate white sketches. Combatants move in a red enviroment. It’s like looking at a battlefield from above, like we are looking at an aerial photograph, like we are suspended and looking at something happening in another dimension. We are witnessing something complex, something distant and at the same time close, something that we can feel with the soul and not with our senses, something that is perceived only if you pay attention and that is often silenced by the noise of everyday life. Beatriz Lumbreras gives us with this work the possibility of a metaphysical experience and catapults us into another dimension, with dynamic and strong paint strokes that fight against the limits to reach the fluidity to form.

Art Curator Sara Giannini


Beatriz Lumbreras

Untitled


Bego Goyeneche “Life beats down and crushes the soul and art reminds you that you have one.” (Stella Adler)

Bego Goyeneche is a talented Mexican artist who specialises in creating magnificent watercolour works. The subjects, in most cases, refer to the world of nature; flowers, animals and plants animate Bego's canvases with colour. Bego has always painted, and over time her technique has evolved in a realistic direction. Every detail she paints is meticulously created following the sinuous lines that nature proposes. Bego collects visual information and reworks it with extreme elegance, often decontextualising the subject or combining it with several elements. Because of this characteristic, many of Bego's creations are inspired by the creative process behind collage. This artistic concept is clearly evident in the watercolour painting entitled 'Segmento', where Bego intends to establish a real relationship between man and nature. Against a multicoloured background, a flower is realistically realised with meticulously studied details. The folds of the petals, the veining, the soft colour variations, the bud, the branch: each element is well studied, even the rendering of light. The light gives life to the flower, gives it three dimensions and allows it to be perceived as a consistent element. Between the background level and the flower in the foreground, Bego inserts a rectangle as if it were a collage, a cut-out. Inside she creates a butterfly wing texture, with the typical colours and geometric sections that characterise the beautiful animal. The black and white of this insert contrasts with the more whimsical and spontaneous background, where the brushstrokes do not follow a logical order but the colour creates new combinations, free from any outline. The artist is very skilful because she manages to create a harmonious artwork by juxtaposing different fragments, creating textures and giving movement and three-dimensionality. The colour tones are vivid and include a wide range of colours. The watercolour is deliberately applied unevenly as the artist wants to evoke contrasting feelings through different textures. While the background appears freer, with the colours crashing into each other and allowing a glimpse of the weave of the cotton canvas used as a support, the flower is definitely made in a more meticulous and detailed manner. The interplay of colours and contrasts created by the inclusion of the detail of the butterfly's wing is interesting. The animal and vegetable worlds are enclosed in a single space and told through metaphors. An explosion of sensations, a whirlwind of emotions hovers among the watercolours. There are also several references to avant-garde artistic currents such as abstractionism (for the technique and the few elements), Mexican muralism (for the bright, vivid colours) and the concept of collage, which here returns to its primordial form, encapsulating the concept of "putting together". Bego incorporates elements of the natural world into her artwork, seen above all from a female perspective. The colour and position of the flower, the reference to the butterfly, refer to characteristics such as elegance, sinuosity and grace. As a whole, the work appears harmonious and balanced, but at the same time it calls the viewer to dwell on every detail, prompting new reflections. The visual experience that Bego gives the viewer is unique.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Bego Goyeneche

Segmento


Benjamin McClish “True happiness comes from the joy of deeds well done, the zest of creating things new.” (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) Observe the world around us, take inspiration from it, capture its essence, and give all this a shape and colors. For the contemporary artist Benjamin McClish, painting has always represented a way to express himself and describe reality from his personal point of view. Playing with different textures to give life to curious and unprecedented effects: the artist uses mixed techniques to create original works with profound meanings. Benjamin's art is the result of a lifetime experimentation, of continuous research combined with instinctive and momentary sensations. "Refinement" (2021) is a riot of elegance and light: a cold color like silver and a warm color like gold merge to create a magical contrast. In "Trinity" (2019) the dominant color is red, the color of love and passion. Three linked circles represent the trinity: three elements united by an indissoluble bond that cannot exist without one another. In front of this work, the viewer sets out on an imaginary journey in which he decides what the circles represent: what is essential in life for you? Without what would your happiness be severely tested? In "Triptych #2" (2021) vertical brush strokes of cold colors such as blue, light blue and purple are interrupted by the gold that emanates light. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry wrote that true joy is the result of welldone actions and enthusiasm in creating new things. For Benjamin, deeds well done are his paintings: the brush was guided by his deep thoughts and special emotions. New things are the works that he still must carry out: how many there will be he does not even know, but it is certain that when something belongs to you it will remain yours in eternity. Art has always been part of Benjamin and he will forever belong to it.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Benjamin McClish

Refinement


Benjamin McClish

Trinity


Benjamin McClish

Triptych #2


Betty Pöll ""Love, it is always before you. Love!"" (André Breton)

"The starting point of Betty Pöll's art, explores the intersection of spirituality and conscience, seeking to examine these complexities through bright, vibrant colours that create a sinuous web of light. The constant in Poll's works is the recurrence of almost abstract subjects that aim to relate to everyone, creating a unique accessibility that engages the viewer's sensitivity. In addition to this, there is also the use of bright, fluorescent colours, which can also be found in 'Red Desire'. The viewer's gaze is caught by the elements depicted throughout the background, which fill the central silhouette of the body, giving the sensation of a flow of energy between the abstract figure and the space. In "The Filter" the main element, which is the central face, takes over until it becomes part of the background itself, pervaded by the two complementary colours that unite the whole painting. The borderline is taken to the extreme in "Levels of the soul". The background constantly characterised by vibrant colours - becomes an opportunity to bring out the lines and marked features (always central) in its force of contrast between secondary colours such as the splendid blue and green, and the primary one such as yellow".

"The wonderful is always beautiful, indeed, only the wonderful is beautiful." (André Breton)

Art Curator Valentina Valentini


Betty Pöll

Red Desire


Betty Pöll

Filter


Betty Pöll

Levels of the soult


BogdiFy "I’m a visual artist using colour contrast and richness of details to transform the invisible into visible" BogdiFy

"The tree of life" at the international contemporary art exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S is depicted as a large tree with the roots spread inward to the ground and the branches spread outward to the universe. The details in the sky are there to represent the complexity and the beauty of the universe and our destiny which is already written. The tree is mystical symbol, it represents the bound of the spiritual realm we are reaching for and the physical realm we are rooted in. On the other hand, it can be seen as a symbol of rebirth, positive energy, and new beginnings. It also underlines the uniqueness of the individual, his beauty and his personal development during his life. The life of a tree begins in the same way as human life, doesn’t matter where on the Earth, it is situated. As the tree grows older, under the nature’s forces, each one grows in a unique and wonderful way. The overall contrast perceived in the painting background gives this unique notion of difference which makes each one uniquely crafted. The masterpiece of Bogdify shows how she sees the world, a symbolic representation of human soul. Nature is mixed with the inner world of the artist and the result is a new and innovative version of Klimt's paintings. The feature that distinguishes BogdiFy from the others is the use of color and shapes. Contrasts of color and geometric lines create a parallel universe belonging exclusively to the worldview of the artist. Iva Bogdanova Vandergheynst, known artistically as 'BogdiFy', is a Bulgarian-born artist based in Lausanne, Switzerland. She is a graduate in Electrical Engineering and holds a PHD. BogdiFy’s artworks are mainly abstract and painted on canvas using mixed-media. Her paintings are vibrant and energetic, meticulously crafted with repeating patterns.

"My paintings celebrate the human, the marks people make on the world" BogdiFy

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


BogdiFy

The tree of life


Brigitte Schraudolph

<<It always gives me great pleasure when someone stops in front of a painting, looks at it and finds their own story in it.>> To introduce the artworks presented on the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldila by the artist Brigitte Schraudolph could be really useful starting from this consideration made by her. She refers to the intention of the artistic creation as the will to get a contact with a viewer in which he can find a place which reflects his personal and own story. The art becomes in this way the occasion to realize an encounter between two people, two points of view, and maybe at the end of this encounter discover many common points. It would be very interesting to investigate this encounter to discover these points. Starting from the first wok presented titled The birth - the soul enters the earthly life. We can see a composition created by some spots and different colors. From the left we can see the power of the yellow colour that seems to want to involve all the place of the composition. This action reminds me of the power of being born. With few elements, the artist is able to communicate something that belongs to the vital experience of the observer as well. The second artwork presented titled The arc of life, present at the center of the composition a tall e majestic arch. Immediately the observer can understand the importance of this shape. In fact this symbol is the arc that reminds me of the idea of a walk.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Brigitte Schraudolph

A moment in which to stay alone and reflect on life issues. In the composition created by the artist Brigitte Schraudolph every element put on become allegorical symbols that want to attract the attention of the viewer and communicate a message, something deepest and introspective. In the same way, the painting titled The earthly life finds its end. In this occasion we can see the composition that tends towards an homogeneity of the shapes and colors used. In the center of the painting, the eye of the viewer seems to be attracted by the vortex. He tries to understand where the journey goes, as if it wants to hide something. This element could be a pretext for the observer to investigate into himself, discover something new that belonged to his life. As if after a when you wake up after a dream you struggle with some elements that you think can be meaningful for your life. This element of the dream regards your deepest desire, your memories, and all the unconsciousness of life. The last painting titled the soul in balance, presents more light and vivid colour. The circle made by the composition reminds me of the circle of life in which every element finds its place. The artworks of the artist Brigitte Schraudolph are like a poem where every colour and shape stands into the composition to tell us about something else. Are all opportunities to go in another place and discover something new, as they were the real Aldila.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Brigitte Schraudolph

The arc of life


Brigitte Schraudolph

The earthly life finds its end


Brigitte Schraudolph

The birth - The soul enters the earthly life


Brigitte Schraudolph

The soul in balance


Bukola Dagiloke "Although humans see reality in colour, for me, black and white has always been connected to the image's deeper truth, to its most hidden meaning." (Peter Lindbergh)

Bukola is an emerging artist with a background in information design and graphic communication. Gratuating from the

been consistent and a slow burning talent has emerged. University of the Asrts in 2006, Bukola’s love for arts has Recently sha has launched herself into the international art world. Pen and ink are Bukola’s work tools. With simplicity

and naturalness gets interesting results, which overlook the varied international art scene with originality, wonderful the attentive viewer. A style in appearance cool, calligraphic, hides intent and messages of great strength. The artist touches on issues such as race, identity and nature, with an eye always attentive to sustainability and fashion.The result is given by patterns, that repeating, in some cases, equal to themselves on the sheet of paper, become almost a mantra, a repetition tending to infinity of a concept, which penetrates the visitor’s brain and leads him into a state of meditative trance.


Bukola Dagiloke

This is the case of Fire in my soul, where the title guides the perception and success of the work itself. The use of pen and ink is one of the most ancient artistic techniques, dating back to the Middle Ages, thus assumes great contemporary connotations both for the themes treated and for expressive force. The monochrome, distinctive feature in all his works on display, allows to focus the attention of the viewer on a particular topic, concept or technique. Without color you can be freer in the experimentation of the sign and its symbolic meaning. Bukola chooses to make his works through the sole use of the outline that defines the images and creates them, leaving the interior spaces as white as the background. Black and white are the alpha and the omega of the chromatic scale. There are no nuances or middle ways, everything is clearly defined and without doubts: principle and end of the whole.

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Bukola Dagiloke

Fire in my soul


Bukola Dagiloke

Queen


Carmella Cardina "My plan is to create a companion series of older women wanting to reveal their bodies to themselves, and revel in their beauty" (Carmella Cardina)

Carmella Cardina began taking photographs with the aim of exploring her body and investigating how she felt about aging. In fact, she believes that living in a culture that values ​youth, as she gets older she has less to offer, and she feels invisible. Carmella represents all those women of mature age who, instead of appreciating the wrinkles on their face as a trace of what they have experienced, tend to turn away from the mirror and hide, not from others, but from themselves, feeling the beauty as a past value no longer belonging to them. Through her intense photographs, all in black and white as if to give the whole a sense of melancholy and nostalgia for something irrecoverable, Carmella investigates the body of the mature woman, placing herself as the protagonist of her shots, in order to force herself and the viewer to see exactly who she is and to accept her for her beautiful imperfections drawn by the passing of time. At "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Carmella presents three photographs. In "Done", the artist is lying in the bed which, even if it houses her body, is almost intact. The woman, with her arms perfectly aligned and a pillow on her head as if wanting to hide her face and identity, seems to want to abandon herself, her thoughts, her body, her life ...almost as if she were dead. In this first shot, therefore, there is an inability to accept one's person, in extremely gloomy terms, bordering on the macabre. In "Gravity", on the other hand, the artist portrays herself in a bathroom, squatting on the floor almost as if to hide under the sink cabinet. There seems to be no space for her in life outside of that cold room: Carmella tries to find an unusual place to hide, to escape from those outside who would like her to be impeccable, handsome and capable in everything. But here in "Visible" there is a change, already announced in the title of the work. In fact, the artist is wrapped with adhesive tape bearing the words "Fragile", originally created to indicate the weak contents of the packages to be transported. Carmella, as if she herself were "fragile content", wrapped herself in tape, like an unshakable brand given by our sick society that aspires in disastrous terms to an unattainable imperfection. But the artist says no: she takes the scissors and photographs herself in the exact moment in which she cuts the tapes, in which she decides to no longer accept harassment, to no longer feel inferior to anyone, and to accept herself for what she is, with wrinkles and imperfections, considering one's body as the sacred temple of our person, identity and soul, and as such, to be accepted, respected and honoured.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Carmella Cardina

Done


Carmella Cardina

Gravity


Carmella Cardina

Visible


Carrie MeeRan "The traditional antithesis of body and soul is therefore not a vain mythological conception. Doubles we really are, we build an antinomy" (Durkhein)

The art of Carrie MeeRan is framed in abstractionism, but maintains a link with the figurative art, which emerges almost

like a child playing hide-and-seek, but hides only the face, thanks to the changes in intensity and color of the pattern that is repeated on the canvas. The artist paints for herself, as a cure for the traumas suffered in the course of his life, but his art becomes universal and speaks an understandable language, immediate, although never taken for granted. The theme that is close to her heart and that she proposes with great expressive force is the duality that coexists in human nature and human experiences. The body is an integral part of the material universe, as we know it through sensible experience. Man is divided into two spheres: on the one hand there is his individuality, or rather his body, on the other hand there is what it expresses, often in antithesis with what it really is.


Carrie MeeRan

Between this two spheres sometimes a pure antagonism is created. From this point of view, the search for selfknowledge, an inner balance, is placed. The strong and clear message passes through a material art, in which color is the protagonist, the shape and outline almost cancelled in the name of a fluid, liquid as the society in which we live. The intuition and the emotions of the moment are the main guide of the brush on the canvas and this emerges forcefully and is certainly the distinctive feature that allows the viewer to feel in tune with the work itself, identify with it and draw its own emotions and sensations. This creates a strong connection between artist and observer, intimate, in which each of the parties establishes a dialogue and the canvas becomes a mediator of lived stories.

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Carrie MeeRan

Spinning Nautilus


Carrie MeeRan

Mon Coeur


Catarina Diaz

Catarina Diaz is a collage artist who creates works of art that combine contrasting elements creating unique pieces of art rich in symbolism, the deep contrast allows Catarina to create pieces that combine realism and surrealism, but not only, also psychological, spiritual and transcendental elements are conveyed. Catarina is a permanent artist at the exhibitions organized by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of “Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica”, she exhibits “Free” and “Out of the blue” which are similar works from a chromatic point of view, but absolutely unique from an emotional and communicative point of view. "Free" sees the model's face completely in dim light, despite this, her confidence is perceptible, the use of a gray scale as a chromatic element creates a deep contrast with the bird in the foreground, in the upper part of the work.


Catarina Diaz

The bare shoulders, the face placed forward indicates a propensity to show oneself to the world without difficulty, a sense of freedom is transmitted, both emotional and mental totally mirrored by the animals used by Catarina in this work. "Out of the blue", while maintaining the gray scale as the predominant chromatic element, focuses attention on blue, first of all on the blue of the model's eyes, perfectly matched to the blue of the bird's feathers. Her gaze is turned elsewhere, towards the horizon, also in this case a sense of freedom is perceived, but the presence of the roses is totally different, emphasizing the delicacy of the model. Catarina Diaz's works of art have the ability to lead viewers to empathize with the women who are represented. The unique stylistic trait and her communicative talent give the artist a profound emotional power.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Catarina Diaz

Free


Catarina Diaz

Out of the blue


Cecilia Börjeson In the works of Cecilia Börjeson, on the technical level, we can notice the almost total abolition of the drawing and the lines that surround the objects defining their volumes; they are no longer important because the workhorse of this Swedish artist is the color. It, bright and lively, pure or mixed, stands out on the canvas in all its beauty. Cecilia Börjeson, completely self-taught, manages to bring out all the potential of colors, and to represent nature with all the sense of truth and brilliance it possesses, thank to her impeccable skill. Water is a recurring element in the works of Cecilia Börjeson. Since it never subsides, it allows her to indulge in reproducing the thousand possible ripples and reflections on its surface. The results are breathtaking. In “Juliön” the body of water appears calm and confidently reflects the forest behind it. This is the only work, of the three under examination, in which a human element appears: three small houses with red walls reside solitary on a small promontory. However, they do not disturb the eye of the viewer, but blend perfectly with the natural scene represented. It seems to admire a figurative representation of a poem. On the other hand, as the artist says: "What is idyll, if not a dreamy summer’s day in July". "Summerless" is, instead, the most abstract of the three artworks, allowing the viewer to see what he believes and to freely interpret the horizontal line that divides the composition into two parts. The brushstrokes are dense and textured, extremely colourful and inviting to the touch. The work exudes pure joy. Speaking of "Winter-Water" the artist says: "There are colours hidden within the ice of winter.", and in fact, to represent this winter landscape, Cecilia Börjeson not only uses the tones of gray and blue, but plays wisely with the whole palette, thus heating the entire composition. White, however, remains the dominant color of the work and consequently the canvas emanates towards the observer a sensation, without doubt fascinating, of sharp and penetrating cold. The brushstrokes of color are, once again, dense and they emerge from the canvas thus preventing the light from sliding evenly on the surface; consequently, the light "stumbles" on these ripples, creating chiaroscuro games worthy of the best bas-reliefs. “I want to make the eyes of the beholder dance as they move across the paintings, following the light on the canvas.” says the artist, and in fact our eyes dance bewitched in front of her works, never satisfied to discover new details of these amazing landscapes that seem to come out of an aldilà, a beyond.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Cecilia Börjeson

Juliön


Cecilia Börjeson

Summerless


Cecilia Börjeson

Winter-Water


Cecilia Brandel “I create directly from my heart and thus paint intuitively what my soul and heart want to convey.” says Cecilia Brandel, self-taught Swedish artist. As a result, her works are completely unique as well as the feelings and thoughts that cross her and us mind from time to time. Looking at her works, we could say that she is a delicate soul, a soul that speaks continuously with and through her own heart. The colors are light and soft, never violent and bright, as you would expect from a gentle soul. In the case of "Trust", the artist chooses to combine pink and blue; it appears to be a gamble choice since these two colors are contrasting, but in reality, looking at the work, we can understand how it was a winning choice. The addition of white as a third color in the composition, makes it more harmonious and delicate. The protagonist of the artwork seems to be a dancer, but we can also glimpse a couple kissing, or maybe it’s just my imagination? This is the magic of abstract art, there is nothing certain and unambiguous, and this is also the magic of unconditioned trust. With this work, in fact, Cecilia Brandel invites you to trust what is beyond the obvious, invites you to trust your instinct, the power of love, and so everything becomes possible and you can overcome any adversity. “I want to light up people’s hearts and my wish is to touch and give something to the viewer.” says the artist. So she, using the color a bit in the manner of William Turner, but with the addition of dripping both horizontally and vertically, in an absolutely contemporary way, touches our hearts making us dance full of trust to an aldilà, an unknown beyond.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Cecilia Brandel

Trust


Cedric Albertini

On the occasion of the International Art exhibition Aldilà, the artist Cedric Albertini presents the work titled “The Windows Down”. To understand his personal way to intend the artistic creation it would be useful to start from the technique used to make the composition. <<He brings together all kind of shapes, colors, lines, and real images. He feeds his drawings with some random pieces and transforms them into a final work>>. This means that the process of the creation of the artworks concern the juxtaposition of several elements. In this way, the viewer, to find under the surface the real mining, could excavate the work, break it down into various parts and try to connect with the intention of the artist. If we consider firstly the tonality of colors used, we can discover a lot of connection with the elements typical of Brutalism's current. Plastic, metal, all elements that want to communicate the power of the vision. They want to attract the attention of the viewer, as if they want to say:-pay attention, here is happening something that you have never seen-. In this way the observer has the opportunity to enter inside the composition, and seems to be involved in the vision stay in another place different from the reality. The stratification of the work made by the artist Cedric Albertini, mentioned above, is a strategic technique connected to this intention. To involve the viewer and take him to another place. Maybe this could also be the explanation of the title “the windows down”. As if the work would be the window from witch, discover a new place, a new way to intend the Aldilà.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Cedric Albertini

The windows down


Chalda Maloff Art has no end but its own perfection. (Plato)

Chalda Maloff presents her artwork “Metamorphosis “ for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. Digitally created enabling the creation of her own “Aldilà”. A positive adaptation were adversity is the strength point for resilience to undertake the important task of representing the artist’s experience to reflect a space in life. It is a conversation after turmoil. Presented digitally with surroundings that wish to evolve in order to create a new reality for the feminine character, whose gaze is waiting for an answer. Subtle tones are included to frame the character’s strong and bold gaze carried with red tones as a cosmic force in the occult exploration were the creative ability is reflected as an independent element based on abstraction and portraiture. Epistêmê is the Greek word for knowledge, while technê could mean craft or art. Plato states technê as enlightened knowledge. There is a close and contrasted relationship between epistêmê and technê, theory and practice, knowledge and art, digital and expression. Expression through technology symbolizes the symbiosis between two created dimensions: the present reality and our constant imaginary to evolve into a new space depicting our “Aldilà”.

Courage is a kind of salvation. (Plato)

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Chalda Maloff

Metamorphosis


Charles Dadi

We are often prompted to ask ourselves if what we see, what surrounds us, is all that really exists or if there is something else, if there is something Aldilà our nose. Not just spiritually speaking, but physically as well. We humans know that we are only an infinitesimal part of the Universe, which in its immensity is populated by billions of celestial bodies, which we will never be able to discover all of. We can only observe some of them, thanks to the tools designed by human intelligence, and imagine others, knowing that in reality any shape or color could be in some corner of the Universe. The artist Charles Dadi shows us, in his works, his universe, how he sees it, how he imagines it could be. Charles's universe is populated by celestial bodies with bright colors and particular shapes. Tongues like lava give fluidity and movement to celestial bodies.


Charles Dadi

The choice of colors communicates a lot: the colors of the four elements that make up our planet interact with each other, giving us the feeling that each represented body has a specific characteristic that distinguishes it from the others; it's as if Charles gives us a clue as to what life is like on that planet. The shades of colors, the lines and textures represented convey the idea of ​their materiality, as if we could grab them in our hands and feel them under our fingers: the heat, the cold, the soft, the edgy. In addition, Charles even takes us right inside them, making us discover their innermost heart. Observing carefully the works presented here "Galaxy A1003" and "Galaxy A1004" it seems to us to be in another world, full of life and joy. Charles's works convey all this joie de vivre.

Art Curator Silvia Grassi


Charles Dadi

Galaxy A1003


Charles Dadi

Galaxy A1004


Chiara Saleri

Chiara Saleri is an Italian artist who combines her profession as a teacher with her greatest passion: art. Chiara is a versatile artist, always looking for new stimuli and inspiration. She herself says that the color combinations in relation to the subject are the key to creating impact works. The work that Chiara Saleri exhibits at M.A.D.S. art gallery during the exhibition "Aldilà" is emblematic. The work is titled “Donna con orecchino", literally "Woman with earring", and is made of acrylic on canvas. Here the artist’s discourse is evident: the chromatic choice is fundamental. The black background is in stark contrast to the gold frame made by simple spatulates within the painting. The gold light is then taken in the woman’s earring, the focal point of the composition. Black is instead taken up in the woman’s dress, outlined by a thin gold contour to bring out her silhouette. The curly hair and lips have the same soft brown. Undoubtedly what is striking is the choice of color that helps to create a work by the graphic setting. The work, in fact, with its vertical composition, resembles a flyer or a cover of a newspaper, thus approaching the French painter Toulouse-Lautrec, considered precisely the "father of graphics”. On an iconographic point of view, the title and the subject cannot fail to recall the famous painting "Girl with a turban" by Johannes Vermeer, also known as "The girl with a pearl earring". In both paintings the background is black and the subject is represented in profile. Chiara’s woman, however, does not look at the spectators but closes her eyes in a moment of reflection, as if she was savoring that moment and is letting go. The earring in both cases is bright and attracts attention. It can be said that Chiara Saleri is paying homage to the famous painting, interpreting it in a modern way, combining her pictorial skills with her graphic knowledge.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Chiara Saleri

Donna con orecchino


Christina Fink “Time is free, but it's priceless. You can't own it, but you can use it." (Harvey Mackay)

Since her early years, Christina Fink has always had to deal with creativity. As she tells us, as a child she loved to create three-dimensional objects, constructions which, as fate decided, then became part of her current work. In fact, the German artist today does not only deal with painting, but also with 3D creations. The artwork that she has decided to display in “Aldilà” exhibition is a stunning canvas, painted with acrylics and entitled “Time”. The idea of ​time that passes even when everything seems to stop and always leaves some testimonies around it, is part of the reflection that led Christina Fink to the creation of this work. The scene is occupied by an almost fairytale-like vegetation, with a tree with a green trunk and a majestic foliage. The romantic atmosphere of the canvas is certainly rendered not only thanks to the natural subject, but also by the use of a delicate and dynamic brushstroke. The tree placed on the right of the small river that crosses the scene in the center, twists on itself, on its years spent witnessing the passing of life, the seasons that always passed, despite everything. Its lush foliage shines with a purple color, with some leaves that take their time and still lag behind, leaving their lighter color. "This tree tells millions of stories in one instant" as the artist herself says, giving this noble shrub the nickname of a witness of time. And so each leaf, each branch with its bifurcations, become an immense network, where Christina Fink masterfully describes the passage of time, the flow of things, in a continuous dance of nature.

Art Curator Claudia Sferrazza


Christina Fink

Time


Coco

A sea of color stands before our eyes. What we are observing is literally a sea in a storm. Horses of color rise from the composition and foamy ridges peep out from a background that is anything but homogeneous. The strength of color is expressed here in all its power and expressiveness and the artist's gesture is all that is needed for the pigment to be represented. Painting on canvas means that, by force of circumstances, the composition of the work has objectively two-dimensional characteristics and yet, in this case, the waves of color overlap each other producing a space that is anything but infinite, as deep as the abyss. And yet, it is not a sea that unsettles us, it is not something we are intimidated by. The human being in front of the infinite is intimidated. Although he is in constant search of freedom, man is afraid of the indefinite and the uncertain and, by his nature, seeks to find comfort, a foothold and a safe harbor that will calm him in the darkest times. Coco here is representing the infinite through the power of color and yet we are not afraid. We are not afraid to turn our gaze towards these waves, we do not hesitate to delve into them to discover what lies beneath the most superficial chromatic ridges. We dive into All the Basic driven by an unknown force that resides in our soul. Probably it's renewed curiosity or the innate urge of man to always look for the reality beyond things. There is no unequivocal answer as there is no defined space in the work. The touches of color are extremely rapid, short and almost nervous: they are interspersed and lay down on the porous texture of the canvas at a frantic pace. It is a chromatic dance that stimulates the visual perception, it is a melody of tonal gradations that pushes us to observe every brushstroke, every trace left by the artist's hand. Scattered in a heterogeneous way, they are inserted in an organic way within the work and act as a skeleton and a supporting structure to the entire visual representation. Above, beside or below them the rest of the colors: a light minty green, fresh from a spring breeze, shyly stains the rough surface of the canvas. A deep red yields part of its expressive power to conform to the other patches representing itself in tiny dry and arid strokes that dot the chromatic sea. White, then, is the unifying element. As a neutral medium, respectful of the chromatic aura of others, it insinuates itself among the waves and among the crests, it lies on the surface or penetrates into the depths: it is, together with the pinkish tones, one of the cardinal points of the composition. All the basic is a hymn to the heterogeneity of color and, in a broader sense, of the existence of each individual. It's a song to the organicity of the composition and of every living matter, it's the graphic representation of a deep sea that doesn't scare but attracts with all its expressive power: all we have to do is dive and get dirty with color.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Coco

All the Basic


Cranda

Carolina Aranda, aka Cranda, is a visual artist and graphic designer from Argentina. Her love for colours, shapes and textures led her to cultivate her great artistic talent from a young age. Through drawing, painting and photography workshops, Cranda has increased her interest in the varied world of art. Her view of this discipline is transversal because it takes into account the different nuances of art. This is evident in her creations because within an image she creates several visual worlds that draw on photography, drawing, collage, graphics and painting. Each of her artworks is unique and contains an interweaving of forms that cannot be replicated, a surprising and intriguing visual experience. Cranda is a bold artist, capable of interpreting change, of keeping up with the sudden changes that art undergoes every day. Her studies, combined with a unique and original style, a strong aesthetic taste for the combination of shapes and colour gradations and that's it. Cranda proposes a modern style that mixes graphic signs, colours and textures. The artist lets herself be guided by her instinct, by her feelings and is not afraid to look for something new in her creative process, on the contrary. The novelty and the constant motion of change are a stimulus for her and she is able to draw inspiration from them and create new, evocative creations. In her artwork "Colorama", light is the element that connects shapes and colours. Reality is deconstructed and then reassembled through the combination of chromatic veils. These create a play of superimpositions and transparencies that allow the viewer to get lost in a chromatic labyrinth. Cranda does not limit herself to using shapes but deliberately juxtaposes them with other elements that interact with each other and establish relationships. Dots, fine lines, contours make space on the coloured surfaces. The chromatic tones are full, without nuances. Cranda's interplay of solids and voids is interesting. Her sign is very graphic and the effect of the white line contrasting with the bright colours creates dynamism and brings the work to life. The artist sets up the image as if it were a mirror of the human soul, jagged, full of different elements that sometimes coincide and sometimes create veils and nuances. Man is colour, light and transparency, all fundamental elements that she inserts into the artwork. The light is given by the white monochromatic background and the thin lines superimposed on the other coloured sections. Transparency is given by the continuous overlapping of elements that create different planes and remain single units but at the same time create a harmonious composition. The artist's reference to currents such as abstractionism is evident, but revisited in an absolutely personal and contemporary key. The result is a fluid, harmonious, fresh artwork. Cranda uses all her skills and knowledge to create an abstract image somewhere between graphic and pictorial. Art evolves, and with it, those who produce it must keep up. The viewer cannot help but be deeply fascinated and involved.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Cranda

Colorama


Dalia Abdel Ghany "I feel you are wondering: what does it mean to be a colour? Colour is the tone of the eye, the music of the deaf, a cry in the dark" (Orhan Panuk)

Dalia's artistic work is a concentration of colours that move within the work and give it dynamism. Colours and shades that come into contact and contrast with each other, but which create a balance. Brushstrokes, marks and lines that run one after the other create works of intense vivacity. The artist lets herself be guided by her personal instinct and pure creativity, walking on the road that leads to the discovery of the most intimate self. Dalia, through her artistic work, expresses herself and more, through her art she also manages to discover herself and bring out her abilities and above all her emotions. Dalia's art appears as a great intersection, in which colors, shades, lights and shadows converge. In the same way, the observer also makes a journey, the gaze is captured and travels along those paths made of colors, different colors and different emotions. In a continuous succession of sensations: calm and harmony, trepidation and melancholy, the viewer is able to experience new feelings and emotions.


Dalia Abdel Ghany

The style of Dalia's works is purely abstract, no figure, no shape that refers to reality, only color and free and unconstrained brushstrokes, no obstacles, in fact her works pay homage to the purity of the abstract movement. The works are imbued with passion and feeling, it is clear that the artist follows inspiration through art, listens to her spirit and gives vent to his sensations in total freedom. Without fear she expresses her being. Dalia's artistic work becomes a journey on the paths traced by colors and full of emotions, a path through which you can get in touch with the soul of the artist and with your own. Dalia's art is the meeting point between emotions, feelings and soul of the artist and the observer.

Art Curator Vanessa Viti


Dalia Abdel Ghany

Contraction


Dalia Abdel Ghany

Expansion


Dalia Slep “I dream my painting and I paint my dream.” (Vincent van Gogh)

Dalia is an artist living and working in Lithuania who loves to experiment, finding her own way to express concepts and emotions through colours and shapes. Abstract art is what represents her most and allows her to express herself completely, without limits or boundaries. With it, Dalia opens up her world to the viewer, establishing a direct relationship. Dalia lets herself be guided by her emotions and her instinct; she prefers spontaneity to breadmaking. The artist loves to be amazed by the end result, loves to observe how her emotions have created a new artwork, completely from scratch. Her aim is to provoke a reaction from the viewer, no matter whether it is positive or negative: when art does not leave you indifferent, it means that the goal has been achieved. In her painting 'Confusing dreams', the artist refers to a dreamlike place, a mysterious and confusing atmosphere that refers to the unconscious. Dreams have always been a much-loved subject and reproduced in art because they allude to a mysterious, subjective and extremely captivating sphere that can fascinate anyone. They are the fruit of our imagination but often linked to a state of mind, to concerns, anxieties or sensations that affect our lives. Dalia opens up her world to the viewer. She paints in an abstract way, deliberately juxtaposing shapes and colours in a chaotic manner. The surface of the canvas is divided in two, as if it were a mirror of water where the land is reflected. The upper part is sharper, while the lower part appears as a continuation, an extension or even a reflection. The effect of the colour dripping down, delineating a division, is very striking. Dalia draws shapes without planning them, she occupies the space with emotions triggered in that instant or reworked. In this way she brings out a section of the unconscious that everyone interprets in a different way, which in turn could trigger strong emotions in the eyes of the viewer. The predominant colours are blue and light blue, brown and beige. The colours are bright but not overly strong, and there is an interesting contrast between the cold and warm colours that balance the balance of the work. Dalia describes a subjective feeling where everyone is able to find their own key to fully understand the artwork.The wavy line and the theme are reminiscent of Salvator Dali's surrealist art. While the colours recall the suspended atmospheres of De Chirico's metaphysical works. Dalia organises the images of his unconscious through a method based on decontextualisation. She takes shapes and lines seen in a dreamlike dimension and puts them together, but realises them according to a principle of chaos. The colour does not follow rigid boundaries, it is left completely free, free to wander and to create relationships with the other elements in the painting. The brushstrokes are soft, fluid and the directions of the colours are not studied. The artist inserts a small part of her world into this artwork and wants the viewer to do the same, to interact, to interpret, to make this image their own. Painting is a process that leads to unexpected results that are worth investigating.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Dalia Slep

Confusing Dreams


Daniel Buchner

Daniel Buchner is a self-taught artist with a background in electronic dance music. His art, as well as his music, is created exclusively on the computer. His digital works are inspired by the art movement of Neoplasticism, as he himself states: "my compositions are an exploration into a new Neoplasticism. Order through abstraction in form and colour. Leaning heavily on the vision of spiritual harmony". In Brothers Part 2, the work presented on the occasion of this exhibition, blue and black lines cross the space, intertwining with an expanse of small squares in shades of yellow, blue and black. Tradition and innovation coexist perfectly in this work in which the formal aspect, indebted to Neoplasticism in its geometric abstraction, is combined with modern digital technology. Daniel's technique is based on the use of small portions of photographs or famous works of art from which he removes all shades of colour, leaving only solid-colour pixels. The pixels are then edited, cut and reassembled to create new works of art, each linked in its title to the original from which it is taken. His adherence to the De Stijl movement is not exclusively formal. Indeed, he not only uses blocks of primary colours combined with each other and in dialogue with the other geometric elements of the composition, but above all he embraces the underlying spirit of this artistic movement. If, in fact, in the De Stijl movement abstraction and the reduction of form and colour to the essential were the expression of a new utopian ideal of harmony and spiritual order to be applied to art as well as to the outside world, in the same way in Daniel's works the search for balance responds to the need to deal with our turbulent times. Thus, looking at his work, we can say that not only is art capable of going beyond places and situations, as the concept of this exhibition argues, but also beyond any historical era.

Art Curator Marta Graziano


Daniel Buchner

Brothers Part 2


Daniel Gaciu “It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” (Henry David Thoreau)

Art can be considered the main nourishment of the mind: the soul, the mind and the eyes need to be opened to the world and Art can be the filter capable of translating and transforming feelings into colorful images. The urban abstract artist Daniel Gaciu seeks an artistic process – of research and transformation - to achieve his personal form of expression. In doing so the artist’s aim is to put on paper what happens in his mind - following the changeability of the thoughts. Daniel Gaciu finds in the space and in its countless and changing forms his source of inspiration; this allows the painter to create and to always give new perspectives, shifting his work into something new and transmuted.


Daniel Gaciu

The artistic investigation of the painter is not limited to an exploration of the known and unknown world but this research spreads, involving also the painting techniques of Daniel Gaciu: he feels free to find a representative way to give his personal view of what lives in his mind and soul, vinified by using acrylics, simple colours and powerful combination of abstract elements. Daniel Gaciu completes his artworks with the use of lights, shades and shadows – focusing his attention on the decomposition of them into colours. The main aim of the artist, therefore, is to offer to the audience a maze of colours and shading meanders, suggesting to the viewers a reading key but leaving them free to play with the feelings that come out from the canvas and hit their hearts.

"We don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are." (Anaïs Nin)

Art Curator Manuela Fratar


Daniel Gaciu

Shaping energy


Daniel Gaciu

Terrain of perception


Dave Thomas

Dave Thomas is a figurative artist whose works of art tell the story of an instant, the female figure is central to all of Dave's artistic production that tells of his emotions and moods. Dave, again a guest at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of "Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica", exhibits two works that follow the typical file rouge of the artist. Fresh and current "Desirability" and "Versatility" express totally different emotions, but remain consistent with the artist's unique style. "Desirability" represents a woman in an intimate moment in which makeup is fixed, a sense of mystery is created, the observer is led to ask himself questions about the woman "Who is she?" "What will she have to do?": “After a day relaxing on the sun kissed beach, the lady is applying the final make up touches ready for a night out. Looking into the mirror on her handbag, is she thinking back to her time on the beach, watching people pass by, listening to conversations, whilst soaking up the sun? Or is she contemplating a night out with a mystery date?” The artist explains.


Dave Thomas

Totem of the artist is the use of red and chiaroscuro, the perfectly created shadows and lights create an atmosphere that persists over time, making the work devoid of any superstructure, but direct and emotionally disruptive. Dave's stylistic coherence is also found in "Versatility ", a work full of movement and dynamism, in which the typical elements of the artist's pieces of art are always present. The relaxed but tense position of the woman creates an extensive aura that conveys attention to the position of the legs, head and arms. The women represented by Dave are strong and independent women, perfectly comfortable being themselves, they are women who do not need confirmation and reassurance, they are stable and confident. Both works are part of the “Beach Life” series.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Dave Thomas

Desirability


Dave Thomas

Versitility


David Jandron “Life doesn’t get easier or more forgiving, we get stronger and more resilient.” (Steve Maraboli)

What lies behind the works of David Jandron, a young American self-taught artist, is a whole universe of sensations, experiences and strength. Through the deformed faces of his figures, the artist tells a piece of his story in each canvas, made up of falls, but also of ascents. The difficult and dark moments in David Jandron's life helped push him towards an in-depth analysis of his style. The change of course, which arrived in 2021, after a period of difficulty and sadness, led the artist to move towards new stylistic horizons. The first work presented in the “Beyond” exhibition is entitled “Pause”. Here, as in the other works proposed and in many others of his production, David Jandron uses acrylic, ink, spray paint on canvas. Through the representation of faces, fragmented and deformed, almost engulfed by the brilliant background of the colors he uses, the artist defines faces that seem to scream at times, at times to remain motionless. The title refers to the skill that the artist has learned and continues to learn every day in his life: wait, pause thoughts and try not to be overwhelmed. The second canvas presented is “Along the path”. In this regard, speaking of this canvas, the artist says: "I have and continue be, shaped by the many people and experiences that I have accumulated." This time too, there are many faces that populate the scene, in lighter tones, on a bright white background. In these just outlined silhouettes, there are the faces of the artist's loved ones, of those who helped him and never abandoned him in times of need. Finally, the last canvas presented by David Jandron in the "Beyond" exhibition is "Projecting". Formally and aesthetically closer to the first, "Pause", here too the shades of green return, which seem to perfectly describe the monsters of the artist's mental projections. But “Projecting” also talks about the future, about how we can and must always find a way to project ourselves precisely in the right dimension, even when it seems impossible and the green monsters seem to overwhelm us.

Art Curator Claudia Sferrazza


David Jandron

Pause


David Jandron

Along the path


David Jandron

Projecting


Davina Dugnas

Davina Dugnas experiments with a world of colours. She uses colours, lines, textures and patterns inspired by places, objects and nature. Dugnas visualises ideas, feels emotions and relocates them into the canvas by mixing contemporary and abstract art. In this way, her ideas and emotions move to a new place, have a new home and take on new visualisations and forms to tell new stories. Her ideas and emotions are told poetically in a very beautiful and sensitive way. Dugnas’s art is in fact a silent poem: her textures and patterns become her metrics and rhymes, colours and lines her content. Her ideas and emotions are, thus, told in a multitude of aesthetic relationships that bring the visual sign to encounter what is the eye of the viewer. “My believe is that creativity sparkle lies from within, expressing one’s true mind and soul”, says Dugnas. So, her creativity undresses in front of the canvas; it becomes the necessary means to express her inner mind and soul which, now nude and without veils, are shared with the world, wishing to be able to give something for everyone. To share her world of colours with the world of people, hoping to feel new emotions and to see new visualisations too. "Seven Rays” and “Silver Angel Wings” are the titles of two works that Dugnas created this year and that are presented in this exhibition. They appear very different from each other, but deep inside, they are very similar.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Davina Dugnas

“Seven Rays” has a vertical shape and is composed of beautiful gold leaves and acrylics of shades of blues and violets, with gesso that makes the surface heavier and rough. The title suggests a concept that has a strong presence in Western and Eastern religions and esoteric philosophies. For example, in the Christian iconography, seven rays were often the symbol of the revelation of the Holy Ghost, thus representing light, hope, and the absence of shadows and darkness. “Silver Angel Wings” has a horizontal shape and is composed of acrylics of shades of blues, grey and violets. At the centre, big angel wings shine, made of circle-shaped and silvery forms embroidered on the canvas. “Every cloud has a silver lining”, Dugnas says to describe this work. The painting, in fact, conveys a dual opposition: the heaviness given by the silvery material on the one side, and the lightness given by the celestial atmosphere created by the colours, on the other. In this way, the whole composition becomes a symbol of balance between heaviness and lightness, encouraging the viewer to see the positive side of things even in difficult and challenging situations, without weighting down and creating obstacles that are, like mountains, impossible to overcome. Hope and kindness, light and dark, happiness and confidence, heaviness and lightness are, therefore, the keywords of these two beautiful paintings in which each one of us can identify and live his/her/their emotions, feelings and memories.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Davina Dugnas

Seven Rays


Davina Dugnas

Silver Angel Wings


Dominika Köck “My works of art are created in my head through my emotions which thereby become portraits of the soul. By painting I show feelings that I could never put into words!” (Dominika Köck)

The Polish artist Dominika Köck takes part at "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art gallery with three artworks that perfectly embody her dynamic yet profound and introspective style. In “Exemption”, the figure of a naked woman kneeling on the ground emerges from splashes of color, some imprinted on the canvas and others dripping along the space; her face is turned to the sky, eyes closed, arms outstretched, in a pose that releases all its strength and power. From her chest come out dark colored spots that seem to explode in the air around her. “Exemption” is a work that testifies to the strength of a woman, in the fullness of her femininity and inner power. Frida Kahlo is instead the protagonist of the second work presented by Dominika, which gives the title to the painting. The Mexican artist is portrayed from the front up to the bust, with bright and vibrant colors that make up her face, hair and clothes. A more abstract background behind her places the woman in an indefinite and almost dreamlike space. The writing on the left "I am my own muse" is very suggestive, ironically referring to the great fortune that Frida Kahlo had in the common imagination, on the ways in which she became an important source of inspiration in the fight for feminism but also as a model to draw from iconographically. The phrase, however, can also be interpreted as if it were Dominika herself who said it, testifying how she respects herself and her being a woman, proving to be a strong and self-confident woman as the muse of her own life. "Nostalgia" instead represents a lady who seems to contrast with the premiere of "Exemption": if in fact the latter released all her strength, the "Nostalgia" woman sadly hides her face behind one knee, curled up on herself. Even the colors that characterize her, more gray and dark, seem to correspond to her mood, more melancholy and sad. Two large wings, however, encircle her shoulders, as if to indicate that even in the darkest times, there is always hope for better moments and nothing can extinguish the grandeur and the powerful energy of a woman.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Dominika Köck

Exemption


Dominika Köck

Frida Kahlo


Dominika Köck

Nostalgia


Dunia Vela

<<Fantasy is certainly not an escape from reality; it is a way to understand it>>. This phrase made by the writer Lloyd Alexander could be interesting if the intention is that of to introduce the artworks presented on occasion of the international art exhibition Aldila by the artist Dunia Vela. Starting from the first artwork titled Ortles. We can see a texture of colour that wants to tend towards an homogeneity of the vision. The colours used are light and bright. Just in the centre some splashes of amaranth break the vision to capture the attention of the visitors. This detail is connected to the intention of the artist to tell us about the contrast between two words that are that of inside us and that of the perception of the word outside us. In the same way, the painting titled Alberobello presents two polarities put on two different sides of the space. This balancing of the composition reminds of the duplicity of perception in life experiences.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Dunia Vela

As if what is happening around us would be different from what is happening inside us. The geometric use of the space is presented also in the third composition in which the artwork takes a circular shape. The composition appears to be divided into two parts, and also the colors used are two. Comes back to the duality of the things of life. As the artist says: <<. Red gives us energy and black gives us power. This mixture of colors conveys the idea to the viewer of strength, passion. It stimulates eroticism and awakens sensuality, intensified by its circular shape, it manages to take us through a world of strength and power. This geometric abstract painting contains a strong contrast, the result of the masterful use of red and black.>> The last composition seems to be different from the other three. We can see on the texture of the background spots and lines that come from one side of the painting as id the center of gravity as an energy, pulling the colors towards the left side of the composition. This power reflects the need to give vent to the fantasy. As if it were a place of escape, to discover in return to learn more about reality.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Dunia Vela

ORTLeS


Dunia Vela

ALBERoBELLO


Dunia Vela

PraTo


Dunia Vela

SigurtA


Ebru Bozok "The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance." (Aristotle)

Ebru Bozok is a talented artist living in Turkey. Artist with a refined and versatile inspiration, Ebru has deepened her technical and theoretical knowledge of painting in the academic field, specializing in watercolor and oil painting. Her artworks focus on the female figure, and in particular in idealized and graceful portraits that enhance the universal beauty of women to the utmost. Ebru embraces the aesthetics of art, which for centuries has re-proposed the female figure as a paradigm of beauty, and enriches it with a unique and fascinating personal vision. Waiting is an extraordinary example of the artist's stylistic refinement and technical mastery, which transports the observer into a delicate mist of soft and impalpable colors, on which bewitching figures with a poignant charm stand out. If on the one hand the outlines of the figures blend into the background, giving an elusive impression of incorporeality, on the other hand the artist focuses on the delicate details of the faces. The lunar pallor, the dark make-up of the eyes and the decorations with phytomorphic motifs make the two faces similar to the refined appearance of Venetian masks, igniting the attention of the beholder with genuine curiosity. The strength of the image also falls on the skilful chromatic choice alternating in the two figures: the shades of red and orange that characterize the hair and the dress of the figure in the foreground, are found in the lips and scarf of the figure in the background, creating a "dialogue" of great visual impact between the characters. Ebru Bozok creates a work full of charm, mystery and of course beauty in its deepest and highest meaning. A beauty that materializes in an accurate compositional ensemble, and above all in an exciting introspective journey.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Ebru Bozok

Waiting


Ego

Talking about the concept of art, refers to the artist Ego, it is like to talk about an ontological and mystical speech. His way to produce art and get inspired by the world, regards subtle levels of thought of a philosophical nature. This means that watching his work could be for the observer an occasion to stop the normal course of his life to reflect and cross himself, to discover to be changed at the end of the experience of watching. If we consider the works presented on the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldila, it is easy to immediately understand this idea. All the three works are built on a kaleidoscopic image, where the vision appears fragmented in different pieces in rotary motions. In the first work titled seeking reflection 01, what emerges at the first glance it’s the image of a face put on the center of the composition. As if the artist wants to concentrate the thought on this image. The observer feels hypnotized by the vision, projecting himself in the composition to empathize with the figure in front of him, as he was mirroring into the view. In the second work presented titled seeking reflection 02, this effect of mirroring and empathy, is accentuated. The protagonist of the painting seems to be a female figure fragmented in different pieces in the same way of the first work. In this decomposition, we can see the various parts in which we can potentially break down. The peace comes when these parts find their balance staying together. In this way, the composition becomes the mirror of our self, not just a portrait. In the same way the third work, tells us about this feeling of observation to the otherness to find ourselves. One element in this occasion stands out and it is the shape of the eye. In addition, this element appears to be involved in this fragmentation and in this rotation. The eye communicates with the intention to get in contact with the viewer with the action of watching. As if this posture would be the pretext to make an experience through the otherness to find who really I am. The art made the artist Ego it is not just a moment to see a product of something that comes from outside. However, staying a little more with ourselves, discovering new places of the mind and in rotation and change, discover ourselves, once and for all.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Ego

Seeking Reflection 01


Ego

Seeking Reflection 02


Ego

Seeking Reflection 03


Elin Lahdenperä

For the international exhibition “Aldilà” at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Elin Lahdenperä exposes the work “Lapponian gate”, through which she achieves a balance between the abstract and the figurative art capturing the surrounding atmosphere, light and shadows. The title takes its name from a U-shaped valley between two mountains in the Abisko National Park in the Swedish Lapland, and it shows the viewer an evening panorama: the sun sat down and the last sunlight can still be seen among the peaks, giving to the sky a gorgeous pink shade. Such a subjective painting encompasses a surprising objectivity: by being reminiscent of the art movement of the Impressionism, Elin captures a fleeting moment and paints what first catches her eye, managing to portray that "first impression" as truthfully as possible. The contrast between light and shadow becomes one of the main subjects of the work, as this perfectly reflects the changing of shades during the last hours of the day. Everything also leaves plenty of room to the artist's interpretation: as she paints, she represents her own feelings emerging from her soul. Her intuitions flow through the brush giving color to the pictorial surface, leaving a clear and indelible mark. By being extremely careful to the subtlest gradations of tone, Elin describes an almost transcendental and mystical landscape, completely immersed in a timeless reality, conveying deep feelings and immense tranquility. The viewer can benefit from the lifeblood emanating from the place, expanding his/her perceptions to become an integral part of that natural world. The artist has often asked herself how the other side of the mountain looks like: by asking herself this question, Elin invites the viewer to discover it with the power of thought and imagination, abandoning himself/herself to a visual experience, where the surrounding environment creates the universal, namely the infinite.

“Nature is not only everything that is visible... It also includes the inner images of the soul.” (Edvard Munch)

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Elin Lahdenperä

Lapponian gate


Emelly Velasco What we allow to shine through on the outside is always only a very small part of what we are in our depths. In addition to our smile and what we say, there is much, much more: a whole world. Only we can decide who to show it to, how much to show, how deeply to open up. For this exhibition that really wants to push artists to show their reality, their truth, the artist Emelly Velasco shows us in each of the works presented a different nuance of her world, a part of herself and of what she wants to convey with the her art. Her art is in fact her sounding board on the world, her way of showing herself and being heard. By observing her works, we feel physically transported within her way of seeing and interpreting the world. Emelly places herself in front of those who observe her works and through each work she opens a door that gives access to a part of her. By observing these works we can in fact see various facets of Emelly. In “Omnisensorial” the disruptive passion that overwhelms all our senses, the frenzy that one feels, that sense of feeling completely overwhelmed. Colors and lines are strong, passionate. In “Rest - Petite” instead we can feel that sensation of delicacy, that sense of waiting, like when she sighs in front of something that makes us feel safe. It is as if we were enveloped in a fog and protected by what surrounds us: that moment of lightheartedness. Finally, the fluidity of vital energy transforms and spreads everywhere in "Divertto Alcance - Proceso". Different energies come into contact with each other and this contact amplifies their vitality and impact on the observer. Intense and bright colors and strong lines interact with each other on the canvas. The colors, the signs, the brushstrokes are for Emelly the messengers of her Self that is deeper than her.

Art Curator Silvia Grassi


Emelly Velasco

Divertto Alcance - Proceso


Emelly Velasco

Omnisensorial


Emelly Velasco

Rest - Petite


Emily McKenzie “The secret of genius is to carry the spirit of the child into old age, which means never losing your enthusiasm.” (Aldous Huxley) The woman is a special being, but at the same time complex and at times difficult to understand; the woman lives overwhelmed by the whirlwind of emotions and often makes the instinct to reason prevail. Time passes, but it's up to her to grasp the beauty of every age. Contemporary artist Emily McKenzie painted "Girls in the Mirror - Picasso" in 2018 with the technique of acrylic on canvas. As the title suggests, the artist was inspired by the Pablo Picasso's unmistakable style to create the work. The protagonist is a female figure whose face and body are disassembled and reassembled allowing the viewer to observe the subject from multiple points of view at the same time. The woman is represented with young and adult features that come together in a single person in the mirror through which she looks. Every adult has within him the child he once was; every child cultivates passions every day and feeds on knowledge that will make him the adult he will be. The two sides coexist peacefully, but sometimes they collide: the child is irrational, carefree, and imaginative; the adult is reasonable, cautious, and realistic. What does the woman see in her reflection? She retraces her past, sees the present and imagines the future that has yet to take shape. The mirror is the metaphor of awareness: everyone in front of it lays bare, shows his weaknesses, and recognizes his strengths. The bodies and faces are painted in different colors, as many as there are shades of a personality and soul. Emily invites every woman to get completely involved in the work: may this painting be a starting point for a journey into her own inner world under the banner of profound reflections and unique emotions.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Emily McKenzie

Girls in the Mirror - Picasso


Esteve Prat Paz “Color in a picture is like enthusiasm in life.” (Vincent van Gogh)

Color is life, energy, and passion. The Spanish contemporary artist Esteve Prat Paz’s works are distinguished by the cleverly balanced color combinations, the perfect proportions of the bodies and the expressive faces of the protagonists who let their emotions shine through. "Figura Sèrie I 21-57" was created in 2021 with the technique of acrylic on paper. The asphalt is not so uncomfortable when you are young, dreamers and with your head in the clouds. Two friends lying next to each other fit their arms into one. At that moment any mishap could happen, but their strength lies in being united. Desires that seem unattainable, quarrels with parents, crazy loves that ended after a day: these are the concerns of two young girls after a school day that ended with a bad grade. At that moment, however, lying next to each other, every problem is cancelled, fear vanishes, serenity takes over. Closed eyes to get away from the reality that surrounds them, hands in the hair and legs towards the sky: the artist through the movements of the subjects makes us understand their thoughts, their feelings. Cold colors characterize the painting: different shades of blue and grey create a pleasant contrast with the pure white of the protagonists' tshirts. Esteve invites viewers to become one with what they see: kids are carefree, but adults should also continue to dream and travel with their imagination. Look at the work and let yourself be guided by your emotions.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Esteve Prat Paz

Figura Sèrie I 21-57


Ethan Robinson

Ethan Robinson is a decidedly creative British expressionist artist. His artworks are young, fresh and offer an innovative, colourful and imaginative view of the world. Often his art comes to life from urban landscapes, buildings, houses and streets. Visual photographs of a contemporary and tangible world revisited with experimental colours, mixed techniques, giving vent to his creativity. Each work is a world in itself, a fragment of reality broken down and revisited through new and original eyes. Ethan often uses several techniques together and this contributes to the uniqueness of his creations because they depart from monotony. The interaction that Ethan creates between landscape and man is interesting; the houses themselves represent not only the house as an architectural building, but also as a family unit, as an individual's ability to adapt. in "Egerton" this concept is very evident. The landscape is the protagonist. Ethan starts with a drawing of a residential street seen in perspective with houses on the right. The constructions are all different, even though they are all coloured in the same way, with a warm hue that turns to red. The sky is surreal, altered, with bright, disruptive colours in stark contrast with each other. The street is also coloured with a contrast of warm-cold tones (red-blue). Amidst the disruptive colours and bright hues, wavy, sharp or hidden shapes and lines emerge, giving rhythm and dynamism to the composition and distancing the real image from the imaginary one. The coexistence of opposing elements makes the work harmonious and well balanced, allowing each detail to stand out. The work contains a message of adaptation, of changing the perception of places depending on who lives there. Creating contrivances to see the place we live in in a different way is a typical human technique for escaping reality and adapting to a new place. In "NMW" we find a basic figurative drawing. The house is still the protagonist, but in a more abstract key. The painting appears much more dynamic and stylised than the previous one; the elements are made up of a set of lines of different thickness and intensity. Ethan here shows his more spontaneous, chaotic side. Oil paint moves across the canvas, drawing shapes. The work is then completed with spray paint, which gives it a more "unfinished" feel, an image suspended in time. Ethan takes his cue from his surroundings, from his city, Manchester, and brings back to the viewer a visual experience that he can decipher and interpret according to his own subjectivity. The colours are bright and vivid. In "The Winter Is Never Kind" Ethan shows another side of his artistic personality. However, the underlying message remains the same and reflects on man's ability to adapt to change, in this case climate change. The artist reflects on winter, personifying it as a real person. Winter is portrayed with an austere, severe and determined face. A few dark strokes outline the mouth, eyes and nose. The background is neutral and allows the stroke to stand out even more. Once again, Ethan uses a mixed technique, a mixture of oil paint, pastel, chalk on an unstretched canvas. The sense conveyed by the work is of something suspended in time, frozen in an instant, deliberately made as if it were unfinished. A conceptual image that contains a more complex reflection. Ethan is inspired by avant-garde movements such as expressionism, creating artworks with deep concepts where his artistic and interpretative skills are evident. Instinctive traits, bold colours and outlined shapes are among the characteristics that most identify him. The viewer inevitably feels involved.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Ethan Robinson

Egerton


Ethan Robinson

NMW


Ethan Robinson

The Winter Is Never Kind


Ewa Mroz “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.” (William Shakespeare)

When a personal and inner process – born from an own lifetime – evolves in an artistic one and it’s able to transform itself in a painting, the final result can only be a powerful image of deep energies and perspectives. The artist Ewa Mroz decides to focus her artistic search on what she experiences fist-hand; she puts her fingers on daily situations and ordinariness, analysing the chances, the perceptions and the intentions in their chaotic aspects. Everything that surrounds her becomes the focus of the artistic investigation of the painter: Ewa Mroz finds in the sun, in the water, in nature the main source of inspiration. Whenever life rushes and drags us in a vortex of frenetic activities, nature is a serene refuge - a comfort zone for the mind and the soul. In this place full of calm and harmony, the artist Ewa Mroz could find her own dimension, the right way to convey what she feels and lives. Through acrylic paint, structural paste, golden details – that mixed together create a dance of floating details - all canvases become raw material for infinitive stories, each of which embraces a different emotion, a different feeling that the artist Ewa Mroz would give to the audience as a mirror to look inward.

Art Curator Manuela Fratar


Ewa Mroz

In a test


Ewa Mroz

In progress


Ewa Mroz

In the glow


Fabricio Triviño

Fabricio Triviño is an Ecuadorian artist based in Mallorca, Spain. Focusing his general artistic work mainly of analog photography, as it allows him to experiment much more with the different types of films, Fabricio works on everything that catches his attention and is expressed through what he lives, with a tendency to capture empty spaces and where the portraits show a concept of distance and emptiness. In his photographic project "A place for my head" exhibited at “ALDILA’” exhibition "hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, through two photographs the artist mainly investigates the distance and isolation due to overthinking. In the first one, “A place for my head I”, a sunset over the sea is depicted, with a person who, along the shoreline, enjoys the natural spectacle in front of him. What strikes our attention most, however, is the burning of the photo, which makes the work unusable on the left side cutting it in half. Fabricio purposely wants to show the photographic accident, as an idea that he relate to trying to find something: in fact, many things surround us but there are times when we get overwhelmed and we do not know what we want, leading us to be incomplete.


Fabricio Triviño

Fabricio's work therefore contrasts an image of total beauty with one of lack, which does not necessarily have to be seen in negative terms as emptiness, but as a non-presence, something that was there and is no longer there, a space to be filled or simply enjoyed for what it is. “A place for my head II”, linked to the first work for its contrasting colors, portrays the dark figure of a man standing on a rock. It is not he who is colored, but the sky behind him, an evening sky with blue tones, with which he creates a strong contrast and a difference between what is visible and what is not. However it is darker than the first photo where so much pressure makes you want to isolate yourself and ends up burying us. Once again, Fabricio investigates the theme of isolation and distance, using colors and composition as food for thought for his works.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Fabricio Triviño

A place for my head I


Fabricio Triviño

A place for my head II


Fadi Balhawan On the occasion of the new exhibition "Aldilà", organized by the multimedia gallery M.A.D.S. of Milan and Fuerteventura, we ask the artists' interpretation and opinion on the complex theme of “dualism”, between dark and unknown sides of every choice that arises before us in the course of our life. A world hidden by the deceptive veil of Maya, which Shopenhauer already told us about in the first half of the nineteenth century: reality as an illusion. Fadi Balhawan was a "normal" Lebanese man until he was injured after the bomb explosion. He finds refuge in art and writing, by staying in the hospital for seven months. He later rediscovered this deep passion during the lockdown due to Covid-19, perfecting the technique that combine his two artistic expressions. "The black tulip" is the work that Fadi presents to us in the form of a video presentation made by Partamian Studios. It tells the story of Cornelius van Baerle, a respectable tulip grower, who lives only to grow the elusive black tulip and win a magnificent prize for creating it. This is Dumas' last great historical novel, a story of romantic love that intertwines the historical events surrounding the brutal murders of two Dutch statesmen in 1672. This fascinating way of making art begins in the classical era with the so-called "Carmina figurata" and then, in the twentieth century with calligrams and visual poems, poetic texts distributed along an image linked to the content itself (Guillaume Apollinaire). Recently, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, a futurist poet author of the famous Zang Tumb Tumb, intervened a different form of visual texts in which the onomatopoeic effect of the words wins. Once again, in the 1930s Paul Klee, starting from painting, came to writing in a completely different way, creating a relationship between shapes and colors, text and image to its extreme consequences by inventing the so-called pseudo-graphemes, signs minimums of a new primitive alphabet, pristine but highly expressive. It is a slow and complex process, which led the artist to work on it for three months. Writing or painting, black or vibrant colours? With this work, the artist finds himself in front of different dualisms and binomials, which he faces with coexistence. The message that we can deduct from all this is probably the fact that everything can coexist, and that we are not always forced to make a single choice.

Art Curator Carola Antonioli


Fadi Balhawan

The Black Tulip


FaeryDesign “The earth has enough resources to meet the needs of all but not enough to satisfy the greed of even one person". (Mahatma Ghandi) FaeryDesign, a self-taught Italian artist, specialising in illustration, digital painting and 3D modelling, is famous within the large M.A.D.S. Art Gallery community. She took part in the "Aldilà" exhibition with a work of excellent creativity and craftsmanship. It is entitled 'On the Other Side' and is an introspective journey into the soul of each of us. The artist takes a scene from the fairy tale "Biancaneve" by the Brothers Grimm. In the fairy tale, the queen is a beautiful woman who possesses a magic mirror, in which she reflects herself vainly. Envious of the beauty of her young stepdaughter Biancaneve, she commissions a hunter to take the girl into the woods and kill her. One day, however, the evil queen discovers, thanks to the magic mirror, that the girl is alive and well. She tries to kill her again by giving her an apple. FaeryDesign creates a still image at this point in the story and offers us its vision of life beyond reality. The two figures make intense eye contact, but the sweet princess in the red silk dress knows not to be fooled by her reflection. Even if it behaves like her and acts like her. Her reflection in the mirror is just a bitter and sad deception of the mind. "You will see that glow of madness, that will that intends to break the link" - writes the artist - and we will be tempted to cross over to "the other side". For FaeryDesign, crossing that line, going towards the unknown, is a mistake and only brings pain. The sweet princess hesitates when the queen, dressed in a black silk dress, reaches out to give her the apple: the fruit of knowledge would set her free, but at the same time it would make her feel dismay and terror. Her heart goes out to the elusive and the artist warns her: "Never interact with your reflection, even when it brings you gifts", because there are no gifts in this life, only compromises and prices to pay. No one knows what lies beyond things. Adam Phillips, in fact, writes - "What no one has ever dared to think about the afterlife is that it may be absolutely identical to where we are now" - so it would be very dangerous and deceptive to leave the world we know for a totally unknown one, only to realise that it is absolutely atrocious and identical to the reality we already experience. We don't know this because no one has ever come back to tell us. Through her work, the young Italian artist conveys her message: give up the temptation to go beyond that limit and get to know another world. A decision motivated by a feeling of mistrust towards human beings and the world she lives in.

Art Curator Alessia Ventola


FaeryDesign

On the Other Side


Felicia Adérian “I like to experiment with my art by using different colors and methods. While painting I can express my feelings which creates a depth to my work. None of my paintings are alike, they are truly one of a kind”

Felicia Adérian is a young Swedish artist for the first time guest at an exhibition organized by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of "Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica" she exhibits "Pink Skies" which is a work with evident influences linked to abstract expressionism. "Pink Skies" creates a romantic atmosphere, pastel colors combined with white give a sense of calm and distension. The work has different textures depending on the amount of color applied, the stylistic apparatus partly recalls the works of Clyfford Still. The colors blend perfectly and create a chromatic harmony without superstructures. The emotional and instinctive element are emblematic of the artist's work, in fact, as she herself says, each of her works is unique, there are no a priori decisions, the artistic production is visceral, real and concrete, the artist expresses herself through color and its drawing up. Pink is generally associated with charm, education, sensitivity, tenderness and sweetness. The shade of pink used by Felicia Adérian was typical in the Rococo period in the 18th century. Pink is combined with blue in "Pink Skies", a color that recalls harmony and calm. The combination of colors used by the artist is aimed at stimulating the memories in the minds of those who observe the work, Felicia Adérian with the creation of "Pink Skies" had the ability to represent a moment, that of the sunset, making it eternal, abstract and so unique that it can allow observers to remember.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Felicia Adérian

Pink Skies


Fernando Espósito “The abstract is for the one who sees it, what his soul feels; having as many interpretations as there are people in the world” (Fernando Esposito)

Fernando Aníbal Espósito is an artist and an Architect from the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic, who has been painting since the Eighties: his works try to explore with versatility of techniques and color combinations the expression in a given moment, like a photograph of the soul, reproducing the feeling of that instant. At “ALDILA’” exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Fernando presents three artworks. “Sudestada” shows the light of a winter sunset in Buenos Aires, seen from the river, invaded by the gray of the frosty clouds, obscuring the city, dulling its colors and the energy of its inhabitants: in fact, in the South, when the Antarctic wind blows reaching the city, it turns gray, loses its colors and everything becomes monochromatic. The mist that rises from the warm water of the river and the humid climate of these latitudes, collaborates in the dull look of life. Life drives go down. In "The murder of Being” two silhouettes of human figures, a woman and a man, are represented in the center of the work: they are unified, since in essence, beyond our gender, we are the same. All brilliance of the soul is oppressed within the relief of a cross, which represents the oppression of religions and beliefs imposed over the centuries that killed and are still killing the true being with punishment and pain, represented by the drops of blood that fall from the religious symbol. However, the relief of the Christian cross is figurative, it can be changed to any other symbol of other religions, since the effect on being is the same. Lastly, "Tribes" is made up of brushstrokes of different colors thrown on the canvas in a chaotic manner, with an extremely abstract result, aimed at representing metaphorically the movements of the human being on Earth and the way in which he has united with others: since humanity exists on the face of the earth, we homosapiens have conglomerated into communities, either out of interest or affinity, consciously or unconsciously. These communities or "Tribes" share the same ideology, which is different from others, but they interact with each other. Each color in this work represents a "Tribe", which mix, agree, fight, and unfailingly coexist. This creates chaos, which can be destructive or enriching for humans. In all his works, Fernando therefore manages to capture, in extremely abstract terms, the beauty of a moment, the concept of an instant, with eternal value.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Fernando Espósito

Sudestada


Fernando Espósito

The murder of Being


Fernando Espósito

Tribes


Ferney Manrique Aragon

Ferney Manrique Aragon is a China-based visual artist who has been working on photography for more than a decade, preferring the analogue one which allows him to constantly experiment the chemical processes in film development in conjunction with the physical mechanisms of the camera itself. His body of work mainly focuses on street photography: at “ALDILA’” exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Ferney in fact presents his project DongBei - The North East” (2021), a series of three photographs that portrays street scenes taken on pedestrian roads in the Chinese city of Changchun, the capital of Jilin Province, once known for being the cultural and political centre of the last Chinese dynasty, the Qing or Manchu. Although a historical wealth scarred by the violence and bloodshed during the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in the 1930s and the current neck-breaking ‘economic growth, the DongBei people’s character and attitude seem to have frost in time. In “Dong Bei i i” a man is portrayed in the kitchen of a restaurant cooking various types of food. It is not known what the food is, nor who the man is, because a large cloud of heat coming from the hot plates hides them, creating a sense of mystery but also of extreme curiosity. In "Dong Bei ii ii" instead, a woman is portrayed sitting next to a cart intent on selling her goods on the street. Behind her, the hectic life of the big city. As she looks straight into the camera at the photographer and the viewer, she is caught in a moment of rest, leaning forward, taking ad- vantage of the lack of clients at that moment. In a city where everything flows quickly, the artist manages to capture the beauty of an instant, of a worker like many others with whom he creates a connection that seems to go beyond the frenzy of the environment in which she is: we stop to look at her and she sees us too. Finally, in “Dong Bei iii iii” another cook is depicted preparing typical Chinese dishes. The man is in the shadows, behind him we can see some curtains, perhaps the separators between the kitchen and the restaurant, and this aura of mystery that surrounds him makes everything more sug- gestive and enchanting. In all these photographs, Ferney, therefore scrutinizes composition concerning frame (space) and time, pushing the boundaries of what the frame encapsulates; by doing so, the full extension of the negative plays a fundamental aspect in the act of image-making as a form of representation, as well as an apprehensive response to perception.

东北北

东北

东北

东北

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Ferney Manrique Aragon

Dong Bei i -

东北 i


Ferney Manrique Aragon

Dong Bei ii -

东北 ii


Ferney Manrique Aragon

Dong Bei iii -

东北 iii


Frank Boyce

Frank Boyce is a talented and original Irish artist who also works as a teacher and creator. With a highly creative and original style, Frank creates unique works that combine rationality and abstraction. These are creations where colour and form are the protagonists and encapsulate thoughtful and complex concepts. Frank does not leave anything to chance, the ideas he encloses in brushstrokes and acrylic patches are important. He reasons about the human condition and the murky, hidden thoughts of man, themes that are part of daily life such as politics and social issues. Frank's visual art is closely related to man's perception of the world and the messages he receives every day. He likes to use particular materials, often reused, because they are also the focus of a profound reflection that converges with the final vision of the work. A common thread linking the artist's works at present is the stylised figure of the charred man, denouncing the precarious condition of the human being who today has to face problems and obstacles every day, even in everyday life. This allegory is also found in the painting "King for a day" in which the artist reflects on the illusory nature of power. In the centre, the protagonists are in fact two stylised human figures, in profile, almost complementary but at the same time opposed. Flames envelop them, leaving them to burn. Both have their heads bowed, in an attitude somewhere between despondency and awareness. As if they know their destiny and are waiting, at the mercy of what will happen. The figure on the right wears a pointed hat, the other a crown. Two sides of the same coin representing two contradictory and ambiguous sides of human nature. The background is an intense, dark and thought-provoking blue. The colour black is also fundamental, outlining the shapes and giving character to the figures. The black contrasting with the blue picks up the ambiguous play of the whole artwork. The brushstrokes are spontaneous, gestural, despite the setting of the work and the message within it having been conceived and studied by the artist. The composition and geometric shapes are perfectly matched to this use of acrylic colours. In creating this work, Frank was inspired by the words of the British playwright Christopher Marlowe, which he decided to engrave on the board and which prompt the spectator to ask himself questions and reflect on the meaning that man attributes to power. In fact, it appears as a human convention, it is we who attribute power to someone and in this way submit ourselves to someone's rules. A king is not a king without his subjects because then he would have no one to control. The parallels that Frank draws between today's society and that of the past are very interesting. The shadow/blue contrast is fundamental to understanding the artist's intentions, the key to reading his works. Doubts, movements, actions, uncertainties, all enclosed in an apparently quiet artwork. The key to interpretation lies in the choice of characters, techniques and structure. Frank uses the figure of the burned man to reflect the world to the viewer, to make him open his eyes and disenchant him, bringing him back to what real life is. But is life real or a series of conventions? Can one man exercise power over another? Can we survive even when overwhelmed by the world? Frank offers very original works both in their execution and style and in the message involved. An innovative artist who is inspired by everyday life and who is not afraid to lead the viewer to deep reflections.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Frank Boyce

King for a day


Frederick John Featham “I have the nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?” (Vincent van Gogh)

Frederick John Featham is a landscape artist who lives and works

in Greece. His works are extremely evocative, full of charm.

They tell of enchanted landscapes, enveloped in magical, dreamy atmospheres. The viewer is able to immerse himself completely in the landscape, feels the sea breeze on his skin, sees the sun fade, the sound of birds and the gentle undulation of the sea, the sound of the wind. Nature dominates unspoilt, reigning in all FJ's works, creating a harmonious mix. The artist takes his cue from his surroundings, painting glimpses, expanses of water, infinite skies that he has before his eyes every day. Light is the key to all his works, through which the artwork lives. FJ allows himself to be enchanted by nature, he collects visual evidence that he then reworks in his studio with colours and brushes. He is extremely precise and realistic in his rendering of landscapes. The colour is fluid, soft and envelops the canvas, defining sharp but at the same time gentle and sinuous contours. He often paints rarefied, intriguing atmospheres. He is very skilled in the realistic rendering of the sky, which is often the protagonist of his paintings. This is clearly evident in his masterpiece 'Blue Moon', where the artist's artistry and gestures are evident. The moon illuminates the scene, creating a link between earth and sky, between the divine and the earthly. The moon erases boundaries, horizons and draws magical and intense colour contrasts; it releases its eternal and shining light, drawing the viewer's attention. Even the few clouds that animate the sky make room for it, as if to frame it. The earth, below the moon, appears as a timid tongue of earth which serves to give depth to the image, to define a horizon. The play of contrasts and the different shades of blue used by the painter are very interesting. The colour transitions take place in a sinuous way, the colours mixing with each other, creating gentle and almost perceptible textures. All the five human senses are awakened by the vision of this work with its dreamy atmosphere. Blue is the colour of mystery, depth, peace and tranquillity. It is associated with spirituality and encourages the flow of vital energy. The water is viscous and shiny and the moon takes advantage of this to be reflected in it. FJ has created a work with an intense vitality that allows the spectator to immerse himself directly in the landscape. It encompasses several life-affirming elements and lets nature take the lead, unleashing its infinite beauty. The artist draws inspiration from reality, revisiting it in a personal way and drawing on various characteristics of artistic movements such as expressionism, positioning himself somewhere between figurative and abstract. A few essential elements, blue as the predominant colour and a moon shining with its own light. Nature does the rest. The light emanating from the artwork is almost unreal, impossible not to be fascinated, enchanted. FJ creates a direct relationship between landscape and man by creating a simple but studied composition that leads the viewer to focus on the immensity of nature. His vision of the world and of nature is unique and he manages to convey it perfectly to those who have the honour of seeing his paintings.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Frederick John Featham

Blue Moon


Gabriela Ortiz Fortunat “Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.” (Albert Einstein)

Gabriela Ortiz Fortunat is a Mexican artist. After embarking on a professional career in the world of international trading, Gabriela has decided to devote herself full time to a passion that has characterized her life since childhood: painting with watercolors. The artist, however, moves away from the canonical watercolor paintings, and gives life to something unique and irrepressible, outside the rigid limits of conventionality. Looking at a painting by Gabriela Ortiz Fortunat means letting oneself be guided by a strong and overwhelming artistic intention, eager to continually experiment with new ways to impress a part of herself on the blank canvas. Other reality, the work presented to the artist for the exhibition "Aldilà", brings this concept to a perfect point of communion between innovation and tradition. The ancient watercolor technique is put at the service of an experimental inspiration, and brings to completion something towards which it is difficult to remain indifferent. On a background of contrasting colors, which blend with each other as if to create the sinuous veins of the marble, clearer, darker lines are painted, which twist in intricate scrolls. The observer can only be captured by the magnetic whole of the painting, driven by an instinctive attraction even before being rational. The artist aspires to generate in the observer a genuine curiosity that can push him to dwell on the work with an open mind and free of prejudices. Only at that point, it will be possible to admire the work in a new light, and to see that what at first glance were nothing more than random shapes and colors, in reality are an infinite corollary of faces, bodies, fantastic creatures, animals, floral and plant motifs. The artist's experimental will is thus not limited only to the technical aspect. With Other reality Gabriela grants the viewer the gift of an active part of the work of art, and to interpret figures and shapes according to his personal way of seeing things.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Gabriela Ortiz Fortunat

Other reality


Gabriele Springer

German artist Gabriele Springer talks about her art with these words: “I don’t have a fixed style - I’m opened to everything new and interesting. I’m most interested in human beings as they have two faces. One face for themselves and another one for the outside world. To me it is very exciting to discover the “inner self”. In this sense the artist explores the other side of people, investigating what the exhibition "Aldilà", called by M.A.D.S. art gallery, asks artists. For everything there is the other half, the truth is never one, the moon has its dark side, the world cannot be just as we see it and so people. The philosophy of Gabriele Springer is very Pirandellian, the Italian playwright Luigi Pirandello in fact through his writing “Uno, nessuno, centomila” brings out this concept: there is an "I" seen by ourselves and then there are a hundred thousand "I" or the infinite images that others have of us. Gabriele’s work entitled "In dialogue - The other me" shows all this. On the left is a sort of faceless mannequin and behind it, larger, there is a figure that resembles a soul. From the symbolic point of view the dummy represents the "fake" part of each of us, what we show to the others while the soul represents the true “I”. The figure of the mannequin refers to the metaphysical painter Giorgio De Chirico who often inserts these elements in his works, just to symbolize a body emptied from his soul and make inanimate environments. From a chromatic point of view, the artist combines magenta with gold, all made colder by the use of grey and black. The technique used is mixed: figurative elements are combined with abstract elements dictated by instinct, making the setting ethereal.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Gabriele Springer

In dialogue - The other me


Gabriella Alongi

Gabriella Alongi is an Italian artist, born and raised in Sicily, now based in Trapani. Her strong philosophical interest and passion for painting led her to create a wonderful union between these two disciplines. Her works are in fact very deep and reflective. They contain messages and concepts to be discovered. The theme of the exhibition "Aldilà" held by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery inspires the artist and pushes her to present two works that are very close to the concept of the exhibition. In fact, in Italian it means "on the other side", "the other side of the coin", it means “the other side of things”, “what is not seen". It is interesting to analyze the work entitled “L'alba", which has a horizontal composition and is made of oil. Let’s start the analysis by reading the quote that the artist leaves us about this painting: “Dawn is the beginning of a morning in a world that does not exist. Dawn is something that is not visible but that exists in the invisible”. We are therefore talking about the moment when the sun rises and brings with it a new beginning. Darkness makes room for the light. The artist describes this moment as invisible in our reality, but visible in another. Dawn is like magic, every day is different, every day presents new colors. Gabriella's work is tinged with delicate pastel colors on which pink prevails. The colors blend with each other to form a sort of floral "mass" that floats in the sky. The artist gives life to the dawn. Give birth to this moment. The force of the moment, the force of light is perceptible and is visually compared to the power of the waves of the sea, represented on the right of the canvas.


Gabriella Alongi

Even more complex is the analysis of the second work in the exhibition, entitled “I tre mondi" which means “The three words” and it’s made of acrylic on canvas. The artist claims to have been inspired by the art of the Indian philosopher Sri Chinmoy, the one who spread the art of meditation in the West. The work is conceptually complex in that it contains within itself three worlds, just as described in the title. The three worlds represent three different levels of knowledge, one transcending the other, to raise man to a higher consciousness, explains the artist. Observing the work, these three worlds emerge and allow the viewer to make a journey and discover them one at a time, in a certain sense performing a meditative act. Order is not essential, every spectator begins his journey from where he feels most attracted. Reading the work in the "western" way we find ourselves facing the first world, a forest of pines that are very reminiscent of the Japanese works of Hasegawa Tōhaku (in particular "Pine Trees"), they are reflected on the frozen lake that seems almost to float in the air until it vanishes. Then the eye moves to the right and slides through the sinuous and delicate leaves of a tree that the artist calls "the tree of paradise" and that visually resembles a weeping willow. The tree leads to a meticulously crafted waterfall. It is important to point out that the "journey" can also start from the waterfall and therefore in this case the tree would lead to an ascent towards self-discovery. The work is undoubtedly a source of meditation and the delicate colors make an important contribution to maintaining a relaxed and harmonious environment.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Gabriella Alongi

I tre mondi


Gabriella Alongi

L'alba


Gayatri Ghorpade

Gayatri Ghorpade is a Bangalore based self-taught artist who considers her journey as an artist as a “inner revelation”. Most of her works are inspired by her experiences, feelings and emotions, depicting creative self expression through various colours, patterns, movements, textures, flow and energy. Avoiding conscious thought and allowing a free flow of ideas, Gayatri paints on a creative impulse using her own organic forms and textured surfaces to create her art which is mainly abstract: in fact, the freedom that can be accessed through abstraction is liberating to her. With her art, the artist looks for forms and meaning within herself that would evoke the same emotion and feeling that she experienced during the actual act of painting itself, trying to include the viewer in this artistic process. At "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Gayatri Ghorpade presents “Grace in Chaos”, a painting in which spots of white and hues of blue color create chaotic yet harmonious compositions on the canvas, leaving an extremely exuberant and meditative result at the same time. The artwork has been created using brushes and spatula tools; texture paste has been used to create a textured surface followed by layers of acrylic paint one on top of the other creating organic forms and patterns. Blue is the dominant color in this work: representing for the artist a sense of calmness, grace and elegance, it covers the entire canvas along with strokes of white creating depth and producing various organic forms and structure. “Color is an innate part of my life, it completely defines who I am”, the artist says. Painting on a creative impulse, Gayatri’s inspiration comes from her inner world of thoughts, feelings, emotions and experiences: discovering her “inner truth” for universal forms and meanings, she disconnects from the three dimensional reality to enter a whole other reality, a realm of infinite possibilities. This journey of self-discovery and exploring the inner world is a chaotic one: the organic forms and textures in this work evoke the feeling of this inner chaos and troubling times for the artist. While the colours in this work bring about a sense of calmness and grace. The art work in its entirety is therefore a representation of strength and the ability to showcase grace and sophistication in troubling times.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Gayatri Ghorpade

Grace in Chaos


Gerrit Hodemacher "The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love and to be greater than our suffering." (Ben Okri)

Gerrit Hodemacher is a German artist who began to devote himself to art in 2019. Important is the precise moment that led him to this new form of self-expression: the night before his father’s death. Gerrit’s art is a description of himself, a snapshot of his inner state at that precise moment, but also a personal interpretation of the out-of-self events that interact

with his own soul, hurling him, stimulating him to reflection and as a last act to artistic production. Art also becomes a form to overcome one’s limits, to test oneself and the final result is the birth of a new ego. Interesting is this work of filing that starting from the work, which is modified and reshaped several times during the work until it is she to say it has come to an end, affects the artist himself, which carries out the same review and refinement work on its own being.


Gerrit Hodemacher

A symbiosis not obvious and that is evident in the final result of the work, upsetting the viewer in admiration of the canvas. His work therefore becomes nothing more than a metaphor of life itself. The life of each of us is an abstract work of art. We begin projects, we carry them forward, but life also has its own course that interacts with ours and modifies our initial choices. Greatness lies in our freedom to pick up the brushes and continue our work, changing direction, but choosing the most appropriate to our being. Never give up, but restarting and always being the architects of your own destiny could be the final messages. He calls his art project “Honour the sunset”. He wants to express that the beautiful, the warm, the happiness can also go and that the honour of these qualities it will soon return

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Gerrit Hodemacher

About the 66


Gerrit Hodemacher

Zone


Graça Souza Graça Souza’s works have dark shades, sharp and edgy traits, and subjects on the border between the physical and the abstract. The Portuguese artist, who studied design and art in Lisbon and London, knows that: "to really notice and appreciate the colours of the paintings, good lighting will make a difference and enhance your senses.". In fact, light is a primary element in painting, both externally, based on how a work of art is illuminated to ensure a good fruition, both internally, based on how the artist decides to illuminate the subject represented. In the three works under examination, Graça Souza uses light in three different ways, showing all her skill. The work "Sea" is invaded by light, it crosses the whole composition embracing it. The sea, moved by the wind, swells and shakes, splashes, bubbly on the surface. The artist manages to make it alive. The work is a whole movement and we seem to be able to hear the gurgling of its waves. "Virtuality-lines that focus" is, in a certain sense, the opposite of "Sea" because to dominate the composition is, instead, the dark and the static. The artist covers the surface of the work with dark and material colors; this darkness is interrupted only by two bright red lines that, starting from the opposite sides of the canvas, join, without touching, the center of the canvas, around a silver point. This work reminds us of the minimalist art of the '60s of the 20th century; an art founded on the use of primary and elementary forms, but not for this reason empty of depth. The work of the Portuguese artist, in fact, shows us another dimension, a place without time and space, a place that could be placed beyond. In "Stains and contours" the main colors are a warm yellow that emanates dynamism, and a brown red that evokes strength. The use of these warm tones attracts the viewer and give the feeling of advancing towards him. The curved lines that cross the composition determine an effect of calm and tranquillity, while those broken, thinner and lighter, but more numerous, produce, instead, a dramatic/nervous effect. The result is an artwork well balanced. Graca Souza proves to be able to use the color frees from drawing, as a privileged means for the expression of the spirit, and therefore for the expression of what resides aldilà, beyond.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Graça Souza

Sea


Graça Souza

Stains and contours


Graça Souza

Virtuality-lines that focus


Gregory Logan Dunn "The difference between the surrealists and me is that I am a surrealist." (Salvador Dali')

"Gregory Logan Dunn is an American artist of great versatility and talent. In the work 'Necropolis', the viewer is confronted with a powerful and evocative image. The work floats against a magnificent cosmic backdrop reminiscent of the Kafkaesque depictions of the most visionary period in art history, Surrealism. The bold approach almost seems to suggest a spiritual conception of sensuality, as an indissoluble part of a strong individuality. Experimentation becomes a fundamental key for the artist to develop an original and unique artistic language. Gregory's aim is to involve the viewer by finding in his works all those words that he manages to transform into images. The composition revolves around an asserted body, immersed in a dense background of light and bright colours, such as green, yellow and red, giving an immediate feeling of disorientation which - we can imagine - corresponds to the same perception experienced by the artist during the creation of the work. The colour soars upwards and from left to right, occupying the whole canvas with the lightness of a daydream. The stylistic precision and the evocative character of the movement of the colour allow us to enter the artist's intimate world, a world pervaded by an impalpable delicacy"

"The surreal is part of reality itself because our real perception of the world is made up of the everyday and the imagination." (Siro Ferrone) Art Curator Valentina Valentini


Gregory Logan Dunn

Necropolist


Gunnel Karlberg

<<I have a great fascination with all the wonderful, complex and amazing patterns and beautiful colors all around us, even in our daily environment. If we just open our eyes and our minds, the world is absolutely amazing. Let go and fall in love! >>. To introduce the artwork presented on the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldila by the artist Gunnel Karlberg, titled Two sides of life, could be really important to start from this her consideration. As she says, she never stops to feel impressed by the world around her. Colors and shapes of the word around her become the inspiring instance for the artistic creation. In the painting Two sides of life we can immediately see the space divided into two parts. One in shades of red and the other in blue. This intention to divide the composition means that the artist wants to talk about the dualism in which life seems to be involved. As she wants to tell us about the sea and the earth, the skin and the blood. The painting communicates with the viewer these kinds of suggestions that come from watching life is the filter from which to contemplate reality. In this way, the artist, with the abstract language, is able to tell us about the way she feels the world around her, and get a connection with the observer. As she stands in front of someone and says: <<now please listen to me, I want to tell you something new>>. For us this could be an opportunity to go into Aldilà.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Gunnel Karlberg

Two sides of life


Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ

Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ is a Norwegian ceramic and visual artist based in Fredrikstad, Norway. Hanne's artistic production is a perfect combination of abstract expressionism and figurative art. For the first time she was a guest at an exhibition organized by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of “Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica”, Hanne exhibits a triptych of coherent works from a stylistic and communicative point of view. "Behind our imagination" is an emblematic and profound work, rich from a chromatic point of view and with a strong evocative power. The work represents three faces that are not entirely defined, in fact, the details of the face are missing and this brings back to that sense of missing identity. Interesting, from this point of view, are the artistic references that the lack of the face recalls, first of all De Chirico, followed by Magritte and many others. The faces are, however, constructed through the use of a multitude of colors to symbolize the idea that within each individual there are different shades, colors and worlds. The background of the work, in fact, is made with different shades of gray and purple, in this way the three faces create a chromatic contrast that emphasizes them in the foreground. "Place of your dreams" is the representation of a woman who seems to be leaving for a journey, the backpack, of a bright orange color captures the attention and deeply conveys the message of the artwork, you can perceive a sense of freedom and independence . The large amount of yellow on the left side of the work seems to indicate an arrival point, the destination of the journey that the woman is starting. The space is open, fresh, probably the artist represented a place that she loves and where she likes to spend time. "We will meet again" maintains the chromatic variations typical of the triptych exhibited by Biedilæ, the combination of abstraction and figurative art permeates the work that sees two faces facing each other in profile, as if the two represented individuals were about to greet each other, the background against which the two faces stand out sees a continuous strip of color, from the center of which another is born. The title of the work and the elements just explained refer to an idea of ​farewell, two people who until then were walking the same road greet each other and start different paths. The works exhibited by Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ combine taste and artistic talent with the experiences of everyday life, this communication ability allows observers to empathize with the works, the artist is able to represent herself and others by dissecting the individual and personal emotions that anyone can feel in the situations she represents and narrates.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ

Behind our imagination


Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ

Place of your dreams


Hanne Margaretha Biedilæ

We will meet again


Helen Hitchens

“Happiness is like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons: we must fight in order to conquer it” (Alexandre Dumas)

Half-human figures half-animals, monsters, diabolical and heavenly part, beauty and brutality are some words that confusedly come to mind looking at Helen’s works. A return to the childish world, where in fairy tales everything is possible and granted, a return to the reality that is only children, but it is not fiction, it is a magical and parallel world from which the adult then detaches. Let the world of monsters, dragons, shapeless beings and whatever else is closer to man than she really thinks and does nothing but to represent with sincerity and naturalness in our eyes our animal part, brutal, sometimes evil, thus helping us to recognize and overcome it through thought, a form of evolution that only man was granted at the dawn of time, as demonstrated by the fact that some of the most advanced societies in history represented them in every context. We are talking about societies like Greek and Latin, where fantasy travels hand in hand with reality and interprets it and studies it or even a fascinating society in its divine dimension, which has produced some of the most interesting works of art in the history of humanity, the medieval one. Helen re-proposes these concepts in our society, with a contemporaneity of thought and realization, through digital photography. The concepts put in place are linked to family roles, in particular to the relationship so visceral in good and evil between mother and daughter. The artist investigates the relationship of mutual servitude that binds the mother to her children throughout her life, in the attempt and continuous search for their autonomy. A child is born of a mother, but it is free, it does not belong to the one who generated it, but the bond that the umbilical cord creates is so tight that it is not easy to dissolve it in the name of the personal freedom of everyone, while remaining the inseparable bond of mutual love. We could continue for a long time to describe the choices, the expressive forms and the profound reflections of our artist, who touches on the most disparate issues, but we leave the pleasure and curiosity of discovery to the viewer, certain who will be able to be surprised and immerse themselves returning to their genuine childhood, but with an adult awareness.

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Helen Hitchens

Beyond 1


Helen Hitchens

Beyond 2


Helen Hitchens

Beyond 3


Helen Hitchens

Beyond 4


Helen Hitchens

Beyond 5


Hiroki

Art has no rules. Artistic expression is, in its noblest and purest exception, something that escapes the logic of the real world and the search for a cause-effect relationship that determines most of the events that happen on this earth. Art is something innate, that comes out without filters from the most intimate part of the human soul. Art as self-expression, art as a gift to the world of a part of one's being. Art as a tool made available by the intellect to represent what cannot be expressed in words, through mathematical rules or notions: art representing the invisible and untouchable. In our contemporary society little time is devoted to the search for ourselves and the search for a method of expression that allows us to bring to light our soul. The creative process is something too labile and insubstantial to be studied and made a fundamental part of daily human activity. Yet, the outflow of being is something that man seeks, craves and desires beyond the daily commitment, beyond the family and work tasks. By creating something one gets to know oneself more deeply and, by going to examine the darker sides of one's soul, one arrives at an awareness of oneself that goes beyond the superficial of things, that overcomes the opaque blanket of the world. And this is how Hiroki's art is shaped before our eyes. They are works without a title: art does not need to be defined and catalogued. They are works without a name, creative expression does not need boundaries, impositions and names. Hiroki's Untitled are a pure form of art, an exercise in creation that springs directly from the artist's soul. The color is represented by impulse, and the shapes and silhouettes that define the composition are the symptom of an artistic conception that makes instinct and inventive genius its most marked peculiarity. Deflagrations of color flood the representative space in Untitled III: supernovas of color have just exploded in the icy space. Chromatic atoms first staying inside the star now flood the whole universe, driven by the powerful energy of the stellar explosion: small pinkish, then red, then greenish-white spots indelibly soil the whole composition. Where will these particles be directed? What will be their new home? The universe is as vast as the interiority of the human being, the cosmos is as obscure as the sides of ourselves that we cannot decipher. Untitled I is a vaporous composition of color and signs that, with an excited rhythm, dirties the representative space and makes it unique, unrepeatable. The digital representation contributes to the creation of an ethereal and multilayered environment: on a backdrop of purplish tones stand out greenish spots that intersect with pinkish streaks with an important expressive capacity. Bluish worms run along the space of the composition: they act as a skeleton and a compositional balance, a defined form in an uncertain and unlimited space. Hiroki's works are the result of the creative instinct of the artist who, taking a break from the fast-paced everyday life and reconnecting to the slow and silent rhythm of nature, gains confidence and knowledge of himself, of the deepest and purest part of his soul that lies within him.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Hiroki

Untitled I


Hiroki

Untitled II


Hiroki

Untitled III


Hiromi Nakai

There is something that escapes mere human sensitivity. Something that our senses do not pick up. It often happens that we consider inexplicable certain sensations that accompany us in our daily lives: fleeting reminiscences of invisible, ethereal flavor of events that cannot be traced back to the objective world. The real world, the world of things and matter, is what our senses are used to picking up. Millennia of evolution to increasingly refine our sensory capabilities and adapt our bodies to the environment around us. Yet, undaunted, we continue to miss that something that cannot be measured according to mathematical laws, that is not classified according to the laws of reason. Yet it exists and, somehow, we perceive it. We perceive that the world is not exclusively composed of opaque matter, we sense that there is something else below the mere objective existence, we are aware that not everything that exists is visible to our eyes. We constantly live with this intuition, the human being from time immemorial has always posed the problem of seeing beyond things. It is our inquisitive and curious nature towards the world that, on the other hand, makes us perceive the element that is beyond the visible world. Perhaps that something we seek dwells in the Platonic world of ideas? Probably. In reality, to formulate an answer with certainty is impossible: the nature of what we perceive but escapes our senses is not measurable by logical and mathematical laws. Is it possible to represent something invisible? Is it possible to shape and mold a certain entity giving it characteristics of form and content? Hiromi Nakai with her works tries to escape the empirical reality to tell us a world that is anything but determined. A universe with blurred and smoky boundaries, with peculiar characteristics that unfold before our eyes little by little, slowly. The artist makes visible through the use of narrative devices borrowed from the real world what in reality is only possible to imagine and hope. And so it is that passion, the burning soul of our rose of feelings unrolls without shyness in Joyful World I Love and Desire. A guttural red stands out in front of our eyes: bearer of the deepest meaning of the feeling, it has the task of outlining the forms and characteristics of what is in all respects an aquatic environment teeming with life. Luxuriant pink water lilies lie on the surface of the placid and voluptuous water, sinuous moving carp sway slowly pushed by the gentle current of this river full of life. The fish maneuver among the luxuriant painted flora: fast, powerful, they don't hold back their vital energy but release it into the environment which, with full hands, receives the wave of life. Hiromi's is the representation through images of what is invisible: a world full of desire and love, a dimension of placid passion that moves away from the world of life and the world of death. It is a space that does not have well-defined space-time coordinates and yet we know it perfectly: it is within ourselves.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Hiromi Nakai

Joyful World I Love and Desire


Hiromu Konno

A work that dwells in a middle world. A work that completely disrupts the principles of traditional art to be literally in the middle between the real and the virtual. Hiromu Konno's work presents these unprecedented characteristics while preserving within itself a profound reflection on the contemporary world. The works have always rested on the white walls of the museums, on the walls with soft lights of the galleries or even, seen and enjoyed by the eyes of a few privileged chosen ones. Yet, today, all that has been overturned. The work of art can be seen literally everywhere, it is no longer the prerogative of an elite few and it is no longer essential to travel and visit museums in order to see the works of great artists. Absolutely not. Every day we hold in our hands all the works of art in the world concentrated in a single space: the virtual one. Our smartphones, as well as our computers, have become powerful tools for the dissemination of art and culture and this is undoubtedly a good thing. But let's ask ourselves a question: is the experience of watching a live painting and observing the same work on any device identical? Are the sensations we perceive the same? Is a work of art that can be seen anywhere in the world, at any time of the day, extrapolated from its historical and natural context in danger of losing its aura? These are questions of Benjaminian memory, certainly, but still absolutely relevant. Hiromu Konno, with his "Nexus Painting" is exactly in the middle between the traditional reality of the work and the virtual world. With its formal peculiarities, "Fulfill a Wish" eludes the problems highlighted by Walter Benjamin almost a century ago, totally eradicating the work from both the real and the digital plane. Middle-earth in fact, home to a work that, at first, lets you glimpse its peculiarities in the space-time of reality. Indeed, our eyes can scan the characteristics of this work, can savor the sinuous and soft lines, the gentle and softly shaded pencil stroke. Yet, "Fulfill a Wish" does not end in the real world. It cannot be considered a work of art without its second and more mysterious, -almost sinister- nature being revealed. Only by catapulting us into the plane of the virtual the work is fully represented and acquires identity, capacity for meaning. And here, looking at the same work of art through a smartphone, it shows its second face: like a chimerical being, it acquires a semblance - and an aura - totally different. The colors are reversed, the space is claustrophobic, black. Hiromu Konno's work presents a double face that leaves us stunned at first sight. Yet, without these two formal realities that meet, the work of art would be incomplete, lacking the profound sense that the artist wants to communicate to us. By producing "Nexus Painting," Hiromu makes us participants in the creative epiphany, the flash of genius that created the work. Literally bypassing the world of the real and the virtual, uniting them for that instant in which we look at the work, the artist makes a gesture outside of the canonical space-time, outside of the world we know, within a world in between.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Hiromu Konno

Fulfill a Wish


Hisatoshi Hisatoshi, Japanese artist, through his three works catapults us into three completely different worlds but linked to each other by the same feeling: being inside a dream. “Twilight Promenade” is a work of bright and romantic colours. The colours of the sunset make us dream, we feel like we are there, and we stopped to observe the sky that gives us magnificent colours. The colours are protagonists in the representation of this landscape, the contrast between the warm colours of the earth and the sky and the cold colours of the water that has shades of green, blue and white is clear, yet peaceful. This work gives calm, serenity and warms the heart. It pushes those who watch the work to have romantic dreams, dreams in which each of us would like to get lost, dreams that each of us would like to come true. Hisatoshi’s second work “One flower that arrived” tells a very different story. Those who watch the work can almost hear the sound of the waves of the sea that carried the boat ashore, perhaps after a storm. The only passenger on the boat is a flower. Is it a message of love, apology, or hope? This work takes us to a different world from the rosy one of the previous one, a world as romantic but melancholy, calm, with which Hisatoshi leads us to think. “Midnight Dragon God” takes us into a fantasy world where the subject fills the canvas and stands in all its magnificence, dazzling us. The contrast between blue and white makes us think of a cold light, white is the midnight moon but it is represented with rays that are normally attributed to the representation of the sun. The rays also symbolize the divinity, the divinity of the dragon that, opening its great wings, rises from a white earth, perhaps covered by snow. It is an imposing image that Hisatoshi offers us, an image that brings us back to our dreams as children, a magnificent and powerful image.

Art Curator Sara Giannini


Hisatoshi

Twilight Promenade


Hisatoshi

One flower that arrived


Hisatoshi

Midnight Dragon God


Ilja Freer “With my Art I want to invite you to join me on a journey full of colourful paintings where you always see something new in it. I want to create some power and energy full work. I don’t except you to see the same like me. I enjoy to play around and experiment with new techniques and a lot of paint. Come and join me on my never ending journey.” Ilja Freer

The international exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S gives a warm welcome to Ilja Freer. Born 1976 in Berlin, Germany, Ilja studied art in school from a young age. Wanting to maximise his creativity, paintbrushes and canvases were soon replaced with spray cans and walls, following the current of street art graffiti in Berlin during the 90’s. Spurred by the pandemic he needed to reconnect with his creative side and so began his journey. Each art piece is an open experiment to discover new style combinations by mixing the colors, using different techniques and shapes. And this is how he presents himself in "ALDILÀ" with Cupper is the new gold, Inferno and Universus. The three works represent a journey into the mind and soul of the artist. His representation of the cosmos and the real is very personal and original. Few but essential lines, bright colors. The visitor can immerse himself in a colorful universe, completely new but which leaves room for personal freedom. One of the characteristics of his works is the energy, of the brushstroke, of the subject, of the colors, of the shapes. The artist enjoys experimenting, each work is in its own style but always different. The colors and shapes recall the main themes of these three works. Instinct is fundamental. The artist's inner universe manifests itself pure, without mediation. His works are the direct representation, in color, of his mental journeys. The mind imagines and the arm acts. Color is the true protagonist of the works and the center of everything. Color is Ilja's artistic choice, instinct and color.

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Ilja Freer

Cupper is the new gold


Ilja Freer

Inferno


Ilja Freer

Universus


Ingvar Thor Gylfason

Ingvar Thor Gylfason is an Icelandic artist. After having experimented in all kinds of mediums and artforms throughout his life, in 2016 he felt in love with the beautiful duo of oil paint and the art brush and he has never stopped since. At "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Ingvar presents “Heat”. The protagonists of the work are a man and a woman who, on a pink sofa, are in the midst of a love complex. Taken from behind, we do not see their faces, but for the grip of their hands, their slow movements and the way they touch each other, they suggest a great alchemy and a strong attraction between the two bodies, becoming almost one and the same and merging with the sofa. Behind them we can see a landscape of skyscrapers that overlap each other, immersed in the fog and becoming almost invisible. It is interesting to note how the artist, despite the painting being accurate in proportions and being very realistic, breaks that realism through big brush strokes, deconstruction of some elements of the painting and whatever he feel is needed to create something extraordinary that intrigues the viewer. Through the amorous complex however, the two lovers seem to enjoy a moment that goes beyond, “aldilà", to the present moment, stopping the passing of time and almost reaching ecstasy, symbolically represented by the beam of white light coming from the top of the canvas that touches, "dirtying", the two bodies.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Ingvar Thor Gylfason

Heat


Inna Perkas “Your visions will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.” (C.G. Jung)

Inna Perkas is a contemporary artist living in Germany. The language of art has been a constant part of Inna's life, and has become the preferred method of expression for shaping her inner world. The emotions, thoughts and the most vivid sensations of life become subjects of representation, which find their ideal dimension in abstract art. Inna's remarkable technical ability - also perfected in the academic field - thus becomes an opportunity to create paintings that contain a rich emotional universe, which "dialogues" with the observer. Inna's works are conceived as an original set of ten paintings, each of which represents a piece of a larger, more complex work, a real path that the artist invites to follow. Farther ... Deeper ... - the work presented by the artist for "Aldilà" - perfectly embodies this concept. Also in this case the whole work consists of nine paintings with drowing china ink cornflower of various colors (blue, purple, violet blue, berry blue, elderberry blue) and with applications performed thanks to a pipette. Each painting contains its own unique essence, which taken individually could already represent a complete work. But the artist shows that she wants to look beyond the single piece. The artist's purpose is placed on a higher level, and offers an overview of the deepest movements of the soul with a continuous alternation of colors and shades. From the serene blue and azure notes of the first two paintings, we move on to the darker and more fascinating atmospheres of the subsequent works. The colored ink helps to give the works a luminescent and iridescent touch, which spreads out on the canvas like an intricate spider's web, giving dynamism and depth to the composition. Inna Perkas succeeds in trying to animate her emotions, making them visually magnetic and fascinating, capable of speaking directly to the emotionality of the beholder.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Inna Perkas

Farther... Deeper...


Irina Makeev “For the Present is the point at which time touches eternity.” (C.S. Lewis)

The artist Irina Makeev has been surrounded by Arts since her childhood, searching and discovering how to convey her love for painting. Her artistic journey – after some time off - is now focusing on the inner investigation of the painter herself; she allows herself to keep an open line of discovery and to be free from outside constraints and appearances of the mind. Through the colours and her touch - soft but at the same time powerful, the painter Irina Makeev would find an authentic way to express everything that her heart experiences and deeply lives. Her main source of creative inspiration is rooted in “here-and-now” tangible reality, transforming the otherworldly feelings that the painter lives in a creative and artistic process. In doing so Irina Makeev is able to give to the audience a different atmosphere, transcendent and transforming. If the focus is on the personal style of the painter, it’s clear how she taps into the natural world to choose the main subject; the landscapes that stimulate the imagination and artistic sensibility of Irina Makeev, then become the pretext, the occasion to create immersive artworks that capture the viewers, dragging them into combinations of colours and acrylics. Following this vortex of emotions, the audience’s heart is led to the deepest connection with itself but also with the universe.

Art Curator Manuela Fratar


Irina Makeev

Wonderland


J photo and art

J Photo and Art is a self-taught digital artist, whose artistic production is rich in geometric elements and transparencies. J is for the first time guest of an exhibition organized by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery and on the occasion of "Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious Hyperaesthesia Oneirica" ​he exhibits "|| sample oo1 ||" a work that recalls, especially for its transparencies, the works of Joseph Nechvatal. In the work "|| sample oo1 ||" the predominant color is orange, a color that conveys energy, disruption, extension and openness, there is also a great presence of black, gray and yellow that create strong color variations and contrasts. The artist's ability to superimpose different layers, different levels, allows him to mix colors while not having to do with paints, watercolors or pigments of any kind. The use of transparencies and geometric elements, which therefore have different shapes and sizes, allows the creation of new shapes and colors that are completely different from the initial ones. The three elements that immediately catch the eye are the circle placed in the central part of the work and the darker rectangle immediately connected. The two black side bands, one parallel to the outline of the work, the other oblique, are also extremely relevant. The different textures that emerge from the work are also emblematic, some elements appear to be completely smooth, others have a different pattern. J had the ability to create a work that every time it is observed allows the viewer to see totally new things and to be delighted, each time, for a different reason.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


J photo and art

|| sample oo1 ||


Jan Arksom

To introduce the artwork presented on the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldilà by the artist Jan Arksom could be important to start from a consideration about the way to intend the artistic inspiration. As it is said: <<primarily the beauty of nature, the landscape, or the human body inspires Arksom’s work>>. This means that the creativity of the artist comes from the action of watching in a contemplative way the nature around him. In fact if we consider the painting presented titled Lights above water, we can immediately understand how he was fascinated by this element to take from it the inspiration to produce art. In this painting, we can see the colours that want to tend towards homogeneity. In this way they remind the motif and the idea of water. In fact the protagonist of the painting seems to be this element of nature. At the same time the artist seems not only to underline the importance of this element but he seems to be in a contemplative stage. This position of the artist could be seen by the shots of light put on the surface. He seems to investigate what appears to be the simplest element on earth. At the same time, the artist wants to demonstrate to the observer the complexity of the water. The fascinating that comes from the discovery of the water in its ontological meaning. Something that almost communicates with transcendence. Jan Arksom on this occasion wants to demonstrate that even a simple element like water presents many shades and meanings, and needs time to be observed and understood in its inner meaning.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Jan Arksom

Lights above water


Janel Tracey “Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.” (Henry Ward Beecher) Art as a tool to express thoughts, emotions and tell experiences; art as a means by which to represent one's vision of the world around it. For the contemporary artist Janel Tracey, painting means this and much more. Her abstract works are the result of a creative process guided by freedom, instinct, and passion. "Angel" was created in 2020 with the acrylic on canvas technique. Large, curved brush strokes follow one after the other, creating an effect that reminds the movement of the sea waves. A perfect chromatic balance is given by the alternation of cold and warm colors: purple and blue create a pleasant contrast with warm yellow and white. The title is very suggestive and offers the viewer the opportunity to interpret the work in a personal way by traveling with the mind in search of meanings. Angel as someone who protects us without our knowledge; angel as someone we rely on completely; angel as someone to whom we confide our secrets without fear of being betrayed. The painting makes you think, but the artist reminds the viewers not to forget to let themselves be carried away by the whirlwind of emotions. Joy, enthusiasm, and serenity fill Janel as she paints, and these are the same sensations that her fresh and original works convey. “Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures” reads the quote from Henry Ward Beecher. Janel's works are exactly the mirror of her soul: immerse yourself in them and you will know a lot about her.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Janel Tracey

Angel


Jayshri Murarji “Colors speak all languages.” (Joseph Addison)

Art is universal and its colors speak all languages. The abstract works created by the British contemporary artist Jayshri Murarji stand out for their interesting and sometimes unusual color combinations. Painting is a way to escape from reality, get away from the noises that crowd the days and give herself a special moment: Jayshri on the canvas paints her world, personal experiences and the emotions she has the pleasure of sharing with her viewers. "Nirvana" was created in 2021 with the acrylic on canvas technique. Accurate brush strokes in different directions create a harmonious movement that gives liveliness and dynamism to the canvas. A curious light effect is returned thanks to the blend of different shades of blue and pink with white. The title invites the viewer to reflect on the meaning of the work: the Buddhist tradition defines nirvana as a state of absolute peace and happiness that cancels any desire connected to the earthly world; figuratively it can indicate a state of full bliss and serenity. These sensations are what Jayshri feels while painting and they are the same ones she would like to convey to the viewers of her works. And what is nirvana for you? What makes you reach a state of unconditional well-being? Get involved in what your eyes see: make it a starting point to process thoughts, nourish knowledge and experience unique emotions. Art lives inside Jayshri, and her works will live inside you.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Jayshri Murarji

Nirvana


Jessica An

“Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and trhe winds long to play with your hair." (Khalil Gibran) Jessica An, a combodian digital artist, presents three works in which the relationship between life and nature is central. On the other hand, the attraction to nature is innate in man. The contemplation of a landscape, the intimate relationship with flora and fauna in the solitude of a walk, the ability to overcome their physical limits have always been a source of poetic and artistic inspiration. The intimate bond with creation, not human, is liberating at a mental level, re-oxygenic body and mind and disconnecting from the technological world that is as functional as it is intoxicating. The artist represents the harmonic dimension of life between her ego and the natural context that surrounds us through the use of sinuous lines, never broken, which are sometimes transformed into flowers, sometimes into faces, just hinted at, but present, symbol of human presence in symbiosis with the surrounding universe. The palette is rich in colors that remind us of emotions of joy and carefree. The reds and kindred are predominant in reminding us of passion and love, central in our loving relationship and respect for nature. Jessica goes further in her intimate human investigation and in the work “Sprouts of love” contemplates, almost as a spectator rather than as a creator, the cultivation of love between man and man. She does so using a rather classical iconography, which almost brings to mind the divine images of the holy family, but inserting an interesting and almost unsettling contemporaneity. Once again, the love between two atypical faces, which could represent each of us, seems to blossom from a tree in bloom, almost by magic, and from the two bodies in union in turn new life is born, which propagates in the natural universe. It is a very strong image, which does not leave indifferent the viewer, who finds himself reflecting on the laws that govern a meeting. To cultivate a human relationship means to take care, to have respect, to create solid roots, to make new fruits sprout, exactly as nature around us does and as it reminds us every year of the arrival of spring, that gladdens our hearts and makes new loves bloom.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Jessica An

Life Garden


Jessica An

Sprouts of love


Jessica An

Me in nature


Jing Qiu “The free man is he who does not fear to go to the end of his thought.” (Léon Blum)

Strength and fragility, determination and indecision, joy, and anguish: the contemporary Chinese artist Jing Qiu does not just remain on the surface of things but goes to the depths to find their nuances. His works are a means of expressing and sharing each of his discoveries: dipping the brush into the soul to give shape and color to his thoughts, experiences, and sensations. His versatility is demonstrated by the diversity of works he creates: painting, sculpture, videos, and performances that tell us stories ready to make us reflect and move. “Disorganized desire No.4” and “Disorganized desire No.5” were made in 2021 with a mixed technique: acrylic, sand, and newspaper in the first case; acrylic, sand, and broken stones in the second. In both works the colors used are black and white: opposite colors with opposite meanings. The title, in fact, suggests what Jing felt while making the canvases: confused, conflicting desires crowded his mind, but each of them was worthy of being represented as part of the artist's spirit. Jing invites the viewer to be completely overwhelmed by the work by giving his own personal interpretation: what are your disorganized desires? Can you give them an order? "END" is a work of 2021 made with sand, plaster, and paint on canvas.


Jing Qiu

A strong contrast is created thanks to the combination of red, the color of love, passion, but also of blood with black and white. The mix of the different materials used creates a dynamic movement on the canvas making it alive, talking. “End” does not necessarily mean something negative: end as a harbinger of a new beginning, end as the end of an adventure that without a conclusion it wouldn't make sense, end as the realization of a dream that makes us take off. “Special dishes” is a video with a profound meaning that Jing made in 2020. The inspiration for this project comes from the mother of a friend of his who committed suicide due to a mental illness in 2018. Jing represented the behaviour of a bipolar patient during meals: an apparently positive moment is immediately followed by a negative one that completely disturbs his mental and emotional state. Do not underestimate the situations, reflect on what is happening around you even if it does not concern you directly: this is the invitation that the artist makes to those who look at his works, in particular this video. Communication through representation, transmission of profound messages through shapes, colors and metaphors: this is the Jing Qiu’s art.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Jing Qiu

Disorganized desire No.4


Jing Qiu

Disorganized desire No.5


Jing Qiu

END


Jing Qiu

Special dishes


Jinyoung Lee

Jinyoung Lee is a Korean artist whose artistic production is fully part of that artistic current recognized as Conceptual Art. The key element of Jinyoung Lee's works and like those that are part of Conceptual Art is the mental aspect of the work and its perception. Jinyoung Lee is a guest, for the first time, at an exhibition organized by the contemporary art gallery M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of "Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaethesia Oneirica", exhibits "Layer_bookshelf_", a work of art that recalls those of the masters of Conceptual Art such as Daniel Buren and John Baldessari. Emblematic, in "Layer_bookshelf_" is the presence of cellophane, which creates a clear separation between the shelves and the books and those who are watching the work, what is packaged is distant and untouchable, it can be something totally new, but also something ancient and primordial: a memory, an emotion, a feeling that fade and are lost in the mind with the passage of time. The artist perfectly expresses this concept by declaring: “I started with a question about our subjective view referring to our things and my works are presented with materialization of our subjective view: that is gradually faded as time goes away from the blurry memories and the daily affairs into the clear plastic wrap and showed the layers of time.” In “Layer_bookshelf_” there are not only books, but also a photograph and what appear to be objects of a child such as the orange car. The cellophane layer condenses within itself an essential concept of human life, the passing of time creates an opacity of the past, something that cannot be crystallized but that remains vague in people's minds and souls. The work of art presented by Jinyoung Lee goes straight to express this sense of sensorial and perceptive richness that daily creates memories, gives sensations and nourishes life itself.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Jinyoung Lee

Layer_bookshelf_


Joana Ribeiro da Silva “My work is about feelings, is about freedom” Joana Ribeiro da Silva

The international exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S presents Joana Ribeiro da Silva's artworks The rains of Castamere and Yellow ledbetter. The first painting is the result of a set of emotions applied with energy to the canvas, in several layers of textures and colors. She started this work in May and, for several months, whenever she felt like listening to the song The Rains of Castamere, she would return to it. The image represents life and emotions that emerge in us in different ways. Yellow ledbetter is a painting inspired by the heat of the sun, sea and sand, which warms our body and soul. It is an acrylic on canvas, with a texture inspired by the beach morning breeze. The painting intends to convey the lightness of sensations we feel on a summer's day. Her paintings are free and spontaneous, it is like she works instinctively depending on how the music inspires her. Each painting has the name of an inspiring song. She works with portraits and abstract paintings. For this exhibition, she decided to show how his soul sees rality depending by the emotion she experiences. The flow of her emotions defines colors and textures: quiet and peaceful, vibrant and passionate or dark and unsettling. Her art is minimalist as to describe the inner essence of human beings.

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Joana Ribeiro da Silva

JColors and textures are applied energetically on the canvas, in several layers for several days or months. Each color and texture means a specific feeling or sensation, and each layer is applied with a different energy, reflecting the emotion of the moment. The result is always a mixture of feelings that embrace and transmit life. She uses traditional techniques, mainly quality acrylic on canvas, mixed with everything. Joana Ribeiro da Silva was born in Porto, Portugal, where she lives. On the eve of entering college, she switched from the arts, which she attended in high school, to engineering, as it seemed to be a greater challenge. Later, she completed an MBA and is currently the CEO of an international fashion company. But her great passion is painting. It is in painting that she finds peace and balances herself, anxiously looking for new colors, shapes and textures. And it is with enormous discipline and inexhaustible energy that she reconciles all dimensions of her life. In her works we can find huge faces that convey feelings and large textured abstracts that reflect emotions. Her abstract paintings are a reflection of the strongest emotions she experiences on a daily basis and are the result of several layers of color, applied with different energy to the canvas, over several days. A punchy, edgy artwork born from several feelings applied by the artist. Her works have been exposed in different art fairs in Europe and are recognized by different art curators and galleries.

“Big brushes, self-made squeegees and several layers of cement or plaster are part of all the paintings development.” Joana Ribeiro da Silva

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Joana Ribeiro da Silva

The rains of Castamere


Joana Ribeiro da Silva

Yellow ledbetter


Johann Neumayer

Austrian artist Johann Neumayer, for the whole 2021 permanent artist at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery in Milan and Fuerteventura, presents for the exhibition "Aldilà" five works from the two series entitled "Play back" and "Space ball”, made with the Rhino 5 software. They best represent the concept of both series that fully match the theme of the exhibition. The exhibition in fact has the intent to invite artists to discover the other side of things, to go beyond appearances and drop the veil of Maya. Analyzing the two works of the series "Space ball", specifically the number 003 and the number 004, Johann creates a kind of world. A world made of colored houses enclosed in a transparent sphere, as in a bubble. This undoubtedly symbolizes two concepts: on the one hand it represents our world, spherical and floating in space, and on the other hand the concept of "bubble" understood as the world of every single person, made by places and people familiar and daily. What is interesting is that outside of this world, outside of this sphere, there is something else: there are people, there are landscapes, there is more. In particular, the artwork 003, with its horizontal composition, seems to be vertically divided into two: on the one hand the spherical world and on the other the same world, or perhaps another, flattened. The reflection is immediate: it represents the different points of view. What we perceive is not always the same for everyone. The other three works instead come from the series "Play back", made in black and white.They are in fact fragments of a world composed by the interlacing of only black lines on a white background. The world in black and white. The other part. The other side. These works convey a certain uneasiness but at the same time transport the spectators in a distant and futuristic dimension that leads to reflection. Johann Neumayer with his works defined as "futuristic" touches on Surrealism and innovation, representing surreal worlds that however have much to teach us in terms of perception of reality.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Johann Neumayer

Play back 004


Johann Neumayer

Play back 012


Johann Neumayer

Play back 017


Johann Neumayer

Space ball 003


Johann Neumayer

Space ball 004


Jolita Pundziuviene “The longer you look at an object, the more abstract it becomes, and, ironically, the more real." (Lucian Freud) The artistic current of abstract art has always gone hand in hand with the philosophical influences of the time since the beginning of its rise. Abstract artists and irrationalist philosophers have always had a lot in common as they both sought truth in the chaos of things. The total rejection of reality is a characteristic feature of the current artist and also of the philosophical thought of irrationalists like Nietzsche and Freud which was in contrast with the serenity that was achieved during the Belle époque. In the imaginary artworks of abstract art we find the wonderful art of Jolita Pundziuviene who manages to convey contrasting emotions thanks to the colors and shapes painted in her masterpieces. In the different types of abstract art that have developed over time, the concept has never changed and the artist exploits this search for truth in the therapy that accompanies and supports the human mind. Jolita's talent helps her to express what her mind develops and through the artist representation the viewer also becomes part of the artist's intrinsic emotions. In her vision of what is beyond there is a world of shapes and colors that become real in the representation on canvas, the landscapes, the emotions, the sense of incomprehension pervade the art viewer who can find the peace of the senses or the restlessness of the soul in the contrasting colors of Jolita Pundziuviene's paintings comes, but what is certain is that whatever emotion her paintings transmit to us, we are faced with real works of art.

Art Curator Letizia Perrieri


Jolita Pundziuviene

Fairy tales grove


Jolita Pundziuviene

Saliamon's mines


Jolita Pundziuviene

The mistery


Jordan Kreikemeier "Energy is always moving outwards or inwards. It can never stay still: if it were still it would not be energy, but there is nothing that is not energy. So, everything is moving somehow. " (Osho Rajneesh)

Jordan's artwork is completely imbued with energy. The young artist paints emotions and sensations that go beyond all boundaries and barriers, emerge from the canvas and pervade the soul of the observer. Jordan uses color as a tool of free expression, in fact it is the only protagonist within the work. A great energy is what the viewer perceives when encountering Jordan's artistic work, a force that sets the entire work in motion that travels from the inside out. The colors that the artist chooses are intense, lively and brilliant, they completely capture the attention of the observer, not only that, they are able to fascinate the heart of the beholder. The bold and colorful brushstrokes make the works of great impact and acquire an enormous aesthetic and emotional value. Jordan's artistic work is of clear abstract inspiration, there is no figure or subject that refers to contingent reality, everything the artist creates is purity. A purity that finds fulfillment in the skilful use of colours, sometimes extremely mellow and material, other times more fluid. Jordan creates in her works an important balance given by opposites, that is, by the static nature of the material colors and the movement of fleeting brushstrokes. The artist has the great power to evoke great emotions, on her canvases, not only the colours explode in their total brilliance but also the feelings. The viewer is completely overwhelmed by the emotions that emerge from the works. In fact, Jordan's artistic work is full of energy, meeting her works means coming into contact with positive vibrations through which sensations and feelings are released and emotions are awakened. The observer finds himself living a unique and unforgettable experience, she makes a journey to discover himself, forgotten emotions and dormant memories. The brushstrokes and colours that are the absolute protagonists of Jordan's work are imbued with a strong passion, the one that the artist possesses towards life and art. Jordan's work is strength, passion and a true expression of oneself and freedom.

Art Curator Vanessa Viti


Jordan Kreikemeier

Cotton candy


Jordan Kreikemeier

Riled up


Jordan Kreikemeier

Saturated


Jose Caldwell "Many of the pieces are inspired by poems or stories I’ve written." says Jose Caldwell referring to his artworks, and "Dream Horses" is one of them. To be precise, for the realization of this work he was inspired by the spirituality of Native Americans and the wild mustang horses that roamed the West. Despite the use of an almost monochrome palette, the artist manages to represent the three primary elements of nature: earth (the mountains), water (the river) and air (the sky). These three elements, however, are not clearly divided, but they intertwine and fit together like a puzzle, the puzzle of life. Against a jagged and unpredictable background, a herd of horses stands in the foreground, on the right. As well as the background and the horses of Franz Marc in "The Blue Horses" match each other with circular shapes, so the horses of Jose Caldwell take up the angularity of the landscape around them, without thus losing elegance and realism. The artwork emanates a feeling of strength and movement, as well as vibrant dynamism because the artist chooses, thus demonstrating his remarkable abilities, to represent the horses in the race and the stars as they fall from the sky. The tones chosen to represent the scene are cold, from the various shades of blue, but this is the strength of the work because this color evokes the idea of infinity and emanates a feeling of spirituality that brings the viewer even closer to the canvas. They put him in a meditative state in which he manages to forget stress, thus becoming freer, connected to a source of energy, inspiration and dreams. “One of the main reasons I will always create art” says the artist, “is to provide reflections and to open windows, so people can perceive the magic of this world, and gaze into the vistas of mystery within as well as beyond.”. Through this work so well balanced in all its parts, Jose Caldwell succeeded perfectly in his intent; he carries us into this magical aldilà, a magical beyond.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Jose Caldwell

Dream Horses


Joseph Stublick

Throughout history, many artists have often addressed existential questions and turned to their creative processes in order to satisfy a noble quest: the understanding of the Unknown. Nonetheless, the American abstract artist Joseph Stublick questions the meaning of existence throughout his work: by unveiling the subtle and mysterious beauty of the boundaries that define us as human beings, he acts as a modern explorer and his canvases as charts of the vast, unlimited universe of which we are only but a small part. In the “ALDILÀ” exhibition, held by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Joseph presents three abstract artworks very different from each other, despite they have all been realised by pouring acrylic paint on a surface. “After Earth” stands out for its unusual format and dark background: on a square canvas, turned of 45 degrees, the paint is spread from the low to the upper part creating a reverse-cascade effect. The rich marbleized effect easily arise natural images such as a mineral treasures, precious gems of the soil cleverly hidden from the human eye, or a molecular composition of cells, spectacular and yet invisible to the ordinary gaze. By portraying a reversed, upward fall, Joseph questions the 'Ephemeral', the temporary nature of all things and most of all, our responsibility to honour such fleeting gift. Contrary to this elegant and darker composition, “Genesis” is a powerful and violent clash of colours. The “beautiful collision of opposite energies” gives and takes in an unbreakable cycle of creation and destruction, equally positive and negative.At first glance the composition seems chaotic and spontaneous, however its vibrant energy invites the viewers to get closer and lose themselves in the detailed and uncountable connections between converging forces. The artist has gone further on and deeper in its research of the Unknown bypassing the limits of the singular canvas and turning to the untouchable individual self. “Soul Reborn” is, as the title suggests, an homage to the human awareness before and after the life of the human body. The acrylic paint has been poured on four canvases, close to each other, so that the colours could drip over the central edges on the other side and the shapes could keep and change form during the process. The vibrant colour palette comes to life, spread diagonally on the four canvases, as a metaphor of the relentlessness and unrestrained nature of the soul. Like Helen Frankenthaler and many other abstract expressionist before her, Joseph Stublick works with soft and hard-edge forms and exploits the format of his canvases to create peculiar compositions, able to address intangible pressing topics, yet so significative during our temporary, mortal existence.

Art Curator Flavia Montecchi


Joseph Stublick

After Earth


Joseph Stublick

Genesis


Joseph Stublick

Soul Reborn


JRN Artemis Biche “Keep your face to the sun and you will never see the shadows.” (Helen Keller)

Spots of contrasting colours describe luminescent landscapes, crossed by brilliant lines. Conscious and unconscious expressions merge, navigating dark waters illuminated by the light of distant sunbeams. The artworks by JRN Artemis Biche, a contemporary American artist, immediately open up the observer to a parallel universe, where the eye is suddenly attracted to a myriad of highly dynamic shapes and colours. The eye is guided by tubular lines placed along the paintings, which tear the work into different parts. Lines that are sometimes golden, sometimes silver, marking the passing of time and telling of the randomness of life with its unpredictable circumstances. In "Icelandic Spars", an aurora borealis seems to crash into a dark and ghostly forest. Acidic tones envelop the entire work like blazing flames. The whole scene is extremely dynamic, provoking in the viewer a sense of restlessness and anguish and, at the same time, wonder and amazement.


JRN Artemis Biche

Three silvery serpentines descend from above, intersecting the sky and giving an intense calm and sensitivity. The link between heaven and earth is conflicting for the artist who, through strong gestures, describes a deep mysticism. The title of the painting is a reference to medieval Icelandic texts in which the sunstone is mentioned as a fundamental element for the Viking population for navigation. It is said that this stone was used to understand the position of the sun on cloudy days due to its ability to polarize the light and, like a compass, guided entire populations in their travels. JRN Artemis Biche, wants to lead to a reflection on the importance of not forgetting the link with nature and creation, like the sunstone. Because, to forget means to falsify one's identity, to burn one's roots and to injure oneself. Let us then allow the rays of the sun to reach us, illuminating our path and warming our soul.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


JRN Artemis Biche

Divine Feminine


JRN Artemis Biche

Icelandic Spars


Juliane Blasquez “The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.” (John Milton)

The artworks by Juliane Blasquez, a French contemporary artist, are intimate extracorporeal revelations, where sensuality and elegance emerge both from the technique of the delicate stroke and from the subjects portrayed. Even the nuances that characterize her paintings are balanced, without going too far in altering their realism. Bound to a figurative expressiveness, the artist focuses her attention mainly on portraits, but breaking away from the classical poses and placing the subject in fairy-tale and surreal places, or rather worlds. The intention is to find and analyze the deep self of people who, in her paintings, seem to release the unconscious. In "La Flamme du porteur", Juliane Blasquez depicts a young man who, in the darkness, lets himself be guided by the light of a torch. The painting seems to be set in the Middle Ages: the subject's clothing is reminiscent of the common male clothing of the time, in particular the hood. The Middle Ages is a period of great change for the whole of humanity. A moment of transition between darkness and light.


Juliane Blasquez

The fire of the torch becomes a vivifying and purifying agent par excellence and its light is a reflection of the luminous nature of the Spirit. Thanks to these properties, it elevates all things to a higher level. A dynamic, masculine element, it generates transformations and, as such, is the main creator of all metamorphoses and the only element capable of transmuting base metals. The symbol associated with fire is the equilateral triangle with the vertex at the top, a geometric figure that alludes to its upward flow. The same shape is linked to the mountain, a metaphor for an ascending and spiritual drive, a striving towards the sky to get closer to the divine. Juliane Blasquez analyzes the light-shadow dichotomy here. Light as a source of life and energy and, at the same time, of darkness. One cannot exist without the other and, for the evolution of consciousness, there is a need for both. The need to consume and renew itself continuously, like a flame.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Juliane Blasquez

Allumette


Juliane Blasquez

La Flamme du porteur


Junija Galejeva "Mirrors are used to look at one's face, and art is used to look at one's soul" (George Bernard Shaw)

The artist Junija is able to create an intense bond between her works and the viewer, in fact she is able to express her feelings in an excellent way. Kandinsky suggested that it is necessary to exercise one's soul, the artist Junija puts this thought into action and what comes out of it is art that causes sensations and caresses the heart of the viewer. The work "Through closed eyes" has an undisputed protagonist: colour, this is a fundamental and predominant part of the entire composition, the canvas is imbued with bright and vivid colours. The artist completely frees the colour from the object, there are no figures or lines that contain the brush strokes, the colour is free, it moves on the canvas, takes up space, sometimes the colours overlap giving life to unique shades, other times they mix and still others, side by side, remain motionless. In Junija's work the great pictorial ability of the artist is evident, moreover all her calm and composure is evident. The brushstrokes and colors that Junija uses bring to mind feelings of calm and tranquility, her work is a sort of door that leads us into a state of mind of peace. It is very clear that in addition to the skilful hand of the artist there is in her the great ability to listen to her heart, the artist is able to listen to her emotions and express them through colours. The artist, completely freeing himself of lines and figures, moves away from reality to totally embrace abstractionism, her artistic work, in fact, finds complete fulfillment in this movement. The colour that is free from the chains of the figures travels the road towards spiritualism and thanks to this path one can grasp one's soul. Meeting Junija's work means discovering hidden emotions, and again, getting in touch with our spirit. Junija's art is a tangible expression of great sensitivity, intuition and above all passion. The entire artistic work arises and takes on the meaning of a bridge between us spectators and something transcendental that shakes our soul and intimate feelings.

Art Curator Vanessa Viti


Junija Galejeva

Through closed eyes


Jurga Alminiene

Jurga’s work titled “Confetti” represents a figure with human features dressed in a copper-red skirt, a forest green long sleeves shirt and a black t-shirt on the top with beautiful balloon sleeves. With her arms outstretched, the figure stands motionless on a grey background upon which illegible words are written; art is the only word the viewer can read. Recalling a mythological creature but in a contemporary fashion, the figure has the face of a smiling unicorn balloon, and a strong tape at the neck sticks the balloon to the rest of the body. The presence of the unicorn balloon gives to the work interesting chromatic contrasts of colours and light: the bright green, pink and orange of the unicorn’s mane are contrasted by more opaque orange and green of the figure’s skirt and shirt. It is the replacement of this unicorn face for a human face that puts the work within a binary framework of reality and fantasy. This binary relation reminds the German term Heimlich, analysed by Sigmund Freud in 1919. He associates the term with what is familiar and known. The negation of the term, un-heimlich, consequently takes the meaning of the unfamiliar and frightening, ceasing to be familiar only when the boundary, which normally exists between reality and fantasy, thins. The disturbing can thus be seen as the line that divides the fantastic from the real, as the contrast caused by something unusual that is inserted into a familiar and known context. In “Confetti”, it is the unicorn balloon face that causes a feeling of un-heimlich. Meanwhile, the rest of the body belongs to a human figure, who is blocked or linked with the fantasy unicorn by the tape. Willingly or not, reality and fantasy are tied together by this indissoluble tape, thus making the whole figure disturbing and unexpected, creating uncanny and disturbing feelings. Jurga describes the work as “an assistant to Donald Trump told him she had a fantastic dream last night…”. What is the dream the assistant is talking about?

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Jurga Alminiene

Confetti


Kalena Leigh Kalena Leigh’s life has always led her to travel the world, now based in North Carolina. Kalena’s travels enrich her culturally and make her know different realities. Colors and fantasy are the basis of her art. The artist uses different media and collage in the realization of her works, always finished with the use of spray painting and oils. Kalena’s works often depict human figures, mostly women, placed in a surrealist context. The two works that the artist shows to the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery represents all this well. "Dream On" and "Sweep Over Me" are the vision of a parallel world, a world created with the imagination of the artist. "Dream On" depicts a woman seen in profile and intent on admiring something in front of her, it is interesting to note that it is probably a selfportrait. The beautiful woman is surrounded by bright colors such as fuchsia blue and light-blue. White daisies float in the air and make the environment playful. Despite the bright colors, a night setting prevails, given by the blue night and the moon, placed in the upper and left part of the canvas. A very interesting element is the piano that occupies a third of the canvas. It appears from the background, like coming from space and approaching the viewer. There are many elements present in this painting as well as the techniques used: we can see elements in relief, drops of color that flow on the canvas and glitter that illuminate the composition. Undoubtedly Kalena Leigh knows how to excite her audience and transport it in a magical environment.


Kalena Leigh

The same magic is perceptible in the second painting, "Sweep Over Me", with a vertical composition. Here the dominant colors are magenta and cyan blue which are reproduced in all the main elements. The subject is a woman submerged in the waters of a limpid lake, she blends with the background, her long and magenta hair floating in the water to become one with it. Around her, small fish swim free. The weight of the woman’s figure is balanced on the right by a large magenta sun placed in a clear blue sky. Also here various elements make up the canvas: color casting, splashing, raised parts. The same small flowers of the previous canvas are reproduced here, as if they were the artist’s signature and its distinctive feature. Kalena Leigh skillfully combines surrealism with her pictorial abilities, transporting viewers into a world where you can only dream.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Kalena Leigh

Dream On


Kalena Leigh

Sweep Over Me


Kana Hawa “Life is like music, it must be composed by ear, feeling and instinct, not by rule. Nevertheless one had better know the rules, for they sometimes guide in doubtful cases, though not often” (Paracelsus)

Kana’s art is born from a philosophical, sociological and human reflection of great depth. The artist investigates the relationship between instinct, which guides man exactly like any other living being, and nous, which differentiates him from other terrestrial creatures, giving that sense of belonging to a thinking species and endowed with a free will that guides. Sometimes, in the name of his freedom and not conditionality, nous can fail. The man, every man, acts following different mental schemes, dictated by different socio-cultural contexts, but also familiar within the same society or still personal in the relationship with themselves. These substantial differences in thought lead to contrasts between man and man, but also within every human being who sometimes by making the instinctive part prevail over the rational part of himself finds that he is acting in opposition to himself, in an almost dichotomous behavior. These reflections have led the artist to a form of distrust and isolation towards his neighbor, which resolves and finds vent in his art. Kana not only pours on the canvas his own frustrations, perplexity about the human race, but the art becomes the main tool to understand the humanity through the different reactions that the spectator has in front of the works. Colors, lines that generate shapes, digitalization, graphism and figurativism, the use of patterns are all key elements of reading for the works on display, which clash with our interiority, open drawers of memory and emotions generating a deliberate confusion of ideas and ideals, force us to deal with our weaknesses. They expose us in front of the artist, almost as if we presented ourselves guilty, with our hands up, but ready to get rid of our moral chains and not to be handcuffed.

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Kana Hawa

Happiness


Kana Hawa

Jumping at shadows


Kana Hawa

Progressive composition


Kana Hawa

LSD


Kana Hawa

The new moon


Kat Richards “The eternal hourglass of existence is turned over again and again - and you with it, speck of dust!” (Friedrich Nietzsche) The vertical line and the circle are fundamental elements in the artistic research by Kat Richards, a contemporary Australian artist. For her, geometry becomes the language through which she expresses inner emotions and analyzes the spirituality embedded in the relationship between man and nature. Her works are magnificent juxtapositions of thin white lines that stretch across neutral colour fields, allowing a controlled spatiality to emerge with a strong visual impact. The geometric representation derives from the need to use elements that carry an ancient symbolism in order to communicate a precise message. The circle, so recurrent in Kat Richards' artworks, is in fact a figure that represents the state of primordial substance, impalpable, transparent and uniform. Without corners or edges, it symbolizes harmony, the intellectual and spiritual dimension. The circular movement can be traced back to the sky, perfect, unchanging, without beginning or end. This means that it can represent time, which in turn can be defined as a continuous and invariable succession of instants that are identical to each other. Linked to the perennial cycle of life, it is a symbol of eternity and therefore of perfection. In the artworks by Kat Richards, the circle is punctually formed by vertical lines which, when placed side by side, contribute to the reading of the entire composition. These also carry a symbolism. They tell of a spiritual path, of an essentiality and order that tend upwards. Influenced by the expressionist approach of the Color Field artistic current, her works are deep inner journeys where both colour and form combine to tell a metaphysical world. A mystical world, an eternal return, in which consciousness needs a cyclical experience of death and rebirth in order to be nourished and renewed.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Kat Richards

Still Moment


Kat Richards

Veil


Kat Richards

Void


Katherine Dale "There is an amazing power getting to know your inner self and learning how to use it and not fight with the world. If you know what makes you happy, your personality, interests and capabilities, just use them, and everything else flows beautifully." (Juhi Chawla)

Katherine’s works exude life. Faces that change, that show different profiles of themselves, opposing souls that live in

the same body. Panta rei, everything flows, this happens in nature with strong evidence, as you notice in a human body

external, but also and above all inner. The human psyche that is born, grows, ages and dies. These passages are not only flows, changes, much more quickly than the external appearance of the body itself. Katherine captures through the outward representation of a face the inner changes, the contrasts that live in us and the duality between what happens in the space around us and how this genetically modifies our body and our action in the here and now. It’s the broad field of epigenetics. The environment forms, forges, influences and creates and we are partly the fruit of it, although we can actively intervene in changing our space and our time.


Katherine Dale

External and internal coexist not as straight lines each of which has its own path, but as curved lines that sometimes meet, interact, going to change and influence the path of each other. This process is sometimes rational and determined, in other cases it is random and not possible. The artist’s moving works therefore explore the relationship between static reality and the Chaotic and shifting imagination. A painting contains in itself not just the image it is representing, but the history of each brushstroke, invisibly. When we look at the human face we perceive, if we are able observers, the emotion of a moment, the fleeting moment, we can at best grasp the feelings felt and imagine what caused them, but we are not allowed to know the existential history that produced that specific emotion at that precise moment. Katherine in her physical works sends us some frames. It is possible to see the work crystallized in a precise moment, or to grasp, through digitalization and movement, a fragment of human life, recounted by the rapid flow and modification of the face in relation to the environment in which it takes place.

Art Curator Erika Gravante


Katherine Dale

Alison


Katherine Dale

Jessica


Katja Tomzig

Katja Tomzig is a German professional artist taking part in international solo and group exhibitions. At “ALDILA’” exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Katja presents “September 2020 was still quite unpleasant here and there. Energy thieves everywhere”, a work from her series of paintings “Facets of Creation”: characterized by fantastic creatures and sceneries, their aim is to bring joy, light and love into the lives of its viewers. The basis for each of these paintings is an uncontrolled blob of colour, in which the scene revealed to her that is finally to be seen in the finished painting. At first glance, a seascape seems to be represented in watercolor and lively tones, with some eyes that look and question us. Looking more closely, we see that from the splashes of color emerge little cute monsters that interact with each other on the cardboard. If this work may initially seem like a play of colors, in reality it hides a deeper meaning: with it, in fact, Katja wants to show the world in the process of transformation in which it currently finds itself. She is in fact convinced that we are on the way to a new world that will be clearly visible in the 2020s. A world that, despite all the fear and attempts at division that we are currently experiencing, will be characterised by love, respect, freedom, joy, abundance, serenity, health and creativity, in which everyone can and will develop according to their talents. This can be seen in this artwork: the process that is taking place. Old encrustations are slowly crumbling away, the completely new miraculous and light-filled is striving to the surface. The new, which is just being born out of divine light, is still trailing a tail behind it that seems mechanical and artificial - somehow fake. Ghostly nests hang from it, vampire creatures suck petroleum out of a kind of hoover hose. The veil worn by the machine's head cannot hide the illusion. The dolphin as mediator between the worlds and guardian of the light observes the process with joy. The magical world of Katja therefore, apparently ironic and superficial, hides an important message of hope for the world and humanity.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Katja Tomzig

September 2020 was still quite unpleasant here and there. Energy thieves everywhere.


Kawarano

Line as an instrument at the service of being. Stripe of wet ink as the outcome of the catharsis of the human soul. Art has always been a way of representing reality and what surrounds us. Since ancient times it has been used to bear witness, to aid understanding, to give lustre to families and entire kingdoms and, in its highest and noblest declination, to represent one's own soul. The latter is a rather difficult and insidious task where the artist must try in every way to be sincere with the figure he most assiduously thinks about: himself. He has to strip himself of the garments of objective reality, he has to rip open his skin to penetrate into his warm and silent intimacy. He must come to terms with himself before the demons of the outside world contaminate the deepest layer of his being. Indeed, this is by no means an easy task. Yet, looking into one's own soul is something we are all driven to do. Often it is the arrival of that moment in life where the human being feels the need to stop and observe his soul. A break from the daily hurry, a halt to reality and the incessant and fast pace of contemporaneity. Let's take a breath and listen to our heartbeat. Slow and constant is the melody of our heart that we often forget to listen to, second by second, in its eternal becoming. Let's breathe and become aware of our body and our mind; of our tensions and our worries, of the promises to be kept and the future plans that - maybe - we don't feel like keeping. We listen to what our soul desires and invoke what makes us feel good. There is nothing wrong in this world.


Kawarano

And that's how Have a Doze outlines itself: it's a cathartic moment indelibly marked on paper. Kawarano performs a sort of purification of himself through the creative gesture and the ink of a pen. Small strokes compose tiny rectangular mosaic tiles that wind like the body of a long snake throughout the composition. At first blank, then dyed a pinkish hue, then bluish and greenish again. In each of these tesserae there is the expressive force of Kawarano, in each of these elements there is the expression of the cathartic moment of which the artist is the undisputed protagonist. Have a Doze - and perhaps even the name suggests it - is a break from reality and an invitation to look inside oneself. The black pigment is spread on the canvas through a slow and long ritual composed of small hand gestures, tiny shifts on the paper and a distillation of Kawarano's soul. In these tesserae and in these sinuous lines there is all the complexity of the artist's Ego, there is all the desire to externalize what is inside him. Like mantras and like prayers, these works are accompanied by an almost sacred aura, by something difficult to explain in words but that can be perceived in every rectangle of color. In Have a Doze there is the cathartic act of the human mind towards the world; in Memory to Revive there is the sublimation of memory intended as a graphic reworking of the past. We look at these works and we are catapulted into the mind of another person, we look at these small tiles juxtaposed one next to the other and we can look inside Kawarano's soul.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Kawarano

Have a Doze


Kawarano

Memory to Revive


Kaylin Skye “Color has in itself a little, but enormous studied strength, which can exert its influence on the entire human body.” (Kandinsky)

Colours have a direct and strong influence on how we feel and art uses colours to reveal and to provoke the most hidden feelings and emotions of human beings. Kaylin Skye’s emotional awareness and dissection are translated into canvases through the visual language of shapes, colours and lines, with the aim of creating a composition that exists in a direct relation with the viewers’ inner world. “My work is heavily based around emotion and feeling from a visual perspective. I have an innate desire for the observer to search inside themselves and create their own thoughts and feelings about what I create”, the artist says. The paintings “Continued”, “Tethered” and “Elements” are three examples of Skye’s approach to colours. Made of different shades of green, blue and yellow and painted with quick brushstrokes, “Continued” is a crescendo of a colours combination that recalls an abstract landscape. A dark green becomes the ‘forest floor’, which encounters the blue of a river’s water or a waterfall in the middle of the painting. At the top, forms alternate through black, green, blue and yellow by creating robust and leafy trees. The painting has neither a beginning nor an end; it is a continuous repetition of abstract shapes without limits. “Tethered” is a painting that has a strong evocative power, derived from the ways in which Skye uses colours. Like pouring rain, shades of orange and light blue fall vertically, overlapped by thick black lines which cut the painting into several pieces. Like pouring rain falls from the clouds, so an endless stream of emotions falls from who is looking at the painting. Different is the painting “Elements”, in which Skye plays with bright and vibrant greens, violets and oranges. Undefined forms are all put together, as if they were pieces of a puzzle, as if different elements learn to live together, cohabiting in the same space. The whole composition obtains dynamicity and movement thanks to Skye’s smart use of colours and to the rounded-corner shapes, which seem to move by creating a vortex of colours. In these three paintings, Skye relies on the unconscious and purely emotional response to three main colours: green, blue and violet; here, each shade and intensity contains a symbolic world that the viewers grasp through an emphatic exchange by allowing a deep reflection of their feelings and emotions.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Kaylin Skye

Continued


Kaylin Skye

Tethered


Kaylin Skye

Elements


Kinga Malkus “The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most.” (John Ruskin)

Creating images that our eyes do not know and expressing concepts through the combination of lines and shapes: abstract art stimulates the imagination of the viewers, who search for meanings to give a personal interpretation. Transforming memories, impulses, and emotions into works that are alive and that speak a universal language: this is the great power that contemporary artist Kinga Malkus has. "It hasn't even passed yet" was made in 2021 with mixed media on canvas. Brush strokes of acrylic paint and subtle strokes of pastels merge to tell us a story. Time marks the days; time is precious and should not be wasted; sometimes time passes quickly and there never seems to be enough while sometimes it seems not to pass. The title of the work makes us reflect on the concept of time and makes it a representation of it: Kinga has immortalized a moment of waiting: who or what is she waiting for? Moments of restlessness alternate with moments of peace: broken lines, instinctive strokes and dark coloured spots make room for softer lines and bright colors. What are you waiting for? Each of us has been waiting for something for a long time, something we want and never got, something we fought for but never got. "The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most" reads the quote from the famous British writer John Ruskin. These words reflect Kinga: colors are for her a charge of energy, a source of joy, but also starting point for reflections. Do not let the dark distress you but let the light and its shades enlighten you.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Kinga Malkus

It hasn’t even passed yet


Klaudyna Busza-Kujawska "“Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle.” (Lewis Carroll)

Klaudyna Busza-Kujawska is a young painter living in Poland. Klaudyna's love for art is expressed through a deep passion for nature, and in particular for the pristine beauty of the mountains. The idea that moves the artist's imagination becomes comparable to the astonishment of the explorer, who finds himself in front of the amazing grandeur of nature. Like the romantic artists who exalted the sublime expressions of the natural world, the luxuriant reality of woods and mountains becomes the absolute protagonist of Klaudyna's artworks. With a significant difference. The artist does not just reproduce the shades and shapes of nature on the canvas, but she literally uses nature to adorn her works. Klaudyna's strong artistic curiosity led her to experiment with acrylic painting with inserts of real Scandinavian moss. We can see the amazing effects of this experimentation in the works presented for "Aldilà", including Afromossian. The work depicts a seductive female profile, whose features, painted with acrylics in shades of gray, contrast with the black of the background. The contrast is even more evident thanks to the use of glossy and matte paints, which create the optical illusion of the figure "detaching" from the background. But the true three-dimensionality is given by the lush afro hair, composed of pieces of moss of various colors. The moss even comes out from the edges of the frame, as if to underline the prevalence of the natural element, by definition irrepressible and wild. Bonsai follows the same compositional logic, and represents a solitary spur of rock on which green-fronted trees stand. Moss is again the element that gives the viewer the charm of the third dimension, giving the impression of entering the wooded forest in miniature. The suspended solitude of the small group of trees seems to communicate a feeling of serenity, a new awareness that has all the fragility and the floating grace of a dream. Through the Looking-Glass presents a different use of moss, which in this case has a marginal role compared to the rest of the representation. It adorns the outline of a singular mirror painted on a gray wall, and invites the viewer to focus their gaze inside the central oval. The reflection of the glass, reproduced by the skillful brushstrokes of white acrylic, gives a glimpse beyond it of a grassy corridor, whose end is only vaguely perceived. With the mysterious essence of the artwork, the artist seems to want to induce the observer to reflect on a higher level, beyond what is known, in order to embrace the unknown to the point of being surprised by it.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Klaudyna Busza-Kujawska

Afromossian


Klaudyna Busza-Kujawska

Bonsai


Klaudyna Busza-Kujawska

Through the Looking-Glass


Kota

Past, present and future: eternal becoming. Constant change. Kota's contribution to the "Aldilà" exhibition can be summed up beautifully in this sentence. Simple words, yet connoted by a meaning so intense as to be the basis of the events of our existence and of the whole world. Art has the ability to make visible and palpable concepts too difficult to explain in words, too complicated and enigmatic to be assimilated only through the formulation of abstract thought. Yet Kota, with his works, succeeds in representing the different eras of the human era, succeeds in making time literally interact with space. Three representative planes make up Harmonious: a wooden board acts as a theatrical horizon for the composition. The surface, left largely untreated with the wood grain visible, evokes an all-natural world outside of canonical space and time. On the right side there is a riot of colors, chromatic streaks of sober and well-balanced colors: an abstract element, a sea full of reflections, a vaporous cloud, evokes the taste of a destination, of an arrival that the three animals are reaching. Eternal becoming of Eraclian memory then. Moving our gaze, our attention inevitably falls on the three levels of representation a little further on. Plexiglass plates hold the silhouettes of a frog, a hare and a monkey. Memory and homage to the illustrious Japanese past, these three animals - chasing each other - are taking long strides towards a defined point, their chosen destination. Perhaps the arrival is the continuation of that chromatic stain that can be seen on the background?


Kota

Maybe the arrival is something unreachable? It is impossible for us to know. Let's remember that everything is in a constant state of becoming, everything is created in the moment in which it is realized. Past, present and future are part of the same instant of time, they are located in the exact same point of the timeline. What matters is the eternal becoming represented by these three planes of representation. The animals, the protagonists of Harmonious, appear in a scroll from the Heian and Kamakura eras: Kota translates the protagonists into the present and makes them participants in contemporaneity. The allusion to the wish for future freedom and carefreeness after a global pandemic is too strong to be left out. By carrying out such an operation, the artist carries out an action of upheaval that involves time and space. He distorts the initial setting of the homage characters in order to give it a sense in keeping with our contemporaneity; he represents the three animals in a running attitude, towards someone or something of unknown existence. In this way past, present and future are fused, mixed together in an indissoluble way and all that matters is basically the eternal becoming of all things. Let's relax our muscles and let ourselves be carried away by the constant flow of the eternal becoming: we cannot do otherwise.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Kota

Harmonious


Kota

The flow of the river


Kristina Zemlanikina

Kristina Zemlanikina is an artist who is completely immersed in art, but above all in the creative process: her aim is to accompany the observer into the soul of each canvas, prompting him/her to release his/her emotions and let himself/herself be carried away by a perceptive and sensorial evolution. In fact, for the “Aldilà” exhibition at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Kristina exposes a work that absolutely reflects these fundamental symbolic values: through “Arcturian Gold”, she wishes to immerse the viewer in an idyllic and paradisiacal setting, outside of time and space. Thanks to the spirituality that surrounds her during the realization of the painting, the artist channels every kind of detail that she perceives with her mind but above all with her heart and inserts it within the pictorial surface, thus uniting art, creation, intuition and symbolism. Furthermore, it can be seen that the driving force of the whole is given by a precise choice of colors and feeling. These elements are inextricably linked to the center of the work: the skillful use of gold, just as in Klimt's works, depicts the material concentration of the divine light, where this hue and all universal emotions come together in this infinite circle. Since gold is the most representative and decorative color, it takes on a role that goes beyond historical evocation: combined with a theme as profound as that of the otherworldly dimension, it awakens, stimulates and spreads a new artistic sensibility. Other colors present in the artwork are black and white: one the opposite of the other but used and mixed together they create a union that emerges from the canvas itself, emphasizing all the details portrayed. Black is also found in the numerous wavy lines, creating a harmonious dynamism, a light breeze that caresses the canvas and expands outwards. While white is quintessentially a symbol of purity, providing a delicate source of light that radiates and surrounds the environment depicted.

“Honor yourself because you are a mirror to others. Love yourself the way you love others. You are a fractal of the Universe. What you feel inside reflects to the whole world.” (Kristina Zemlanikina)

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Kristina Zemlanikina

Arcturian Gold


Lana Christ

For the international exhibition “Aldilà” at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Lana Christ exposes “Exspiravit”. With this artwork, the artist succeeds in bringing out her painting’s skills, by drawing inspiration from her surroundings, and thanks to this she manages to reach a purely abstract vision of her subconscious. She is always discovering new color connections, different techniques and new expressive concepts as well: everything is set to capture the viewer's optical perception, involving him/her in a wide expanse of color. Lana indelibly fixes emotions and moods on the canvas, enlivened by the vision of orange, black, white and, like an electric shock, with the use of bright red. Each brushstroke releases a charge of energy and vitality! The dense layers of color underline the creativity of this artist, where red specifically suggests a new representation of multidimensional spaces. The act of imprinting different strokes by spreading the color totally defines this work, which encompasses an otherworldly reality, where every detail is indissolubly united with the material. By recalling the artistic movement of the Abstractionism, Lana wants to represent a revolutionary artistic language capable of freeing the mind and soul of the viewer. In this way, an expressive and symbolic function of color prevails, emphasizing the viewer's feelings and suggesting a close link between the viewer and the artwork. The ability to visualize a reality that is not yet real, to trigger the imagination through which numerous visions of the sensory world can take shape, are some of the peculiarities of this work that help the artist to bring her own feelings into the painting, in the search for some completely new forms and images, with the aim of expressing abstract and innovative concepts.

“The modern artist works to express an inner world: movement, energy and other inner forces.” (Jackson Pollock)

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Lana Christ

Exspiravit


Lassie Kraemer Is the world in which we live real or is there a wall that does not allow us to access the real reality? The real is opposed to the virtual and virtual is all that is possible, including the afterlife. Lassie Kraemer, a German artist, paints “Untitled”, a work that speaks of her feelings and three different dimensions of realities connected to each other. This is not Lassie’s only goal: her main purpose is to arouse an emotion, a feeling in those who watch her work. We can see distinctly the difference of the three levels because the brushstrokes are very different. The first part, which represents the first level, the material world, appears quiet to us, a black brushstroke draws the principle of what could be an arch, almost a window on a terrace from which to see the starry sky, black traces of red seem to move towards the second level, the central one, which is characterized by explosions of thunder: now we are in the subconscious. It is a place where the rational is lost and instinct, passion and feelings dominate. It is a tumultuous world, always in storm. It is the dimension that silently dominates each of us in our lives. The unconscious is the seat of the most secret desires and the most terrible fears. The place where we are really ourselves, without moderation, without filters. It is a place of absolute and individual truth. The third level in which Lassie brings us is quieter than the second but less orderly than the first. It is a place where only the mind and the heart can reach, a spiritual place, perhaps the artist’s Aldilà. Lassie Kraemer, through her passionate and unique ability to paint and express herself, guides us on a journey within ourselves, the most adventurous journey that each of us can ever make.

“I believe everyone's reality is different and nobody experiences the world exactly the same like another person; but more often than not we find aspects in others we feel drawn to and understand deeply.” (Lassie Kraemer)

Art Curator Sara Giannini


Lassie Kraemer

Untitled


Laura Alonso

“There is nothing like a dream to create the future.” (Victor Hugo)

The surreal visual artist Laura Alonso feels involved in the energy that moves the cosmos: in her own perception of the reality, she finds the foothold to analyse the world around her and to express the motive force of nature and of the universe – also and above all reflecting the inmost, deepest dimension. The artist, through her short digital sequences, would give to the viewers her own interpretation of life: she is not just focusing her artistic investigation on the physical and concrete world but mostly on the world beyond this world. In order to express it and to convey in any meaningful and lasting way her own emotions, Laura Alonso feels free to discover and use an innovative artistic form. Using the moving digital art, the artist is able to create a unique atmosphere: basing the expression of her art on dreamy, ethereal and minimal aesthetic scenes, the artist replicates a parallel world. With a soft and romantic touch, with a delicate pastel stroke and sweet mixture of colours the artist can infuse in her artwork a sense of harmony, tranquillity, positivity and calmness. Sharing her own perspectives of the worlds, Laura Alonso leads the viewers to reflect upon their own condition and also the great beyond.

Art Curator Manuela Fratar


Laura Alonso

By your side


Laura Sobrado “Music is the shorthand of emotion.” (Lev Tolstoj)

The notes of a staff are like brush strokes on a canvas: they write a symphony that in the first case is heard and in the second observed. Music and art are united by a strong connection that has inspired several famous artists of the past for the creation of works: Kandinskij, Matisse, Mondrian and Paul Klee are some examples. Laura Sobrado is a contemporary artist based in Washington who has made the combination of art and music her hallmark. Each song has its essence, hidden meanings to reveal and understand: Laura selects the song to represent, performs the manual mapping of the instrumental structure and then begins a creative process during which instinct and emotions take over. "Only You" was created in 2021 with the acrylic on canvas technique. The title of the work refers to the song by Ric Hassani from which Laura took inspiration. Different shapes painted side by side create a compositional structure with balance and perfect harmony. Cold colors such as blue and warm colors such as yellow are illuminated by accurate white brush strokes. Music is part of us, it excites us, evokes memories, and acts as a soundtrack for unforgettable moments: Laura immortalizes the notes of the songs on the canvas with the desire to make the viewers make a special inner journey. Music is a therapy for our spirit, but art is too. Laura creates unique works that can speak to people's hearts: set your senses in motion and let yourself be carried away by what they suggest.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Laura Sobrado

Only You


Lausen

Lausen is a young German artist with an original and inimitable style who lives and works in Zurich. Guided by her feelings and the unexplored paths that her mind suggests, she creates works that are absolutely creative, eccentric and never seen before. She does not limit herself to the mere visual representation of emotions or figurative subjects, but often creates intertwining elements, abstract compositions that arise from her way of seeing the world. her surroundings inspire her; she is a keen observer of reality, which she then breaks down and interprets in a very personal way. She questions the viewer about the relationship between space and man's perception of it. She plays with volumes, shapes and the contrast between two and three dimensions. Her predisposition for architecture and interior design is evident, the result of a course of study that led Lausen to explore different artistic worlds, learning to look at art in a transversal way and not just with brushes and colours. In her images she creates real, tangible, visible worlds. The atmospheres are always harmonious, clear and bright, and the contrast between the background and the foreground elements allows the latter to stand out strongly but without breaking the balance of the artwork. The architectural solutions adopted by Lausen are clearly evident in "One to Ten". In which the artist places ten interior rooms that build spatial relationships between them and with the viewer, creating a direct contact with the artwork. Lausen opens up her world and makes it available, creating a self-portrait in a personal and creative key. Using the metaphor of construction, she brings together ten elements that are different from each other but all in communication, like parts of a larger whole. A fragmented personality in which every detail corresponds to an intimate and hidden side of the artist that she decides to explore together with the spectator.In order to express herself, she uses the language most congenial to her, creating architectural building blocks, incorporating within them forms known to her, places of the mind, strength and sensitivity given by the solid structure. An interweaving of rectangles, geometric shapes, circles that enclose an emotional identity. The process of interaction between the artist and the artwork tells us a lot about Lausen's artistic and creative process, it tells us her way of understanding art, of interpreting her emotions and her desire to recreate spaces in which the spectator can also identify and interact. Each room is delimited by rectangles that are placed side by side, creating a solid, geometric structure that is also slender and elegant. The colours Lausen uses are mainly grey, white, black and brown. Colour tones that she then declines in different gradations. In every space he searches for depth, perspective, geometric constructions and the result is a complex composition that often deceives the human eye. Lausen is undoubtedly a bold artist, her style is disruptive and extremely personal. She brings together her knowledge of the architectural world and mixes it with her elegant taste in shapes and colours. She builds experience into object and image, interacting with space and interfacing with her inner world

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Lausen

One to ten


Lika Ramati Lika Ramati is among the most historic permanent artists who exhibit at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery. She is a digital artist but her interests and influences include different branches of art, ranging from design to photography. Her art is first and foremost a tool for her own personal growth, indeed, speaking about art, she claims that “[art] is an impulse, a life force, which I drown to pass forward.” She is particularly fascinated by the female figure, often portrayed in her works. The great part of her creations lies in the editing of her original photographs. In “Door to the window”, the gigantography of a female face mixes with the image of the facade of a palace. In “The Art of Eye Contact” the picture is almost entirely pixelated, the subject’s eyes are not visible so there is actually no actual eye contact: as usually, the artist starts from an initial image to transform it progressively, changing colors and the structure of the picture itself. In “The Golden Pineapple” the atmosphere gets even more gloomy, the red colour - with its predominance - highlights and wraps the golden pineapple that becomes the fulcrum of the image. The object stands out in its accentuated three-dimensionality, acquiring an importance and a meaning that probably goes beyond the object itself, that becomes a symbol of something else, a twisted object of desire which might remind of Pandora's box. In “The Pink Illusion” the artist uses a particular effect giving the visual idea of color on canvas. Once again there is ambiguity and something unsolved in the picture: the figures are two, a hooded one in the foreground and a veiled woman. There’s mystery and probably an allegorical meaning. The red is still present but it is the pink which gives an effect of rupture with the rest of the picture, indeed an illusion. Lights and transparencies, together with the woman’s gaze, are the visual core of the picture. In “The Vortex”, spiral movements and decorative elements accompany the central photograph: a duplicate face with only the left eye (from the viewer’s perspective) visible. There is a strong contrast between warm and cold colors, while the golden spirals provide the finishing touch to an eccentric work. With this series of five works, Lika plays once again with opposites, contrasts and juxtapositions giving her personal vision of “Aldilà”. Her art is an example of a new type of artistic research, made of attempts, different visual layers and a common denominator: many questions but no firm answers.

Art Curator Viola Provenzano


Lika Ramati

Door to the Window


Lika Ramati

The Art of Eye Contact


Lika Ramati

The Golden Pineapple


Lika Ramati

The Art of Eye Contact


Lika Ramati

The Vortex


Lo Bubble “Healthy introspection, without undermining oneself; it is a rare gift to venture into the unexplored depths of the self, without delusions or fictions, but with an uncorrupted gaze.” (Friedrich Nietzsche) Lo Bubble is a promising emerging artist residing in Switzerland. While working in the paramedical field, art has always played a fundamental part in her life since she was a child. Her imaginative and prolific creativity led her to search for the ideal form in the mixed media technique to give shape to her artistic self. She seeks her inspiration in the multiform and multicolored appearances of nature. The love for the woods, the flowers and the superb expressions of nature are realized on the canvas according to the principles of abstract art. This art form perfectly fulfills Lo's goal, that of letting the viewer's imagination free, making him free to develop his own interpretation of what he sees. This is the logic that also animates Purple Smog, a work presented by the artist for Aldilà. Against a background painted with vigorous brushstrokes of purple, black and white, a central cloud of dense, material color emerges and strongly illuminates the entire composition. In this evanescent ensemble with blurred outlines, the rhythm of the composition is broken up by a pearlescent glow in the right corner of the painting, from which two straight, clear lines branch off. The contrast between these elements unexpectedly changes the perception of the entire work, and captures the gaze of the observer in a magnetic, fascinating way. The work represents a perfect example of Lo Bubble's talent who, despite being an emerging artist, already proves to possess a remarkable and interesting artistic maturity, capable of arousing interest from a technical point of view and above all emotions and powerful sensations from the emotional point of view.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Lo Bubble

Purple Smog


Loopo.tv "Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced." (Søren Kierkegaard)

Each one of us - as thinking and thoughtful human beings - is different and unique and this is possible because the human is as an untouched canvas, ready to absorb all that is coming from the external inputs. The experiences that the digital artist Loopo.tv lives on his skin - but also as secondary characters contribute to the develop and the growth of him - understood as personal and artistic. The artist Loopo.tv finds in the digital tools an own and personal method to express and make concrete his artistic investigation. He feels free to enrich his personal artistic research experimenting with 3d software and infinitive kinds of art in motion. Working in this manner Loopo.tv is able to translate the changing of the world – changeable and in continuous evolution by its own nature: its changes can be imperceptible or impetuous. Following this line of thought, the artist allows himself to create his own endless environments; through the technological process he could analysis and discover always new way and techniques to portray the vibrant and energetic world around him, giving to the audience a starting point to reflect on the both sides of the coin – the calm and relaxing atmosphere and at the same time the stereotypes that born from it.

Art Curator Manuela Fratar


Loopo.tv

Open-Sea


Louis Anthore

Luis Anthore is a French artist whose artistic production is closely linked to human beings and nature. Luis is a guest, for the first time, at an exhibition organized by the art gallery M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, on the occasion of "Aldilà - Beyond the Obvious Hyperaesthesia Oneirica" ​exhibits "le premier portrait" an evocative work that unites different artistic influences in itself. The central subject sees a male figure represented, whose stiffness in posture recalls the figures of realist painting, as in Alexander Deineka's “Textile Workers”, or Räderscheidt's “Tennis Player”. The reference to Anton Räderscheidt is also perceptible in the background that recalls that of "Self-portrait", Luis Anthore, however, highlighted the image of the man, who seems to be in a reflective phase, thanks to the use of a continuous line of blue color which appears to be the extension of what is a wood, a forest, made with a chiaroscuro of blue. Central to Luis's pictorial creations is the use of chiaroscuro which he himself expresses as the tool that allows him to create the forms of the works. What makes the work a perfect combination of realism and surrealism is the addition of elements that deviate from reality, the green hair, the pink drape covered with flowers and the presence of the entire subject outside of any context. Luis Anthore tells of a primordial relationship of the human being with nature, which in this work is celebrated, the blanket covered with flowers turns out to be a gift, something precious that induces the individual to think, reflect and ask questions. With this work, the artist also induces the observer to reflect and linger more on the questions and any answers.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Louis Anthore

le premier portrait


Ludmila Vorotnikova “Nothing is more visible than things hidden; Nothing is more manifest than things minute; Therefore, the superior man should be aware of his aloneness.” (Confucius)

Artistic expression has always been a field in which each artist can give space to a particular skill. Some artists characterize their artistic production for an admirable technical virtuosity, others for the strong and visceral sensations they produce in the observer. Still others possess both qualities and to this they add their own distinctive sign, a "signature" of form and substance that makes it possible to recognize the artist's hand at first glance. For Ludmila Vorotnikova the distinctive trait is an innate compositional grace, which balances each element of her paintings with harmonious delicacy. Grape Lover strikes the observer for the wonderful crown of leaves and fruits that adorn the head of the face in the foreground. The amazing detail of every single shade of the foliage and of the small insects (in particular of the bees in the foreground, whose wings are decorated with geometric motifs) enhances the simplicity of the face to the utmost, reminiscent of the magnificent elongated faces painted by Modigliani. The artist, in fact, seems to direct attention to the big blue eyes, languid and full of love, which in their pure essence contain a whirlwind of emotions. However, if elegance and emotional intensity are the heart of Ludmila's art, technical skill is certainly not far behind.


Ludmila Vorotnikova

In Warrior we can admire a real masterpiece of painstaking precision, which characterizes the representation of the warrior girl in every detail of the headdress, hairstyle, dress and floral decorations. It is an experimental graphic work, distinguished by the skilful alternation of shaded and flat colors, lines and sinuous curves that chase each other on the canvas according to a perfectly studied trend. The fanshaped motifs on the top of the headdress "dialogue" with spiral-shaped motifs, and contrast with the rigor of the lattice that distinguishes the decoration of the hairstyle. But it is on the collar of the dress that Ludmila's mastery is best expressed: the phytomorphic motifs seem to support the swelling of the ruff, almost reproducing the volume of the fabric and giving a feeling of three-dimensionality to the entire work. Ludmila thus gives soul to the figure of an authentic warrior, whose intimate essence is represented - as often happens in the artist's works - by the superb multicolored flowers that surround her. They seem to symbolize the supreme ideals for which the young woman fights, as a staunch defender of the deepest laws of Being.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Ludmila Vorotnikova

Grape Lover


Ludmila Vorotnikova

Warrior


Luisa Barba “We may ignore, but we can nowhere evade the presence of God. The world is crowded with Him. He walks everywhere incognito.” (C.S. Lewis)

What is on the other side? Who is waiting for us ALDILÀ? For the artist Luisa Barba, God presence is on both sides, the one where we live and the one beyond, whether of light or dark, hope or despair, we need to remember that He is always present. “Abyss in the depths” is a reminder that even in the hardest moment, anyone can lose their faith, their hope or doubts their decisions, they need to look inside theirselves and find their spirituality, to give them strength to follow their own lives. God is right there, stretching out his hand to always welcome and support everyone, with the same hand that created them, with just a touch, as Michelangelo represented in the Sistine Chapel, so in the artist’s “The Creation” is featured the same iconography of Adam and God’s hands barely separated, thus giving life to humanity. Also in “Creation” the representation of two hands, repeat itself, this time they are intertwining, surrounded by pure energy, the same one that gives life to every living creature, which the divine will always welcome in the afterlife, full of love and light. That same hand that come to rescue, in “Desperate Salvation”, anyone encounter obstacles and they feel dragged toward the darkness they have to remember that He is always ready to give them His hand of pure light, that will accompany everybody along the whole path until the end. Precisely in “Last Breath” it is possible to observe how the rest of the world will begin to surround itself with shadows and abandon its concreteness, anyone will be ready to reunite their own light with their Creator.

Art Curator Alessia Procopio


Luisa Barba

Abyss in the depths


Luisa Barba

The Creation


Luisa Barba

Creation


Luisa Barba

Desperate Salvation


Luisa Barba

Last Breath


Lujanne

Ana Luján, aka "Lujanne", is a young and creative Spanish artist who paints, writes and is a veterinarian. In her art, nature and animals occupy an important place, as this strong passion is also reflected in the subjects and colours that animate her artworks. Lujanne is extremely creative and this allows her to see the world with new and different eyes. Creativity is the key we have to explore the world, to make it our own through images and through our minds. Man without creativity is nothing, he would be a standardised element in a world all the same. Creativity allows the artist to express his ideas, to create a connection between reality and fantasy, between painter and spectator. To understand and comprehend the creativity of an artist, it is necessary to go further, to decipher the messages encrypted within the artworks without stopping at appearances. Transmitting a sensation, generating food for thought is the task that falls to the work of art. In the work "DILEMMA", Lujanne creates a polymateric image by combining different techniques. Creativity also means daring, using all the means available to the artist. And this is what Lujanne does. Using plaster, acrylic and resin, the artist models two horse silhouettes and places them in a symmetrical position, as if they were fighting but at the same time as if they were reflecting each other. Two sides of the same coin, two opposing sensations that want to dominate but do not realise that in reality one does not exist without the other because they are complementary. There is no denying Lujanne's plastic skill in modelling the silhouettes of horses, an anatomically complex animal that is not at all easy to make. Her studies undoubtedly gave her the basis for such a realistic and balanced realisation of the animal which stands out in all its beauty and power. The artist identifies the two protagonists as love and fear, two instincts that man has to control every day in his soul. On the one hand is rationality, which brings with it doubts and fears; on the other is the impetuous sentiment which, when it arises, is untameable. The choice of the horse as an animal is not accidental and neither are the small details that differentiate the animal on the right from the one on the left. A continuous struggle that will probably never reach a lasting outcome and that man will always have to face within himself: reason or feeling? The choice of colours ranging from blue to green, with this marbled effect, adds to the beauty and intrigue of the work. Lujanne plays with contrasts, especially between the two- and three-dimensional. She covers the bodies of the horses with colour, but without creating a clear break with the background, but rather giving continuity to the colour. The artwork is open to the viewer's interpretation, who can identify the conflictual relationship between two opposite poles, which he then deciphers subjectively. The construction of the structure is vertical, as if to indicate that confrontation should be a tool for growth, seen in a positive way even if it has a negative connotation. The animals stand powerful and fearless, their expressions determined, each one convinced of being right. The influence of the natural world in Lujanne's art is undeniable. The shapes, subjects and colours recall this great passion of her. The images he creates are curious, original and intriguing, especially the three-dimensional rendering of the animals and the combination of colours. The spectator is placed in front of a masterpiece of style and elegance and is invited to take part in it, to decipher it.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Lujanne

DILEMMA


Luz Sanchez

Permanent M.A.D.S. artist, Luz Sanchez, presents during the "Aldilà" exhibition three works entitled “Más allá de la pandemia”, “Nuevos abrazos” and “Selfie más allá del momento”. With this series, the Uruguayan artist gives us a glimpse of life beyond the pandemic. Since the pandemic broke out, for many people art has been one of the few safe places where to take refuge during the most hopeless times. Now, at last, art can also narrate the moment in which a genuine hope of a more secure future reignites and at the same time - it can fill with meaning old subjects and give them a new light. In fact, Luz Sanchez prefers once again the representation of human figures (very recurrent in her art), but this time we, as observers, can focus on the new encounter between the bodies, on their physicality. In “Más allá de la pandemia”, the artist revisits the subject of the bathers (with a clear reference to Cézanne and his figures with visible contours) depicting a moment of joy and reunion between human and nature. Beyond pandemic, there has been the rediscovery of a new sense of community and a breath of air for the planet. In “Nuevos abrazos”, a family gathers in a group hug: colors are bright and cheerful and despite being at home the space opens. “Selfie más allá del momento”, instead, proposes a reflection on how much technology has allowed us to challenge time and preserve the memory of a moment going beyond this. It also seems to remind us that beyond the screens there are real people and physical contact. The pictorial style as well as the idea of meaning is coherent between the various works. Brushstrokes become more dense and decisive in the third work, color impressions are strong and they contribute to express a precise meaning. In this sense, the chromatic strength of the works can remind of the Expressionism way, although the artist herself claims not to associate with any particular movement. It is straordinary to think of Luz as an almost entirely self-taught artist. Her accuracy and the clarity of her intentions are the result of an exciting career and experience, which has brought her here. The artist has a clear and recognizable style, and it is definitely her own style despite the various influences acquired over time.

Art Curator Viola Provenzano


Luz Sanchez

Más allá de la pandemia


Luz Sanchez

Nuevos abrazos


Luz Sanchez

Selfie más allá del momento


Lydia Pagonis No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality. (Shirley Jackson)

Lydia Pagonis presents her artworks “At the Ready”, “Thoughts wreaking havoc” and “Robot on parade” for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. The artist portrays mechanical characters across her three artworks, which are being constructed by bold strokes surrounded by a whimsical and colorful environment, which depicts emotions engaging with their mechanical self. Mechanical and organic fractions represent respectively the characters and its surroundings. The bold strokes created by the artist, are meant to be shaped as part of an assemblage in the natural and manmade world, in order to portray two diverse ways of creation, from organic growth and mechanical construction. She conveys the idea of balance between both worlds: the natural and manmade world enabling the creation of her own “Aldilà”. Tearing up realities in different points of time teach us how to balance what is important in everyday life. It is a matter of reinventing ourselves during a lifetime exploration of contrasted realities. We can achieve a mindful self again without being automated. Our awareness of the coexistence of the natural and manmade world will reflect on how we will construct our “Aldilà” and render it tangible.

Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don't resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like. (Lao Tzu)

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Lydia Pagonis

At the Ready


Lydia Pagonis

Thoughts wreaking havoc


Lydia Pagonis

Robot on parade


Maico Camilo “Abandon the urge to simplify everything, to look for formulas and easy answers, and to begin to think multidimensionally, to glory in the mystery and paradoxes of life, not to be dismayed by the multitude of causes and consequences that are inherent in each experience -to appreciate the fact that life is complex." (M. Scott Peck) Looking at Maico Camilo’s presented artwork, “Equivocal 1”, it is soon evident that this is a layered artwork, both pictorially and symbolically. For this reason, the first thing that comes up in one’s mind is complexity. This 180x340x6 cm gel and acrylic piece of art is the portal through which the observer can sense what the Brazilian born artist wanted to express with its layered colors and structures. This is not just abstractionism, it is rather the visualization of an ongoing battle between the colors and the shapes. Whenever we look at an abstract painting, it is perfectly normal that some of us could perceive an emotion rather than other, but in “Equivocal 1” it is very hard to perceive anything other than chaos and uncertainty. Every historic juncture is characterized by doubts, anguish and fear: the one we are experiencing is no different. Art can help us elaborate what we feel and it can offer us a new key to see the reality. The different contours and lines and figures that emerge from the whitish background remind the observer about the different personalities and lives and dreams and fears every one of us have. The colors that seem to fight to conquer space over the others remind of the different ways life can be lived and experienced. The truth is that there is no univocal or right way to experience reality, as reality itself is the most complex thing we come across as humankind. So let there be circles, squares, rectangles. Let there be yellow and pink and green. Let there be chaos and fear, peace and tranquillity. “Equivocal 1” is here to show us the multiple facets of the journey we call life.

Art Curator Irene Delaude


Maico Camilo

Equivocal 1


Malin Hjalmarsson Following her heart and soul, Malin Hjalmarsson is now a full-time artist, choosing to devote herself entirely to art. She describes her art as expressive and intuitive, and most of her works start from figurative subjects, but then they flow into abstractionism; for these reasons her style cannot be approached and rigidly enclosed in an artistic current, but she draws what she considers most appropriate from abstractionism and figurative, and mixes it all. The result is an art that is totally her, exclusively inspired by her heart. In "Soul" we can admire a figure of a half-woman; it is represented naked to better represent the soul, the vital and spiritual part of living beings, their essence. This half-bust, however, is not well defined, but fades and blends with the background with the same pink-purple hues. A leaf partially covers her face, while an arch of flowers opens under her, it is like a floral festoon that seems to welcome Spring. In this work there is no trace of preparatory drawing and therefore the color is spread directly on the canvas, with short and fast brushstrokes. Every naturalistic objectivity of flowers is distorted by the intuitiveness of the Swedish artist; for this reason, it is never known what will appear in her works. The juxtaposed use of warm (burgundy and orange) and cold (petroleum blue) colors makes the sense of spirituality of the work in an extremely suggestive way. It seems to look beyond the real, beyond the concrete, aldilà. “I love to explore life in colours and I think the world needs beautyness.” Malin Hjalmarsson says, and with her work we can say that she has undoubtedly contributed to increasing beauty in the world.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Malin Hjalmarsson

Soul


Marc-Alain Félix

A mixture of abstract and figurative is his artistic strength, vibrant colours and outrageous lines are his artistic lexicon. This is Marc-Alain Félix’s art. Nothing is already planned in his paintings as “he paints on the spur of the moment with an intuitive approach”. Intuition allows Félix to connect with his emotions, feelings and perceptions and to respond to what surrounds him. Through visual representations, Félix invites you to take a voyage between reality and imagination, where his perceptions of today’s life are told. In the artwork “Prémonitions”, a big figure that recalls a duck is represented in strong red and blue, with dotslike-eyes on its body. Its face is turned towards black figures on a blue background, aligned from the taller to the shorter in vertical boxes. A bright yellow is the contrasting background upon which, at the top, blue clouds and stars float. A contrasting feeling is highlighted with the words “fly” near the duck and “mute” upon the black figures. Everything, in this painting, appears ambivalent. “Everything around us is related, including ourselves, therefore predictable”, Félix says. In “Confusion”, the combination between abstract and figurative is more blurred. At the centre, a strong blue collies with a strong black, eyes are represented on a quick, purple brushstroke, pointing straight to the viewers’ eyes. Shapes resembling female breasts stand at the left margin, and a light blue figure with human features carries a red load at the right. Cigarettes float at the top of the painting as the word “existe” does, while at the bottom, the word “fuck you” becomes “lucky you”. In a beautifully mysterious way, this painting is a metaphor of the cross between the real and the unreal world, where nothing is clear and everything possible. The fine line dividing reality and imagination is embodied in the painting ”Liberty dance”. In a white and turquoise background, big and yellow human figures with flower and eye heads are portrayed near black highways. The painting is full of small figures here and there: a book, a ‘dead apple’ tv, a ‘Rosa’s Bus’, a road sign, a black standing crowd, and people behind bars waiting to run across the ‘free’ road. In this painting, Félix is able to combine real figures in an absurd way, thus resulting in something that goes beyond our intellectual perceptions. As he says, “our imagination allows us to go beyond reality, but what is beyond?”.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Marc-Alain Félix

Prémonitions


Marc-Alain Félix

Confusion


Marc-Alain Félix

Liberty dance


Marguerite Rahal

<<The painting represents how I perceive all women. Colorful yet fierce, beautiful yet cautious, powerful yet sensitive. I dedicate this piece to the ones that do not recognize their faculty. I hope this mirrors a reflection of the power within.>>. To introduce the artwork presented on the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldilà by the artist Marguerite Rahal could be really important to start from this her consideration. As she says, the muse of this special painting is the woman and the power of the woman. What does the body mean to the woman? An object, something that has to be cured and valorized? The answer comes from the painting of the artist. The woman’s face put on the centre of the artworks wants to fix her gaze on the observer and convince him of his strength and power. It’s like something that wants to be expressed by the subject and waiting for the canvas to tell the feelings and the emotions. It’s like being quiet for a long day, and accumulating the emotions inside the soul and in the end trying to express them. This is a responsibility that Marguerite Rahal has with the observer: using the canvas to express every feeling she has and the way she looks at the world. Therefore, this is a mission that the artist has with her way to intend the art, and the painting. Thus, the language used by her to tell and say what she wants. Using colours is her way to make a speech in a very simple way. And the observer, from the other side of the canvas, wants to listen to this special language. When we observe the painting made from Marguerite it is like listening: -I want to tell you about my truth and me. In this way, she expresses the freedom to recognize our way to feel sensations and emotions. There is no need to be afraid of our reality and our life, if we have courage to say what we want to say we can have a big and precious power.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Marguerite Rahal

Soul Mirror - Queen of Petals


Marie Demiz

The artist Marie Demiz goes more and more towards the discovery of herself and her style. The three works presented during the exhibition "Aldilà" at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery are a proof of this. They are part of the "Urban Collection”, a collection still in progress and represent at best what Marie is at the moment: a versatile artist who over time has been able to combine her figurative skills with abstractionism, not always easy to understand but that over time has been able to make her own. The three women constitute three works entitled "Emancipe", "Emotion" and “Fusion". The titles themselves make it clear that conceptuality is the basis of Marie’s artistic production. They are three important and concrete words. Three words that nowadays have a great weight in society and in the path of awareness of the human species. First of all we find the word "Fusion" which can be understood in many ways but certainly, above all, means union and inclusion. It reminds us how important it is to meet and appreciate diversity and to unite it, to make it one. The work has two main colors, also proposed in the other two works but that stand out in a particular way in this painting: the fuchsia and yellow. The woman’s gaze is the most decisive of the three, it seems to embody the fusion. She is determined and self-confident. Similarly the look of "Emotion" reveals its sweetness and sensitivity. Confirming the will to make these faces concepts and leak what the title suggests. Finally we find "Emancipe" also represented by a woman with a firm look. Her face seems to be framed by the horns of a ram, symbol par excellence of strength. Emancipation is undoubtedly an important theme for the artist who strongly believes in the girl power. These three works form a harmonious composition, ideal to be displayed side by side but at the same time interesting also in their uniqueness. Marie Demiz makes the spectators travel: first frightened and intrigued by the black traits and then carried by the flou colors that illuminate the canvas, and finally leads them to dwell on the features of the face, leads them to investigate what is hidden behind a look, to carefully observe every little detail so as to reveal every secret that each face wants to tell.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Marie Demiz

Emancipe


Marie Demiz

Emotion


Marie Demiz

Fusion


Mariette Edling

On occasion of the international art exhibition Aldilà the artist Mariette Edling presents three artworks titled Bridge, Concordance and Meanwhile. Her personal artistic language wants to create a melting pot of elements that put together wants to create the meaning of the painting. Starting from the first artwork titled Bridge. In this composition, we can see many floral elements, other ones that come from nature, stars and circles. This technique of juxtaposition of various shapes and forms stands out to create a vision in which the artist seems to be free to tell us about her feeling and her emotion at the moment of the inspiration. The space of the painting becomes the place of freedom where the feelings and the thoughts take shape. As the artist says: << For me the creative process of painting is meditative and mending. Through my pictures, I want to share the power that it gives me>>. Share with us this freedom. The second painting titled Concordance presents a similar complex vision in which we can see fantastic and animated figures. Asif watching the paintings is like entering into the fantasy worlds of the artist. The third painting titled meanwhile presents the same language but at the same time a figure put on the centre of the composition stands out in a waiting position. As if the artist wants to tell us about the moment in which despite the wait and the state, something seems to happen. In the end, the imagination of the artist Mariette Edling evokes other words from the reality that presents points of contact with the place of the dream and the fantasy. Maybe the other sides of the reality, or just the real way to intend the Aldilà.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Mariette Edling

Bridge


Mariette Edling

Concordance


Mariette Edling

Meanwhile


Marija Constantinou Paradise is to love many things with a passion. (Pablo Picasso)

The artist portrays colors as her “Aldilà”, which is surrounded by vigorous strokes enabling compelling firmness to depict her created freedom. Blue and white tones carry the responsibility to reflect stillness and contrast it with the passion of intense tonalities. Marija Constantinou, presents her artwork “Clear your mind of your thoughts” for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. Calligraphy strokes are being executed as a statement of the rhythm she is perceiving in a particular moment of awareness. Japanese calligraphy is an art form of balance, where we perceive the motion and stillness at the same time, due to the fact that in Japanese calligraphy you have just one stroke, one moment to make it right, where concentration and reflection is key to undertake the task. The artist uses calligraphy strokes in order to express the awareness of her stillness while she is being mindful about the motion of her emotions throughout a traced statement of her thoughts. Marija seeks this imperative moment in order to reflect on how to balance two contrasted situations, the background as chaos and the strokes as harmony, in favor of tranquility and passion at the same time.

There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality. (Pablo Picasso)

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Marija Constantinou

Clear your mind of your thoughts


Mariko Artists who question about the afterlife by twisting reality as we know it and creating imaginary worlds. The Japanese artist Mariko represents her personal Aldilà with three works depicting sweet figures, with blond hair, that we never see in the face. “Angel’s heart” depicts an angel of which we can only see the back and a thick pink hair. Small fragments of light detach from his figure and are carried by the wind to another dimension, perhaps a window on the world of mortals on which the angel watches with all his heart. The wind moves the petals of light and these turn into flowers of a flowery meadow that extends under a clear sky, without clouds. This image is sweet, serene, it makes us feel safe, calm. The window on the flowered lawn appears distinctly detached from the world of the pink- haired angel who is surrounded by a purple atmosphere, which shines on the edges of the window. “Eye, love you” is a very different representation, we see only an eye, the nose and a slight hint of the mouth of the creature that looks at us. The only colour on the face depicted is yellow, yellow as the crown of the angel depicted in the third painting. Even this angel, just like the first, is from behind and observes the starry sky. “Standing angel” observes the falling stars in the sky, looks at them from the ground, is in the midst of plants with leaves moved by the wind. The angel is brighter than the stars themselves, looks at them and seems to be thinking of something. Mariko represents her Aldilà not as a place, but as creatures silent, bright, and peaceful guardians who watch us from another dimension and watch over us.

Art Curator Sara Giannini


Mariko

Angel's heart


Mariko

Eye,love you


Mariko

Standing angel


Marine Kearney "This is my journey presented to you, unfiltered." (Marine Kearney)

On the occasion of the new exhibition "Aldilà", organized by the multimedia gallery M.A.D.S. of Milan and Fuerteventura, we ask for the interpretation and opinion of the artists on the complex theme of “dualism”, between the dark and the unknown sides of every choice that presents itself to us in the course of our life. A world hidden by the deceptive veil of Maya, which Shopenhauer already told us about in the first half of the nineteenth century: reality as an illusion. Marine Kearney is a woman, wife and mother, but also an artist. Her process is to reproduce what she sees and what she feels, through an evolutionary painting. She works with acrylic on a wooden board, a support that allows her to include charcoal, pencil, stencil or even wax or collage, a set of techniques that testify to the artist's artistic maturity and the profound experimentation she has faced in her path. "At the end of the painting I came to an exotic place where my childhood memories came back to me, as it created a moment of joy and a dancing mood. This is my journey presented to you, unfiltered", says the Irish artist of French origins.


Marine Kearney

"Reclaim" and "Twist" are the official titles of the two acrylics on two different supports, canvas and wood, which Marine decides to present at this International Exhibition. The flat backgrounds, the bright colors, the alternation between the soft shapes of nature and the rigidity of pure geometry, recall the famous stylistic language of a second Henry Matisse (post-1909 period), which translates into an exasperated contrast that they seem to want to go beyond any objective of verisimilitude and for this reason he opposes his time, placing interiority and emotions in the foreground, paving the way for the various artistic avant-gardes of the post-turn of the century. Her paintings have the constant intention of changing and evolving. Praising the nature that surrounds her, and always placing her as an absolute subject, she Marine interprets her personal vision of her life, offering us a "safe place" in which to take refuge and read inside the best solution to our personal questions.

Art Curator Carola Antonioli


Marine Kearney

Reclaim


Marine Kearney

Twist


Marlene Luce Tremblay “Timelessness is the ideal of pleasure.” (Herbert Marcuse)

Branches, petals and leaves entirely envelop the artworks by Marlene Luce Tremblay, a contemporary Canadian artist who, using a technique similar to double exposure photography, blends Renaissance paintings with photographs of lush plants. The artist's aim is to explore the concept of time, breaking down and recomposing its lines and opening up new interpretations. Past and present suddenly coincide, creating new futures, new worlds and new consciousnesses. A recurring element in her works is also water, a symbol of purity and spiritual rebirth. Water frees the soul from earthly stains and purifies the body, flowing into the depths of the earth, piercing dark and dense matter, only to return to the surface and bringing with it secret and pure energies. According to the Greek philosopher Thales, water is the archè, the principle from which all things originate, the basic element of the universe. In "Layers of Past in Time", we can see a waterway and people from distant times navigating it in small boats. The atmosphere, enveloped in bluish and cold tones, communicates calm and tranquillity. The work is intertwined with a myriad of details in a dense vegetation suspended in the void, linking together like paths in an infinite labyrinth. Once again we encounter Nature at the origin of everything, source of life and mother of the whole. Generator of the world's consciousness, it is powerful and immutable to our eyes. Immortal in its ciclicity, it has accompanied all time, becoming the common element of all existence. Past, present and future are thus repetitions in eternal return. Marlene Luce Tremblay, with her art, spasmodically studies time in all its facets, leading the spectator towards a sort of a-temporality, in which everything is condensed and immobilized.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Marlene Luce Tremblay

Layers of Past in Time


Marlene Luce Tremblay

Romanticism of the Past


Marlene Luce Tremblay

Ships of Time Past


Marta Volontè “Il portiere di notte vive al limite della fine, dove non è ancora inizio. Lo scricchiolante e vecchio albergo è un mero punto di passaggio, tra il prima e il dopo. Malinconico e solo, in un perpetuo susseguirsi di brevi incontri e addii, il portiere di notte prova a immaginare il mondo da cui tutti gli ospiti provengono e la destinazione che dovranno poi raggiungere. Quando arriva l’inverno è ancora più dura, perché senza i colori e la vita dei fiori lì intorno fatica ancor più a sognare, a immaginarsi lontano da lì. Quando tutti i bicchieri degli ospiti sono stati riempiti, guarda fuori dalla finestra, dietro tutte le altre case, dietro il sole e dietro il cielo. Prima o poi lascerà anche lui l’albergo.” (Marta Volontè)

Marta Volontè is a young Italian artist. She is participating in the art exhibition "ALDILÀ" organized by MADS Art Gallery with an amazing artwork created at the end of 2020. Recalling up a famous song by Enrico Ruggeri, the artist titled the work "Portiere di notte". Reading her thoughts, the artist describes a fragment of the life of a solitary man who, in the dark of night, leans behind his window and observes the daily routine of the hotel porter. The hotel, which Marta Volontè makes by skilfully painting with oil on canvas, is surrounded by other small houses inside which life flows slowly. All around is a serene atmosphere: the artist mainly uses warm colours. Quick brushstrokes give the painting dynamism: people coming, people going. In the background, laughter and confused voices. The night porter is alone. His only friend is the melancholy that accompanies him in the pauses between a "hello" and a "goodbye" to customers. The hotel, creaky and old as the artist Marta Volontè identifies it, is a "mere point of passage between before and after". The night porter is beyond this world, he cannot enter it, but he can imagine. He imagines what has brought those people there and what their next destination will be. The walls of this hotel, every day, listen to the stories, passions, gossip and quarrels of those who stay there. The night porter tells tales so profoundly that he almost feels as if he is actually living the lives of others. He stretches out his heart towards the elusive, towards a life that is not his own. When he returns to his senses, it is already winter, and “without the colours and life of flowers” it is difficult for him to imagine himself far from there."Sooner or later even the night porter will leave that hotel”, but for now this is his life and it repeats itself in a cadenced manner every day, in an infinite limbo between what he thinks is real and what exists beyond. An unknown place that can only be accessed with the mind. The night porter has lived a thousand lives, but has never lived one.

Art Curator Alessia Ventola


Marta Volontè

Portiere di notte


Martin Hildesheim "Does not the doubt ever assail you, o dreamer, that everything may be a veil of Maya, an illusion?" (Walt Whitman) Martin Hildesheim is a German artist, born in northern Germany. He is participating in the contemporary art exhibition 'Afterlife' organised by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery. The aim of the exhibition is to show the world "beyond" things through the artists' works. Martin likes to paint portraits and landscapes. The first work is entitled "EyesLook - Moments": he uses pastel, white laqueur, charcoal, sanguine, shine-glitter spray and white curtain fabric on grey cardboard. The work is a description of a delicate moment, the fascination of change. The woman can speak with just her eyes. What is on the other side? Is what the sweet woman observes real? According to the philosopher Schopenhauer, the human perception of reality is distorted due to the presence of a kind of veil that does not allow man to see the true reality. In a passage of his essay entitled "The World as Will and Representation" he states that «It is Maya, the deceptive veil, which envelops the eyes of mortal and makes them see a world of which it can neither be said that it exists, nor that id does not exists». The white curtain fabric that covers the woman's head and face is a clear reference to Maya's veil.

Art Curator Alessia Ventola


Martin Hildesheim

However, the woman has managed to free herself by removing the veil from her eyes, which are not used to seeing the light. She is afraid, but at the same time feels a great sense of freedom. She feels free from the chains of ignorance, she does not want to go back, even though what awaits her is unknown and painful. The second work is entitled "Sunset in the park - Twilight in somewhere ". Martin Hildesheim uses what his eyes see to draw a sunset in the park with a few colours and rough, fast brushstrokes. But this is not just a sunset. The artist's eye becomes the medium through which he enters another world. He goes beyond the visible and draws reality according to what the colours, scents and sounds convey to his soul. But it is not the same for others. Beyond is a place that can only be accessed with the mind. Each of us creates his own imaginary world where the reflection of the lake becomes a part of the sky, the leaves of the trees are flying birds, while for another person the rays of the sun, reflected in the water, become a lava flow coming down from the forest in the background. And that small green spot, that resembles a small lake, is mistaken from afar for a large cloth used for harvesting almonds. Nothing is as it seems and the artist Martin gives us a great example with the fruit of his original creativity.

Art Curator Alessia Ventola


Martin Hildesheim

EyesLook - Moments


Martin Hildesheim

Sunset in the park - Twilight in somewhere


Masataka Ikeda

An art that smells of silent and distant times, a painting in which you can taste the taste of warm and diffused light, a work that evokes an indefinite space-time able to incorporate, with its peculiarities, the viewer. We live in a society in which visual and sensory stimuli bombard our senses continuously. Our eyes are now accustomed to the cold and diaphanous bluish light of electronic devices and our ears constantly pick up electronic sounds and persistent ticking. The morning alarm clock, the notifications on our smartphones; the incessant jingles of advertisements and the faint but constant clatter of fingertips on the computer keyboard accompany us daily. These noises shake hands with the multicolored and effervescent universe that is our reality. By now this is our world, this is our increasingly fast-paced, interconnected and digitized life. Yet, let's pause for a moment. Let us try to savor the calm, the warmth of the golden sunlight. Let's try to rest our gaze by looking into an indefinite point of space: let's turn our pupil beyond our home windows, beyond the buildings and stare at an open panorama. We gather our thoughts and unroll them calmly, one by one, there is no hurry. And so it is that, standing still, we are catapulted into another space-time, into another dimension that instinctively seems parallel to our own. However, here - in this new world - there is silence. Masataka Ikeda represents a place beyond the present and the past where time, so slow it flows, almost seems to have crystallized. There is no hubbub, no noise. The feeling is that of breathing in a peaceful, serene and quiet atmosphere. Sunrise invites you to explore this distant world, urges the observer to get lost among the narrow streets of the block of flats and incites him - gently - to dwell on every small detail: the fruits peeping out of the green curved tree, the walls painted in a guttural orange with ochre shades, the dawn that rises silently and inexorably in the distance. One gets lost in these streets, stone by stone, building by building. We enter the blue night, the deepest and most distant space. Yet the feeling we get is still that of a calm warmth. The aura of solemn and sweet quietness is dictated by an extremely natural chromatic palette: the colors are genuine, earthy and the same blue - which inspires us so much calm and depth of soul - is, together with yellow, the common thread of our journey inside the work. The watery and ethereal brushstrokes wet the support and the Japanese paper that composes - impeccably - the space of the work. Its porosity and softness, accompanied by the patchy rendering typical of the collage technique give Sunrise that aura of dreamy carefree that inspires us so much this work. Is this reality? Is this a dream? Is this a parallel world? The work of Masataka Ikeda induces us to ask these questions without needing an unequivocal answer. It unrolls its essence in front of our eyes, it makes available its space and its vivid colors to give us the possibility to travel within its streets and roads while remaining still.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Masataka Ikeda

Sunrise


Megumi Kiuchi

Our observation of the world, both internal and emotional and external, is almost never "clean", that is, free of interpretation and conceptualization. We are accustomed to judging what we observe through the filter of memory and sensations related to past experiences. Even in the case of "new" events or ideas not previously considered, we cannot help but try to "understand" and measure them on the basis of what we know. We might consider this "pre-knowledge" our "slavery". In a world like ours, extremely fast and full of inputs that stimulate our senses and our mind, it is difficult - if not impossible - to exercise a vision towards what surrounds us totally free from references and preconceptions. Anything we see reminds us of something else, any subject we are talking about shakes our memory to produce a thought soiled by countless - and improper interpretations. What then is the reality of things? What is the meaning of what surrounds us and therefore its true nature? Will we be able to lift the Veil of Maya of Shopenauerian memory to fully enjoy the pure vision of the world? It is a complex question to which centuries and centuries of philosophical thought have not found an answer. Yet we all recognize that our vision is not something objective, although man is an arrogant animal, he does not get to the point of not realizing that, what he sees, most of the time does not correspond to reality and that the emotions and feelings he feels, are probably distilled by the filter of his reason or, even worse, of his heart. Man knows this, he is a slave to this subjective vision and can do nothing about it. Or maybe he doesn't want to do anything? Perhaps the human being is satisfied in basking in his dwelling of fictions and preconceptions, there is no reality easier and more enjoyable than the one hoped for, desired. Yet Megumi, with her works, literally slaps us in the face. Her works focus on the questioning of the most intimate part of us, they guide us to a vision eradicated from preconceptions and prejudices to accompany us in the presence of a new reality. It is up to the viewer then, whether or not to accept the invitation, whether to leave his comfort zone and embrace the unknown. Watermelon is a layered work. Layered in the literal sense of the term: the harmony of form and color is achieved by laying down the color in stages. On a greyish-green background, a thin whitish veil gently lays down, thickening towards the center: it is certainly a watermelon, its round profile and the writing engraved in color right in the center shout it out to the viewer. It is a watermelon and nothing else. And yet, are we sure? Are we sure that is really the outline of the fruit? Are we sure that the writing always acts as a caption to what is represented? Let's dig into the cleverly overlapping layers of color, study the outline of the silhouette: first an orange area, then an intense red area - cross-shaped - at the highest point of the silhouette. And then? Then other multiple features, other imperceptible nuances make up the heart and the true sense of Watermelon; other writings, other scratches and mottles make up the composition. Suddenly, the intuition. What if instead of being a watermelon, the figure in the center was an egg?

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Megumi Kiuchi

Watermelon


Melina Soltavi "It doesn't make much difference how the paint is applied as long as something is said. Technique is only a means to arrive at a statement." (Jackson Pollock) Post-modern art is characterized by the use of innovative and mixed techniques completely different from previous styles that the art users were used to apporach to, over the centuries. After the Second World War, new currents began to arise and develop hand in hand to contemporary socio-political events, getting closer and closer to people and not only to art critics and experts. The techniques and subjects are ever closer to everyday life and the concept of critical taste begins to fade, but popular opinion grew as a yardstick for art itself. This is thanks to revolutionary artists like Jackson Pollock first Andy Warhol later. The contemporary artist Melina Soltavi manages to create real masterpieces by representing subjects close to popular taste and playing with materials and artistic techniques. Thanks to the advent of new different currents, what becomes important is transmitted directly by the performances of the artists themselves and by the emotions that subjects can arouse rather than the perfection of technique or mastery in representation. The talent of the artist Melina is certainly evident in her works, but what sets her apart is the delicacy and feeling of mystery behind her subjects. The gazes of the people she reproduces are magnetic and deep and the colors manage to give the subjects an ethereal air. The artist goes beyond the appearance of what is visible and conveys her point of view through fascinating paintings.

Art Curator Letizia Perrieri


Melina Soltavi

TERRA


Michael Angle Oh!

Poet and artist Michael Angle Oh! is based in Sweden, where he is in contact with nature and so he’s constantly evolving and inspired by her. Michael’s soul is ancient and brings back flavors now lost. The artist presents a work that consists of an illustrative work and a poetic text written by hand. "The Owl Castle" is the title. Michael Angle Oh! creates a totally surreal work, created thanks to the use of collage and mixed media. On the left a series of objects placed one above the other, form a tower while on the right there is a staircase that leads to the clouds, on which runs the horse of his work "Big Horse Insania". Surrealism is therefore evident, it belongs to the style of Michael who challenges viewers to reflection. Michael explains his own work through his homonymous poem, in which he interprets the work with his own words and guides viewers on their journey into it. The artist in fact says "I am dreaming, a way in the sky" and then still defines the work as a "garden in balance" bringing balance to this work through words. The poem also mentions the work "Big Horse Insania" in homage to himself and his beautiful work. Analyzing the various elements within the work they are all from the past. Black and white also contributes to accentuate the feeling of antique. Twice the same Corinthian capital is repeated in two different angles but in both cases it acts as a supporting pillar. Even the elements of the fireplace and the tent bring back to the past. A marginal element that is mentioned by the artist at the end of the poem is the fountain, located in the artwork at the bottom right. It is therefore the end of this journey, the final destination. Michael writes "I feel.. Emotion fontaine". In this way the artist creates a kind of association by image, the fountain leads from the symbolic point of view to crying, an eternal crying dictated by the fountain that will never stop the water from gushing.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Michael Angle Oh!

The Owl Castle


Michael Angle Oh! A garden in balance ~ an Angle 8D~world. I modern distract you! Observer. Le show

I am dreaming, a way in the sky

Swept clouds from sea blue, carriers within Big Horse Insania, evolving mind ~ magical moon ~ I caught you with an ink of an eye. [A late bat night! ~ They talk..]

In Tower I am, your reality

Hundred stairs dancing widely, spears from a wand! Illustrious silver splashes! ~ Des fleur pour vous Oh! I bow, hold my hand,, ‘It’s Adorably’ Rose Ann. I feel,, Èmotion fontaine.

~ Breathe Oh! Breathe

29 September ~ 6 October 2021 / Michael Angle Oh!


Michael Angle Oh!

The Owl Castle (poem)


Michael Griesbeck Michael Griesbeck is a German artist, born in Munich and raised in Murnau and Munich as well. He himself says: “I am particularly interested in experimental and complex material works, where it is curiosity that drives and leads me to the search for completely new ways and interpretations. My mostly informal works often show the combination of natural processes with technical, deterministic color and design possibilities.” In fact, his art is mostly Informal, following the teachings of the American informal movement’s artists, born in the second half of the XX century. In particular Michael uses the dripping technique, developed by the great Jackson Pollock. The two works on display at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery belong to the informal current but contain developments and novelties. The two works are part of the series still in progress titled "Shoetime" in which Michael uses heeled shoes to paint, later becoming works of art. Each painting is accompanied by the pair of shoes used by Michael. The artist states about the series: “It is an interpretation of missing quality of life, a transformation, of lost emotions due to CoronaVirus ”. The multimedia set-up of the art gallery allows visitors to observe the creative process of these two works, "Hommage to Louboutin" and "Anouk... It’s CHOO-Time". Michael in fact creates artistic films that show how shoes are his brushes. He fills the shoes with color and pours it directly on the canvas or uses the heel to splash it. The first work, "Hommage to Louboutin" presents red and black as dominant colors. Red in particular is the typical color of Louboutin’s soles and therefore red becomes a clear reference to this particular, became iconic. The artist uses just a couple of Loubotin to realize the work that during the creative process stain and color, becoming an integral part of the artwork.


Michael Griesbeck

In the second work, "Anouk... It’s CHOO-Time", the artist uses a pair of Jimmy Choo in the same way of the first work analyzed here. In this work the dominant color is pink, accompanied by a multitude of colors that fill the canvas, but above all stand out white and black that create a strong chromatic contrast. In addition to the creative process and style, these two works have in common another aspect: both are made on a canvas covered with a grid, perhaps iron, applied by the artist. In the case of "Hommage to Louboutin" the grid is positioned perpendicular to the canvas, instead in the second "Anouk... It’s CHOO-Time" is positioned diagonally. This element contributes to making the canvas three-dimensional. The artist then goes beyond the Pollockian dripping but adds elements: fashion through designer shoes that at the same time replaces the artistic medium and also Michael creates a further movement and contrast by adding a perfectly geometric grid. The contrast between disorder and order is evident and harmonious at the same time. The eye is constantly forced to move from perfect lines to causal splashes of color. Michael Griesbeck shows that chaos and order can coexist.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Michael Griesbeck

Anouk...It's CHOO-time


Michael Griesbeck

Hommage to Louboutin


Michael Manning "The richness of life lies in memories we have forgotten." (Cesare Pavese)

Michael Manning is a promising artist residing in the United States. Michael expresses himself with a personal art of great visual impact of a multidisciplinary character, but realizes his ideal dimension in the work with print media collaged onto canvas. The collage, in fact, represents a versatile artistic form suited to a continuous experimentation and search for solutions that are always different and extremely creative. It is not surprising, therefore, that the artist's imagination finds in this artistic language the privileged means to give shape, color and soul to his compositions, in which gaudy and contrasting chromatic tones dominate, combined graphic elements, writings and images of all types. The artist surprises the viewer even in the smallest details, as happens in the work presented for the "Aldilà", entitled You Title This. The work is configured as a self-portrait, in which the artist portrays himself in the act of holding the moon with one hand, while he emerges from the lower part of the creation, characterized by an intense blue color that represents the ocean. To "fill" the canvas, Michael used objects, souvenirs and images collected during a trip, and looking closely you can see a surprising variety of inserts. The artist covers even the smallest corner of the canvas with slogans, postcards, stickers, newspaper articles, in a sort of horror vacui that does not leave out even the smallest detail. However, it is enough to take a step back to realize the extraordinary communion of the elements, aimed at creating a cohesive and balanced whole of great complexity. Michael succeeds in raising the collage to an artistic form of great aesthetic, compositional and technical skill, without forgetting the emotional contribution of the work, which makes it a true icon of dynamic vitality.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Michael Manning

You Titled This


Miguel E “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see." (Edgar Degas)

Looking at Miguel’s works we immediately notice that the female figure, with her naked body and her face, is the protagonist. The first word that comes to mind when facing any of the exposed canvases is beauty. The proportions, the harmony, the ability to make bodies emerge from a void space, standing out in all their magnificence, biology, are all essential traits to fully enjoy the great and indisputable beauty that stands out before our eyes. On the other hand, what is more beautiful and meaningful than a human body? Of course the concept of beauty is relative and varies over time, but it is still the wonder in front of the greatness of creation, the sinuosity of movements.The representation of the human body that, for philosophical, social and identity implications, has been object of multiple variations in time, has, on the other hand, found space in every age and in every figurative context with forms able to reconcile the expressiveness of the artist with the sensitivity and taste of his time. The naked female body has a marked essentiality and Miguel is able to transmit through figurative language the subtle motions of the soul. Through a passionate and uninterrupted investigation, there is an attempt to grasp in the representation of women, in all the variations consistent with their own aesthetics, the deep sense of existence. The woman, between form and life, in her most intimate dimension, naked, helpless, becomes the image of grace and beauty embodying the poetic essence of the artist. Painting thus becomes a source of liberation for the artist, a profound connection between himself and those who observe his paintings, which, thanks to the beauty transmitted, fully relives with him the emotions of every single moment represented.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Miguel E

Nude1


Miguel E

Nude2


Miguel E

Nude5


Miguel E

Nude7


Miguel E

Face2


MIIO OKI “Art attracts us only by what it reveals of our most secret self.” (Jean-Luc Godard)

Blinova LyudMila Viktorovna, aka MIIO OKI, is a young, creative and multifaceted Russian artist who likes to experiment and find new artistic ways of creating creative processes that trigger emotions. Her skill in the use of technique is evident, her academic training has enabled her to acquire a solid basis for procedures in the realisation of more daring artworks. MIIO is always looking for novelty, experimentation, new techniques and tools to express concepts and ideas. She lives art as an experience, not as a finished object. Art always needs new ideas, continuous stimulation. MIIO's works are fresh, modern and dynamic. She moves between abstract and figurative subjects, she lets herself be inspired by everything, leaving no detail out because anything can become art. In her artwork "JOKER" the protagonist is the famous villain, the Joker. A portrait that focuses on the enigmatic and intriguing face of one of the most peculiar and well-known characters in the world. The features are characteristic: the flamboyant green hair, the clownish make-up and the icy eyes. The realism with which the artist creates the artwork is surprising, her artistic dexterity evident. It is a powerful image, a metaphor for the current human condition where anyone can become the Joker. The figure is extremely emblematic, very subjective. Some people see tragedy and others comedy, two sides of the same coin. The painting is therefore open to the interpretation of the viewer, who will read a different message into it according to his subjectivity. The acrylic is applied with glazing and overlapping, a technique which, together with the use of light, brings out the masses and the realistic rendering of the face. The green of the hair emerges from the dark background. The artist's choice to divide the artwork into two parts is also interesting from a chromatic point of view, light and shadow, a winning play of contrasts. The Joker's eye is very detailed, a true mirror of the soul for the observer. The artist takes some of the characteristics of expressionism and makes them his own, revisiting them in a modern key. Nothing is left to chance, neither the choice of subject, nor the choice of colours and photographic cut. The resulting image is timeless, a universal symbol of an inner struggle that has no time or age. An extremely attractive and intriguing image, surrounded by mystery and curiosity. The viewer is captivated by it and at the same time tries to decipher it. MIIO proves to be a dynamic, effervescent artist who is not afraid to express strong concepts and lead the viewer to reflect. Undoubtedly skilled in drawing and technique, she does not limit herself to mere visual representation, she goes beyond. Art, like the world, is constantly evolving and we must not stop moving. The artist is the one who is able to grasp every day the new challenges that destiny places before him and reworks them trying to surpass himself through ever new creative processes.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


MIIO OKI

JOKER


Minako Yamano “You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop.” (Rumi)

Minako Yamano presents her artwork “LIFE XXXIX(39) – Sea Clock” for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. This artwork is part of the “LIFE series, which is a microcosmic/macrocosmic abstract works where motifs are taken from various artificial and natural objects”. The artist remembers as a child when she saw the image of undersea volcanic activity, she was a witness through technology and learnt about the breathing of the ocean. Minako carries the blue as the inhale waiting for green and white tones to exhale between the flowing of every breath taken by the ocean. Waves are triggered by the volume of the fire mountain teamed up with every element across its path, scanning the area with different vibrations creating blue lights to be promptly taken away to reveal us precise gold details. The activity is hidden beneath the dark waters, which Minako has colored with deep and bright blue tones in order to enlighten the ocean. Golden details remind us how imperative is tranquility after turmoil, which often brings us balance in our existence. Time the ocean, time its waves, time its life. Minako Yamano renders it tangible for her “Aldilà”. “LIFE XXXIX(39) – Sea Clock”, the artist is the witness of the deepest ocean’s “Aldilà”.

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Minako Yamano

LIFE XXXIX(39) – Sea Clock


Monika Kovatsch “No tree, it is said, can grow to heaven unless its roots reach down to hell.” (Carl Jung)

Luminous and spectacular landscapes open up to the viewer's gaze. Abstract landscapes, rich in details formed between one layer of colour and the other, which seem to move like small flames and delicate waves on the shoreline. The material decomposes, attracted upwards, light and dancing. Pleasantly studied and juxtaposed nuances tell of mystical feelings and sensations where the eye absorbs the beauty and remains enchanted. This is just a brief introduction to the art by Monika Kovatsch, a contemporary German artist who makes nature her muse. In it, the artist tries to find the answers to her questions, analyzing its eternal return and the consequent cyclical nature of earthly life which, defenceless, follows its flow. In "Nature", orange and ochre colours blend with soft greens, creating a landscape with a strong visual impact. The artist uses a technique of delicate glazings which, laid one on top of the other, create pleasant imperfections. In some places, the colour seems to have been burnt, leaving a glimpse of the colour underneath. The work appears to disintegrate into a thousand particles that fly upwards, giving shape to the concept of consciousness. The mirror of water is also a recurring subject in Monika Kovatsch's work. In it, nature is reflected, showing the subject as split and the painting divided in half. The mirror is nothing more than the presumption of defining human identity, but the only thing it can actually provide is recognition of the physical features of our bodies. True human identity is something spiritual, which goes far beyond mere appearance. Duality here becomes a symbol of existence, because light and darkness; day and night; good and evil; death and rebirth cannot live without each other. Monika Kovatsch talks to us about balance. A spiritual balance, without which life would not have the same meaning and beauty.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Monika Kovatsch

Nature


Moshe Sigel Moshe Sigel’s works can be defined, as he says, as abstract landscapes. The artist currently living in Jerusalem, but originally from Tennessee and raised in London, starts from the idea of creating a natural landscape, but without having a well-defined project, and then lets creativity and freedom take over. In this way he succeeds in painting the ideal, original and essential form of nature. His art is in search of the spiritual dimension of reality and at the same time, as himself states: "This approach also adds an element of the subconscious to the work.". In "North Meets South" we can admire a rocky landscape, probably a desert, but the colors chosen by the artist, bright and cheerful, do not give us the feeling of burning and dryness, as we would expect from a representation of such a landscape, but allow the work to emanate joy, light, life. The brushstrokes of color are flat and uniform, without any presence of lumps or pasty, and this technique usually leads the work to appear static and firm; however, here, Moshe Sigel manages to overcome this "problem" adding in the sky a strip of bright green, an Aurora Borealis so beautiful and powerful able to amaze the viewer. The total absence of the human figure and human elements arouses calm and peace in the viewer, but at the same time emanates a sensation of mystery, hallucination, dream. All these characteristics bring us back, with the due differences, to the Metaphysical painting of the first half of the 20th century. Just as the artists of this current tried to represent a reality that transcends the one that can be known to the senses, so Moshe Sigel in his work managed to go beyond the simple representation; he managed to go aldilà.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Moshe Sigel

North Meets South


Mosperceived

Mosperceived is an American abstract artist who experiments and combines different media to continuously challenge his own expressive boundaries: mixing oil sticks, markers, acrylic and spray paint but also magazines and found material, he instills new life and meaning to the old in his innovative and symbolic collages. The artist carefully craft complex, apparently chaotic, compositions that withhold a significative and logical order and a precise message to the viewers. This is also the case of “ Eternal LIFE : $HOTSFIRED “, an acrylic and mixed media on canvas, that Mosperceived presented at the M.A.D.S Art Gallery exhibition, entitled “ALDILÀ”. To create this particular piece, the artist worked on many layers, combining rigorous geometrical forms with spontaneous, freehand interventions. Very much likely the creative process of American Artist Jasper Johns, Mosperceived incorporates the technique of collage as a basis for his painting. On top three rows of black and white shots targets are carefully ordered and stained by full, clean stripes as well as by heavy paint drops and serpentine strokes of spray paint. In the right corner, on a dark background, the number one has been stencilled with purple paint over and over almost obsessively, mirroring the rigorous sequence of shot targets opposed to it. The geometric composition creates a vertiginous path from the upper to the lower part guiding the viewers' gaze, bouncing around their focuses from the top to the bottom of the canvas and vice versa. Mosperceived conceived “ Eternal LIFE : $HOTSFIRED “ as a “bridge to the afterlife”, able to capture the immortality of the spirit. Arranging precise symbols on the canvas, not only the artist addressed the darkest truths of our present time, but also instilled a message of hope for a better future: “At the top of the piece there are Shot Targets symbolizing the target of Human beings, especially people of colour. Although dark I wanted to enlighten the viewer by adding many bright colours and sporadic paint movements to show hope and new life. The purple “1” s throughout the painting symbolize life and the realization that we only have one of them. Make the most of life and continue to grow and evolve into unknown.” As the American Pop Art artists that experimented with collages in the 60s, Mosperceived conceived an assemblage of many materials to produce a new whole: he forged his own powerful message by combining and processing different forms, symbols and media of our culture as well as contemporary issues. The multitude of signs and methods of expressions captured and exploited by the artist are carefully balanced on the canvas as his innuendo to both our mortal and immortal life.

Art Curator Flavia Montecchi


Mosperceived

Eternal LIFE_$HOTSFIRED


Nancy Dimiceli “Curiosity begins as an act of tearing to pieces or analysis.” (Samuel Alexander)

The artworks by Nancy Dimiceli, a contemporary American artist, immediately reveal themselves as intense expressions of the unconscious. Dynamic brushstrokes where the body moves freely, guided by deep inner feelings. Intense colours, often acid, more or less pasty, stretch out on the canvas. The order dictated by reason dissolves, leaving room for emotionality, which the artist exploits to the full, living the moment as a liberation. In fact, strongly influenced by the art of American Abstract Expressionism, her creations are the result of the act of painting as a direct expression of the artist's experience. Important for her artistic growth is Terrence Coffman, a well-known contemporary American artist, whose works represent “…landscapes of my inner being, my attempt to move into a greater reality… I’m a conduit of sorts. I don’t stand before a subject to copy it. I breathe it in, consume it and let it flow through me onto canvas”(T. Coffman).


Nancy Dimiceli

Nancy Dimiceli takes these teachings to make painting a path of deep spirituality. The canvas becomes a place of encounter with the most unknown self, a means of liberation of the soul and a mystical dialogue with a world that is far away, now close. In "Wordless access", white, blue and azure brushstrokes and spatula strokes blend in places with orange and yellow. An ocean in a storm, a mirror in a thousand pieces, an apparent confusion, which nevertheless sees hope. Her paintings are explosions of energy, turbulent inner storms, which have finally emerged from the darkness to take shape and see the light. They are universes that are new to our gaze, inaccessible worlds that we can only reach by ourselves. Places of ice or fire, places with unpredictable and confusing shapes that, for Nancy Dimiceli, are a priceless source of inspiration.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Nancy Dimiceli

Angel Twilight


Nancy Dimiceli

Fusion Glow


Nancy Dimiceli

Perfect to me


Nancy Dimiceli

Wordless access


Nathalie's Art An explosion of colours created with the use of acrylics and the modelexic technique, is what Natalie S Atamian presents at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery during the ‘ALIDILÁ’ exhibition. Her paintings, just as all her body of works, reveal unique sensibilities and high emotions that suddenly impressed the viewer at the first sight. Soft colours are used to create the paintings’ background, a good choice that underlines the subjects’ details, almost close to the ‘action painting’ artistic current for the swiftness of the brush stroke on the canvas. Big and abstract artworks with a deep meaning, given also by the titles assigned, reveal Nathalie’s expressionist style. “Princess Chloe” shows a sort of emotional dualism: on one hand the frenetic; chaotic; colourful and geometrical head of hair that surrounds the Princess’ relaxed face. Her closed eyes, her subdued features confer to her soul a ‘zen’ state of mind. It can be read as a painting reflecting a moment of meditation, a moment of estrangement from the agitated royal world, full of responsibilities and expectations. More stinging and vivid “Crown of Thorns” gives the perfect idea of what the title refers to. Nathalie’s ability in conferring the exact impression of agitation and pain is visible through the numerous hanging splinters. The fact of seeing these scraps and red spots resembling stains of blood, confers to the piece a sort of suspense that keeps the viewer fixated at the scene imaging the pain suffered by the subject hidden under the mass of pointed brushstrokes. On the contrary, “Silent Gathering” is the representation of a group of men having a discussion. The adjective that presents the picture: ‘silent’ refers both to the way the people speak, maybe with a low tone of voice, and to the emotions spread thanks to the soft colours used to draw the men’s garments. Just some circles made up with the use of a thin and subtle black line compose the heads of the people gathered while, their bodies are made up by some vertical brushstrokes, soiled with some spots of colours representing the words and the thoughts not said. The three paintings have, each of them, their dynamicity not only concerning the scene itself but also referring to the emotions spread: an ensemble of feelings that help in understanding the meaning of what it is represented.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Nathalie's Art

Princess Chloe


Nathalie's Art

Crown of Thorns


Nathalie's Art

Silent Gathering


Natsumi Sumita "To them, I said, the truth would be literally nothing but the shadows of the images." (Plato)

Natsumi Sumita is an emerging artist residing in Japan. Specializing in mural art, Natsumi has also perfected her artistic technique in the academic field, at the University of Bournemouth, UK. Her art is distinguished by a style that favors clear and thin lines and full, dense colors, which immediately transport the viewer into an almost dreamlike dimension. In fact, Natsumi's works use the symbolic language of art to search for their own truth to existential questions that cross her artistic and personal path. With Portal - the work presented by the artist for the exhibition "Aldilà" - the artist tries to give an answer to a doubt that seems to recall Platonic philosophy: where is the border between existence and non-existence? Art thus becomes the starting point for a lofty goal, a profound self-awareness that passes through knowledge. From the greyness of the background, Natsumi allows the viewer to glance beyond a painted portal and glimpse an idealized world, in which nature reflects an intimate purity. It seems symbolically personified by the little lamb in the foreground and by the flowers that adorn the foliage of the trees. As in the Platonic myth of the cave, the solar sphere seems to be a harbinger of hope and wisdom, although it does not reveal itself completely. The full, material brushstrokes accompany the viewer in the artist's personal hyperuranium, which does not coincide with reality but with an interpretation of reality. The apparent simplicity of the composition allows a careful look to linger on the great accuracy of both stylistic and symbolic details (such as the small compass on the lawn or the black hat that "floats" on the trees), projecting the delicate feeling of the artist in a poignant glimpse on the essence of the human nature.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Natsumi Sumita

Portal


NEVRO

NEVRO is a Professor of Neurosurgery (PhD) with a strong passion for Art that has always been for him the definite removal of boundaries in Neurosurgery. In fact, in NEVRO’s work, the world of surgery, the human psyche and science come together to create spaces of inner dialogue, making art an extension of neurosurgical practice and exposing his understanding of the brain while displaying recurrent feelings that arise in the clinical practice. His painting is presented as abstract and experimental, offering elements necessary to understand his vision of reality, directly inspired by the world of neurosurgery, a complex and mysterious world that creates a strong connection with the mind and emotions. His work, therefore, has an encouraging message but disturbing thoughts may be mixed in some pieces, as it happens in “Dear Brain”, the artwork presented by NEVRO at "ALDILA’ "exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery. Consisting of an old carved and painted wooden door, in the center of it a large skull appears, anatomically well represented as evidenced by the brain, in which, however, large blue eyes exhibiting anisocoria appear, making the representation more alive and animated. According to the artist's account, the work displayed as a regret letter from mind to brain, symbolizes an introspective obnubilated state of mind where backflashes of mercy occur after a severe head injury, sorrowful for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. NEVRO’s language is presented as a strongly desecrating gesture, with an evident provocative value and considered as an art form that, in some way, raises some fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms that underlie the aesthetic event. Battlefield, weapons, game, probabilities and self-control are recurrent themes in his paintings, which are obvious insights of Neurosurgery. Another important element in his work is the readymade, used with the desire to seek something that goes beyond the traditional painting technique, in favour of a new and more conceptual procedure: he manages to skillfully combine his own carving and painting technique, using same tools present in the neurosurgical theatre (such as scalpel blades, rongeurs and drills), characterised by an evident symbolic realism, in which all his communicative power shines through Nevro's works, therefore, take the viewer's attention beyond the traditional confrontation between image and its corresponding object, where words become "a way of adding colour to the painting" (Duchamp, Resonances du ready made, cit, p24).

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


NEVRO

Dear Brain


Nicholas P. Kozis

Nicholas P. Kozis exposes at the international exhibition “Aldilà” at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery five works (“Awaken 1”, “Capture 1”, “Gravity 4”, “Rise 5”, “Rise 6”) through which the power of imagination can capture images that are always different, highlighting a very dynamic chromatic and symbolic evolution. By artistically realizing new horizons, open and free, and by crossing the thresholds of different dimensions, going beyond the visible and the material, the artist’s creative action produces multiple combinations of figures, tones and movements. Everything is generated by consciousness, knowledge, reality, but above all by the 'preconscious', intuition and perception. Nicholas creates multidimensional and sensory visions in which feelings, emotions and moods emerge with energy, capturing in this way the viewer's attention. In all of this, it becomes clear that every expression, either of the artist or of the viewer, merges with the forms present in the space-time continuum. Such visual images are universal and each individual grasps them deeply as a personal event, thus constituting a phenomenon of great collective harmony. The artist emphasizes the play of light and shadow that draws the viewers into each work, immersing them in an emotional journey into their soul. The final effect is that of a kaleidoscope that conveys innovation and great temperament in the use of such vibrant tones. The fusion of light and color creates a powerful dynamism that is constantly changing and it appears unstoppable. In this way, Nicholas' works are modern and revolutionary, leaving plenty of room for creativity, from which both the active spirit of the artist and that of the observer emerge. All these scenarios embrace the dreamlike aspect of the viewer, enhancing an exclusive and subjective experience and thus creating a structure so imaginative that it merges with the deepest emotions of everyone.

“The purpose of art is not to represent the appearance of things, but their inner meaning.” (Aristotle)

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Nicholas P. Kozis

Awaken 1


Nicholas P. Kozis

Capture 1


Nicholas P. Kozis

Gravity 4


Nicholas P. Kozis

Rise 5


Nicholas P. Kozis

Rise 6


Nils Bossius Klintenberg Nils Bossius Klintenberg practices shamanism and meditation with constancy and passion, and his art is a natural byproduct of the things he lives and it is inspired by things he has seen during his spiritual travels or are interpretations of emotions or symbolism that emerged during spiritual work. His paintings are melting pots of shamanism/animism, ancient Norse paganism, Hinduism, Buddhism and a bit of Christian mysticism. In the works under examination, we can see his representation of three of the numerous Indian chakras, the energy centers located in our body, designated to collect, metabolize and finally release outward the vital energy that surrounds us. In all three works the chakras are represented by the Swedish artist in human form, with their eyes closed and a serene expression on their faces. All three works are painted with long and rapid brushstrokes, like flashes during a storm, and yet, at the same time, they appear soft, like waves of the sea; the artistic value of these works lies precisely in these traits, in this peculiar gesture. The artist, following his instinct and inspiration, creates an artistic language made of signs and colors, where although there is a figuration, it passes, in a sense, in the background. Nils Bossius Klintenberg’s enthusiasm and emotions emerge in all their gestural expressiveness. The basic colors of all three works are different shades of brown; to these, however, he adds green in the case of “Anahata”, blue in the case of “Vishuddha” and yellow in the case of “Manipura”. In this way, the artist manages to give a tight rhythm, but serene overall, thanks to which colors and gestures not only coexist, but balance perfectly in mutual harmony. Anahata is the heart chakra, it governs love, relationships, generosity and empathy; Vishuddha is the throat chakra, it governs listening, communication and the ability to tell the truth; Manipura is the solar plexus chakra, it governs the will power, personal power and self-confidence. "Through my pictures I try to inspire people to see the mystery within themselves. To see them-selves as mystery." says Nils Bossius Klintenberg. With these works he therefore invites us to dig within ourselves, to look deeper, to seek our inner aldilà, our inner beyond, and thus to become people completely devoted to the light as he became after starting his journey.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Nils Bossius Klintenberg

Anahata


Nils Bossius Klintenberg

Vishuddha


Nils Bossius Klintenberg

Manipura


Nina Michailidou “In our time there are many artists who do something because it is new, they see their value and their justification in this newness. They are deceiving themselves, novelty is seldom the essential. This has to do with one thing only, making a subject better from its intrinsic nature.” (Henri de Toulouse Lautrec)

Nina Michailidou is a multi-disciplinary Greek artist who experiences art in all its aspects. Also interested in interior design and exhibition curatorship, Nina is a complete artist who loves to deal with multiple aspects of the artistic world, not just painting. She is a bold artist who loves to experiment, also making use of other creative artistic processes that approach the world of photography, painting and engraving. Her artworks contain many details and are never trivial but the result of in-depth study. The compositions are studied both in structure and technique, nothing is left to chance. Nina takes countless cues from the outside world and channels them into her works, reinterpreting them through a personal key and with the original and creative style that characterises her. Her subjects are often cityscapes, buildings, constructions or characters wearing gas masks reminiscent of the First and Second World Wars. This characteristic of the artist can be seen in her work 'Nun'. The protagonist is a nun, recognisable by her headdress, her robe and the crucifix around her neck. The woman is in threequarter profile, wears a gas mask and does not look at the viewer, as if to avoid him. Her gaze is downwards. The attitude is that of someone who has resigned herself, who has stopped fighting and is about to accept her fate. To create it, Nina was inspired by a photographic document from the First World War and revisited it. The elements introduced by Nina create a timeless image, fixed in time. The choice of black and white is very interesting, as if to give a dramatic and ancient tone, but at the same time permeated with topicality. The details are meticulously crafted, including the folds of the dress, the buttons, the collar, the fine crucifix and the headdress. The artist's skill lies in taking and revisiting a historical photographic document while maintaining realistic details and at the same time creating modern textures. Gas masks originated in the First World War to protect soldiers from the first chemical bombs. By making the characters in her paintings wear them, Nina creates a link between the past and the present and prompts the viewer to think more deeply. The mask thus has several metaphorical meanings. The light gives three-dimensionality to the subject, giving it life and realism. Fundamental to Nina's artwork is the use of the concepts of memory and decadence. The past is fundamental to understanding the present and she therefore decides to bring it to life in her works, revisiting the subjects and creating a thread with current events. The stroke is controlled, an indication that Nina is very aware of her artistic qualities. She moves through space with elegance and determination, creating a play of contrasts between solids (subjects) and voids (monochrome background). Through the lights she also creates contrasts between two- and three-dimensional, thus creating a artwork that is static but at the same time full of life. Nina is very skilful because she is able to exploit all the resources at her disposal, giving the viewer a work that is much more than an artistic expression, it is a world in itself.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Nina Michailidou

Nun


Nkosi Ndlovu "Give women the right opportunities and they are capable of everything." (Oscar Wilde)

The artist Nkosi Ndlovu is a newcomer to the large M.A.D.S. Art Gallery community. She is participating with a fabulous work titled "Abundance" in the digital art exhibition “Aldilà”. The Melbourne-based artist began her artistic journey as a painter. She later explored other avenues such as graphic design, photography and finally digital collage. Nkosi has developed her own style that highlights black bodies, particularly black women in surreal scenes of tranquillity and peace. Nkosi wants to create small worlds, through her artwork, in which she and the viewer can lose themselves by playing with size, shape and texture, providing an escape from reality. By alternating full and empty spaces, Nkosi Ndlovu creates a masterpiece that represents an improbable rational world. "Abundance" is the representation of an image that beyond its appearance can invite deeper reflection. The artist takes up the line of thought of the Dadaists, who used to extrapolate objects from their everyday function and make them something else, cancelling what they were created for. However, this imaginary world does not necessarily exist in reality. The way in which the artist Nkosi depicts black women suggests the idea of the world she has in her mind. A world where women live in perfect harmony with nature, which is represented as the "lifeblood" that runs through the woman's body and elevates her to a champion of justice and respect that should be recognized to all women. Art represents the reality of the artist, her truth. The world beyond the veil. The world we all aspire to reach. Nkosi Ndlovu harmoniously combines human beings, nature, geometric shapes and color. The black color of the woman's skin becomes the fertile soil on which plants and flowers sprout. On a small podium, in front of the bust that stands, a small black silhouette that can also be seen on the stairs. This silhouette could represent Nkosi Ndlovu. This is the reason why we find it in all the works of the artist.

Art Curator Alessia Ventola


Nkosi Ndlovu

Abundance


Noelia Gómez

Noelia Gómez Pellejero is a professional painter from Zaragoza, who today combines the teaching of drawing and painting in her highest NoesElla art academy with the creation of works. All Noelia's paintings have very precise subjects, with a clear intention at the base: her passion is in fact that of representing free women, far from stereotypes and social conventions, making sure that they give the viewer food for thought on the current perception that society has of women, denouncing the harassment and inferiority to which they are still subjected. According to this intent, ”Estigma" is the work of art presented by Noelia at "ALDILA '" exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery: the body of a young girl, almost posing in front of the artist, is represented from the knees to the neck, the long hair falls along her arms, hands are abandoned and relaxed, breasts and intimate parts are covered with pure white clothes. Apart from black and white, the dominant color here is pink, which for the artist symbolizes the color society attributed to female sex along with other stereotypical qualities. “Estigma” therefore wants to represent free women, far from stereotypes, insisting in particular on the “signs” that the company has left on the female gender and which unfortunately slowly disappear. Noelia's works are therefore a high form of denunciation of the extremely patriarchal system in which we live, and instead a celebration of the woman's body in all its beautiful and normal imperfections.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Noelia Gómez

Estigma


OHBA Sakura

The river of oblivion flows slowly, placidly and incessantly. Perpetual is its motion, indefinite and smoky is the goal. The flow of memories is in continuous evolution. Second after second, moment after moment. What is the present if it can - at the same time - consider itself the past? Reminiscences of some distant time fade before our eyes at an unprecedented speed, taking on the appearance - in our minds - of vivid moments of reality. The colors are bright, we can recognize smells and scents. The silhouettes are crystal clear, still firmly anchored to everyday life. Yet, the passage of time is too busy creating new memories rather than animating old ones. And so it is that the vididid colors that inflamed our minds are transformed into feeble copies of what they were and the shapes, at first well defined, now present an uncertain and smoky physiognomy, faint outlines of a memory that is now nothing more than opaque fog. The river of oblivion flows slowly, placidly and incessantly and the memories and moments of life lived with it. Depleted of their salient features, impoverished of their vital sparks, the reminiscences of the life that was flowing impetuously in the flow of obscure forgetfulness. The elimination of memories is a physiological event typical of every living being. Our mind is the author of the river of oblivion. We cannot escape the process: we have no choice but to console our conscious self well anchored to reality. Yet there is something that could modify this process. Certainly it cannot reverse and annul the nature of our mind, but it can help us to sublimate the moments of our life that are now part of the past. The chromatic matter is the instrument of action par excellence. The pigment and the real consistency of the color make us forget for a moment the oblivion of memories by fixing on something real - the canvas - our still vivid memories. And so it is that clumps of chromatic substance flood the immaculate surface still to be painted. A particularly vivid pink ignites our senses and makes us participate in the sweet memory of Sakura. Like flashes of memory, like rapid flashbacks, these pinkish patches accompanied by bluish elements and emerald green touches accompany us in the vision of the artist's memory. Cosmea flowers move elegantly before our eyes. The faint breeze caresses the slender stem and gently moves the soft, round leaves of the flower. All around, patches of wild grass peep out from the cracks of the grey asphalt. The chromatic matter is persistent and the brushstroke is incisive and material: the planar surface of the canvas is not enough for her and she rises with small touches from the two-dimensional world. Small ridges, sinuous hollows and flatter areas become the protagonists of the composition. The chromatic patches come closer, know each other and join together formulating new shades and tones of color. Cosmos is the strength of Sakura's memory, it is the commitment not to forget our past life, it is the warning to remember even the smallest wonder that we can glimpse in everyday life. Let's enjoy the past moment and imprint it in our mind: let's smile thinking about little pink Cosmea flowers moved by the sassy breeze.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


OHBA Sakura

Cosmos


OHBA Sakura

Pyracantha


OHBA Sakura

Slight Drowsiness


Olivia Stocheci

If you ask to a child as he imagines an aldilà, a world that resides beyond ours, a fantasy world, he could answer exactly with an artwork by Olivia Stocheci. The Romanian artist, in fact, reports on her canvases both imaginary and daily subjects, but always with vivid colors and with wonderful compositions that make we think of a magical world. "Fiery nigth" seems to be the visual transposition of a fairy tale story. Below, a female figure, perhaps a warrior princess, turns her back to the viewer and her dress widens to fill the entire bottom of the canvas. Immediately in front of her, high rocky hills cut the canvas diagonally, so that most of the painting is occupied by the night sky against which three strong winged dragons twirl and spit fire. The sky represented by Olivia Stocheci is never dark and empty, but on the contrary, it is always dotted with stars, some of which remind us of those of the "Starry Night" by Vincent van Gogh. In the same way as the Holland artist, Olivia Stocheci uses a very special pictorial technique. The Romanian artist spreads the color with dense brushstrokes, but with minimal thickness, juxtaposing different colors thus making move the entire composition.


Olivia Stocheci

"Celestial Elephant" is part of the "Celestial" series that addresses topics such as our place in the universe, life, death and transcendence. In particular, ““Celestial Elephant” is an allegory for the soul’s departure and the journey beyond.”, says the artist, and she add: “The myriad colours radiating from the subject are a reflection of our unique experiences and traits and how at the end of our earthly journey we dissolve back into infinity.”. Both in this artwork and in "Fiery Night", we can see in the starry night sky that acts as a background, a falling star. It is, in a certain sense, the signature of the artist; in fact, almost all her works present a falling star and the artist gives it many meanings: it can be auspicious, bad or just a reminder that time is fleeting. Olivia Stocheci speaks with and through colors; she has managed to find her own artistic language, and although she loves to experiment with various styles and materials, we can say without doubt that in this type of works she can make visible all her creativity and all her innate talent.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Olivia Stocheci

Celestial Elephant


Olivia Stocheci

Fiery Night


Otoya

Reality is a constant becoming that does not keep track, that does not keep history, that does not change itself in order to be able to live in a definition, but changes itself with the awareness that it must be followed, and therefore lived, in the continuous change. The past, the present and the future, although they present their own accurate definition, are all symptoms of the passing of time, of its incessant, perpetual and infinite motion. Every second, every millisecond spent in the middle of the temporal instant is presented to our eyes as new, never once equal to itself. The cycles of the seasons, the dichotomy of day and night and the geological eras are nothing but macro-changes indicating the imprint of time. The nothing is created, nothing is destroyed, everything is transformed, as Lavoiserian memory, is the pivotal point of our discourse and of Otoya's art. Ink stains irretrievably dirty a paper with water-repellent qualities. Drop by drop the representation is transformed, changing its connotations and characteristics. At first a blackish-purple stain, then a pinkish blotch with blurred and indefinite outlines. And more drops upon drops, change upon change. Variations of colors are formed, chromatic stripes that intersect one another, the pigments of the various inks get to know each other: they meet, they get to know each other, sometimes they separate, other times they merge into a chromatic tonality derived from the latter.


Otoya

Everything is in continuous becoming, everything is in continuous change. Otoya's is a pure recording of phenomenal reality: the work of art and the creative genius dwell in the performance rather than in the final result. Ink, at this point, is the perfect medium to represent the incessant forward motion, the ceaseless and eternal becoming. Composed mainly of pigment and water, it is an extremely malleable tool: even the smallest drop of water intended to fall on liquid pigment can radically change its nature. The stain can expand, change its boundaries, literally break its structure and drip to one side. One drop is enough and the balance is broken, it changes. Nothing is created, nothing is destroyed, everything is transformed and ink is nothing but the perfect medium to tell a truth that dwells in every corner of the universe, in every dark recess of our world. Connection of change I and Connection of change II, are nothing more than the visual transposition of one of the fundamental laws of our being and of the world: a rule that determines our existence, that has determined the past and that will determine the future. Man by nature is not very accustomed to change, is a stationary animal and habit that bases its existence in days always equal to themselves. The human being is afraid of change, probably in the deepest part of his soul he is terrified of it. Otoya with his phenomenal recording of reality wants to propose a wish, a prayer to receive change as an inevitable feature of our life and nature. Everything transforms, is this what makes our existences so interesting?

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Otoya

Connection of change I


Otoya

Connection of change II


Patrick Bezalel “I spread the art, the art spread His story.” Patrick Bezalel

"ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S welcomes Patrick Bezalel and his strong faith. He's an artist, photographer, and designer. His source of inspiration is faith in his God, Yeshua. He's used to define his works as "Living Art” aas they are immersive experiences. The first artwork, Behold the king shows Heavenly Yeshua as the king and heir of the world, upon his head rests the crown of thorns which symbolizes suffering. The artist represents Yeshua as a lion, a noble and proud animal. He does not seem to be scratched by the suffering that belongs to him, he shows himself proudly with a conscious look. This because of the sanctity of representation. Fountain of life represents a mountain: it is the mirror of the artist's soul. The mountains used to be a subject of his photography, it reminds him of his God. From afar, the mountains stand tall and lofty. Majestic and seemingly unapproachable. But as we come near, they welcome and surprise us. But as we come near, they welcome and surprise us with flowing waterfalls, beautiful rock formations and trees standing pretty and proud. The third artwork is named Mercy, Patrick says "From above, Abba God sees His Beloved Son Yeshua hung on the cross between two sinners. The most defining moment in history where the mercy and the grace of God satisfies the justice and the judgement of God. Where God pours His wrath on Yeshua as ‘He who knew no sin became sin for us at the cross’. Abba God did not only predestine the time but He chose this place in Deuteronomy 12:4-5. And it was exactly in Jerusalem where this greatest act of worship and sacrifice happened 2000 years ago. The valleys of Jerusalem form the letter and bear the name of God. It was on these hills that Yeshua, offered Himself up as an offering to redeem us all – sinful men and to offer us the gift of eternal salvation through believing in His work of redemption". The three works show the extreme versatility of the artist who passes from an extremely realistic painting style to abstract art based on the subject he decides to represent

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Patrick Bezalel

Behold the king


Patrick Bezalel

Fountain of life


Patrick Bezalel

Mercy


Patrick Moles “To be a surrealist means to banish from the mind the already seen and to search for the unseen. " (René Magritte)

« Patrick Moles is a French artist, more precisely a special soul. He is one of those people who intrigues you and calms you down at the same time, as happens when observing and investigating his work. Patrick's art finds in abstract painting the ideal form to satisfy an inspiration receptive to the emotions and stimuli that identity, experience and history arouse. Emotions are, in fact, the true protagonists of the artist's works, and he is particularly skilled at representing them with precise chromatic choices, as in "Amazing Blu Planet" which, with the use of the two primary colours juxtaposed and so close together, red and blue, create a very strong relationship between them that leads us to the artist's personal conception of mysticism: something that is difficult to fully grasp at first glance, and indeed becomes more complex the more one dwells on it; an expression at first glance, of a continuous and endless search for one's identity in the contemporary world".

"Surreal is the reality that has not been separated from its mystery" (René Magritte)

Art Curator Valentina Valentini


Patrick Moles

Amazing Blue Planet


Pierrette Clément "Color in a painting is like enthusiasm in life" (Vincent Van Gogh)

The artist Pierrette in creating her work follows her instinct, letting herself be guided by the emotions that find concrete form in the various shades of colour she creates. The fluidity of colour on the canvas creates unique and unrepeatable weaves and details, and the viewer gets lost and is carried away by the delicately moving flows of color. Paths not yet traveled, bordered by sensations and memories, is what the observer finds in front of him looking at Pierrette's artistic work. Human emotions and feelings move and follow the same path as the colours on the canvas, which mix and intertwine, sometimes they mix creating different shades, other times they separate from each other, Pierrette's work therefore becomes a metaphor of life with its ups and downs, joys and sorrows. The red and blue colors are the main protagonists, a thousand shades are born from them, through them the artist tells a story, in an incessant meeting and clash of forces. Like water and fire that meet, one repels the other, so the colours move within Pierrette's work, a clash that creates a perfect balance. In fact, Pierrette's work is not static, but in motion, the observer is totally captured by the colors that flow and mix, which rotate in a continuous motion. The work is alive and through the dynamism it possesses it is possible to perceive the strength that is in it. A work in full pouring art style is totally abstract, the various colours move freely without constraints or borders, there are no signs or lines, no figure appears that recalls reality. Color is the only medium and protagonist, it is able to speak to the observer and manages to transport him to another reality, made of strength to be absorbed. The sensations that emerge from Pierrette's work are positive and give the viewer a moment of great joy and vivacity. The colours that the artist used emanate a strong energy, in fact she gives us the great gift of being able to reinvigorate our soul through her work. Abstract art shakes the soul of those who look at it and Pierrette perfectly manages to shake the feelings of those who encounter her work. In fact, Pierrette's artistic work possesses a strong evocative power from which the viewer cannot escape.

Art Curator Vanessa Viti


Pierrette Clément

The fight of the life


Quynh Klaus There is geometry in the humming of the strings. There is music in the spacing of the spheres. (Pythagoras) Quynh Klaus presents her artworks “Pink Splash”, “Das blaue Mineral”, “Mondkrater”, “Ohne Titel” and “Buntes Chaos” for the “Aldilà” Art exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art gallery. Pythagoras thought planets surrounded themselves with notes of vibrations. Celestial bodies as rhythm forces. Quynh states: “As a synesthete, I paint the music I am listening to”, where music is visible throughout melodies and harmonies created with different traced rhythms across the artworks she creates. Kandinsky perceived his work as pure visual music. The artist Quynh Klaus has the goal to go further than music and portray it as tangible as possible in order to make a registration of a particular moment while she is creating. The moment of creation is her “Aldilà”. “Pink splash” presents a subtext subtlety with very strong and precise rhythms in order to convey the idea of a strong fragility. “Das blaue Mineral” undertakes the task of making a statement with accurate traces of pure enclosure as a moment to stop on our compelling path to reflection. “Mondkrater” comes after a pause, the colors used on this art piece are heard with optimism and rejoice, as Kandinsky declared: “The sound of colors is so definite that it would be hard to find anyone who would express bright yellow with bass notes or dark lake with treble”. “Ohne Titel”, is an artwork waiting for a title, for a perception of rhythm, which I believe can turn into a “Hopeful Chaos”. “Buntes Chaos” is created listening carefully to the notes perceived with serenity and portrayed with a vast collection of colorful tones. The science of music is tangible through visible art with the compelling force of the synesthetic perception of Quynh Klaus.

Color directly influences the soul. Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the hammers, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another purposively, to cause vibrations in the soul. (Wassily Kandinsky, Concerning the Spiritual in Art)

Art Curator Karla Peralta Málaga


Quynh Klaus

Pink Splash


Quynh Klaus

Das blaue Mineral


Quynh Klaus

Mondkrater


Quynh Klaus

Ohne Titel


Quynh Klaus

Buntes Chaos


Raul Ciuro Cerezo

The life of each of us is made up of moments of great mental serenity alternated with more difficult, complicated moments that test our inner balance. We are changeable beings, the society in which we live and external influences continually modify our being, both outwardly and inwardly. To make a metaphorical comparison they are like the clouds of the sky, a moment before we seem to have caught a representation and a moment after the variation of the winds and currents has already modified the image that our gaze had captured. What is interesting, however, is that a new form is created, sometimes more labile, but other times more solid and truthful than before.This is the challenge we face every day. We are at the mercy of the winds and of the course external to us, but we can influence our inner self, recreate a new mental balance, possibly more solid than the previous one because rational, thought, obtained by a deep reflection on oneself. Raul invites us to reflect on deep existential concepts through a simple, abstract style, but that leaves room for a faint figurativism, in which outline and white background, rapid and decisive drafting of color are distinctive features. The immediacy of the representation comes straight to the viewer. The artist shows us the almost robotic mechanism of the mental functioning and he does it by depicting the human mind from within and imagining the mechanism of the functioning of thought, in and out through the mouth, point of contact with reality outside of us. The title of the work also invites us to reflect on a very topical issue: reversing the question that scientists have always asked themselves, Raul seems to wonder: can man think like a robot? Can the human being reach such a point of rationalization and automatism that allows him, in the moments of greatest difficulty, to regain a balance of thought? As Manzoni would say "to posterity the arduous sentence".

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Raul Ciuro Cerezo

Pensamiento robótico


Rea Gru

Have you ever wondered what the unconscious is and how it is present in our everyday lives? According to psychology, the unconscious is the part of our mind that is also unknown to ourselves, the one that does not reach our conscience. Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, explained in fact that we could compare our psychic apparatus to an iceberg: the part of the iceberg that emerges above the water is the conscious part, while the submerged part, much larger than the visible one, is the unconscious part. So, without often noticing it, the unconscious acts in our daily lives. The artist Rea Gru, with the work presented here, entitled "Riddle of the Unconscious" reflects on the relationship between conscious and unconscious in our lives. The unconscious is precisely that part Aldilà what we can see and understand. Rea has managed, through her art, to transform an unconscious and non-rational part of her mind into something visible and tangible, that we too can see and that speaks to us. By observing the work we can really feel the depth it communicates to us, through the forms and their movement. Rea shows us in this work a hidden corner of her mind that has been transformed into lines and shapes. As the artist herself tells us, the elements represented are not random, but consciously chosen by her for what they symbolize: the skull symbolizes threat or death; the daggers the danger, but also the protection; the owl wisdom; finally, the ink pen used is a precise form of communication for Rea. In this way Rea managed to perfectly combine her conscious, her rational thought, with her unconscious, hidden even from ourselves, giving life to something that goes far beyond the representation of a thought. In this work we can see and above all feel a truly profound part of the artist.

Art Curator Silvia Grassi


Rea Gru

Riddle of the Unconscious


Rosana Kossatz For the international exhibition “Aldilà” at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Rosana Kossatz exposes three works (“Courage to see”, “Far beyond the stars”, “Infinite golden”) from which strong and profound values emerge thanks to an accurate chromatic selection and to the symbolism that each painting preserves within its pictorial surface. The importance and the inspiration to something that goes beyond our dimension, pushes the artist to search for new elements to depict in a parallel universe, full of feelings, moods and chromatic nuances. This is something that can be found in “Courage to see”: the abstract style is emphasized by the use of shades that penetrate two-dimensional space and help the viewer to have a unique experience. Rosana simulates long, full-bodied, diagonal and vertical brushstrokes that cross the artwork from the left-hand corner to the opposite one, providing an architectural structure that defines the canvas. All this movement creates a connection between the earth and the celestial, the physical and the spiritual, the dark and the light, up to reach the universe. The artist invites the viewer to free himself/herself from the worries of the mind, where the imagination is the so-called “keystone”, the essential element that triggers dreams and makes them infinite. In “Far beyond the stars”, on the contrary, the spatial and creative dimension emerges through the artist's subconscious, accompanying the viewer into a mysterious, dreamlike metaphor and allowing for a greater dialogue between the work and the viewer. From the center of the canvas there is a beam of light, as to represent a star, drawing the viewer's attention, as well as making his/her feelings merge with the surrounding warm atmosphere. By framing that transcendental moment in which everything unites and constantly evolves, Rosana wishes to combine the energy of the cosmos in a single point of convergence that brings together ever-changing emotions, colors and perceptions. Her research best expresses the perceptive process of everyone, expanding it beyond boundaries. Finally, in "Infinite golden" the essence of the surrounding environment is enhanced: an immense expanse opens up, following the many nuances. Golden details can be noticed, highlighting the most evident bluish and purplish tones of the work. All this can open the door to a composition which is so vivid that anyone looking at the painting will be enraptured. The artist's chromatic and structural experimentation is dynamic and proves to be a powerful means of applying it to develop an abstract and “informal” aesthetic. The viewer feels the need to immerse himself/herself completely in the play of colors, so as to begin a journey into his/her own introspection and deepest emotions.

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Rosana Kossatz

Courage to see


Rosana Kossatz

Far beyond the stars


Rosana Kossatz

Infinite golden


Russell Pulford "The world is not to be put in order. The world is order. It is for us to put ourselves in unison with this order." (Henry Miller)

Russell Pulford is a British artist living in Australia. From 2015 he decided to devote himself completely to his passion for art, which led him to specialize in landscape painting of great visual impact. At the basis of this choice there is not a simple aesthetic research, but a higher ideal, which aspires to enhance the natural beauties that surround us, as they constitute a fragile and irreplaceable heritage. The care and respect for the environment is also at the center of the work presented by the artist for "Aldilà", entitled Nullabor Sunrise. The work, painted with acrylic, represents a natural, evocative and poetic scenario, of a splendid sunset that it extends over a desert territory. At the center of the composition, a road stands out, which unravels towards the horizon, and almost seems to invite the observer to follow it. The work, in fact, seems to have its own three-dimensionality, due to the color spread in a dense, material way, according to the criteria of the knife technique palette. Indeed, the artist's aim is to combine love for the environment with painting, and to use the universal language of art to reflect on the sensations of sublime serenity that the contemplation of nature brings. Furthermore, painting becomes an opportunity to discover nature itself in a different, more conscious and personal way: with every single shade of the grass, every cloud and every detail of the landscape, Russell first of all surprises himself for the harmony and uniqueness of the landscape which, stroke after stroke, takes shape on the canvas. The artist thus projects the essence of the beauty of the Earth into his works, creating not only a painting that represents nature, but an invitation to admire and protect it. An invitation that cannot be rejected.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Russell Pulford

Nullabor Sunrise


Russell Vanecek

Russell Vanecek is an American artist whose artistic production is closely linked with the love for nature, its shapes and colors. Russell Vanecek is once again the guest of an exhibition organized by the art gallery M.A.D.S. on the occasion of “Aldilà Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica” he exhibits two works, particularly rich from a chromatic, stylistic and communicative point of view. What is iconic in Vanecek's works is the ability to represent nature, and in particular, birds, in their essence avoiding any kind of superstructure or irrelevant details, are often represented with a shadow as in "Birds in Tree XI" , at other times, however, he represents them with a delicacy and purity devoid of any pretentiousness, as in "Finch in the Garden".


Russell Vanecek

Coherence is emblematic in both works, in “Birds in Tree XI” there are also contrasting textures that appear as a pattern, an element missing in “Finch in the Garden”. Russell Vanecek's works convey feelings of tranquility and peace, one feels immersed in an atmosphere placed outside the world, in which there are no needs of any kind. "The pleasure I derive from observing nature is the complexity of color and texture. Time, light of day, and seasons of the year adds to the experience. People, animals and birds living and moving in nature are part of my daily observations. These combinations are captured in my memory as fleeting images. " expresses the artist.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Russell Vanecek

Birds in Tree XI


Russell Vanecek

Finch in the Garden


Sadhana Sorin Dejust

“Dance with the waves, move with the sea. Let the rhythm of the water. Set your soul free.” (Christy Ann Martine)

A self-taught French artist, she makes abstractionism, almost impressionistic in its trait and in its material drafting, her distinctive mark. The titles of the works dictate a sign in the reading of the same, but leaving open to the viewer different interpretative windows and going to touch different emotional strings depending on the experience and life experiences of each of us. A dance made of brushes and colors, this is the impression you have in front of a canvas of Sadhana. The involvement is such that we can mentally enter the work and dance with the artist, but the music we feel is only ours, it resonates only in our minds. We are all connected, but each has its own instrument and as in a large orchestra the final harmony is amazing. The artist herself talking about her works tells us that music is the key to the creative process: "It propels me into other universes of emotions, memories and colours which I express on canvas. My pieces are a combination of abstraction, harmony and powerful feelings. My art is here to awaken and transfer someone into another dimension”. A colorful palette, with bright colors, oxygenated, ranging over the entire chromatic range, are traits of continuity in the three works on display. The sources of inspiration are the most disparate: her life as a woman, the landscapes of her life, travel are just a few examples. It could be summed up by saying that it is the emotions of a moment that remain imprinted and live in memory, the small moments of joy that enliven life, the beauties of creation to be in the broad sense protagonists together with the creative act itself, of her delicate and light works, which bring a smile in the eyes and heart of those who observe.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Sadhana Sorin Dejust

LIFE IN PINK


Sadhana Sorin Dejust

THE RIVER II


Sadhana Sorin Dejust

VOYAGE III


Samantha Beau “Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask and he will tell you the truth" (Oscar Wilde) "Carnivale” is an artwork produced by Australian artist Samantha Beau and inspired by a trip she made in Venice during the celebration of the carnival in 2019. The ability of the artist to capture emotions from her experiences is particularly evident in this 63.5 cm x 155cm oil on canvas. The artwork is composed by abstract figures for which Beau chooses bright colors such as pink, green, as well as yellow and blue. The colors help the viewer to unravel between the representation of her Venetian experience and to understand the reality she lived there. Although the figures are abstract, on the left there are two figures that remind me of Venetian masks, like the first is on the top left and reminds of the feathers some masks have. If all the figures in the artwork are clearly abstract, there is one on the right side that is not. The viewer can distinguish a female naked figure that Beau represented after having seen her in Venice. In fact, the artist attended a mask ball in which a naked woman was being painted. Beau’s talent resides in her mastery to first observe reality and then go a step beyond it, after having recollected it in her mind. The result of her Venetian experience is colorful, chaotic but at the same time clear. We can consider Beau’s artwork as a postcard, a now vintage object we all sent to our loved ones when we were traveling somewhere, as we wished they had been there with us. "Carnivale" reminds me of postcards: thanks to the artist’s expressivity the viewer is able to imagine not only the situation of Venice in those days, but also the colors, the sounds, the scents, the voices of the people abuzz. What "Carnivale" does is express excitement, the one I am sure Beau experienced on her skin.

Art Curator Irene Delaude


Samantha Beau

Carnivale


Sara Eckhardt

The painting presented on occasion of the international art exhibition by the artist Sara Eckhardt titled To be and become, it’s a melting pot of different elements and shapes, as if the artist wants to tell us about what she thinks and what she feels. As if the canvas was a tele where the worlds become figures and elements. Starting from the bottom a lot of elements represented the human body in different manifestations. We can see a decomposed body, in various meaningful elements like the brain, the heart and the skeleton. On the bottom of the composition a crouched man is portrayed during the sleep phase. These elements can remind us of the idea of life. As if the artist contemplated the idea of the life in a lot of manifestation and now wants to tell us about what she watched. Death, sleep, the heart that reminds the love and the brain to the intelligence. Every element that composed a normal life of a fellow. In the second part of the painting, an element seems to predominate on the others, and is the head of a man in which a child in an embryonic state is seen instead of the brain. This insert could mean that the idea of the birth regards not just the traditional meaning to come into life but also to the idea of to give a birth to an idea, to stay into the changing, into the becoming of the thing. As if the artist wants to tell us << I haven't finished being born yet>>. This is a great message that the artist Sara Eckhardt wants to leave us. As if this constantly changing concerned the true going beyond, into the Aldila.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Sara Eckhardt

To be and become


Sara Simmons “Nature is not a place to visit. It is home.” (Gary Snyder)

Nature speaks to us, sends messages that we must be able to grasp, teaches us how to live. Sara Simmons is a contemporary artist based in Georgia; since she was a child, she has lived in complete harmony with the world around her, so much so that it has become the main source from which she takes inspiration. Fabrics of different materials and patterns, second-hand objects are recycled by Sara to create unique pieces that can give personality to a wall by illuminating an entire room. "Snake in the Grass" was created in 2021. An unusual coat hanger is identified with a very particular work of art created through the union of several fabrics: different plots in which plants and fruits grow, lush green trees and a blue sky with flower shaped clouds create a fairy-tale landscape. Sara's works reflect her singular personality: sunny, surprising, and always ready to experiment. “Nature is not a place to visit. It is home” reads the quote from the famous American poet Gary Snyder. She fully agrees with him: nature is immense and free just like art is. Nature must be preserved and cared for, and art is like a seed that must be cultivated so that it can sprout and grow. For the artist, the creative process is a moment in which you must let yourself be guided by your own feelings without fear, you must listen to what thoughts and emotions suggest to us. Her unique and original style make her a recognizable artist among many others.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Sara Simmons

Snake in the Grass


Sarah Shinhyo Kim Sarah Shinhyo Kim is a Korean-American artist currently living and working in the United States. She studied Fine Arts at Cornell University and earned her BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design. After many years in the fashion industry, in 2014 Kim made the leap to becoming a full-time artist. As a way to explore human communication and relationships, Kim’s work focuses on the increasing popularization of ‘emoticon’ pop-imagery in the past decade. While these images, known colloquially as ‘emojis,’ are vehicles of individual emotional expression, their universal and semantically rich nature allows us to transcend cultural and linguistic barriers. Sarah says: “emojis act as vehicles of individual emotional expression, revealing a simplified, yet honest feeling about our everyday lives. Their universal and semantically rich nature allows us to transcend cultural and linguistic barriers, while at the same time reflect and comment on complex social issues.” Sarah Shinhyo Kim shows us all this through three works exhibited at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, located in Milan and Fuerteventura on the occasion of the “Aldilà" exhibition. The works are all created and formed by emojis, humanized smilies that express different emotions. It is interesting and amazing to notice how much precision and attention to detail is present in these works. Every small part is cured, nothing is left to chance. In particular, the two diptychs "Social Network" and "Microcosmos II" are particularly elaborate: at first glance it is not possible to distinguish the myriad of emojis that compose them, but at a careful observation they slowly emerge and the gaze is lost. The setting of these two works appears meticulous, just as the realization of the Pointillism’s works, pictorial movement born in France in 1870, but on the other hand the works contain a psychedelic component, approaching the psychedelic artists of the '60s. The work "Social Network" clearly shows the structure of socials: an infinite intrinsic network that connects billions of users, represented by emoji, each with a different expression and emotion, symbolizing the same way humans’ emotions. “Microcosmos II" instead is composed of multiple "worlds" symbolized by circles that contain a number of emojis, crossed by streams that make up this parallel universe created by the artist. The last work analyzed here - "Before the Pandemic" - is different from the others: it has a sculptural component, the emojis in fact are made through a malleable material and the connotations (eyes, mouth and eyebrows) are engraved. The various components are glued together, forming a perfect circle, almost to symbolize our world. Unlike the previous works that are in black and white, this presents three colors: beige, brown and nudepink, as if to symbolize the different shades of human skin. It is undoubtedly an inclusive and complex work at the same time. Is this our world now? Made of emotions expressed through a simple emoticon? Are feelings now reduced to this or is it simply a way to express themselves better within an "aseptic" channel that deprives us of expressing ourselves for what we are? Sarah Shinhyo Kim leads viewers to question and reflect on what our world is today, our "aldilà", a virtual world that tends to overcome the real, to shape itself to it, to become part of it almost absorbing it.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Sarah Shinhyo Kim

Before the Pandemic


Sarah Shinhyo Kim

Microcosmos II


Sarah Shinhyo Kim

Social Network


Seiko Tanaka

A multi-colored representation stands out in front of our eyes. Our eyes are magnetized by the compulsive rhythm of the figuration. We perceive a regular, solemn, faint breath; we feel the vital force that, energetic, flows in the color, in the lines, in the forms. Seiko Tanaka's painting is a hymn to the equality of living beings, a warning not to climb on the pedestal of human arrogance but to treat the different existences in the same way, comparing ourselves positively and placing ourselves on their same level. The spark of life envelops the whole world. In the flowing water, in the depths of the earth, in the ice of the Arctic. Life adapts, manages to survive even in the most inhospitable places: the wonder and splendor of the vital spark kisses every place on this earth. A riot of colors invites us to carefully observe the composition: the lines are soft and sinuous, there are no right angles in the world of Seiko. In nature, landscapes, inanimate objects and living beings are outlined by organic, gentle and curved shapes. Straight lines and angles are, in their formal essence, something reminiscent of the artificial, sort of man-made creations that we have forcibly inserted into the environment. The sharp profile of a mirrored skyscraper, the straight line dictated by the shape of a chimney that stands out in the silhouette of a city in the distance, the streets and our own homes are, on a formal level, elements that will never combine with the surrounding environment, that will never leave room for nature by promoting a symbiotic life. Seiko Tanaka knows this well and her works are completely absent of angles and straight lines. With our gaze, we follow and study a black and yellow outline that accompanies us and introduces us to the representation. Sinuous runs in the work and then branch out into thinner black lines that slowly identify and make recognizable the represented. Like elements of an impassable perimeter, these contour lines enclose within them a riot of colors formulated according to different textures and patterns. It almost seems to have to do with the typical patterns that characterize the fabric of kimonos and plaids. The reference to Japanese tradition is strong and evident. Silhouettes of chrysanthemum flowers rise from the vision and the golden seigaiha rises from an infinite blue backdrop. Each portion of the representation is depicted through a peculiar formal treatment and color scale, and yet, if we consider the composition as a whole, the whole is extremely organic and coherent. After getting lost in the preciousness of color and texture, the eye now lingers on the totality of what is depicted in Fuji-Uma: the call of two horse heads is deafening. Proud and brave, the two animals approach and meekly brush their long snouts. It is the meeting of two existences that produces new possibilities, new paths to follow. But let's observe again: the mane and the ears, the deep blue space and the outline form a figure with clear and delineated features. Mane as slopes, ears as peaks: before our eyes unfolds the representation of the sacred mountain and symbol of Japan: the great Mount Fuji that towers over men. "Humanimaliving®" by Seiko Tanaka is a hymn to the union of man with the animal world and the environment that surrounds him, it is a song to nature in the broadest sense of things. Every life, every glimmer of existence is here celebrated in a multicolored and multiform representation that makes nature its most powerful expressive force.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Seiko Tanaka

Fuji-Uma


Sergio Campolo We are not able to see anything that is really in front of our eyes. We see a man, only this. A full life, only this. Separated from death. But death itself is part of life, part of a journey. Billions of small or large details that our eyes, our consciousness and our awareness cannot perceive. Awareness cannot perceive. It is there, around the individual human being, from conception to the end of physical life, that something deeper, more profound, develops. We navigate through the distraction and noise that are the soundtrack of the everyday life of a chaotic society. We are like the children of a caring mother and an attentive father and so we let ourselves go in the warm, protective hands of today's world and protective hands of today's world, swept up in a delirious riot of futility, pain and relief. Birth, weaning, growth, ageing and death become complex journeys, influenced by something we often cannot define and control. We are constantly conditioned by what we fear most and accept least: death. The perception of the afterlife is the manipulation of the unknown, of what lies beyond the physical world, beyond what can be observed with the eye. Beyond what can be seen with the eye and frightens the heart. Only what could be defined as self-elevation, liberation from the limits of earthly awareness, would lead to a vision of the afterlife. Of earthly awareness, would lead to a clear vision of what we really have in front of us and what is around us. Everything is part of everything, everything composes and defines us. Life is death in the making, just as death can mark the beginning of a new life. Awareness will open the doors to the afterlife and set us free.

Art Curator Alice Scaffai


Sergio Campolo

The Weaning


Sharmaine Thérèsa Pretorius “The sun was sent backward.”

Sharmaine Thérèsa Pretorius is a South African artist who is divided between Oman and Bulgaria. The work exhibited by the artist, on the occasion of the exhibition organized by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery - “Aledilà - Beyond the Obvious - Hyperaesthesia Oneirica”, entitled “Time Epiphany” is fully part of those works that have a conceptual and avant-garde depth; the musical accompaniment of Opera From Scratch 2017 entitled "The Second Sight", creates an ethereal atmosphere, one of a kind, almost hypnotic. The central color of the work is purple with all its chromatic variations ranging from a purple more tending to pastel, to lilac, to a variation of blue. On a chromatic level, however, there are also different contaminations, some streaks of a color tending to gold that seem to represent light and the sun, accompanied by streaks of a gray-white color, similar to ivory. “Time Epiphany” seems to be a spiral, a vortex that contains within itself the light which, however, fights to reappear. There are many similarities with this work, the image recalls the representation of a clock and therefore time, but also that of an eye, and therefore attention and observation. “Time Epiphany” brings to mind pictorial techniques such as the pointillist one, immersed in a totally different reality, which is accompanied by an almost psychedelic approach. The sweetness of the piece to which it is accompanied brings the work back to something reflective and spiritual, one feels pervaded by a sense of peace and completeness, the observer captures, in this way, the essence of himself and of his soul.

Art Curator Martina Viesti


Sharmaine Thérèsa Pretorius

Time Epiphany


Shiri Binn

Shiri Binn, an Israeli artist, is gaining attention in her country art scene with her modern paintings that span a wide variety of artistic techniques, including oil paintings, drizzle and motion effects, portraying both people and diverse imagery and scenes. She has a unique way of transforming real life-like images into surreal pieces of abstract art in a style that is distinctively her own. At “ALDILA’” exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Shiri Binn presents three pieces.“Minstrel” is composed of a series of chromatic trails of different soft colors that give life to human figures, animals and musical instruments. They are players whose sacred music seems to catapult them into another dream dimension made of colors and sinuous shapes that Shiri is skilfully able to represent. A dove is depicted in the upper part of the painting, giving not only further movement to the scene but also an intense sacredness. “The Flood” is instead an abstract and profound work. It is the representation of the vision of a glass seen from the inside of a warm apartment while outside there is a storm that draws on it lines and shapes that, mixing with the colors of hectic life, give life to lively mixtures of colors but at the same extremely peaceful. The same skilful mixture of colors, which is a constant in Shiri's works, returns in “The Look”, the representation of a colored profile of a human face, from which two large white and deep eyes emerge. The artist says that only after painting this so spontaneously she realized that she painted her own eyes, her big emotional eyes. Growing up she kept all her thoughts and feelings inside as if she had no mouth to speak. She got used to being in the closet so scared of coming out and letting her religious family down, until today. This painting therefore is about her secret and silence, putting what's behind those eyes out there.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Shiri Binn

Minstrel


Shiri Binn

The Flood


Shiri Binn

The Look


Snjezana Cirkovic

Snjezana Cirkovic is an artist who, while remaining within the realm of abstract art, likes to experiment with different techniques, each time searching for the most suitable one to express her vision of the world and her deepest feelings. Having created her works using a wide variety of media, from brushes to palette knives and rulers, she is currently exploring the technique of fluid art, which she uses to convey the idea of the fluidity of emotions and thoughts. According to Snjezana, just as in the fluid art technique the colours flow freely on the canvas, combining with each other in an unpredictable way and without limits or contours, so too our moods should flow freely without boundaries or limits of any kind. The choice of this type of technique constitutes a turning point for her towards even greater attention to her own interiority. Indeed, fluid art is a technique in which the artist's control over the work is somewhat limited. It is possible to direct the colour by moving and rotating the canvas, but the final result cannot be fully predicted. Thus, its use prompts Snjezana to loosen her self-control and let herself be guided by her deepest emotions. Let it be, the work she is presenting for this exhibition, is part of the Let it flow series, which is made entirely with the technique of fluid art. Through a selection of deep, dark tones, intended to symbolise the contrasts that dominate the artist's soul, the work explores the darkness that inhabits it. This way Snjezana embraces the theme of the exhibition Aldilà, which aims to explore "the other side of things, situations, places". The other side that the artist intends to reach with her work is that of the rebirth that follows change. It is a place that is reached by overcoming an obstacle and that leads to the abandonment of a previous situation and the beginning of a new adventure.

Art Curator Marta Graziano


Snjezana Cirkovic

Let it be


Soho Swan “Creativity takes courage.” (Henri Matisse)

To dare, to show one's personality without fear, to propose alternative art: all this is Soho Swan, an artist of Latvian origin who currently lives between Italy and Latvia. She loves to experiment with different creative processes, but lately she is focusing on digital and video art. In BLACK MOON (2021) the protagonists are four coloured wolves standing out from a dark background. Legend has it that the moon fell in love with this animal so much that before returning to the galaxy it decided to steal its shadow: since then, the wolf howls at the moon, in this case the black moon, to claim what it has been deprived of. MEDUSA and NOSTALGIA are two videos create in 2021 that make the viewer understand the passion that binds the artist to Greek mythology. The first work, as the title itself says, represents Medusa: she was one of the three Gorgons and the only one not to be immortal. She has a monstrous appearance, snakes and boar tusks surround her head; her gaze petrifies anyone who looks at her. In the work there is a strong and at the same time pleasant chromatic contrast given by the combination of orange and grey with black. NOSTALGIA is a short black and white video featuring a mermaid: long, loose hair, curvy shapes, and a large fin. A rose placed on the staircase, several butterflies fluttering around her create a fairy-tale atmosphere. Soho Swan through her works tells a story through which she invites us to go in search of meanings by giving a personal interpretation of what we see: thoughts, reflections and emotions come together, giving viewers a unique experience.

Art Curator Camilla Gilardi


Soho Swan

BLACK MOON


Soho Swan

MEDUSA


Soho Swan

NOSTALGIA


Somi Hu “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. I try to act in that gap between the two.” (Robert Rauschenberg)

There are artists who try to occupy a middle ground between art and life, producing permanent works which make reference to change and Somi Hu is one of them. Born in Tehran, Somi Hu left her homeland because of the troubled Iranian political situation, migrating in a European country where she now lives as a refugee. She moves between art and life, and her works act as a bridge between the two. “Sometimes by drawing about different social things I want to be the sound of silence people who needs to be see or hear”, she says. What she reveals in her works comes from her personal experiences and knowledge. The passage of these experiences and knowledge from her inner self to the canvas links her to the surrounding society, thus connecting her experiences to those of the others. Such passage makes Somi Hu’s experiences fixed stories that can be read as they appear or reinterpreted by the viewer. A huge part of her works is dedicated to women and girls: “Afghan girl” and “Women and sprite of the nature” are two beautiful examples. With a photorealistic style, the paintings are not just mere reproductions of what a camera could record. In this paintings, there are Somi Hu’s experiences and knowledge about what it means being a woman and living in a country ruled by a dictator. In the first painting, a beautiful young girl with a red hijab is portrayed; her expression is more than sad: she is worried, panicked, and in pain as women life in Afghanistan is anything but easy. Rebirth and hope are the keywords of the second painting; here, a beautiful woman with an orange sleeveless dress and beautiful flowers on her hair is portrayed. Her gaze is not sad anymore as she becomes the spokesperson that women can be “happy, kind and motivated from within the heart even in the worst situation”. “Dalí and flying out of the time” leaves women and troubled countries to be a eulogy of the great painter Salvador Dalí. The bizarre Dalí’s face breaks the bright yellow background and looks straight in the eyes of the viewer. With this painting, Somi Hu wants to show that great art and great artists do not belong to a single epoch and time, because they are ageless. As Somi Hu says, “they reincarnated and recreated time after time and they can be feel deeply by people who grasp and love them”.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Somi Hu

Afghan girl


Somi Hu

Dalí and flying out of the time


Somi Hu

Women and sprite of the nature


Sonakshi & Disha “The moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease for ever to be able to do it.” (J. M. Barrie)

Sonakshi and Disha Chaurasiya are two artist sisters living in India. Love for art has been strong in Sonakshi since childhood, however it was during a moment of deep personal upheaval that painting actively entered her life, easing the inner anguish she was facing. Art gave Sonakshi a new energy, prompting her to found MediARTation. During the period of the pandemic, Sonakshi also approached his sister Disha to art. Both shared a communion of the ideals of art, understood as meditation and serenity, and of a fervent imagination, in constant movement. The sister relationship between Sonakshi and Disha thus also translates into a fascinating and solid creative partnership, which however does not neglect an accurate technical expertise. Their art, in fact, is open to continuous experimentation with pictorial means, styles and techniques, which has led the two sistersartists to create works of poignant poetry and beauty. Sonakshi & Disha in their art privilege the representations of nature in its multiform splendor, but without limiting themselves to a simple "reproduction" of reality, but taking the opportunity of the inspiration given by beautiful landscapes to contemplate them through a personal filter. The work The birth of a Mystery depicts a romantic moonlight landscape, surrounded by a dark starry vault. The painting - executed with acrylic according to the palette knife technique - summarizes the nature of shooting stars in a fabulous key, explaining their mysterious end with the birth of magical and ancient creatures, the sirens. The eye falls on the central figure, which "comes to life" at the touch of a star breaking on the mirrored surface of the sea. The artists thus combine the contemplation of nature with childhood memories, and project the viewer into a world of sublime delicacy and grace, to be embraced without prejudice and indeed to participate. Sonakshi and Disha thus succeed in giving shape and color to a rarefied and intangible universe, and the observer seems to perceive in it a reflection of a unique inner beauty, which may still have much to teach others.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Sonakshi & Disha

The birth of a Mystery


Stanislav Valevski “The object of art is not to reproduce reality, but to create a reality of the same intensity.” (Alberto Giacometti)

Stanislav Valevski is an emerging abstract artist with great creativity. His artworks are as concise as they are original and evocative. Using just a few elements and bright, bold colours, he creates works with a very personal style. He channels various artistic genres into his canvases, primarily abstractionism and expressionism. He starts with feelings and emotions and translates them into masterpieces. Stanislav often plays on the visual contrast between calm, tranquillity and disruptive emotion that breaks the quiet. This mix of sensations is translated into colour and the end result is stunning, evocative. The element that makes his canvases unique is a technical feature: a thin transparent layer of oil paint covers each of his works, giving them an original, gentle and elegant texture. This extremely important element predisposes the viewer's soul to contact with the work of art and prepares him to establish a very intimate and revealing relationship with it. In 'Tria contrari' the contrast is also recalled in the title. The background is dominated by a blue tending to green that evenly covers the entire surface of the canvas. The brushstrokes are laid horizontally, often overlapping, creating veils and a special effect. This colour shade instils peace and tranquillity and predisposes the viewer to listen and reflect. As do the delicate, sinuous brushstrokes that fill the space. Stanislav breaks the wall of calm with three dynamic, bursting brushstrokes that resize everything, break the balance and create new ones. Three minimalist lines of intense orange meet on the canvas in a clear and decisive manner. This is the artist's typical contrast. The reference to the number 'three' is also evident in the title. It is a number that has always been a symbol of perfection, completeness and balance. The oil colour allows us to create different textures and to give different intensities to the colour, which can be more defined and full, or veiled. Also interesting is the intentionally ill-defined white stain in the lower part of the work, which again breaks the quiet pattern but in a less clear-cut manner, decidedly softer and more sinuous. Stanislav is certainly inspired by minimalism but also by the colour fields typical of more contemporary artists such as Rothko. Colour-field painting" is here revisited in a modern and personal way by the artist. Colour is freed from any figurative construction, becoming an expression of acute, almost mystical sensitivity. Luminous surfaces and strong colours outline a complex play of veils and a wealth of tonal passages. The painting is therefore a pulsating, lively and metaphorical whole that invites us to lose ourselves and contemplate the nature of the human being. The viewer inevitably feels involved, almost as if the work reflected his current state of emotional precariousness. Colour is the protagonist of Stanislav's artworks and it is exciting how such a primordial element can touch the deepest chords of the human soul.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Stanislav Valevski

Tria Contrari


Stephanie Lampres "The appearance of natural forms changes while reality remains constant." (Piet Mondrian)

One of the various evolutions of abstract art is the synthesis of the forms of nature into real geometric figures used by the artists of the early 1900s using color directly on the canvas as if it happened spontaneously. This type of art called geometric abstractionism characterizes this painting by the contemporary artist Stephanie Lampres which recalls the works of the famous artist Piet Mondrian to whom we owe the worldwide development of this current. In Stephanie's works we find traces of abstract art in every shape and the way in which her figures and her subjects are broken down and then reproduced in a totally new way is very fascinating. The use of pastel colors is in contrast with the geometric lines and this gives the work a magnetic aspect with an intrinsic meaning. During the first experiments of geometric abstraction many artists started from the decomposition of naturalistic objects to arrive at their representation purely in the form of lines and colors, the artist Stephanie Lampres made this concept her own in the most total way, overcoming the concept of decomposition, but arriving immediately to the abstract representation of a subject that arouses deep emotions and a sense of peace. In her avant-garde vision, Stephanie is able to see beyond the simple form of things, representing them through their intrinsic form and their inner nature.

Art Curator Letizia Perrieri


Stephanie Lampres

Window seat


Stephen Linhart “The path to paradise begins in hell.” (Dante Alighieri)

A-temporal fusions of surreal imagery. Female bodies embedded in an ephemeral beauty where light and shadow share space, fighting incessantly. Semi-transparent veils that, one on top of the other, prevent a clear and limpid vision. Stephen Linhart, a contemporary American artist, uses the medium of photography to achieve a distant, almost evanescent reality, superimposing different dimensions on each other and thus describing impossible and irrational worlds. In most of his works, we encounter an aesthetic that communicates disturbance and anguish, in a spasmodic search for a stability and calm that are almost impossible to achieve. Nature and its elements are also a recurring theme in his works, reminding us each time that, deep down, we are part of it and we could not exist without it. The female figure, constantly present, contributes to enriching this vision. Indeed, the woman-nature archetype has an ancient origin. The female figure has always been associated with Mother Nature as the generator of life.


Stephen Linhart

The cycle of life-death-rebirth is analyzed by the artist from a romantic point of view, where man, powerless in front of the immensity of Nature, cannot do anything but remain at the same time fascinated and horrified. In "Thicket", one of the artworks presented on the occasion of the "ALDILÀ" exhibition at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, what appears to be an underwater setting, merges with a dense network of plants that envelop the entire vision. On the surface, light filters through the branches, while at the base of the work, a female body can be glimpsed lying on its side. It seems to be wrapped in flames, afraid, sad and suffering. The anguish that pervades these works is a warning not to forget the source of everything. Not to forget that, in order to see the light, we often have to sink our roots into the deepest darkness.

Art Curator Francesca Brunello


Stephen Linhart

Artifact


Stephen Linhart

Escapade


Stephen Linhart

Inanna


Stephen Linhart

Night moves


Stephen Linhart

Sending them back


Stephen Linhart

Sky trees


Stephen Linhart

Snow fairie


Stephen Linhart

Stray from the path


Stephen Linhart

The land


Stephen Linhart

Thicket


Subok Kim <<Just as branches grow gnarled and tangled, and just as diverse plants grow in one place, so do humans>>

Kim Subok joins M.A.D.S. Art Gallery during the ‘ALIDLÀ’ exhibition with three paintings that, in their appearance, seem to be similar but that hide some differences, starting from their seasonal references. All the three relate to Nature and its harmonious essence, but << no two trees in the forest are identical. Each differs in its shape and size. Some are straight, some bent. Some are glorious, others simple, even meager. Yet nothing in the forest vaunts itself or shows off, nor does it lose heart and feel small. Each is different, but that is no fault. Every entity in the forest is seen as equal and precious>>. Close to the artistic technique of pointillism and the divisionism, Kim gives birth to harmonious paintings that perfectly describe the season they refer to. The use of colours in these pieces is fundamental to give importance to the feelings and the emotions that each dot and point composing the whole, cause. What is important, looking at these paintings, is to catch the deep meaning hidden beyond the colourful coat that is what immediately stands out by looking at the canvas – that is, the human world, the infinite world. The little open spaces here and there on the scene, show a little surface of what the forest, representing the cosmos, covers. The choice of the artist to not represent in detail the surface and the leaves of the crude trees, highlights the aim to draw out memories with the object and to render them through overlaying of line and plane with a habitual, abstract touch. With this technique, the artist has chosen to arrive to the viewers’ conception of what he sees, letting him achieve a sort of catharsis that wells up from deep within the heart.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Subok Kim

Harmony of Nature


Subok Kim

Forest of Winter


Subok Kim

Harmony of Nature II


SurrealArtSuomi “I love to push my viewers in a certain direction though with added poetry, but still plenty of room for the mind to explore” (SurrealArtSuomi)

SurrealArtSuomi (Martin) is an emergent photographer who has started photography about one year ago. Using programs on his computer to explore the possibilities in creativity, he loves to create surreal images and let the photo's tell their own story instead of him, due to the fact that different people see different things in the abstract/surreal creations. At “ALDILA’” exhibition hosted by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, SurrealArtSuomi presents two photographs. "Diffusion" portrays a play of light and shadow that allows a glimpse of a person's profile seen from above. The light, which is configured in long strips, covers his/her body, almost as if they were drops of rain that run down his/her skin. With this photographic expedient with an abstract result, SurrealArtSuomi lets our imagination complete who the person in front of us is, whether he is a man or a woman, his/her identity, and what kind of person he/she can be. But there is not, deliberately, a single answer.


SurrealArtSuomi

“White pillars” instead portrays a wooded landscape that seems to be captured while the photographer runs. The horizontality of the figures filmed "on the run" contrasts with the thin slender trees, which, sinuous, stretch to touch the sky. This photographic expedient makes the viewer feel a strong sense of movement, as if he was inside the work, in a sometimes dark landscape that we are unable to place geographically. The intent of SurrealArt Suomi then is precisely this: to impress on the photographic paper elements that we can recognize, but always leaving them undefined, so that our imagination can conclude the story we have in front of us and fill it with images that are part of the our experience. The result is always different for each of us.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


SurrealArtSuomi

Diffusion


SurrealArtSuomi

White pillars


Susy Danelon “Wanting to be play-full with my themes, I incorporate many fun different elements to tell a story giving the viewer the opportunity to let their own imagination go wild, like a memory of a fun dream.” says Susy Danelon, Canadian artist who has been painting since she was a little girl. Her works remind us, with due differences, those of the Surrealists, in particular those of Juan Miró, because they too let their works be free and they accepted within their paintings every aspect of the irrational and the unconscious: from dream to magic, from the game to the absurd. So, in the "BREAKING FREE" series, Susy Danelon takes her Rhode Island Chickens as her starting inspiration, but then lets her creativity and her strong imagination flow autonomously, and so the canvas is populated with figures and fantastic objects, partly zoomorphic, partly geometric. Everything, or almost everything, is familiar, though transfigured, and the bright and playful colors add a touch of cheerfulness to the compositions, arousing positive feelings in the viewers. The artist wisely uses childish traits, in a certain sense primitive, and rejects all sorts of perspective layout. In all three works under examination, in fact, there is no proportion between objects, buildings and animals, there is no real point of escape, there is no hierarchy between center and edges, but everything mixes into a confusion that is only apparent. All this is the result of a conscious choice by Susy Danelon; "I paint to feel moved myself, but I want to move people too.", she says, and in fact the final result of her works is of innocent and vital happiness that undoubtedly moves the soul of those who are in front of her works. To say precisely what Susy Danelon’s paintings represent is almost impossible; this, however, does not mean that they have no meaning. They are, in fact, the result of multiple factors: "My work is personal, I search for my inner inspiration when I paint, I pour what I feel, it is a subconscious journey between my life experiences, my body and surrounding energy.”. The titles chosen by the artist help a little bit to reveal their secrets, but they are very evocative and enigmatic too. They do not explain what we are looking at, but invite us to look more closely at the works, invite us to go beyond the first impression, aldilà the first impression.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Susy Danelon

Enjoying the View From Here


Susy Danelon

Gestationary Orbit


Susy Danelon

Lift up


Suzanne Harkhoe

Suzanne Harkhoe is a Dutch Surinamese conceptual artist and technologist active in installation, painting in mixed media, technology based art, sculpture, photography and film. Her dystopian world view towards contemporary society is born out of her belief in equality and freedom: being an artist who identifies with marxist critique of political society, her anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist sentiment is enforced by her identity is reflected in her works of protest and diaspora art. At "ALDILA’ "exhibition, Suzanne presents" The Summer of Liberation Prevails ", a pictorial work with a strong socio-political intent. Figures almost dehumanized due to their extreme figurative synthesis alternate with each other in a fight, looking like dancers in a tribal dance. Almost haunted, they scream and raise their arms to the sky, twist around each other, especially those in the background, releasing violence, despair and a lot of strength - you can almost hear their screams. Identifying with the Marxist critique of society, vital for understanding this current moment in which we witness the dehumanization of oppressed groups, this work is therefore inherently anti-capitalist and signifies the first stage of revolution in which both imperialism and capitalism need to be dismantled. As a part of the Surinam diaspora living in western Europe, the duplicity of living in the country that had colonized Suzanne’s native land is an element in her work. Her personal social reality is shaped by social structures that limit her freedom and the racism, patriarchy and ecocide they enable and enforce. She looks into the neoliberal plague and how social resistance arises despite of physical social distance, highlighting sovereignty of all the people and our innate equality that is not reflected by the dominant political system - the urgency of life cannot be sustained by a profit-based economy. It reassesses geopolitics, as the destructive role of imperial countries is showcased.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Suzanne Harkhoe

The Summer of Liberation Prevails


Svetlana Miettinen/Arts Of Me

“Quantum Art”, this is what the artist Svetlana Miettinen calls her artistic technique. Into her paintings, her emotions and her feelings are the main subjects and the elements that animate the scenes. What is important for the artist herself, is to reach the viewer's soul and to keep alive her passion in the others. Soft coloured and with no outlines, the paintings presented at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery both represent a harmonious and delicate scene that touches the whole society, also representing the same message. “A Dream” refers to the artist’s desire to give birth to a new and vibrant world, in which everybody is the creator. A new planet, represented by the green and deep purple spots of colours on the low right corner of the canvas, made up of radiant energy coming from the people living on it. The female face emerging from the Earth is the humans’ subconscious taking energy from the rays of sunshine filling up the surroundings. Svetlana’s aim to concentrate all the attention to the subjects of the scene represented, as well as its meaning, is visible through the use of a soft and almost invisible background that permits the single elements to stand out, capturing the viewers’ gaze.


Svetlana Miettinen/Arts Of Me

Similar to a fairy tale, “We Are Waiting For You” is the reflection of the universe. If in “A Dream” we have seen an earthly dream, in this blue piece the artist expresses almost the same concept moving the attention to the aquatic world. The female figure on the right side of the canvas represents a mermaid staring at the viewers to call them to follow her. In fact, as the artist herself affirms: <<They are waiting for me, and the planet Earth to join a new community of free creatures>> this painting is an invitation to create a new world, free from the current restrictions and social distances, but in which we are closer. The soft but vivid colours used in this painting and the dynamicity created by the fluid brushstrokes, bring the viewers’ looks to the big spiral representing the Earth, the new world.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Svetlana Miettinen/Arts Of Me

A Dream


Svetlana Miettinen/Arts Of Me

We Are WaitingFor You


Sylvia Martina Malikova

The fluid art of Sylvia Martina Malikova is an art with almost endless results, because despite the repetitiveness of the technique - the absolute variability of the colors used, their different consistency, their way of being laid on the canvas, make the works real labyrinths of colors within which it is allowed that each of us imagine what he wants. The artist of Slovak origins, resident in the Czech Republic, engaged in consulting in the field of economics and industry, author of the book series "Man in Five Elements", paints with passion and inspiration for 20 years, with the aim of making works that create a healthy living space in the places where they are hung. “My goal is for my paintings to create harmony in the space where people live or work. They are to be caressed for the soul.”, says Sylvia Martina Malikova, and she adds: “I believe that my paintings have a positive effect on the environment in which they are located, thanks to the harmonious combination of not only individual colors, but also shapes.”.


Sylvia Martina Malikova

In "Bronz" the combinations of warm and cold colors and the way in which the artist manages to mix them, make the viewer feel cuddled by them, he feels attracted to the canvas, cradled by it. It’s like watching a spell. In "Metamorfosys Tokio", instead, the colors and shapes are stronger, and in this case the artist seems to entice the viewer to dynamism, to action. Metamorphosis, on the other hand, always imply a transformation, and transformations are always necessary but violent acts. Sylvia proves to be a capable and talented artist, but above all proves to be an artist who has understood the power of art and its ability to carry viewers aldilà, beyond.

Art Curator Francesca Catarinicchia


Sylvia Martina Malikova

Bronz


Sylvia Martina Malikova

Metamorfosys Tokio


Sylvia Rossouw

Did it ever happen to you to meet a person and immediately feel everything in him/her/their is too much? Too passionate, too lively, too joyful, too fond of life, a volcano of energy, words, thoughts, ideas and feelings. Sylvia Rossouw is such a volcano. In Rossouw's art, it is impossible to separate her professional and creative practices as an architect and as an artist because they have an osmotic relationship, a reciprocal influence on each other. Her artistic passions and inspirations go beyond the contemporary world. Rossouw’s works, in fact, appear as a bridge between the past, present and future, an eternal bridge that connects the artist’ feelings and emotions to those of the collective. The ancient world is what interests her: the ritual, the sanctuary, the wisdom, the sacred, the relic, the ruin and the abandoned draw Rossouw emotionally. A connection is created that is translated in visual language, wishing to open a portal of emotions and feelings toward the viewers. “Cleopatra, hold your breath” is the title of the series of paintings that Rossouw presents in the Aldilà exhibition. Five paintings with different but linked stories, five paintings in which Rossouw questions the relevance of a place, a specific place in a specific time, in revealing a person’s identity. By grounding her works in her personal experience, Rossouw is in search of a possible collective truth about how the connection to a place can inform what is remembered and what is forgotten, thus starting a never-ending dialogue with the viewer. The mixing technique is what grasps the attention: bright and opaque colours counteract paperback romances and prints. Here, the juxtaposition of speed and slowness is stronger than ever and creates beautiful visual tensions between the dynamicity of colours and architectural shapes and the stillness of old sheets, to which Rossouw gives a new life. The composition of the five paintings recalls architectural proportions. You can see the mapping of houses and neighborhoods, the layering of big skyscrapers and a wall, whose pattern recalls a postcard, saying “My sky is bright”. Rossouw’s works are honest and sincere, simple and complex, energetic and passionate, dynamic and static. They are maps that interwoven her personal experiences with those of the others.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Sylvia Rossouw

A leopard in the den


Sylvia Rossouw

Part 1: Weaving and mapping_the past


Sylvia Rossouw

Part 2: Weaving and mapping_the future


Sylvia Rossouw

Postcard: No doubt


Sylvia Rossouw

Standing on the shoulders of giants


Taija Mantyla Taija Mantyla is a Finnish artist who stands out for her particular technique in which the abstract plays with the images. Her works in fact are apparently abstract, created by colors, signs and light but as soon as you approach and you stay to admire her works you can slowly discover the countless characters that emerge from the stains of color. Taija’s works are a journey to the rediscovery of imagination, magic and fantasy that brings out the lightness of youth. Taija Mantyla through her works manages to revive the spectators those joys that only childhood could give. Two examples are the works on display at M.A.D.S. art gallery during the event "Aldilà". Entitled "Behind curtains" and "Through holes", the two works with vertical compositions are made of acrylic on canvas. As often happens, Taija is carried away by the colors, is guided by them and their strength to reveal what is behind, precisely “beyond" just like the meaning of the exhibition’s title. The first work examined here is "Behind curtains": it presents purple as the dominant color alternated by yellow and white.


Taija Mantyla The artist creates messy brushstrokes, dictated by the immediacy and spontaneity that hide behind them faces and eyes all to be discovered. There are in fact many characters who hide among the colors as if they are the soul of the canvas, the feeling is just that these characters try to get out of the canvas, from their “home” and their colors. The canvas thus comes to life and becomes a small world of people and animals. The second work, "Through holes" is more complicated. Here dominates the red that is broken by the brushstrokes of yellow, which thus illuminates the canvas. Here too, the immediacy of the brushstrokes conveys a strong energetic charge. They create circles, holes in fact, as the title says. These holes seem to contain worlds, as if they were magical passages that lead to different realities. In this sense the artist completely embraces the theme of the exhibition and shows how reality is not only what we see but there is so much to discover around us. Taija teaches spectators to go outside the box, to follow their instincts and to give free rein to creativity.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Taija Mantyla

Behind curtains


Taija Mantyla

Through hole


Taiki Hori "I like the rule that corrects emotion. I like the emotion that corrects the rule." (Georges Braque) The artistic movement of Cubism develops at the beginning of the twentieth century, which sees its full realization shortly before the First World War in 1912. The main characteristic of this movement, which was completely different from other artistic currents from the very first moment, is the particular way in which the subjects are broken down in their original form and reproduced by the artists on the basis of total reality and in a totally analytical way. The artist Taiki Hori follows this current by introducing it perfectly into the world of contemporary art by experimenting with shapes and colors, showing subjects of strong visual impact while maintaining neutral backgrounds and flat colors. The use of color and the way to manage it by palying with shades, are very similar with the paintings of the famous George Braque who coined the term "cubism" in 1907 in honor of an exhibition of him. Thanks to his particular style Taiki Hori manages to show what lies beyond the superficial image of his subjects, from the distorted faces of the people with very deep expressions to the horse that is like the famous horse of "Guenrica" by Pablo Picasso. The way of making it and the stroke are very similar to the Spanish artist's horse, even if in a concretely different way we can see a similarity in the artistic styles, which makes Taiki Hori a true cubist painter. The inner beauty contained in the subjects represented by the artist emerges in the mastery of the use of colors and the precision of shades. The hidden world that Taiki Hori gives us is a teaching of beauty above all canons.

Art Curator Letizia Perrieri


Taiki Hori

Straight facer


Taiki Hori

Puzzled face


Taiki Hori

Horse


Taru Rouhiainen

Around the great mysteries of life there has always been a high demand of meaning and clarity. Fear and curiosity deeply influence our approach to the Unknown so we usually tend to forget the beauty of the Untold and of the personal discovery. Abstract artist Taru Rouhiainen does not believe in depriving her Art of its mysteriousness by over explaining it: confident of the power of her vibrant colours on the canvas as well as of the intuitive minds of the viewers, the artist builds the basis for a spontaneous dialogue between the two by constantly renovating her approach to painting and colourful opposition. Focusing herself on the playfulness and unpredictability of the daily practice, Taru approaches the creative medium with a spiritual enlightenment. At the “ALDILÀ” exhibition, held by M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, the abstract artist presents “Swirl of Warmth”, an acrylic on linen canvas: the title explicitly refers to the texture and to the warmth touch of red upon green and blue paint. In fact the artwork stands out for its stark dichotomy of cold and warm shades. This particular juxtaposition of colours is symbolic and significative to Taru's creative process: “I love turquoise and various shades of red and I like contrast so I chose those colours for this work. I love the impact of warm red with the green and turquoise. I see a character rising up above the existing reality to a place where dreams are made true.” The powerful and dynamic composition is furtherly enhanced by the hypnotic and circular brushstrokes on the canvas. The soft and curved brushstrokes remind of Georgia O'Keeffe's elegant approach to abstract subjects, which ultimately conveyed a sense of mystery in an ethereal, colourful dance of opposite shades. In a similar way Taru's artwork is a gateway to another dimension, it captures a warm rebirth, the forceful emerging of red from turquoise. Purposely painting with red, a colour often associated to passion and love, but also a symbol of life and danger, over blue, a more calming and serene shade, Taru frames a peculiar opposition of meanings, a metamorphosis in the making: “We can always arise from the situations in our life and go to a magical place where everything is possible. We can manifest the things we long for into our lives if we are in the right state of mind.” With this message, the artist encourages the viewers to let go of their convictions and troubles and, instead, to trust and open themselves to the ever-changing nature of reality. “Swirl of Warmth” is a celebration of life in its purest form, a dynamic evolution of texture, perspective and feelings which constantly change in form, consistency and meaning to elevate us to a better, more profound understanding of the outer and inner self.

Art Curator Flavia Montecchi


Taru Rouhiainen

Swirl of Warmth


Tatiana Leclerc

If we consider the action painting, we can find some peculiarities to give meaning to Ana Tatiana Leclerc’s painting. It is easy to try to intend this picture as a certificate of presence, where the subject of the ontological speech chooses the figurative language to escape and self-assert itself. It stands out on a dark backdrop with beams of light and strong colours. A series of black marks on the bottom seem to intertwine in a melting pot of strong actions to underlie the other marks, more singular, made by bright and lively colours. A game of contrasts of shades that do not choose a gradation to emerge, but stand out to underline the violence of the gesture in the figurative construction of the picture. It is the abstract expressionist logic that tries to evoke a singularity, a subject, which now, with the mark, in the composition, becomes an allegory of an emotional state. A post-expressive research, where the unconscious comes out by the vision, for try to understand itself. This means that the artist’s will to assert himself, as a perceptive instance, a presence that exists and reacts to otherness in all its possible manifestations. If we want to use an expression to describe this concept, it is like to say after waking up: <<I do not remember much about the dream, but i could say that I was there too>>.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Tatiana Leclerc

A window on life


Teresa Ciaramella Italian artist Teresa Ciaramella was born and raised in the province of Benevento. After more than a decade of artistic inactivity she resumed painting as a free personal expression, in the pure tangible transcription of her own inner world. Her style is free, out of the box, out of any kind of label. She ranges from black and white bodies to colored bodies, from portraits to conceptual abstracts. On the occasion of the exhibition "Aldilà" Teresa presents at M.A.D.S. Art Gallery two works entitled "FEEL" and "STREGA". Two works with a strong emotional charge. What characterizes Teresa’s art is precisely the strength of her brushstrokes that transmit a great energy. In the case of the mixed media work "FEEL", black and white clashes with a yellow flou that creates vibrations. A face emerges from the darkness, the gaze is fixed on the spectators and hypnotizes them. Stylistically, the artist combines figurative elements with improvised elements, dictated by instinct. This duality allows the viewers to be carried away by random brushstrokes and to focus on the deep and dark gaze of the subject. The same dualism is perceptible in the work "STREGA" which is instead a tribute to the native land of the artist, Campania, a region of Italy.


Teresa Ciaramella

The title is literally translated into "witch" and represents the legend according to which the witches sprinkled their naked bodies with oil before making their witches. Teresa Ciaramella wants to pay homage to these women and their wisdom, exorcise the cliché that witches were evil and therefore exalt and celebrate them.The work represents in fact a naked body seen in profile. The body is inserted in a magical context: numerous brushstrokes of different colors cross the canvas and blend with the white body. The bright and fluorescent colours are reminiscent of the psychedelic artists of the 1960s and in a certain sense also of Ernst Kirchner, but the speed and dynamism undoubtedly refer to the French photographer Dani Olivier and his luminous artistic nudes. The works of Teresa Ciaramella excite and transport souls to the rediscovery of the past and of their own self.

Art Curator Giorgia Massari


Teresa Ciaramella

FEEL


Teresa Ciaramella

STREGA


Terhi Mänty On the occasion of the international art exhibition Aldila the artist Terhi Mänty presents the artwork called Frozen. To understand her language could be useful starting from the colours used. They seem to be involved in creating a game of shape and sheds. The colours that seem to be more defined in the edges reach the central part of the design to blend, perhaps moving towards a new monochrome. As if the artist's intent was to discover a new form, a new colour. The brush seems to rise in the cracks in the background, the chromatic blanket stretches and contracts as if it was a stretched sheet moved by the wind. This movement creates visual dynamism in the composition, the curves in which the colour creeps create an energetic force that communicates with the visitor to capture his gaze so that he discovers the moment of stillness, of peace. To understand where his instinct for painting and the need for figurative language begins, we should consider tohis considerations: << My paintings are based on a frequent feeling or perceived moment in life with a desire I want to bring out. Therefore, each work has a story behind. I enjoy the freedom in painting. There are no rules. Only the feelings with the colors.>>. This means that the artist starts from contact with natural elements to translate this contact into the shapes and colours used in the composition. So a few simple elements are enough and the artist can be said to be able to give them back a great evocative power, achievable in the gesture behind the colours. This practice also exists behind the poetic gesture. To start from an element and translating the suggestion that it causes into words, like it happened into the figurative composition. Frozen is therefore nothing more than the result of these suggestions caused by watching the things of life and trying to translate them into an image on the canvas.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Terhi Mänty

Frozen


Terry Baker

Terry Baker is an artist and photographer who, through a combination of both disciplines, produces digital artwork influenced by recent concepts in physics and astronomy but mostly by the School of Surrealism - Max Ernst, Salvador Dali and Yves Tanguy. His unusual work derives from his own extreme close-up photography of textured surfaces; the photographs are taken through a series of physical manipulations, including tearing and burning, and then combined with other materials to create small collages. These are re-photographed on a copy stand to produce high resolution files which undergo extensive editing in Photoshop. His aim is to produce dreamscapes that are full of curiosities, creatures and alternative worlds that exist in the random wanderings of the subconscious mind. At “ALDILA’” exhibition, Terry presents two of his magical artworks. In “The Origin of All Possible Worlds” the artist is attempting to visualise a lucid dream he experienced and this artwork is the result. He saw a fiery desert and an indigo sky with pale lightnings flashing. He saw the sky tear apart and a spinning orb of light appearing in the blackness, throwing shards of light into the night. One shard ballooned out like a pink overstretched bladder and disgorged a multitude of new worlds into the raging landscape. This is what the artist saw in his dreamy delirium; the origin of all possible worlds.


Terry Baker

In "The Spawning of Multiplicities" the protagonists of the work are a series of coloured bubbles that alternate with each other: some of them are in turn made up of bubbles, others give rise to some smaller ones, creating an accentuated oneiric composition even more so by the red background on which they are placed and suspended. According to the artist, they represent bubbles of quantum foam, an infinity of them, disgorging their entrails into an already beleaguered imagination. This is the stuff of which dreams and nightmares are made. Each bubble contains a multiplicity of worlds and each world spawns its own peculiar menagerie of curiosities and only the boundless power of the imagination can contain them in any safety. Were they to spill over into the waking world the division between sanity and madness could no longer be drawn. Dalì understood this all too well. And he was not mad.

Art Curator Matilde Della Pina


Terry Baker

The Origin of All Possible Worlds


Terry Baker

The Spawning of Multiplicities


Thanos Tziourmakliotis "I’m drawn to dark art. When I create, my emotions are playing a big part to the final result" Thanos Tziourmakliotis Thanos Tziourmakliotis makes us think over at the international contemporary art exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S with his Fate. Thanos Tziourmakliotis is a self-taught digital artist from Larisa, Greece. He was born in 2000 and he is currently studying at the University of Thessaly in the Department of Culture, Creative Media and Industries. Thanos, in his works, plays with reality and surrealism. "I try to fit something imaginary into a realistic background. I love attaching a foggy and mysterious atmosphere in my creations. Fate always has cruel plans for us. Many people had their lives cut short far too soon. This piece was inspired by Hugo Lederer’s statue, Das Schicksal, and shows fate as a ruthless woman, dragging two innocent victims by their hair. A young woman and a young man in the early prime of their lives were clearly overtaken by death, while the male still seems to be clinging to life. This harsh and disturbing composition makes the viewer to argue with fate about her choice, but simultaneously guides him to appreciate life and be humble". The mist reveals the tragedy of the event. The cruelty of fate is underlined by the suffering expressions of the subjects represented. A dark, funerary atmosphere that makes the observer reflect on the transience of life and the unpredictability of events. The treated theme shows an extreme sensitivity of the artist's soul, his attitude reflective of him. The setting created is halfway between real and mystical: we find ourselves catapulted into a parallel world which, however, puts us in front of the tragic reality of life. The power of destiny against man's impotence is represented through three bodies. The first imposing, a female figure that is so powerful as to have masculine features, the importance of the figure is underlined by the red cloth. The two victims, on the other hand, are slender, without clothes, without muscles.

"I am constantly learning as I create and I can already see the finished artwork in a blank canvas" Thanos Tziourmakliotis

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Thanos Tziourmakliotis

Fate


Thoma Sehnsucht "A painting is not a picture of an experience; it is an experience." (Mark Rothko)

In the 1920s an artistic movement was born, but will be known only later as "color field painting". The term was coined in the 1950s by the art critic Clement Greenberg and is connected to Suprematism and post-war abstract expressionism. The artistic movement is characterized by paintings produced on large canvases in which the color is the real main focus more than the subjects and geometric shapes. This is the case of the artist Thoma Sehnsucht who offers a lot of space to the color in his artwork that is applied in an apparently casual way, but which manages to convey deep sensations if looked at carefully. The great exponents of color field painting used large canvases sometimes covered only with a single color as in the case of the Russian painter Kazimir Severinovič Malevič or Mark Rothko. Thoma takes up this technique but he adds color in the form of emotions as personal sign. The strokes on the canvas seem to follow a pattern and a repetition typical of the spatial abstraction used by many famous artists of the twentieth century including Manzoni and Fontana. Everything refers to the philosophical concept that a work of art can be defined as such when it transmits emotions of whatever nature they are. Thoma Sehnsucht's work manages to convey a lot of emotions through the use of a few elements and repeating colors, this makes him an artist who is able to see beyond the purely aesthetic sense of things, but to evaluate their hidden value and deep meaning. The very title of the work "Aldilà" as the exhibition advises us not to stop at the surface, but to dig deep and find what is beyond.

Art Curator Letizia Perrieri


Thoma Sehnsucht

Aldilà


Tiffany Jarrett

Tiffany Jarrett’s creative practice strongly depends on her emotional state. Her creative process starts with no predetermined plans as she lets herself be carried away by her emotions, thus resulting in spontaneous movements and actions. “My paintings are visual interpretations of my spiritual journey. Each painting is an expression which represents a reality beyond our physical world, both internal and external places”, says Jarrett. Her innate need to translate her emotions into visual language lets Jarrett create beautiful abstract paintings, whose meaning and interpretation completely depend on who is looking. Paintings such as “Faded”, “In the Light” and “Mindscape” are perfect examples. In them, dark colours like brown contrast with lighter colours like pinkyorange, white and light blue, they are neither vibrant nor bright but silently powerful and communicative. Everything is perfectly balanced, appearing in continuous movement and never static. Beautifully composed, the three paintings are inspired by both natural elements and human conditions; they are much more than just simple colours on canvas. While “Faded” has a more abstract visualisation, “In the Light” and “Mindscape” recall natural landscapes. The first is an overlapping of colours: brownish shades at the bottom slowly become lighter through shades of light blue and white in the middle. “In the Light” recalls those marvellous views when you seat on a plane, surrounded by a crystal clear sky and fluffy white clouds. Once you fly, you leave the bad weather behind and everything becomes bright and calm. The sky leaves the place to a flat landscape in “Mindscape”. Here, greens and light browns unite to form small hills, contrasted by a cloudy sky. Mindscapes is the term Jarrett attributes to her artistic practice, where each painting becomes a pure representation of her inner world and the world that surrounds her. All three paintings are, therefore, mindscapes: an exploration into the space between what we see and what we feel and perceive. Her works, thus, become polysemantic, rich in dichotomies and contrasts which lead the viewers to discover their contrasting emotions and find a balance between them. For every bad day, there is a good one; for every sad thought, there is a joyous one; for every darkness, there is always a light.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Tiffany Jarrett

Faded


Tiffany Jarrett

In the Light


Tiffany Jarrett

Mindscape


Tomas Bertuleit

<<Abstract painting is my choice for expressing my soul, my searching and my feelings and emotions about life, living in this world. It is a way to bring out colors with little shape, following my energy flowing in their own intensity, searching for textures, and combinations of colors to express my inner landscape>>. To introduce the artwork presented on occasion of the international art exhibition by the artist Tomas Bertuleit titled Energies could be useful starting from his consideration. As he says the abstract language for him is the place of freedom where the colours and shapes flowing freely on the space to become a reflex of the feeling and the emotion of the artist. In this way the abstratism of the vision becomes the pretext to get in contact with the viewer. In fact in the artwork, we can see different shapes and forms that are put together to create a game of shadow and light which seem to hypnotize the observer. This relationship with the observer gives the opportunity to get out of ourselves and abandon ourselves to the flow of colors created by the composition. So the artwork is not only a way to express the intimate personality of the artist but also is a pretext to create an encounter with the observer trying to ask him if he has time to listen to this flow. This could be the real way to go to aldilà, beyond ourselves, discovering new places and in this way discover more about us.

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Tomas Bertuleit

Energies


Tony Garcia

In Tony Garcia’s paintings, reality seems to have lost its familiar properties to enter a world with vibrant colours and surreal sceneries. Here, conscious and unconscious realms of experiences meet each other in shaping a world where dream and reality coexist together. “All Hail the Queen” is the perfect example of this coexistence. In a world recalling Alice in Wonderland’s visual aesthetic, a gigantic clock, indicating a quarter to twelve, rises from a blue sky. Being the strongest piece of the chessboard, the Queen, who stands upon the clock, proudly overlooks her kingdom. On the forefront, the rest of the pieces of the chessboard remains grounded on the terrain as if it were bowing to the Queen. On both sides of the painting, beautiful trees function as the edges of the pieces and heart-shaped flowers sprout from the terrain. The same heart shape that is enlarged at the middle of the clock, the same heart suit that when playing poker has the highest point. At the same time, a hot-air balloon with an eye wide open looking at the Queen’s kingdom and colourful ice-creams fly into the sky, while a beautiful green butterfly with a pencil body walks on the edge of the clock. The whole composition results perfectly balanced thanks to the right place occupied by each of the protagonists. In this painting, Garcia shows his impressive skills in giving communicative power to the pieces of the chessboard, which are faceless and therefore, it is not easy to understand emotions and temperament. The Queen stands straight and fierce, you can immediately imagine her face and dominant posture; while the pieces of the chessboard are in an oblique position, suggesting their subordinated position. “All Hail the Queen”is a representation of life which is balanced by the power of the unconscious and dreams. The relationship between the dominant and the dominated in real life is perfectly represented with the use of the unexpected and the unconventional, where every characteristic and detail become symbol of a real scenario. The surreal painting, therefore, becomes a way for Garcia to liberate his thoughts about society from the boundaries of the real representation of it. In such a way, by presenting unexpected scenes and imaginary objects, Garcia’s surreal representation of reality is more effective and high-impact than just the mere real representation of it.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Tony Garcia

All Hail the Queen


TORIAM “I wanted to paint nothing. I was looking for the essence of nothingness, and there it was. A nothing that, in reality, was always full of content. Because it reflected a society of fast consumption, immediate enjoyment, banality and passion. The essence of the people their lives. What surrounds us on a day-to-day basis. Any material, that serves for inspiration and creation.” TORIAM

The international exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S presents TORIAM. She spent her first years in the Real City. Where she develops a realistic style of lighting under the influence of the great Michelangelo Buonarroti. When she was 10 years old, she moved to Madrid, where she got to know both ancient painting as well as what was done in her time and other styles. They were determining influences to evolve to a style of great luminosity, with quick and loose brushstrokes. La chica de Soul is a girl on the street under the streetlight. This work is the emblem of the representation of light through the use of color. The woman, caressed by the wind, takes on the colors of the night. However, it appears illuminated by street lamps. The work slightly recalls the traits of pop painting but has its own originality and a strong communicative charge. Looking at the work, the observer perceives the sensations of the woman in front of him. Supertramp is the representation of tramp faces in the park. Once again the color is the master of the scene. The shapes are vaguely reminiscent of Picasso's paintings. A picture that we can define as a glimpse of society. The strongly abstract faces shine in their colors, yet their eyes are dull. The whole is harmonious and with a strong impact. You are the reason shows a funky dancing couple. They are kissing each other and at the same time they are melting. They are one into the other and the power of their kiss pervades us. Once again TORIAM's style proves to have a strong emotional impact

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


TORIAM

La chica de Soul


TORIAM

Supertramp


TORIAM

You are the reason


Tove Tømte "I wish to tell stories describing social relations, stripped of religious codes, sex, ethnicity to try to reach the genuinely human" Tove Tømte Tove Tømte makes us wonder at the international contemporary art exhibition "ALDILÀ", hosted by the international art gallery M.A.D.S with her Connected, Synergy and You are dancing in my chest. The first one masterpiece and the last one present figures that belong exclusively to Tove's painting. They are one of a kind. They are beings that come to life from the artist's soul. Connected is refered to the period of the corona pandemic, and influenced by it. The artist represents physical isolation and distance. This condition gave birth to other ways to communicate, for exemple, through digital platforms. The artists illustrates tiny isolated “tribes” which have the necessary distance but are in connections with thin lines in metallic (the representation of digital). Synergy is the perfect mix between conscious and subconscious. The same objects are repeated in different ways. Just as the the artists of the Cubist current did. The shapes are related to each other. They show themselves as in a dream. The dream universe is recalled in this work, a more complex reality than the one we are used to. You are dancing in my chest is inspired by this quote from Rumi: “Your dance inside my chest where no-one sees you but I do, and that sight becomes this art”. He describes the artist's longing for her grandchildren and her great grandchild, but also the joy coming from their bare existence. This became even more obvious and important during the pandemic and the picture is dedicated to these wonderful human beings. The artist illustrate this dance using figures having synchronized and repeated movements. The colors are quite light and the figures are almost white, in order to describe the volatility of relations and to recreate a dance that never ends. Tove Gunnulfsen Tømte was born in Norway. She has been very passionate, bordering on obsessive, in making pictures using different techniques and materials. Most of the techniques are self-taught and are based on trying, quite a lot of failing, and then trying to discover new possibilities in the paintings. She mainly paints using acrylics on plywood and she likes to describe her creations as recycling/transformations of waste into art.

"I see my pictures as a part of a dialogue with other people, wishing to touch and move them through recognition" Tove Tømte

Art Curator Mara Cipriano


Tove Tømte

Connected


Tove Tømte

Synergy


Tove Tømte

You are dancing in my chest


Ulla Strandberg

On occasion of the international art exhibition, Aldila the artist Ulla Strandberg presents the work titled Between then and now. The technique used is that of the collage, in fact we can see a lot of elements that seem coming from other tales, put together to create the story of Ulla Strandberg . Starting from the bottom, we can immediately discover the protagonist. Female figures that looking through window panes. She seems to come from the other side of reality to get in contact with the observer. As if, she wants to say:-I want to look at you too-. His gaze seems to want to communicate that something will happen. In addition, another element near the female figure communicates that something is changing. The crow standing on the windowsill. This symbol seems to represent the metamorphosis, the change. The composition made by the artist Ulla Strandberg is a tale where every element becomes meaningful largely. As If was the composition that gives meaning to the elements. << It means that she can experiment without any right or wrong, just by discovering new possibilities again and again....>>. This means that without any rules the artist has the freedom to enter in her imagination and creativity to tell us in a second moment what she saw. The viewer lets himself be carried away in the vision, to listen to the characters, understand their meaning as if he were entering a place other than reality. Will this be the concept of aldila?

Art Curator Elisabetta Eliotropio


Ulla Strandberg

Between then and now


Vaida Kacergiene “There is a greater spectacle than the sea, and that is the sky. But there is a greater spectacle than the sky, and that is the interior of a soul.” (Victor Hugo)

For the international exhibition “Aldilà” at the M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, Vaida Kacergiene exposes her work “ENDLESS”, which emphasizes the presence of an otherworldly and mystical world, and certainly recalls the Celestial Kingdom. In a boundless landscape, where heaven and earth meet in a scene which appears to be as an embrace, one can notice a figure seated close to a valley while looking at the cleaning away of the clouds, by managing to discern the pure souls of loved ones while they are releasing their energy into the universe. Their upward hovering seems like a dance: their light, soft lines cross the clouds and head towards infinity. Their diagonal direction from left to right is diametrically opposed to the outline of the promontory: each line adds movement to the pictorial surface and best defines the symbolic value of the canvas. Everything is united and moves in unison: thus, there is no clear separation between the two dimensions and each element is fundamental to the representation and pictorial composition. From the use of colors up to the choice of the subject matter, Vaida gives the painting a supernatural power, drawing inspiration from what is being suggested from her feelings and heart. Through those delicate nuances of color, the work gives the viewer great luminosity, highlighting a radiant and transcendental way to travel and giving a sense of harmony and serenity in his/her soul.

“The best and most beautiful things in this world cannot be seen or even heard but must be felt with the heart.” (Helen Adams Keller)

Art Curator Alessia Perone


Vaida Kacergiene

ENDLESS


Vetla

“Keep your face to the sun and you will never see the shadow.” (Helen Keller)

Gold is a precious material, almost futile to underline it. It is one of the most precious materials that the earth gives us, but not only, it is also beautiful in its brightness. It is as precious and beautiful as the sun, without which nothing would have been in the past nor could be in the future. This has never been as clear to our eyes as in the terrible months of the lockdown, during which we could observe the sun only from a window or, for the lucky ones, from a corner of their garden. In those moments we realized that the sun is not only a source of heat for our skin, but nourishment for our mind and joy for our heart. In the work on display “Dawn” Vetla recreates her own sun, not letting herself be deprived of such a powerful source of light and energy. The result is extraordinary. A great golden sun, changing according to the light of the day, reflective, dazzling, dazzles us just looking at it, giving us back that feeling of physical and moral warmth that the solitude of the pandemic has taken away from us, embracing and enveloping us in its almost mystical dimension. The work gives us the perception of being alive, dialoguing. It seems to be able to give answers and comfort to our why. Gold is also a material that when it oxidizes forms a transparent patina, which protects it from the passing of time and keeps it always equal to itself, giving a perception of eternity, but also of timelessness and no spatiality. Here is that the vision of the quadripartite work of the Russian artist leads our mind outside the dimension of here and now and leads us to a place where everything is possible and that becomes the goal of our thoughts and desires. Gold is the key and we are free to lose ourselves in contemplation.

Art Curator Federica D'Avanzo


Vetla

DAWN


Vicka "I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for.” (Georgia O’Keeffe)

Through art, humans can elaborate their experiences and express them in a creative way. The silent voice of art helps us to say what we hardly express in words, allowing ambivalences, conflicts and deep emotions to emerge. In some way, art becomes the artist’s therapy that frees him/her/them from the inner world made of emotions, feelings and thoughts. Once shared, art becomes the perfect cure for the viewers; a connection is installed that allows the viewers to search their inner self, their emotions and thoughts. For Vicka, art is both therapy and cure. “I have all these feelings inside; I paint to express them, to share them, to free myself from some of them”, she says. Vicka is a very successful doctor specialised in osteopathy, hypnosis and auriculotherapy to treat patients suffering from long-term pain. In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic came out and Vicka experienced the same burn out that she witnessed before with her patients. She needed to find a solution to rise from the abyss and, after a long time, art came to her again. “Blue Dream”, “Halo” and “In the Deep” give us an apt road to approach Vicka’s art. In “Blue Dream”, a beautiful blue flower blossoms, while others are still in bloom. As the title suggests, the representation of the flower is far from reality, it is a flower whose colours have been altered in a dream. Bright, yellow leaves contrast the bright blue of the background, and sprays of pink are scattered throughout the painting, as if they were the shadow produced by a beautiful pink sun. The paintings “Halo” and “In the Deep”represent a human hollowed and edgy face. Despite they are pretty similar, Vicka is able to convey different feelings and emotions with the use of colours. A strong red for the face in “Halo”, outlined by bright and precise yellow and green lines, and enriched by bright green eyes whose gaze seems worried, lost and sad. Blue is the colour of the face in “In the Deep”, with long and thin eyebrows and long lines protruding from the cheek and the neck. The green eyes seem vacant and nostalgic, recalling the expression of someone who has lost the train of thought. What unites the paintings is the black background which highlights the faces and their expressions even more. Through her paintings, Vicka creates a personal universe which, inevitably, connects with a collective universe, as everyone in life has experienced the feelings of re-birth, nostalgia and perdition.

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Vicka

Blue Dream


Vicka

Halo


Vicka

In the deep


Victoria

Different are the subjects represented in her digital paintings, by the young artist Victoria. Concerning the concept of the current exhibition: ‘ALDILÀ: hyperaestesia oenirica’ to which she takes part in M.A.D.S. Art Gallery, the artist has created three paintings that perfectly represent the ‘beyond’. Taking examples from old and original artworks, such as photos or movies, she has given birth to a new interpretation of the scene and the subject depicted, thanks to her artistic creativity. Similar in the technique to which they remand to, “Salieri” and “Lauryn Hill” can be considered close to the portraiture current. Taking examples from the artists of the past, to which Victoria looks at, these two paintings have something in common with the dark but luminous paintings of the excellent Dutch artist: Rembrandt. In ‘Salieri’ a suffused light serves as the background for the scene, in which the main character is depicted while acting. The scene is the representation of a moment, taken from the movie ‘Amadeus’, that the artist wanted to focus on. The facial expressions made by the actors are something touching that deserves to be captured. A deep gaze highlighted using a shine Aurea that surrounds the girl is what suddenly stands out by watching ‘Lauryn Hill’. The subject is a real woman, a musician, to which the artist has given new vitality with her artwork. The sound created by her performances can be perfectly heard while watching the painting. The movement and the dynamicity created by the light brown brushstrokes, can be considered as the musician notes that give emphasis to the whole scene. Different in style, technique and in the subject represented ‘Untitled’ is a scene that comes from Victoria’s subconscious and that she wanted to recreate through her passion for the Japanese Manga. At a first approach the scene appears as a chaotic one, lots of objects, a lot of small religious symbols and meanings give birth to a surreal, somewhat desolate landscape. The scene, composed of just three colours, can be read as a last meeting between the couple’s lovers. A cold atmosphere in which desolation, sadness and fear are the main feelings. However, something positive can be seen in the small lotus flowers scattered here and there, that confers to the scene purity and beauty also in the middle of this confusion.

Art Curator Martina Stagi


Victoria

Salieri


Victoria

Lauryn Hill


Victoria

Untitled


Yukari Blair

In the end, art is a tool. Deprived of its aura of solemnity, deprived of historical and cultural connotations, stripped of formal and academic impositions, artistic expression is nothing more than a mere tool at the service of the human being. Man is in fact the only animal to feel the need to create art, is the only living being to give a part of himself to the world through the use of color and shape. Is man therefore in constant search of artistic expression? Is the individual instinctively led to express himself through the creation of something new? Is art useful to man or to his soul? These questions do not need an unequivocal answer, on the other hand art is something extremely far from objective and normative reality. Let's grasp art as pure formal expression, listening to its chromatic melody and letting ourselves go to the sight of the sign and the spot of color. We open ourselves in making art, in shaping matter and formulating a formal symphony. We open ourselves in receiving art with our full hands, looking at it in its peculiarities, characteristics and creative expression. We embrace the artistic event to go in search of ourselves. Yukari's work is all about freedom of expression. Free from any tedious academic reminiscence, devoid of obvious references to the real world and stripped of frills and aesthetic affectations, the artist's work is that something in the world that speaks to us of its interiority, that direct line between reality and its soul that would otherwise be invisible. Definitely invisible. In fact, art has the power to make palpable and observable what in reality is not: feelings, moods, fears and phobias, hopes and desires are all here, in the texture of the oil pastel that breaks on the rough immaculate paper. Free from all restrictions and faint memories of a cold winter dawn, the composition is all played out in shades of pink, purple and bluish. The colors, extremely juxtaposed, give an almost magical aura to Spray so much so that, seeing the work out of the corner of the eye, the milky cloud that dwells in the center seems to disappear for certain moments, only to reappear. A faint mirage of moonlight in a rosy desert. Yukari pushes the pastel against the paper, emphasizing the waxy quality of the tool: the result is an extremely varied and multiform texture. The pigment is almost reduced to a soft cream, a buttery substance that is spread without skimping on a paper so porous that its reliefs can be seen even under thick layers of color. Yukari's art comes directly from the deepest part of her soul and is the mirror of her ego without restrictions and regulations. Spray is the graphic representation of the expressive freedom that an individual has the right to achieve and the duty to obtain. It is a cry to look at oneself in order to discover the vastness of one's own soul, the intrinsic beauty springing from the vital energy of each of us.

Art Curator Lisa Galletti


Yukari Blair

Spray


Yulia Krieger

Using the human body as a tool, white and faded figures are at the centre of the painting, black shapes resembling objects and animals are scattered on a brownish and gold background, illuminated by a big orange fire ball at the centre. It is “Plato’s cave” by young artist Yulia Krieger. “Art is a language that doesn’t need words”, she says; and through this painting, Yulia silently approaches the philosophical myth of Plato with colours, shapes and lines. Plato’s cave is an allegory to describe reality and the illusion of knowing. Just imagine people who have lived locked up in a cave that has an opening onto the outside, and who are not able to see the exit. Behind the prisoners, there is a burning fire that sheds light. Between the fire and the prisoners there is a wall, long and low, and behind it, other people hold objects (statuettes of animals and objects of all kinds) in their hands and make them protrude above the wall. The light of the fire, therefore, casts the shadows of the objects on the wall in front of the prisoners. Those shadows are the only things the prisoners have ever seen, believing that they are real objects. Now imagine that one of these prisoners is suddenly freed from the chains, forced to get up, and move towards the cave entrance. After being tied to the dark all his life, at first he would be blinded by the light and his eyes would hurt. Only after, he would be able to see the things themselves without shadows or reflections. The freed prisoner, finally able to see the sun, would be happy with his new condition and would pity those who remained in the cave. What would happen if the freed prisoner returned to the cave? As before he had needed time to get used to the light, so now he would not be able to see in the dark immediately. The others would find him ridiculous, clumsy, and would not believe him when he told them that it is worthwhile to go out, to see the sunlight, to know the world outside the cave. Nobody would believe him. Indeed, if he tried to free them, they would kill him to stop him. The allegory of the cave aims at showing that humans perceive a fictitious reality based on what is already in front of their eyes. Krieger’s beautiful visual representation is the spokesperson of what would happen if we dig deeper in our reality, if we free ourselves from prejudices and biases and see the surrounding world with our own eyes. What is your reality? What kind of world do you see?

Art Curator Martina Lattuca


Yulia Krieger

In the deep


Yvonne Kok " The goal of life is living in agreement with nature." (Zeno of Citium)

Yvonne Kok is a young Dutch artist who lives and works in Haarlem. Her subversive and irrepressible art of her takes female figures and animals as privileged subjects, depicting them in a vortex of intense colors that strongly emphasize a unique and personal style. The animal world thus becomes an opportunity to observe the perfection of nature through the artist's subjective filter, which surprises the viewer with bold and visually striking color combinations. King Leo, the work presented by the artist for "Aldilà", is fully part of this artistic vein, and allows you to take a look at Yvonne's creative universe starting with the creature that best represents the perfection of the animal kingdom. The work seems to have been conceived on two different levels. On the one hand, the detailed representation of the leopard, lying on a large branch, which divides the painting horizontally and marks the dividing line between the cold tones (green, blue) of the lower part of the canvas and the warm shades (pink, orange) of the superior part. On the other hand, the more "naturalistic" aspect is superimposed on graphic elements, such as writings and symbols that dot the entire work almost like graffiti. These elements become an integral part of the work, creating a real decorative apparatus that expresses a heartfelt invitation to protect and respect nature, in this case represented by the symbolic presence of the King Leo. The work is configured as a fascinating and original artistic contribution that enhances the extraordinariness of each creature, inviting the observer to reflect on the common belonging to the animal world, within which everyone has the opportunity to show their essence, wild and free, like that of King Leo.

Art Curator Chiara Rizzatti


Yvonne Kok

King Leo


Zephrard

Zephrard is a French artist, painter, sculptor and photographer with a highly original style and multifaceted approach to art. Zephrard approaches art in a self-taught way, juggling sculptures and visual works that he creates from his own experiences and his personal and creative vision of the world. His first approach to art began with the creation of sculptures and photographs, after which he became interested in painting. His multifaceted skills and his strong taste for the combination of shapes and colours allow him to create unique, dynamic and innovative works. He takes his cue from nature, his surroundings and his subconscious, creating extremely intriguing, engaging images that strike the viewer with their vivid, vibrant colours. Zephrard approaches art in a direct way, he is not afraid to dare or to create; on the contrary, what he is looking for is a reaction from the viewer, who feels a tangle of emotions and feelings in front of his compositions. In "Arthur", contrast is the real protagonist of the work. The eye of the observer gets lost in this labyrinth and tangle of lines. The juxtaposition of the two opposite colours to their full potential is very interesting. Red is intense, dark and deep, warm and energetic. Blue, on the other hand, is glacial, tending towards white, cold and pungent. Zephrard makes this photograph by creating a play of light and paying attention to the exposure time. An abstract work, unique and imitable because it immortalises an instant frozen in time. His photographs encapsulate worlds of their own, suggestive artistic creations open to subjective interpretation. Inside, everyone sees different forms. In “Robert”, the artist brings out another side of him, that of the visual painter. In this tangle of brilliant acrylics, Zephrard encapsulates a reflection on old age and what it means metaphorically and symbolically to move towards adulthood. His face is gruff and chubby, his eyebrows furrowed and his gaze distrustful. He wears a hat and a robe that identify him as an old but elegant and probably aristocratic man. Zephrard does not concentrate on the making of the face because what interests him is to create a universal symbol to encapsulate a concept from which to start a reflection. The style he adopts is a mix of 20th century avant-garde art, with some influence from late 19th century art. The setting of the portrait and the fragmentation of the colours are reminiscent of Van Gogh. The abstract work arouses a tangle of conflicting feelings and the viewer is led to ask many questions about the choice of subject and the way in which it was made, its gaze and its iconographic attributes. In "The Elements", Zephrard plays with light and colour contrasts to give the image dynamism. The combination of the colour yellow, which at times reflects the light and looks like gold, and the luminous blue, which fades into an intense blue in the lower part of the work, is a winning combination. This is an abstract photo that contains all the elements of nature in a harmonious and intriguing way. They harmonise with the passage of time to give life to the emerald. The work is perceived as a dynamic set of details, a continuous flow marked by the passing of time. Nature reigns supreme, deciding how to manifest itself in all its virtuosity, beauty and power. A perfect and elegant combination of light, water, wind and fire. The end result is elegant, harmonious and perfectly balanced. Zephrard proves to be a very skilled artist in the use of different techniques, ranging between different styles, artistic influences and ideas. He encapsulates facets and contrasts in vibrant, engaging and intriguing images. He captures the viewer's attention and keeps them interested by drawing them into visual games of colour and light.

Art Curator Ilaria Falchetti


Zephrard

Arthur


Zephrard

Robert


Zephrard

The Elements


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