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WEDNESDAY | 2.18.2015 | MACEANDCROWN.COM | Vol. 57, Issue 15

ODU Football Schedule Released. B2

Sex Educator Laci Green Speaks at ODU. The Mace & Crown

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Face In The Mace Mace & Crown Staff : Sean Davis Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@maceandcrown.com

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Hashtag #ODU to see your face in the Mace. Instagr a m

Brian Saunders Copy Editor briananthony93@gmail.com David Thornton News Editor news@maceandcrown.com Veronica Singer Arts & Entertainment Editor artsandentertainment@maceandcrown.com Nate Budryk Sports Editor & Distribution Manager nbudr001@odu.edu Zachary Chavis Photography Editor photo@maceandcrown.com Rashad McDowell Technology Editor technology@maceandcrown.com

Elijah Stewart Senior Graphic Designer estew010@odu.edu Jason Kazi Advertising and Business Manager advertising@maceandcrown.com Noah Young Digital Content Manager webmaster@maceandcrown.com Jugal Patel Digital Editor jpate016@odu.edu

Staff Writers: Alex Brooks Alyse Stanley Amy Poulter Jasmine Blackwell Jessica Perkins Libby Marshall Michael High Matt O’Brien Symmion Moore

Staff Photographers: Dawit Samson Jason Kazi Joshua Boone Joshua Caudell Nicolas Nemtala Schyler Shafer Shamon Jones

Mace & Crown is a newspaper published by and written for the students of Old Dominion once a week throughout each semester and once in the summer. Originally founded in 1930 as the The High Hat, the paper became the Mace & Crown in 1961. The Mace & Crown is a primarily self-supporting newspaper, maintaining journalistic independence from the university.All views expressed in this collegiate paper are those of the author, not of the University, Mace & Crown, or the editors. Phone: 757-683-3452 Advertising: 757-683-4773

T w it t er


NEWS

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For even more campus crime information, visit Maceandcrown.com.

Crime Log

Students in front of Webb Center hand out roses for Valentine’s Day

With love from me to you Alyse Stanley SeniorWriter

The Old Dominion University Women’s Center encouraged students to share their support for those affected by sexual assault with their Valentine for Survivors craft tables. Led by the Women’s Center’s own MPower peer educators, students glitter-glued and bedazzled Valentine’s Day posters with inspiring messages to show rape survivors their love and support. Every 107 seconds, someone is sexually assaulted in the United States according to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. Eighty percent of these victims are under age 30. ODU’s Women Center helps those

affected by sexual abuse through programs designed to educate and empower victims. One of these programs, the Sexual Assault Free Environment (S.A.F.E.) Program provides safety resources and advocacy resources, educational information and even instructions on how to support friends or family. “I want [students] to recognize that survivors of sexual assault need this encouragement,” Karmen Matusek, S.A.F.E. graduate assistant, said. Matusek organized the event, one of many the Women’s Center prepared for the week of Valentine’s Day. “Valentine’s day is one time for us to let women know that they are heard in many different ways.” As it was their first time holding this event, it was not without its

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hitches. On Tuesday the peer educators had to close up shop half an hour early and on Thursday the loud music in Webb made it difficult to explain to students the purpose of the craft tables. However, they ended the week with more than enough Valentine’s to display in the Women’s Center windows and post to their social media. The choice of the word survivor to describe those who have been sexually assaulted was purposeful, explained Matusek. It’s one of the key concepts the center tries to instill in all their M-Power peer educators and those they counsel. “You may be a victim, but we want you to become a survivor,” said Matusek.

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Laci Green visit’s ODU | ODU Women’s Center

Laci Green Schools ODU on Sex Alyse Stanley Staff Writer Students have passed out at previous presentations, YouTube personality Laci Green warned as she began her “Best Sex Ever” lecture on Feb 9. She clicked to the next slide: a close-up photograph of a woman’s genitalia. Even though the room was full of college students (or perhaps, especially because the room was full of college students), the crowd burst into hoots and hysterics. She smiled and shouted to be heard over the din of laughter. “It’s a f—ing vulva people, calm down!” Green said. Over a million viewers subscribe to Green’s YouTube channel, “Sex Plus,” where she tackles topics of sexual education with a bubbly attitude that contrasts her candidly crass language and the blushingly taboo nature of her videos. With over 10 years of experience in sexual education and activism under her belt, Green tours colleges across the United States and Canada to fill in the gaps many high school sex education programs fail to cover. This very lack of a holistic sexual education inspired her to become an activist. Through her channel and lectures, she hopes to inspire the kind of discussions she wishes she had access to growing up. “Best Sex Ever” provides students with the bare minimum of sexual education everyone should know, in her opinion. “There’s nothing in this program you won’t find between your legs. Or someone else’s legs,” Green said once the audience finally quieted down. Precisely because sexual education is incomprehensive, basic information is distorted by myths and media. The average penis size is 5.5 inches,

but the most common size students guess is seven inches. “That’s porn honey,” she said. “That is a porn peen right there.” She cited her inability to find a picture of an average size penis on Google as a reflection of the unrealistic expectations the porn industry has created. Studies also show that people are more concerned about their partner’s girth and fit with their own genitalia rather than penis size. Similarly, the idea that a woman’s hymen breaks when she loses her virginity, known as having her “cherry popped,” is a myth. The hymen’s importance is entirely cultural, Laci explained. It does not cover the vagina, otherwise women could not menstruate. Green told a story of how, growing up, she was so misinformed she thought she had somehow lost her virginity when she started her first period. Circumcision is another issue that gets distorted by a lack of proper education. The bulk of research shows failing to circumcise only poses health risk in countries without ready access to soap and water. Thus the argument that circumcision of children is necessary to promote cleanliness and prevent disease doesn’t hold ground in a more developed country like the United States, Green said. “Look, we don’t chop off your ears because they’re a little bit harder to clean, so let’s not chop off part of your dick,” Green said. Green gave a crash course in the biology of both male and female genitalia, and encouraged the crowd, particularly women, to go home after the show and check out their own “equipment.” “Just check it out and see what’s up. Orgasms. They are awaiting you,” she said.

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When she mentioned the prostate, a confused male voice rang from the crowd: “A what?” Another roaring laugh erupted from the audience, this time Green joined in as well. “You are in for a treat my friend,” she said. Green was not afraid to plunge into the more somber topics of sexual education. Consent, the buzzword of college sexual education, is as simple as a sober, unpressured, verbal “Yes” from one’s partner. A murmur of confusion rose from the crowd at the word “sober.” Green said this point is what generally freaks people out the most, though it does not forbid alcohol in sexual encounters. The federal standard is that if an individual is too drunk to drive, they cannot give consent, Green explained. Students read from cards she stashed around the room that listed what consent does and does not sound like. Consent sounded enthusiastic and excited, while a lack thereof sounded hesitant and anxious. The final answer to what a lack of consent sound like? Silence. Establishing consent is not a contract, it’s a conversation, Green said. “Just check in with one another.” Green also discussed how a lack of comprehensive education on sexually transmitted diseases has led to widespread hysteria about them. “Why are we so afraid of STDs?” she asked the audience. STDs, or sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as they’re more accurately titled, are just like any other illness. The room went quiet. The shame surrounding STIs stems from a society that stigmatizes sex, she explained. Genital warts and warts on other parts of your body

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come from the same virus, but one is met with contempt and judgment. Many STIs, including chlamydia and most strands of gonorrhea, are completely curable. However, the danger they pose is in their invisibility. Many STIs, particularly chlamydia, do not have obvious symptoms and if left unchecked can lead to infertility. The best way to prevent STIs is to practice safe sex and get checks regularly, once a year at minimum or before every new partner. Green said she gets a lot of emails from people asking how to respond if one’s partner is pressuring them into unprotected sex. She said everyone has a right to protect their health. “If your partner does not respect your right to respect your health, I would argue that they don’t respect you,” she said. “And maybe they’re a douche bag and you shouldn’t sleep with them.” However, when Green asked for someone to come up and demonstrate the correct technique for putting on a condom, she found no shortage of volunteers. Audience member William Pillajo, in a moment of spontaneity he later admitted, took the demonstration to the next level. Before a sea of cameras, he knelt before the mint green dildo Green provided (and held both appropriately and inappropri-

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ately in its biologically designated location) and put the condom on with his mouth. This time, it was Green’s turn to be shocked. A native of Utah, Green said she loves meeting and connecting with her fans and being on the road. “When you’re a YouTuber, a lot of what you do is alone. It’s just me and my camera,” Green said. Throughout her tours, what has stuck out most to her is how connected her fan community is by their collective negative experiences, by feeling confused and scared by their sexual identities. “I’m sad that that’s what brings us together. But I’m happy I can provide an open forum for them,” Green said. Green has video blogged, written, and hosted web series for Planned Parenthood and Discovery News. In 2014 she became a writer and host for MTV’s first original YouTube channel, “Braless,” a series that dissects race, sexuality, and gender issues through the lens of pop culture. Off the internet, she has created peerbased sex education groups in the San Francisco Bay area and served on the Board of Directors for the ACLU of Northern California. She is also a certified dating violence and rape crisis counselor.


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Craig Ferguson on the set of The Late Late Show | Sonja Flemming/CBS via Getty Images

It was a great day for America at the Harrison opera house George Plank Staff Writer “Before tonight is over, each and every one of you will be personally offended by something I said.” This was the warning comedian Craig Ferguson gave to his audience on the night of Feb. 6 in the Harrison Opera House. Ferguson, a Scottish-American comedian who recently left his position as the host of “The Late Late Show,” is an author, screen writer and actor who is commonly recognized for his work on the “Drew Carey Show.” He is a proud American citizen who’s often heard brandishing the catch phrase, “It’s a great day for Ameri-

ca!” He has had a total of three other stand-up specials and even performed for President George W. Bush at the 2008 Correspondents’ Association dinner. Upon entering the Opera House, patrons were graced by the presence of performers playing bagpipes. Josh Robert Thompson, impressionist and voice of Ferguson’s effeminate robot skeleton sidekick on “The Late Late Show,” stepped on stage first. He regaled the audience with his experiences in church and the perils of having Morgan Freeman as the voice of his GPS unit. After a brief introduction of Ferguson by Thompson, a voice over announced, “Who’s that at the door?”

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and Secretariat, a pantomime horse that served as an inside joke to those who are familiar with the talk show, came out to his usual theme song and danced around. Secretariat was joined shortly after by Ferguson who was immediately bombarded with applause and shouts from the audience. Ferguson demonstrated early on how well adept he is at handling a rowdy crowd. One of the audience members decided it was a good idea to start yelling during one of his jokes. Ferguson, without missing a beat responded, “It’s not the f---ing TV! I can hear you…” His quick wit and comedic timing were further demonstrated when some of the audience took offense

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when he said was not really the south, but rather on the cusp. “I had better keep moving because I know 50 percent of you have scopes,” Ferguson said. As the night drew on, the audience was delighted to hear Ferguson’s stories of his time on the “Drew Carey Show.” He reminisced about the time him and Mick Jagger, singer for the Rolling Stones, attempted to collaborate to develop a screenplay, as well as described his personal affinities. “I always had a thing for upper class English women. I always wanted to do to them what their ancestors did to my country,” Ferguson said. The show itself was structured in a manner very similar to his last two

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specials. At the start of the show he announced to the crowd that he was going to tell a joke. He would use the set up for the jokes to go off on tangents that would lead to other jokes. Each new joke harkened back in some way to the previous jokes all the way to the end. The night proved to be entertaining for both fans of his show and those who just wanted to laugh for a while. While some may not have found comfort in his crass and often profane choice of wording, Ferguson’s quick wit and mastery of the craft of comedy proved to a winning combination for an excellent night of entertainment and humor.


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Sports

For updated Monarch sports coverage, visit maceandcrown.com.

Coach Jeff Jones argues with referee during game. ODU Athletics-

Road Losing Streak Hits 4 as Monarchs lose to Roadrunners Nate Budryk Sports Editor The Old Dominion Monarchs’ road struggles continued Thursday with a loss to the Roadrunners of the University of Texas- San Antonio, 72-67. With the loss, the Monarchs’ road losing streak has reached four games, with three more games left to play away from the cozy confines of the Constant Convocation Center. With the loss, ODU falls to 7-4 in C-USA play, and 18-5 overall. UTSA moves to 7-5 in conference and 13-10 overall. The Big Blue came out of the gate strong, with the man they call “Pops”, graduated senior Jonathan Arledge, scoring the first seven points for the Monarchs. That level of play was on display for the majority of the first half, as the Monarchs entered the locker room with a 37-30 lead at the

break. However, the second half was a different story, altogether, as the Monarchs were outscored 42-30. In a game where the Monarchs had the edge in assists, steals, blocks and rebounds, including an impressive 18 offensive boards, the Monarchs’ shots simply weren’t falling. ODU shot just 43 percent from the field, 27 percent from three and only managed to get to the line three times, hitting just one of three free throws. Conversely, the Roadrunners shot the lights out, as they shot 51 percent from the field, just over 46 percent from the arc and a devastating 83 percent from the charity stripe, hitting 20 of 24 shots. ODU committed a whopping 21 personal fouls, compared to only six from UTSA. Both Arledge and junior ball-handler Trey Freeman both had to play with four fouls down the stretch, significantly limiting what

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the Monarchs could do defensively. Leading the way for the Roadrunners was Keon Lewis, UTSA’s senior guard. Lewis had the hot hand for sure, as he finished with 21 points to lead all scorers shooting 5-7 from the field, 2-3 from downtown and a clutch 9-9 on free throws. For ODU, the high man was Freeman, who scored 19 in the loss, adding six boards and four helpers. Arledge added 15, but was also responsible for three of the Monarchs’ six turnovers, one of which with under a minute to play and ODU down three. ODU led for the majority of the game and led by as many as 10 three different times, yet were unable to hang on to get the victory. The Monarch offense fizzled down the stretch, as it tends to sometimes do. However, the defense rarely plays as poorly as it did Thursday, and often limits the

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need for much scoring from the offense.

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2015 ODU Football Schedule Released De’Andre Taylor Contributing Writer The ODU football schedule has been released as the Monarchs continue to prepare for the 2015 season,which begins in September. This will be the second year for the Monarchs playing in the FBS. Get your ODU gear ready for an exciting home opener when the Monarchs will face off against their cross-city rival, the Norfolk State Spartans. What a game it was last time the Monarchs and Spartans met in the 2013 season, with Old Dominion kicking a game winning field goal in the final seconds to secure the victory 27 – 24. The Monarchs went on to go undefeated at home that season and are looking to do the same this upcoming season. But the excitement doesn’t stop there. The following week, the Monarchs will be hosting a team from

Jasmine Blackwell Staff Writer Old Dominion University’s football program has lost an original member of the coaching staff, Zohn Burden, who has been hired by Vir-

the Atlantic Coast Conference, the North Carolina State Wolfpack. This will be a rematch between the two teams from last season as North Carolina State won a close game 4634. Old Dominion kicked a surprising onside kick with an 11 point lead in that game, but was unable to get the ball which swung momentum to the Wolfpack’s favor. Old Dominion did convert on a number of 4th downs and scored late to make it a one score game, but ultimately, the Monarchs’ defense couldn’t stop North Carolina State from scoring. But this season, the game will be played on Old Dominion’s turf and will no doubt be another great game. After three straight home games against Norfolk State, North Carolina State and Appalachian State, Old Dominion will travel on the road to play their first Conference game against Marshall. Old Dominion will close

out the rest of the season facing teams within their Conference. Old Dominion will be looking to

secure a better record this year as they finished 4-4 in Conference USA last year, with an overall record of 6-6.

Monarchs, Burden Part Ways

ginia Tech as a wide receivers coach. “We appreciate the efforts of Coach Burden with our football program. Zohn helped start our program back in 2007 as one of the original staff members,” ODU Head Coach Bobby Wilder said, according to ODUS-

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ports.com. Under Burden, in 2013, Old Dominion was the only FBS school to have four players with 40 or more catches. According to ODUSports.com, “I want to thank ODU President John

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Broderick, Athletic Director Wood Selig and Coach Wilder for the opportunities they gave me here at Old Dominion,” Burden said. “I’d be remiss if I didn’t also thank the student-athletes and coaches with whom I’ve worked closely, in addi-

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tion to the community and fans that have supported us. I will be forever grateful for what we have been able to accomplish here.”


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Technology

Visit Maceandcrown.com for video game reviews and more.

ODU Enginering and Computational Sciencies Building | ODU Website

Rashad McDowell Technology Editor

Letter from the Technology Editor

Here at the Mace & Crown, we pride ourselves on bringing quality news stories to our readership. While our primary focus is, and has always been, the activities and events that involve the ODU community at large,

sometimes our stories do stray away. This has been the case much of the time with the Technology section. While I can try to rationalize it by saying that tech news around the world does affect the ODU community, that excuse holds less water when we look at the amazing research and development that happens on campus.

That being said, I would like to inform everyone that the Technology section of the Mace & Crown student newspaper will begin to run feature stories on the more tech related departments on campus. This series of features will begin with the Department of Computer Sciences. We will work systematically

through the faculty and staff, as well as the research projects currently being led by the department. Our goal in all of this is to provide a comprehensive look at the powerful minds and outstanding technological advances being made right here at ODU. As a journalist, this makes perfect sense, bring newsworthy material to

the hands of every reader. At the same time, I hope to breed more school spirit among the readership and leave everyone a bit more informed about the wealth of technological information happening in our classrooms and buildings. Look forward to these stories coming soon to the physical paper and the Mace & Crown website.

Internet archive brings back thousands of old games Ross Reelachart Contributing Writer Archive.org has tapped into the vast body of nostalgic titles to bring long forgotten and pioneering games to a web browser near you. When it comes to preserving our shared history, software is often one of the first things to be left out of the archives. Just as computers evolve and advanced at an incredibly accelerating pace, so does the software that allows us, as users, to do things on computers. The addition of newer and faster machines and software makes things even a couple years old obsolete. This is especially true of games and programs well over 20 years old, relics of the early years of commercially available PCs. But thanks to the dedicated efforts of computer programmers and engineers, and the spark of nostalgia, a substantial portion of our video gaming history is being preserved and made available

to play for newer generations. Archive.org, also known as the Internet Archive or “Wayback Machine” informally, has made more than 6,000 classic PC games available. All are free to download and play, though with the caveat that many require a specialized program known as an “emulator” in order to function on today’s machines. Archive.org helpfully provides a link to the “emulator” and easy to follow instructions on how to set it up and run it, along with a few other methods to play these classic games, including ones that only ran on DOS. From this archive, we are able to access some of gaming’s most seminal and well-remembered entries like the original Doom, SimCity 3000, and Populous. In an age where the video game industry is constantly chasing the newest blockbuster franchise and forgetting anything else that came before, it’s refreshing to play the games that started it all. Wolfen-

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stein 3D, touted as the grandfather of 3D shooters, allows a whole new generation to experience the game that laid the foundation for years of first person shooters. Through titles such as Leisure Suit Larry or Monkey Island, players can experience the early years of the once-extinct adventure game genre. For those whose nostalgia doesn’t stretch back into the 80’s or early 90’s, there are also the original demos of more recent fare like Halo: Combat Evolved, Deus Ex and Turok 2. Archive.org even has a store of brick and mortar arcade games that are sure to drown older gamers in waves of nostalgia. Thanks to an emulator that allows them to run in a web browser, old school gamers can show the next generation how they lost their quarters and time to such classics as Ghouls ‘N Ghosts, Gauntlet, and the fighting game that started it all: Street Fighter 2. Within the last few years, video

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game developers and publishers have made money re-releasing beloved classics for purchase, often with high definition treatments or even complete overhauls resulting in something akin to a director’s cut. While it is nice to have the chance to play the definitive version of the first Resident Evil or play a graphicallyupgraded Grim Fandango, there is

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something special about playing an old game as it was originally intended and experienced. By preserving a bit of our digital history, Archive.org is allowing us to re-experience what made many of us gamers, and introduce newer gamers into the surprisingly long and complex history of their favorite hobby.


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Wikipedia

New federal agency to tackle cyber threats Rashad McDowell Technology Editor The White House announced on Tuesday, Feb. 10, its plans to create a new executive department tasked with tackling the threat of cyberterrorism faced by the nation. The Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center will have the primary task of centralizing all the intelligence that deals with cyber threats and will work side by side with agencies such as the NSA and CIA. This agency will be model off National Counterterrorism Center, which was created after the Sept. 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. The decision to create this new agency comes on the heels of several high profile cyber-attacks, not only

domestically, but worldwide. Some have criticized the federal government, claiming that it didn’t share information that may have prevented past attacks. According to The Wall Street Journal, all intelligence collected by federal agencies is managed by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. As a division of the previously mentioned office, the CTIIC will collect and determine what information can be shared and with who. What is lacking in this announcement is a single policy to govern the federal government’s handling of potential cyber threats, cyber-attacks and data breaches. As it stands, the CIA, NSA and FBI can and do collect intelligence that relates to cyber threats, domestic and

foreign. As recently the Thanksgiving week hack of Sony Entertainment, this decentralized approach to cyber intelligence led to minor confusion. While each agency pointed fingers at North Korea for the attack, none were at the same level of certainty. This proved frustrating for Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for homeland security. “The cyberthreat is one of the greatest threats we face, and policymakers and operators will benefit from having a rapid source of intelligence,” she said in an interview with the Washington Post. Following the Sony hack, Monaco went on rounds throughout Washington to drum up support for the new agency. Monaco, who has a background in counterterrorism, has been

one of the most major proponents of treating cyber threats similarly to terrorism. “We need to build up the muscle memory for our cyber-response capabilities, as we have on the terrorism side,” Monaco said, summing up her feeling about how best to tackle this growing threat. President Obama has been very vocal about the need for a stronger stance and increased proactivity in relation to cyber threats. “No foreign nation, no hacker, should be able to shut down our networks, steal our trade secrets, or invade the privacy of American families, especially our kids,” he said during his Jan. State of the Union address. The announcement for the CTIIC

hasn’t been received without some question as to the need for another intelligence agency. “We should not be creating more organizations and bureaucracy,” Melissa Hathaway, a former White House cybersecurity coordinator and president of Hathaway Global Strategies, said. Despite the few voices that don’t feel the answer to cyber threats is a new agency tasked with intelligence, plans for the CTIIC already well on track. The agency will begin with 50 staffers and a budget of $35 million. It stands to be seen how effective the new agency will be without a single policy governing cyber threats.

“Battlefield: Hardline” inches closer to completion with newest beta test Carlito Ricafort Staff Writer Downtown Los Angeles- the streets are void of all civilian life. In it’s place is a skirmish between the L.A.P.D. and numerous bank robbers. A few years ago, this kind of setting would have been associated with the popular co-op game, “Payday 2”. Electronic Arts (EA) aims to change that with the release of “Battlefield: Hardline,” an upcoming 2015 game developed by Visceral Games (responsible for the “Dead Space” franchise). Since it’s announcement, many gamers are skeptical, believing “Hardline” to be a mere re-skin of the previous game in the franchise, “Battlefield 4”. Back in June 2014, a public beta was held for “Battlefield:Hardline.” This beta was in very early stages, and therefore Visceral was able to collect feedback on multiplayer months before launch. There was both positive and negative feedback which caused

EA to delay the game, pushing “Hardline” back from it’s Fall 2014 release date to early 2015. In a statement released on Battlefield’s official blog, they planned on improving the game and implementing new ideas based off of player feedback, but “there was only one problem. We would need more time. Time that we didn’t have if we decided to move forward with launching in just a couple of months,” according to the blog. “Battlefield: Hardline” has a new release date of March 17, 2015. In preparation of it’s release, a second public beta was launched on Feb. 3 and ran for a little over a week. The beta included three different maps, three game modes, and plenty of weapons for the players to unlock. This new beta is a lot closer to the final product, and definitely aims to convince players that “Hardline” is its own game, and not just an expansion to a previous title. “Hardline” has received plenty of

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balancing fixes. No longer are cops casually carrying rocket launchers and heavy machine guns into battle against a few bank robbers (instead, these weapons are now scattered throughout the map for players to pick up and use). No longer does it take a couple magazines from an M16 to destroy a police cruiser or muscle car. In addition these fixes, the run speed of players has been increased, which is more in-line with the copsand-robbers aesthetic and not the slower pace of the soldiers in “Battlefield 4”. The HUD has been cleaned up slightly, and many small tweaks have been made here and there. The maps are more interactive, audio is enhanced, and the camera has been adjusted slightly. The beta also introduces a new game mode: Hotwire. Hotwire is similar to Conquest, a mainstay in the franchise. Players are sent to capture set points (flags) on the map, and holding more points than the opposing team will cause that team to

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bleed from a “ticket pool”. Hotwire puts a new twist on that game mode by replacing the flags with assorted vehicles, which require the players to drive above a certain speed in order to capture the point. Surely enough, players are encouraged to not only defend their captured vehicles, but to steal or even destroy the vehicles owned by the opposing team. This allows for fast-paced and fun gameplay, but it is not without it’s flaws. “The main problem is the car physics. Or lack thereof. I’ve always thought Battlefield’s vehicle handling was pretty decent, if a bit floaty, but cars in “Hardline” have no weight at all,” Hayden Dingman, a writer for PC World, said. Dingman brings up a great point. Just a few minutes with the vehicles in Hardline is all it takes to back up his point. Hopefully, the car physics can be improved by Visceral before the final product. Is “Hardline” worth the $60 pricetag?

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Throughout its development, “Hardline” has been criticized because of it’s existence as a full-fledged game that will retail for $60 at launch. In fact, during the first beta, a petition was created on www.change.org, asking for “Hardline” to not be released as a standalone game, but as DLC for the existing “Battlefield 4”. The petition only amassed roughly 1,500 supporters, but that vocal minority is representative of broader fan base of the “Battlefield” franchise. The newest beta widens the gap between “Hardline” and it’s predecessors, but without a full product (and a yet-unexplored single player story mode), only time will tell whether or not “Battlefield: Hardline” will bring longtime fans of the series back onto the battlefield.


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For more student life pictures, visit our social media!

LIFE

A variety of activities took place on February 12 at the Webb Center | Student Engagement and Enrollment Services

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ODU beat UTEP 79-50 at the Annual Hoops for the Cure Game on Valentine’s Day | Taylor Nguyen Hoops for Cure

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The Vagina Monologues organized by the Women’s Center this past week, benefitting the YWCA | Schyler Shafer

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For Colored Girls, a choreopoem presented by the Starving Artists in celebration of Black History Month | Nicolas Nemtala

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Making a dierence one section at a time Now Paying Writers, Photographers, Videographers and Artists Meetings Tuesday 12:30 in the U-Center


Creative

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E NC L AV E

Submit your creative pieces to the Creative Enclave by emailing artsandentertainment@maceandcrown.com. sudokucollection.com

Violets Roses are good Violets are the best Their misunderstood Neglected by the rest A strong Rose Blooms through the concrete But Violets, They blossom in the snow. Roses, Don’t know the taste of defeat Nor the burning of the cold Yes, A Rose’s love is deep But there’s something Only a Violet knows If it’s love you want to keep Then you must know how to let go Roses arered Violets are purple One is buried with the dead The other keeps your heart full

Break of the Day by Nate Fakes

R.A.W.

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


February 18  
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