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WEDNESDAY | 2.10.2016 | MACEANDCROWN.COM | Vol. 59, Issue 4

WHAT’S

INSIDE STUDENT PROFILE: A LOOK INSIDE

ODU’S JUNGLE ON CAMPUS

THE COLLEGE WOODWORKER

A4 Rachael Vincent Contributing Writer

CHRYSLER MUSEUM

OF ART’S

LANDSCAPE

COLLECTION B4

WRESTLING SNAPS LOSING

STREAK 19-18

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Zac Jones’ girlfriend stands in front of an unstable tripod, gripping an adhesive gun on a weatherworn deck inside a fenced-in backyard a few miles from the ODU campus. The couple listens to the sound of college students conversing on their way to class and the crackling pavement as the Monarch bus makes its daily route. Jones, a 2015 ODU graduate, is a woodworker and is growing his business through a tutorial YouTube channel, which has slowly gained a following. Jessica Kilmurray, his girlfriend, is about to set some glue on what will eventually be a corn-hole board for Jones’ latest woodworking tutorial. “If it gets messed up, it’s okay, we can fix it,” Jones says as Kilmurray anxiously expresses her concern of messing up his project. Jones grew up with woodworking from his dad, but, “I didn’t even know I liked it,” he says. Three years ago, however, Jones decided to pick up the hobby by making his very first woodwork piece–a beer pong table. He studied several YouTube tutorials learning the ins and outs of woodworking. Once he felt he had sufficiently mastered the skill, he decided to post his own how-to videos on building decorative cork boards, coolers and light-up corn-hole boards. Although he was already familiar

with woodworking when he started, James had to experiment with unfamiliar skills on the technology side of his projects. It was challenging at first, but he says, “I learned the technology side more and more as I did each tutorial.” Jones’ videos have a proficient quality about them. It’s hard to tell he learned his skill purely through experience and picking up tips he observed from other tutorials. His practice seems to be paying off. Jones has generated 196 subscribers to his channel called “The College Woodworker,” which has 11 videos. He’s gained 31,015 views and 114 likes on his most popular DIY corn hole board tutorial. Despite the seeming popularity, Jones believes his business is only a 4 on a success scale of 1-10. “The beginning of a business is the hard part,” he says. Although more orders are starting to come through, getting the business going hasn’t been easy, but with support from the people close to him it’s been an enjoyable transition from a hobby to a business. Every entrepreneur needs moral support, and Jones’ girlfriend is quick to stand by him. “I definitely support whatever he decides to do,” Kilmurray says. She is an ODU alumna and supports Jones by handling the marketing side of the business and creating and handing out flyers to help promote his products.

Jones is taking a different approach to his woodworking channel in order to appeal to women and expand his target audience. “It’s not just for college people, it expands to everybody,” Kilmurray says as Jones nods in agreement. For both the bonding and marketing aspect, he would like Kilmurray to be more involved in his tutorials. He plans to incorporate some of her interests, like baking, into his YouTube channel. Jones’ dad shows moral support by watching the tutorials and being his most honest critic. He’s constantly showing Jones ways to speed up production and reminds him that the most important thing about making wood pieces is the accuracy of the cut. Jones may get advice he didn’t ask for, but “the videos always come out better when I listen to him,” he says. Jones is currently working on a light-up beer pong table. “My pride and joy,” he says. He continues finetuning his business, just as he’s done with his woodworking skill. With a team of support reminding him that the sky is the limit, it won’t be long before he brings his company, from a 4 to a 10 on his scale. Although he hopes to move past the backyard and the unstable tripod stage, Jones’ main priority is to have fun and inspire others. “I want my customers to look at my product and wonder how I made that and attempt it themselves,” Jones says.


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Face in the m ace

Hashtag #ODU to see your face in the m ace

EDITORIAL BOARD

Mace & Crown Mace & Crown is a newspaper published by and written for the students of Old Dominion once a week throughout each semester and once in the summer. Originally founded in 1930 as The High Hat, the paper became the Mace & Crown in 1961. The Mace & Crown is a primarily self-supporting newspaper, maintaining journalistic independence from the university. All views expressed in this collegiate paper are those of the author, not of the University, Mace & Crown or the editors.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Amy Poulter Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@maceandcrown.com

Ross Reelachart Technology Editor technology@maceandcrown. com

Stef Wasko Copy Editor swask002@odu.edu

Matt O’Brien Sports Editor sports@maceandcrown. com

Josh Whitener News Editor news@maceandcrown. com

Sabrina Brooks Senior Graphic Designer sbroo029@odu.edu

Adam Flores Arts & Entertainment Editor artsandentertainment@ maceandcrown.com

Jason Kazi Social Media / Advertising Manager advertising@maceandcrown. com

Joshua Boone Photography Editor photo@maceandcrown. com

Jugal Patel Digital Editor jpate016@odu.edu

STAFF WRITERS Alex Brooks George Plank Jonah Grinkewitz Julius Ayo Larenz Johnson Megan Snyder Shannon Jay Zachary Moeller STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Brian Vliet Diana Macaraeg Jonathan Harding Naomi Luking Schyler Shafer Shamon Jones

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NEWS

For even more campus crime information, visit maceandcrown.com. COMMUNITY CRIME LOG

LOCAL NEWS ODU COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES APPROVED FOR NEW PROGRAM

JANUARY 31ST An assault was reported to have occurred on January 31st at 12:21 a.m. at this approximate location. The assailant was cleared by arrest.

The College of Health Sciences Kinesiology Ph.D. program was just approved by the State Council of Higher Education. Student applications are already being taken and accepted for enrollment in the new program. The program will focus on the practice of kinesiology and rehabilitation services.

BLACK HISTORY EVENTS CONTINUE ON CAMPUS On Wednesday, Feb. 10, Kayden Coleman, a once-pregnant, transgender man will share his story with attendees in the Hampton/Newport News rooms in Webb Center. The talk will begin at 5:30 p.m., and Coleman will share stories of his journey. Dinner will be provided.

JANUARY 31ST An assault was reported to have occurred on January 31st at 2:27 a.m. at this approximate location. The assailant was cleared by arrest.

On Thursday, Feb. 11, ODUnited will gather in the Isle of Wight Room in Webb Center to host a workshop that promotes inclusiveness on campus and throughout the ODU community. Discussions about how to be a better ally and why being pro-black doesn’t mean anti-white will be included. The workshop will begin at 7 p.m.

JANUARY 31ST

An assault reported to have occurred on January 31st between 2:23 and 2:40 a.m. at this approximate location. The case is being investigated by Norfolk PD.

ENDANGERED TIGER CUBS BORN AT NORFOLK’S VIRGINIA ZOO The newest addition to the Virginia Zoo are a pair of male tiger cubs, born on Jan. 6 and 7. The Malayan tiger cubs belong to a species that has less that 300 in existence. Though they are not on public display at the zoo yet, the zoo has a live video feed where the curious can watch the cubs eat, sleep and play 24/7 on their website.

AMAZON PRIME LAUNCHES ONE HOUR DELIVERY IN HAMPTON ROADS Online retail giant Amazon has extended its newest service feature to the Hampton Roads area. Prime members can now shop on the website and receive items hand-delivered in an hour or less with a delivery fee of $7.99, though opting for two-hour delivery is free. To see if Amazon is delivering to your neighborhood, you can check your zip code online.

Courtesy of Mace and Crown

Date/ Time Reported

Date/ Time Occurred

Location

Category

Incident Number

Disposition

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 12:25AM

4800 Blk. Hampton Blvd.

Assault - Simple

2016-ODU-000112

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:23AM - 2:40AM

1200 Blk. W. 37th Street

Assault - Simple

2016-ODU-000113

Investigation by other Agency 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:27AM

4200 Blk. Bowdens Ferry Road

Breaking and Entering

2016-ODU-000114

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:27AM

4200 Blk. Bowdens Ferry Road

Destruction of Property

2016-ODU-000114

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:27AM

4200 Blk. Bowdens Ferry Road

Trespassing

2016-ODU-000114

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:27AM

4200 Blk. Bowdens Ferry Road

Assault - Simple

2016-ODU-000114

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

01/31/2016

01/31/2016 2:27AM

4200 Blk. Bowdens Ferry Road

Prevent Summoning of Emergency Services

2016-ODU-000114

Clear by Arrest 02/01/2016

02/01/2016

02/01/2016 10:30AM - 10:40AM

4600 Blk. Elkhorn Ave - England House

Narcotics Violation

2016-ODU-000117

Judicial referral 02/02/2016

02/01/2016

02/01/2016 4:48PM - 4:49PM

1300 Blk. W. 49th Street

Hit and Run - Property Damage

2016-ODU-000120

Active 02/02/2016

02/01/2016

01/30/2016 9:00PM - 11:00PM

1000 Blk. Buckingham Ave

Larceny

2016-ODU-000121

Active 02/02/2016

02/02/2016

02/02/2016 7:30AM - 8:00AM

4300 Blk. Elkhorn Ave. - Garage A

Hit and Run - Property Damage

2016-ODU-000123

Active 02/03/2016

02/02/2016

01/22/2016 8:52AM 02/02/2016 5:51PM

1000 Blk. W. 49th St. - Gresham Main

Larceny

2016-ODU-000125

Active 02/03/2016

02/02/2016

02/02/2016 9:00AM 02/02/2016 3:00PM

4700 Blk. Powhatan Ave. - Powhatan Apartments

Larceny

2016-ODU-000126

Active 02/03/2016

02/02/2016

02/02/2016 1:20PM - 1:40PM

1000 Blk. W. 45th St. - Garage D

Hit and Run - Property Damage

2016-ODU-000127

Active 02/03/2016

02/02/2016

02/02/2016 8:45PM

4200 Blk. Killam Ave. - VIllage Lot 3

Narcotics Violation

2016-ODU-000128

Clear by Arrest 02/03/2016

02/04/2016

01/28/2016 7:00AM 02/03/2016 3:00PM

5200 Blk. Bluestone Ave. - Lot 4

Destruction of Property

2016-ODU-000132

Active 02/05/2016

02/04/2016

02/04/2016 1:00AM - 9:00AM

1000 Blk. W. 43rd Street - Village 8

Destruction of Property

2016-ODU-000135

Active 02/05/2016

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NEWS

Check out a video of the greenhouse at maceandcrown.com.

A view inside the Arthur and Phyllis Kaplan Orchid Conservatory, located near the MGB building. Jugal Patel Digital Editor 20 feet below a lattice of rafters, fans and complex metal tubing, almost every square inch of ODU’s orchid conservatory is bursting with life. Areas to walk and observe flora struggle to hold back plants sprouting through cracked pavement. The entrance is a door to another world, a drastic departure from the land surrounding the campus greenhouse. One step inside the conservatory meets a kaleidoscopic rush of

perfume-like smells and vibrantly saturated colors over the subtle drone of fans above. Marcus Jones curates the greenhouse, formally called the Arthur and Phyllis Kaplan Orchid Conservatory. Jones controls the world inside —

he can do it from anywhere in the world, through an app on his phone. The greenhouse is immediately hotter and intensely humid. From the side walls, warm sprays of mist envelop a dazzling array of plants every so often, producing a sound somewhere

in tandem with more metal tubes that allow for control of the greenhouse with exact precision. This artificially created world fits in a small room just 50 by 25 feet. It’s one of five carefully controlled greenhouses in the $2.1 million structure,

“...Between the symphony of a rainforest and the hiss of a serpent” the temperature, humidity, ventilation, irrigation, the life or the death of these rare and exotic species — and

between the symphony of a rainforest and the hiss of a serpent. Vines and ferns scale the back wall

totaling a space of 30,000 square feet. It’s known as the display. There are plants inside from all

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@maceandcrown

Edited photo by Jason Kazi. over the planet– Africa’s miracle fruit, South America’s amazon lily, Hawaii’s baby woodrose and Asia’s arctic snow. The plants here grow in every shape and color imaginable. Some are endangered and a few extinct in nature. One has leaves stained bloodred around spots of green. There’s a bizarre-shaped spectacle of a flower, bright orange and hiding below a thicket of ferns. There’s a leopard printed flower and a seemingly prehistoric species with leaves around 4


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NEWS feet long and 3 feet wide. In the corner, a small L-shaped pond with lily pads sits next to a wooden adirondack chair, overlooking the display. Jones’ office is only a few feet away from the jungle on campus. With a younger assistant, he opened his door, clipboard-in-hand, and stepped outside in a rush to enter the room of plants. Wearing sunglasses, a green sweater zipped to his neck, blue jeans and grey slippers, he’s not exactly a hippie, but he is hip. He speaks between colloquialisms of the day and botanical jargon. “Walk with me,” he said. Jones was headed towards the Mills Godwin Life Sciences Building to speak with five other botanists about an experiment. They plan to take a russet potato and grow it within fungal soil media that supports a Lady Slipper orchid. “They’ll put anything in these experiments,” Peter Schafran, another botanist who accompanied Jones on

For more photos of the greenhouse, visit maceandcrown.com.

the Smithsonian Institute, education with local school children and stormwater and wetlands restoration projects with the city. Sea level rise is a growing research interest both at ODU and for researchers in the greenhouse. The presence of roads, buildings and sidewalks magnify the intensity of flooding as water is unable to permeate into surfaces. Because of this, botanists are interested in studying the ability of plants to absorb higher quantities of water. “It’s an interesting subject,” Jones said. “It plays into everything that most people see in cities.” “So you take a plant like bald cypress, which grows normally in swamps, but it also grows well in roadside medians,” Jones said. “Look at California, the way everything’s been planted out there for years and years and years and years. Now they’re running out of water. Maybe that’s going to change the whole idea of what should be planted.” One way of tackling sea level rise

“Some people stay longer and for reasons that are deeper.” the walk, said. “It’s like they’ll take their own lunch and stick it in there.” The idea is to see if the presence of a potato — or any other species for that matter — could produce germination in the orchid. On the way to MGB, Jones explained why orchids are special. “Orchids adapt to so many different climates and so many different areas of the world, ” Jones said. “They’re everywhere.” The conservatory allows the biology department to study conservation efforts for struggling stands of orchids, which offers a unique look at how evolution takes place. They also serve an essential role in the pollination process and the abundance of biodiversity. The greenhouse is used for outreach and education as well. The collection includes around 475 species and is open to the public. About 1,000 people a year visit the conservatory for tours, classes and other events. Materials in the greenhouse have been used in courses at ODU including botany, ethnobotany, biology and evolutionary biology. Even English, art, philosophy and photography students have drawn inspiration from greenhouse. “We do a lot of stuff here besides orchids,” Jones said. The botanists are involved with projects including butterfly gardens around campus, research with

was through a wetlands restoration project just behind Brock Commons on Monarch Way. “A lot of the native plants that went in there, we grew ‘em here,” Jones said. “We helped them get aquatic plants in there to help with that uptake of water and nutrients and to clean up that system.” Over five years of curating the greenhouse, Jones has seen all sorts of people transiently admiring his display. He enjoys talking about the people who visit just as much as the plants themselves. “People come here for different reasons,” Jones said. “Sometimes people come here because they love plants. Other people come here and just sit in the front and do homework.” Some people stay longer and for reasons that are deeper. “For the longest time I had a couple people that came in here for religious reasons,” Jones said. “Not that this place is religious, but it’s quiet, and it’s warm in the winter time. They would sit and just think. [Another] volunteer is 78 and she graduated ODU in 1959. She comes in every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.” The orchid conservatory attracts visitors from near and far. It is the largest orchid collection in the Tidewater region of Virginia. The display greenhouse is open to visitors from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Jones’ office tucked in a back corner of the Orchid Conservatory.

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Photo by Jason Kazi.


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NEWS

Follow Alicia Garza on Twitter: @aliciagarza.

Co-founder, Alicia Garza, of #BlackLivesMatter speaks at the Ted.

Photo by Jason Kazi

#BlackLivesMatter Co-Founder Alicia Garza Speaks at Ted Amy Poulter Editor-in-Chief Over 1,500 students, faculty and community members attended activist Alicia Garza’s address at the Ted Constant Center on Feb. 2. Garza, most notably known for her involvement in the social justice movement Black Lives Matter, spoke to attendees about racial injustices that black citizens often face. Her appearance was a part of President John Broderick’s lecture series. Just after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the 2013 killing of Trayvon Martin, Garza wrote what she calls a love letter to black citizens across the country. “I didn’t write that letter because I knew that eventually it would become the banner for a worldwide movement,” Garza said. “I wrote that letter because too many of the people who are sworn to protect and serve our communities are literally getting away with murder.”

During Zimmerman’s trial, Garza said she often heard speculation about what Martin had done to provoke Zimmerman, or how Martin’s parents were to blame for their son’s death. When a school friend of Martin’s was interviewed by media outlets, she was criticized for her manner of speech. Garza said it was these conversations that angered and inspired her. “I watched as many of our major news stations were covering

and manslaughter, Garza was gathered with many of her friends. She recalled the moment that the decision was delivered by television news networks, and how she and her friends fell silent. Garza said that her friend’s heads sunk as their shoulders dropped forward, unable to make eye contact with one another. “I thought to myself at that moment, that’s the weight that we carry,” she said. “This was awful, but we already knew the system doesn’t

rules to protect themselves and their children from a fate similar to Martin’s. She read through their frustrations, but ultimately thought that these things “were not a death sentence.” The “love letter” was written in the aftermath of the trial and gave birth to the to the now famous #BlackLivesMatter. Garza wrote, “Our lives matter, we matter, black lives matter.” Her sister Patrice put a hashtag in front of her words.

“Hashtags don’t start movements, people do.” the Trayvon Martin trial,” Garza said. “That was interesting to me, because you can’t put somebody on trial who’s dead, so it was really the George Zimmerman trial, but already, the framing is happening.” On July 13, 2013, when it was announced that Zimmerman would be acquitted of second-degree murder

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work for us.” When Garza encountered people on her Facebook feed saying, “We need to make sure that our kids pull their pants up, make sure our kids don’t wear hoodies, and make sure our kids get a good education,” she said it upset her. Garza said she felt that people were trying to define

“I didn’t know what a hashtag was,” Garza said. The hashtag took off and people were instantly using it as a platform to fight back against the negativity surrounding the trial. The accessibility to the conversation using the hashtag helped to spread Garza’s message and movement quickly,

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though she doesn’t cite the hashtag as the movement. “Hashtags don’t start movements, people do,” Garza said to the silent crowd. Along with a couple of her close friends, Garza decided to use the platform they had incidentally created to form chapters of the Black Lives Matter movement across the country. Garza took questions from the audience at the end of her address. One student asked how he, as a white man, could be a better ally. Garza used the opportunity to tell white attendees that they must talk to and encourage their peers, saying that “they can have conversation with other white people that black people are not able to.” Another student asked if there was a local Black Lives Matter chapter, Garza delivered a quick response. “No, but it sounds like y’all should start one. Boom!”


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NEWS

Attend the H.R. Sea Level Rise/Flooding Adaptation Forum on Feb. 18.

Photos by Jonah Grinkewitz

University Librarian George Fowler presents the survey results to the community.

Perry Library Looks to Improve After Survey Jonah Grinkewitz Staff Writer The results are in for the survey conducted by ODU’s Perry Library assessing how students, faculty and staff rate their services. It focused on three areas: the quality of the library as a space, the effectiveness of service, and information control. The library may be the most important building and tool for many on campus, and library staff hope to use the data from the survey to improve its facilities. A discussion of the survey results took place on Feb. 1 in the Perry Library. “We wanted to know, are the libraries doing what they should, and

are they doing it well?” said George Fowler, University Librarian. The survey was carried out by a volunteer task force of library staff headed by Megan Smith. “In general, the survey revealed

lected. This consisted of 508 undergraduate, 179 graduate, 93 faculty, and 47 staff responses. For faculty and staff, the biggest concern was not having enough resources and not being able to print for free. They also

talking on the fourth floor and that once the upper floors closed at night they had trouble finding a quiet place to work and study. Survey results also revealed that students wanted the library website

“It’s not teaching to a test. This is what our users are telling us and we want to respond to it.” —George Fowler, University Librarian that undergraduate students care most about space in the library, specifically more quiet study space,” Smith said at the survey discussion. The survey consisted of 22 questions and a comment box, and overall 827 valid survey responses were col-

commented on wanting to improve the look of each floor and make areas more inviting. In the comments section of the survey many students had positives to say about the learning commons, but complained that people were still

to be improved and that they were least interested in individual attention from library staff. “Perhaps students need to be educated more on what a library can do for them, with regards to information literacy and resources,” said

Gail Dickinson, the associate dean of education. Overall, the library staff felt that the survey yielded helpful results that they want to use for improvement in a master space plan for the library. “Now that we have the data we are going to use that to inform the decisions that we make,” Fowler said. “We need more quiet study space. We need more group study space. We may need more space for faculty to engage with us and interact with our partners to bring them in.” Fowler said that the library wants to use this survey again in the future, but added, “It’s not teaching to a test. This is what our users are telling us and we want to respond to it.”

Sea Level Rise Continues to Impact Campus Areas Ben Maxie Contributing Writer Monarchs may have noticed that Norfolk floods almost every time there is significant rainfall. Subsequently, 49th St. is almost completely impassable at high tide after a storm. These problems are likely to worsen as the ocean continues to encroach on city streets. Apocalyptic flooding of Norfolk will not likely happen suddenly. Around the year 2100 is when the water level could be around seven feet higher than today. “Water lapping up on our shores runs over from storms, which will get worse,” Larry Atkinson, a climate change oceanographer at ODU, said. As glaciers and ice sheets continue to shrink, the ice lost is dumped into

the oceans. For example, Antarctica loses apartment building-sized icebergs on a regular basis, dumping around 310 cubic kilometers of land ice into the water per year. Put simply, man-made climate

totrophs, that consume CO2 – plants, so now we are introducing more ‘heterotrophs’ without an equivalent amount of autotrophs.” This effect is driving CO2 concentrations higher.

“There was an ice sheet on Quebec and Ontario which is gone now. The land [around Norfolk] is still trying to compensate for this shift in weight,” Atkinson said. “Around one-third of the sea level rise is from this effect.”

“Apocalyptic flooding of Norfolk will not likely happen suddenly.” change is an imbalance between the proportion of things that take in CO2 and produce oxygen– plants– and things that take in oxygen and produce CO2–animals. “Internal combustion engines essentially added artificial heterotrophs (that make CO2),” Greg Cutter, an oceanographer at ODU, said. “It is the balance between hetero and au-

Atkinson said Norfolk land is also sinking. This is mostly “subsidence because of ground-water pumping from the deep aquifers,” he said. As water is pumped from pockets under ground, the land can sink to fill the space left behind. A small amount of this effect is also from a process known as glacial isostatic adjustment.

Water also expands as it warms, raising the water level by thermal expansion. Water further expands because of a condition known as rising dynamic. “There are high and low pressure areas in water, like air pressure,” Atkinson said. “There is a high area off the east coast, around three feet compared to Bermuda.”

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As the climate changes, more sea level rise will stem from the Gulf Stream. “Because the North Atlantic is warming and expanding and land ice in Antarctic and Greenland is melting, adding water to the ocean,” Atkinson said, “the Gulf Stream will slow.” These conditions will not likely improve, and residents of low-lying areas like ODU must adapt. Low lying areas around the world, notably southern Bangladesh, are relocating people away from the rising water. This is a point of active discussion in the Hampton Roads area, and interested students should attend the Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise/ Flooding Adaptation Forum at the Chrysler Museum on Feb. 18.


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NEWS

For more news updates, visit maceandcrown.com.

Sorting Through the Weed:

Marijuana Attorney Moe Spencer Talks Marijuana Politics Erin Sudek Contributing Writer Moe Spencer has worked numerous jobs in law on the West Coast since 2002. While finishing law school, his career began as a public defender. After graduation, he was assistant to Bill Bradbury, the Secretary of State for Oregon. Later, Spencer would become the state director of government and legal relations for the American Cancer Society. After two years, Spencer worked for Davidson Law Firm in Pasco, Washington, as a criminal defense, family law and trial attorney. Today, Spencer has his own law firm, Spencer Palace Law, which specializes in cases involving civil

rights, expungement of past criminal records, marijuana law and contracts. He frequently represents marijuana growers and processors, helping them to obtain retail licenses. Spencer spoke in ODU’s North Cafe about the history and influence of marijuana in politics on Feb. 4. Spencer discussed the history of why marijuana became illegal, highlighting the racist intentions of marijuana laws, the “war on drugs” and gave details on why marijuana is a schedule 1 narcotic. He explained how initially, laws against smoking marijuana were targeting Mexican immigrants and black citizens. He related the the issue to the prison industrial complex. He dropped names like William

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Randolph Hearst, the man who created “yellow journalism” and persuaded his readers to illegalize marijuana, and Richard Nixon, who started the “war on drugs” and used marijuana politically to benefit his reelection. Spencer said the government’s manipulation of law psychologically to change how people saw this medically beneficial drug was dumbfounding. Spencer spoke about numerous medical benefits of marijuana. “I’m not here advocating for marijuana, even though I’m an attorney,” Spencer said. “There are some problems with it.” Spencer explained the legal logistics of obtaining medical marijuana cards, the rules and how it all works.

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He stressed the medicinal element of marijuana throughout the evening. He first learned what he now teaches when he was working on small crimes and saw the amount of cases related to marijuana. When he began researching and learning about the laws and how intertwined with race marijuana politics was, he wanted to “be a part of the change.” He wanted to represent the “low hanging fruit” of society and change the way the U.S. handles marijuana. “People need to stop getting arrested for having marijuana,” Spencer said. Moe Spencer provides the American people with the legal and historical facts in order for them to take an educated stance on marijuana and

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its use in the U.S. Spencer said it’s important for people to come to a conclusion so that our government will listen and can work towards a more just, sensible and fair legal system regarding marijuana. “Moe Spencer changed my perception about the legalities of cannabis and how history has shaped it into a negative product,” ODU senior Tommy Kiesner said. “I have a better understanding of the industry as a whole and the process of getting involved in it.” Spencer will continue to speak at universities and other audiences across the country to represent those who are subject to what he calls unfair laws.


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Arts &

Visit maceandcrown.com for a video recap of Pharaoh’s show.

E N T ER T A I NM E N T

BITS OF A&E MAURICE WHITE OF EARTH, WIND & FIRE DIES AT AGE 74

Maurice White, singer and founder of Earth, Wind & Fire, passed away on Feb. 4. White had been battling Parkinson’s disease that also forced him to stop touring in 1994. The band won six Grammys in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000.

‘MEMORIALS TO THE MISSING’ A RADIO PLAY

On Feb. 17-20 and 24-27, the University Theater will present “Memorials to the Missing.” A radio play written by Stephen Wyatt, it is in collaboration with the Department of History’s WWI Initiative: “Remembering World War I: A Hundredth Anniversary Commemoration.” For ticket information, visit ODUArtsTix.com or call (757) 683-5305.

AUTHORS TO DELIVER BLACK HISTORY MONTH KEYNOTE

Assistant professors Erik Nielson and Travis L. Gosa will deliver and discuss “The Hip Hop and Obama Reader.” The authors have examined the influence of hip-hop on politics during the Obama era. The event, free and open to the public, will take place Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m. in the Big Blue Room of ODU’s Ted Constant Convocation Center.

‘WATER STORIES: CONVERSATIONS IN PAINT AND SOUND’

An alumna of ODU, artist Anne Neely presents a series of imposing works addressing issues of water environmentally, ecologically and culturally. With a soundscape by Halsey Burgund, Neely’s paintings, which express her bond with the natural world, will be on display through March 13 at The Baron and Ellin Gordon Art Galleries, ODU.

DON CHEADLE TO STAR IN MILES DAVIS BIOPIC

Don Cheadle’s “Miles Ahead” is a new Miles Davis biopic in which Cheadle directs and stars as the legendary jazz icon. The first trailer appeared on Feb. 3 portraying an aggressive and violent Davis. The film first premiered last year at the New York Film Festival and will arrive in theaters April 1.

JAY PHARAOH ROCKS

THE NORVA WITH LAUGHTER George Plank Staff Writer The audience at The NorVa erupted with a mixture of laughter and pained groans on Jan. 30 with Saturday Night Live cast member, Jay Pharaoh. “Buckle up. It’s going to get worse,” Pharaoh said early in the evening, giving the audience a taste of what to expect. The NorVa was an interesting choice for a comedy show. The interior bears a mismatched, warehouse aesthetic equipped with a chandelier and a fully stocked bar. Fold-out chairs were lined in rows and those seats were sold early to those willing to pay a little more. A general admission ticket meant standing, either on the ground floor or on the balcony, for the whole show. The show was titled the “Jay Pharaoh Homecoming Experience” by

No topic was off limits, from the Bill Cosby allegations to Caitlyn Jenner as he said, “Shout out to Bruce Jenner… It took a lot of balls to do what he did.” Naturally the audience reacted negatively to some of his material, but he was always ready with a snappy comeback and a quick transition back into the set. When some members of the audience groaned at the mention of Bill Cosby, Pharaoh shot back, “Is he here? I don’t see a problem.” Immediately, the audience was back on his side and ready for whatever was going to come next. Pharaoh proved to be a talented impressionist. Time and time again during the show, he demonstrated versatility in his vocal prowess. He did impressions of fellow comedians, Kevin Hart, Katt Williams and Eddie Murphy. He also included impersonations of hip-hop moguls

“Buckle up. It’s going to get worse...” —Jay Pharaoh the live disc jockey that preceded the comedian. Pharaoh grew up in Chesapeake, Virginia and attended Indian River High School. Pharaoh has playfully mocked his roots in SNL skits in the past; most notable is his depiction of the principal of Booker T. Washington High School, Daniel Frye, on a field trip to the Virginia Zoological Park in Norfolk, Virginia. James Frye, Pharaoh’s actual principal and inspiration for the character, was the one who eventually introduced the comedian, but not before claiming that he, “taught Jay everything he knows.” Pharaoh’s choice of words remained colorful throughout his performance. He worked hard to earn the 18+ requirement to enter The NorVa. He never shied away from f-bombs, s-words and even the occasional n-word. He also showed no regard for possibly offending audience members.

Jay Z and Kanye West along with political candidate Ben Carson and others. In character, he recounted the time he had the opportunity to meet President Barack Obama and how Obama had tried to correct Pharaoh’s impression of him. “You play me too straight. I like to have fun from time to time. Turn up, bitch,” Obama said to Pharaoh as he relished in telling the audience. After the show there was a photo-op available to anyone who was willing to wait just a bit longer to brave the crowd also trying to get a photo with Pharaoh. Fans responded incredibly throughout the evening. It seems wherever Jay Pharaoh goes, or whatever he decides to do, there will be a following of people there to see it happen. Chalk it up as another funny night for a very funny man.

Jay Pharaoh brings his comedic genius to the NorVa.

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Photo by Shamon Jones

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Stream these albums at maceandcrown.com

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MONARCH MUSIC MINUTE Hell YES!

I’ll Listen to it Twice, Even.

We’re Getting There...

ADAM FLORES

Eh...

Face Palm.

Majid Jordan ‘Majid Jordan’

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Canadian Duo Majid Jordan, Majid Al Maskati and Jordan Ullman, the group’s singer and producer respectively, are pop enthusiasts first and foremost. Add a mixture of R&B and PBR&B. Toronto newcomers Majid Jordan have a careful mix of tracks with their eponymous debut released on Feb. 5. Back in 2013, Majid Jordan coproduced Drake’s “Hold On, We’re Going Home” from his platinum selling record “Nothing Was the Same.” They were also featured on the track, which went on to become Drake’s

most successful Billboard R&B and R&B/Hip-Hop single. Returning the favor and momentum of his partnership with Majid Jordan, Drake premiered on the duo’s first single from “Majid Jordan,” “My Love” in July of 2015. Drake is also featured on the cut, adding to the ambience of a sparse interaction of instrumental elements. The album yet rises to the occasion, building vocally on a “hot love and emotion” theme. Majid Jordan has released music videos for “My Love” featuring Drake, “Something About You” and most re-

cently, “King City.” Within the duo’s short, yet early stages of their career, it seems every new single and video has been met with success. It remains to be seen if the pairing can escape from under the shadows of Drake. “Majid Jordan” brings a darker sound, which seems to lull on various tracks of the album compared to their Drake counterpart productions. For every song that hits a high note is a song that is moody in shape, forming a blur that shows off the duo’s solo material as discreet background music at times.

Wiz Khalifa ‘Khalifa’

Cameron Jibril Thomaz, better known by his stage name, Wiz Khalifa, has released “Khalifa,” which dropped on Feb. 5. Since his 2006 debut album, “Show and Prove,” the veteran songwriter, recording artist and actor has proven his worth as a major player in the hip-hop industry beginning in his early days in Pittsburgh attracting attention with local mixtapes. Now, at age 28, “Khalifa” continues to show the evolution of his songwriting and message. As the follow up to his “Blacc Hollywood” album from 2014, the new record sports 13 new

tracks with an influential list of collaborators ranging from Travi$ Scott, Rico Love and Juicy J to Ty Dolla $ign and more. Khalifa has been the subject of some recent social media controversy, sparring with Kanye West on Twitter, which since has dissolved peacefully. Currently up for three Grammy nominations, the hip-hop mogul’s collaboration with labelmate Charlie Puth has the pair in contention for Song of the Year with “See You Again” and the “Furious 7” ode to late actor Paul Walker. “Khalifa” begins with the highly

charged “BTS,” which sets the momentum for the rest of the new record. By stating within the opening track, “My mom raised a fool,” fans have no remorse for the product of that upbringing. The track continues with a highly syncopated beat, ethereal synth pads, sparse pumping bass grooves, all with a tinge of R&B instrumentally and vocally. With “Bake Sale” featuring Travi$ Scott currently climbing the Billboard Hot 100, Khalifa’s fifth studio album precedes a “Rolling Papers 2” mixtape due later this year. Courtesy of Atlantic Records

Young Thug ‘I’m Up’

Courtesy of Roadrunner

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Jeffery Lamar Williams, the native Atlanta hip-hop artist better known as Young Thug, has released the mixtape “I’m Up” on Feb. 5. The rapper and singer-songwriter is best known for his breakout debut single “Stoner” back in February 2014. The commercial single also garnered him a nomination from the BET Hip Hop Awards under the category, Best Club Banger. Young Thug began his music career in 2010. In 2011-2012, he started attracting attention with the release of his three-part “I Came From Nothing” mixtape series. Rolling Stone

and Pitchfork hailed the young artist in reviews of his 2013 tape, “1017 Thug.” Citing Lil Wayne as his biggest influence, at just 24, Thug has made numerous connections on the hip-hop scene. He has worked and collaborated with the likes of producers and rappers Gucci Mane, Flame, Jadakiss, Wale, Nicki Minaj, Rich Homie Quan and many others. His “Barter 6” mixtape, released in April of 2015, peaked at No. 22 on the Billboard 200 chart and sat at the top of the iTunes Album Charts. “I’m Up” serves as another mixtape predecessor to his highly anticipated

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album, “Hy!£UN35,” leek-speak for “HiTunes,” due later this year. “I’m Up” is a nine-song compilation that includes the single “F Cancer (Boosie)” featuring Migo’s Quavo. His fellow Migo’s partner, Offset, appears on the cut “Special,” which also features Solo Lucci. The new mixtape shows his eccentric, yet diverse singsong style, which makes his music fascinating. “I’m Up” vibes at a comfortable level musically, yet several areas seem to stall out when those high points want to sore.


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Check out Patwary’s work at maceandcrown.com

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Sci-Fi Romance – “Dust Among the Stars”

Sci-Fi Romance’s ‘Dust Among the Stars’ Is Out of This World Lexie Nobrega Contributing Writer Folk band Sci-Fi Romance released their third album “Dust Among the Stars” on Jan. 26. It features 10 tracks, which together give the feel of a cinematic story. Vocalist and frontman Vance Kotrla’s emotional lyrics combined with the simplistic, yet breathtaking guitar chords and rich cello solos make the album shine as a uniquely original masterpiece. Apart from singer-songwriter Kotrla, Los Angeles based Sci-Fi Romance includes cellist Jody Stark, Mr. Mike and Kurt Bloom on drums, bassist Johnnie Kotrla and other collaborating artists. The band debuted in 2010 with their album “…and surrender my body to the flames.” Their most recent release, the 2014 EP “October,” is based on classic horror movies while sonically capturing the aesthetic on an old, analog cassette machine. Their music has been described by many as “steampunk folk” for its artistic fusion of modern folk with airs of Americana and soft rock and layered with haunting, deep vocals that paint a chilling gothic story in each album.

“Dust Among the Stars” continues to show the band’s versatility and evolution. The first track, “If I Fell,” pulls the listener in with its catchy rhythm and soothing cello, then lulls you with the somber, melancholic “Autumn Waltz.” Some songs tend to feel almost too dreamlike. Before you can space out, however, Vance Kotrla jars your senses awake with powerful, explosive sounds such as the track, “Goodbye at the End of the World.” The most magical aspect of “Dust Among the Stars” is its ability to evoke raw emotion out of its audience. Its themes of love, loss and longing are accessible to anyone and prompts the listener to contemplate their role in the vast universe and all that encompass who we are. “Dust Among the Stars” proves its worth in its compelling music and lyrics It is stellar and beautiful giving a fresh new take on the modern folk genre. Within the new record, Sci-Fi Romance strives to resonate profoundly with their audience. Their masterful technique of letting the flow of their rhythm and lyrics paint a dynamic story falls nothing short of breathtaking.

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Shomi Patwary and Navid Rahman’s “American Dreams” collaborative multimedia exhibition at Work Release.

Two Artists and Their ‘American Dreams’

Elizabeth Proffitt Contributing Writer The “American dream” has been used to describe the ideal American life since the 1930s. The general allure for a better life and the optimism for anyone being able to reach their goals spurs creativity. It is in that spirit that Shomi Patwary and Navid Rahman base most of their artistic success through the creation of their own “American Dreams.” Through their exhibition at Work Release on Granby St. in Norfolk, Virginia, the pair illustrated their inspiration and separate artistic journeys with their multimedia show, which ran from Jan. 22-30. The artists spoke to a packed restaurant of art lovers and students on the eve of the close of their show. They recounted stories from their pasts, which made them what they are today, and talked about where they would like to go in the future. Patwary, an alumnus of Old Dominion University, spoke for most of the mini lecture, while the more introverted Rahman gave a tutorial and drew on a tablet, which projected onto a screen for the audience to see. Of the two artists, Rahman is the illustrator while Patwary is primarily a music video director. He has

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worked with Beyoncé, A$AP Rocky and Charli XCX. These achievements were inspiration for the name of their show as Rahman and Patwary feel they are really living the American dream. The artists have known each other since they were children, and so this collaboration was natural. They balance each other well. Rahman focuses on details and line-work in his art, while Patwary focuses more

our stuff. It’s really a dream,” Patwary said. To wrap up the talk, the artists spoke about the inspiration for the title of their show and what the American dream means to them. “[The American dream] sounds like such basic words that people have heard over and over again, especially now with the political climate, and with people talking about how ‘they’re going to make America

“… It’s kind of funny that you’ve got two brown guys that are representing the American Dream...” — Shomi Patwary on the big picture and final result of the project. “I can’t stick to one thing forever. I have to always try something new, and that’s how I kind of ended up doing video,” Patwary said. “Everything was kind of self-taught, so like, Pharrell [Williams] would ask if we knew how to do a DVD for him, and we’d just say yes and try to figure it out on our own. We were hungry, so we’d just try and do whatever they wanted.” “It’s really weird, because we were looking up at these guys and they were actually liking and watching

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great again’… It’s kind of funny that you’ve got two brown guys that are representing the American Dream,” Patwary said, while gazing around at the scenes of his most successful music videos projected on the walls and curtains surrounding the room. Rahman ended the discussion saying, “The idea of the American dream is really simple to me. It’s opportunity, comfort and happiness… Being able to work as an illustrator is the most fulfilling thing to me because I am surrounded by people that I love, that push me to excellence. You really can’t ask more than that.”


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Visit “New Light on the Land” at the Chrysler through May 15.

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and railroad companies depict outdated technologies, not accurately representing modern machines, which altered the perceived harmony these images show. “It’s propaganda while also showing the landscape as it is,” Feman said. A sharp contrast to this propaganda is depicted in Sebastiao Salgado’s “Serra Pelada, Brazil,” planted next to Charles H. James’ commissioned piece from the Crozer Iron Company. While James’ desolate and messy landscape depicts an orderly tipple, Salgado’s image of several people

the role of writer Zora Neal Hurston in her daily life, walked around the writer’s hometown adding original poems inspired by Hurston. Chi becomes a character all his own, donning his infamous Mao suit with Lake Kamloops, Canada in the backdrop. These landscapes hold their own stories and might explain the artist’s relationship with the landscape. Eatonville, Florida was not only Weems’ muse’s hometown, but also the first U.S. town to incorporate black residents. Chi’s backdrop is near the city that saw the first Chinese-Canadian

“It’s propaganda...”

Photo by Edward Burtynsky

Shedding New Light on the Chrysler Museum of Art’s Landscape Collection Shannon Jay Staff Writer Curators Erik Neal, Seth Feman and Ed Pollard could have pulled out any number of beautiful photos from the Chrysler Museum of Art’s collection of landscape photographs for their latest exhibition, “New Light on the Land.” However, the goal was to bring out lesser-known photos, organized in a way to make viewers rethink conventional ideas of photography and the role photographers play in a place’s perception. “We’re interested in these questions of how people depict the landscape, and how photographers… change the way that we’re actually able to see the land itself,” Feman said about the themes in the new exhibit. Feman is also the Chrysler Museum of Art’s newest curator of photography. This shift in perception began bubbling while looking through images for another upcoming exhibit at the Chrysler, the traveling show “Edward Burtynsky: Water.” Large-scale photographs in this show are filled with rich colors and enchanting lines, but sometimes reveal harrowing scenes. In one photo, slick black swirls in a

turquoise pool actually capture the gulf oil spill. Photographs in “New Light on the Land” are lumped into four different themes. “Tourism” explores photos taken of places to encourage visitors. Weather photographers are taking advantage of already popular tourist spots or commissioned by cities to take tasteful photos and entice visitors. Frank Mason Good was hired by Greece to take photos of the city to promote tourism. Good dismissed close-ups of rough ruins, pulling away to focus on the contemporary city as a whole. This showed a deliberate effort to control the perception of the landscape along with the viewer’s ideas of the city. Platt DeBabbatt monopolized on already beautiful tourist spots with his year-round photo studio perched near Niagara Falls. Peaceful images of couples enjoying the falls are riddled with consumerism, as DeBabbatt made a living selling these shots to tourist, and viciously competed with other photographers along the way. The next section, “East vs. West,” connects two sides of the world and conquers mysterious land through photographs. Depictions of holy land

like Good’s “Fountain of Jericho” are pre-conceivably shaped by the viewer’s perception of the familiar location filled with backstory, blurring the lines of fiction and reality. “The camera was a neutral tool that wasn’t actually distorting anything at all,” Feman said, “but in fact the expectations being projected on the image by the consumer would’ve altered what they’re seeing. What you see in a photograph isn’t just what’s depicted, it’s kind of what you bring to it and what the photographer brings to it.” This is true of the sole Ansel Adams piece in the show depicting The Canyon De Chelly in Arizona from a virtually identical perspective of Timothy O’Sullivan’s geological survey photos made 70 years earlier. Unlike O’Sullivan’s flat and matterof-fact documentary image, Adams focused on the design of the vertical lines enhanced through contrasts. Feman recognized the photographers sought different objectives, and stated Adams saw landscape photography as “an interior image you create through nature.” “Man v. Wild” explores the tension of human relationship with the land. Photos commissioned by the Farm Service Agency by Dorothea Lange

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single-file configures controlled chaos, while in reality these men are frantically digging for gold in a mine notorious for dangerous conditions. “Life as a Stage” combines the concepts of altering perception and man’s relationship with the land exercised in previous sections and takes them to the limit. The negative for Thomas Barrow’s “Barcelona Backdrop” has been scratched with an X, permanently and deliberately demonstrating the artist’s depiction of the landscape is a manipulated scene. “Every observation is an act of authorship,” Feman said. Artists Carrie Mae Weems and Tseng Kwong Chi become apart of the landscape, not as themselves, but as characters. Photographed from the series “Eatonville,” Weems, who takes

mayor. Feman ends the tour with a dingy and dark image by Sally Mann’ “Untitled, (Antietam #21)” depicting Civil War battlefields, utilizing photographic methods from the era. Mann manipulates the image by carelessly, but deliberately letting chemicals pool up, which create orbs invoking thoughts of spirits of the dead. The Chrysler had several images of a field from the Civil War era scattered with bodies, but Mann’s image is a less literal cultivation of the same idea. It explores the memory of the event that lingers on and embodies all the themes explored in the exhibit, controlling the perception of photographers to invoke particular emotions in viewers who bring their own story to every photo.

Train No. 17 Crosses Bridge 201, Wurno Siding, VA by Ogle Winston

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To watch the movie trailers, visit maceandcrown.com.

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MONARCH MOVIE MINUTE Mind Blown

A Must See

Add to my Queue

MEGAN SNYDER

Well, there goes 2 hours of my life

Straight to DVD

‘World of Tomorrow’ 2015 | Unrated | 17 min.

Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film and winner of 25 other awards worldwide, “World of Tomorrow” is the touching and cerebral story of Emily, a curious little girl who is visited from the distant future by a third-generation clone of herself. Emily’s clone explains that soon, the body of the original Emily, or Emily Prime, will die, but thanks to advancements in modern science, her consciousness will live on indefinitely in the form of a series of clones. Because humans no longer have cumbersome bodies, time travel is much simpler, and Emily Prime is

effortlessly transported nearly 230 years into the future. She is then guided through the Outernet, a more sophisticated version of the Internet. Together, Emily Prime and her clone view memories that the young Emily Prime hasn’t even experienced yet. Emily’s clone eventually returns the toddler home, never to visit again. “World of Tomorrow” forewarns audiences of the risks mankind takes in endeavoring to cheat death and simulate something as precious as life. In her robotic, emotionless voice, Emily’s clone recalls the sterile yet musty smell of a museum, a memory that was programmed into

her by her creators. One of the film’s most unique features is the voice of Emily Prime, provided by director Don Hertzfeldt’s four-year-old niece, Winona Mae. Hertzfeldt recorded Mae’s indiscernible murmurs and excited outbursts as she was coloring one day. He then edited the audio to create an authentic dialogue. Hertzfeldt also managed the film’s production, animation and editing, in addition to cinematography, production design and digital effects. This film is available on Netflix. Courtesy of EMA Films. Image reflected on vertical axis.

‘Chloe and Theo’ 2015 | PG-13 | 112 min.

Courtesy of Tarnol Group Pictures

“Chloe and Theo” opens with an expansive wide-angle shot of the Arctic. The land is “so silent that if you scraped a harpoon on the ice you could hear it for miles,” the voice of Chloe (Dakota Johnson “50 Shades of Grey”) echoes across the tundra. An Inuit man hunts on the shifting ice. He stumbles and his meal escapes. As a result, his family goes hungry that night. Cut to the jagged skyline of New York City where the Inuit man, Theo Ikummaq, travels with little more than a backpack and the rubber

boots on his feet. Theo must warn world leaders, whom he refers to as the elders of the South, of the certain suffering all of mankind faces if great change is not made. Along the way, Theo meets Chloe, a spunky and mischievous homeless girl and the only one willing to listen to Theo’s message. Inspired by his determination and passive disposition, Chloe devises a plan to have Theo’s words broadcasted all over the world. While the tale of this unlikely friendship is heartfelt, “Chloe and Theo” ultimately disappoints. The

underdeveloped plot leads audiences astray, and the quality of acting by Johnson and others is just plain painful. The only inkling of redemption this film had was in its potential to be featured as a feel-good Earth Day special on Animal Planet, but an anticlimactic, unresolved ending swiftly terminated that possibility. This natural disaster of a movie isn’t even based on true events. This film is available on Netflix.

‘Slow Learners' 2015 | Unrated | 96 min.

Meet Jeff and Anne, two high school teachers and best friends who missed the memo about being cool. After years of awkward first dates and failed attempts at age-appropriate social interaction, the two decide to reinvent themselves over the course of the summer in “Slow Learners.” What Jeff and Anne don’t expect is that, come August, they will finally realize their love for each other. Audiences collectively gag, but are willing to accept this cliché, because this movie is seriously funny and quite simply, a good time.

The first thing you may be asking yourself is, “Who are Adam Pally and Sarah Burns and where have they been all my life?” Both have played supporting roles in other mainstream films such as 2009’s “I Love You Man” and 2013’s “Iron Man 3,” but emerge from relative obscurity in this film. Don’t doubt their chops though. Pally’s timing and subtle changes in facial expression are sidesplitting, while Burns is just as bold, crass and refreshing as your Amy Poehlers of the world. For example, when another shop-

per steals her parking spot, Anne throws the temper tantrum of the year in what can only be described as the most underrated scene of the film. Another laugh-until-you-cry moment occurs in the dinner scene set to an Italian opera. Vying for Jeff’s attention, his date and Anne use a bottle of wine, various eating utensils and an oversized meatball to seduce him. One could say Anne was successful, though everyone ends up covered in marinara sauce. This film is available on Netflix.

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Courtesy of Netflix , Accelerated Matter and RLJ Entertainment

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Watch “Grease LIVE,”on FOX.com or on the FOX NOW app.

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Greased Lightning Strikes for FOX George Plank Staff Writer After major network successes of “The Sound of Music: Live,” “Peter Pan: Live” and “The Wiz: Live,” it has become abundantly clear that there is a market for live theater musical broadcasts. While the previous three broadcasts have been exclusively on NBC, on Jan. 31, the FOX television network decided to throw their hat into the ring and see if they could replicate the same success with their own presentation of “Grease: Live.” Grease portrays the story of high school students and star-crossed lovers Danny Zuko and Sandy Young. Despite having strong feelings for one another, but because of Danny’s social status, he has to pretend he has

absolutely no feelings for Sandy. This drives a wedge between the two, and they go their separate ways. The story ultimately asks the viewers to examine themselves and see if it’s worth changing in the spirit of love. The FOX broadcast stays true to the stage version of “Grease” for the most part. They perform all of the songs in the stage songbook and pay an equal amount of acknowledgement to the movie version. The FOX version also added two additional songs that were not previously featured in any other version. These songs add depth to already empathetic characters and add more value to the overall production. Naturally, because the live version was written for television, they

had to censor themselves in some segments. In the iconic musical number, “Greased Lightning,” instead of saying the usual line, “You know that I ain’t braggin’. She’s a real pussy wagon,” in the television broadcast version, they chose to say, “You know that I ain’t braggin’. She’s a real dream wagon.” Aside from that change, however, there weren’t any other drastic changes. The live version had just as many jokes and innuendos as any other version. FOX disregards the viewer’s suspension of disbelief. In between commercial breaks, FOX has Mario Lopez talk about the previous musical number and interact with cast members on their way to a quick costume change. For the viewer, this is

more confusing because Mario Lopez, who had been playing MC to “Grease: Live,” then goes on to play the host of “American Bandstand” in the musical itself. There is no shortage of cameos in “Grease: Live.” Joe Jonas is the leader of the school dance’s band, Boyz II Men serenade the character Frenchie and the actress playing Frenchie in the film version now plays Vi in the live version. Those are only a few of the guest stars to grace the performance. Coca-Cola sponsored the event, and it’s blatantly obvious. The logo was plastered all over the website for the event, and in the diner, every single table has some form of Coke branding to the point where it was borderline distracting.

“Grease” is considered one of the classics in terms of American musicals. Every year, hundreds of theatres put on their own production for live audiences. Seeing those traditional stage tropes reflected on the television screen is almost surreal. Some sequences work well with live singing and impressive choreography, while other scenes leave little to be desired. The race sequence is one of the most unintentionally hilarious things ever seen on FOX, and a live audience can really distract from the action on screen. In the end, even with all its flaws, “Grease: Live” was a hit with 12.2 million viewers. It is still “Grease” and “Grease is the Word.”

Muse Writers Center Holds Grand Reopening in Ghent Jonah Grinkewitz Contributing Writer The Muse Writers Center began as a sort of traveling classroom over a decade ago. Local teachers, artists and dedicated staff donated their time, and the community offered its quiet spaces. On Jan. 30, the Muse reopened its doors to the public, this time at its permanent home in Ghent Market Shoppes. Beginning Feb. 9, the Muse will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. More hours are to be announced. The new and expanded 2,700 square-foot facility includes five

large classrooms and two semi-private rooms, in addition to a library and auditorium. Flooded with sunshine pouring in from its two large windows, the library serves as a cozy spot to read, write, study or just relax. According to the Muse’s web site, hundreds of works of fiction, nonfiction, memoir and various books on the art of writing will be made available to the public. For work intended for live performance, the auditorium provides the perfect platform for writers of all ages to share their creativity. Openmic nights, teen and preteen readings and staff-led talks are just some of the events that will take place in the spa-

cious, well-equipped theater. The Muse Jam is held in the auditorium every second Friday of the month. Artists and audiences are welcome to sing, play, recite poetry or other pieces, practice comedic bits or simply listen and enjoy. While admission is free, donations are encouraged to help support the Muse’s numerous scholarships. The Muse will continue its tradition of meeting beyond its walls at local restaurants, bars and cafés. One such event occurs the first Friday of every month as Café Stella on Colonial Avenue hosts a Writers’ Coffee Break. If cold brews are more your style, check out the Writers’ Happy

Hour every Wednesday. Executive director Michael Khandelwal teaches several poetry classes. ODU’s professor of English, Tim Seibles, and adjunct instructor of English, Alison Schoew, currently share their skills and experiences with Muse students. Schoew has a master’s degree in applied linguistics and will be teaching the “Start Writing, Keep Writing… Write Now” course. “I love the one class that I kept taking for years… and now, will be teaching,” Schoew said. Writers at every level can take classes at the Muse. Prices range from $40 to $230 per seasonal session. For

writers on a budget or unable to commit to the academic rigors required for college courses, the Muse offers more than just books and desks. As the Muse celebrates its 10-year anniversary, reviews on their Facebook page reflect support and high praise for the writing community. The Muse “opened up my [fiveyear] writer’s block after suddenly losing my brother,” one patron said. Visit the Muse Writers Center at 2200 Colonial Ave., located within the Ghent District of Norfolk, Virginia. You may also support its creative endeavors by visiting donate.themuse.org or by calling 757-818-9880.

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MONARCH STYLE

Monarch Ladies’ Style: Chelsea Mayo Clare Benedetto Contributing Writer Chelsea Mayo, a junior majoring in graphic design, was spotted after class on Friday dressed for the elements in a deep blue sweatsuit. She paired the suit with black combat boots, a matching beanie and an infinity scarf. Mayo’s suit has a fun story behind it. Mayo’s best friend, who she cites as one of her main style inspirations, found the suit on Amazon and was excited. She then tried to get Mayo interested. “I told her, ‘Alright. Fine. For Christmas, I’ll get you one and you can get me one, and we’ll wear them whenever we’ll see each other,’” Mayo said. A relative newcomer to fashion, Mayo credits her sister with being one of the first people motivating her to experiment with style. Scarves and

suits are common choices for her, but she is challenging herself to take risks by wearing heels more often. Mayo, who describes her style as “in the middle of dressing up and dressing down,” always makes sure to include color in her outfits. Even if she is planning to wear mostly black one day, she is always careful to insert color somewhere. There is a definite knack for dressing during winter months. It involves searching for clothing that is warm, comfortable and low on the frumpy scale. Knits like Mayo’s scarf and hat are popular options for warmth, as is fleece, which, in addition to its warmth, is both soft and machinewashable. It is frequently found lining sweatpants and hoodies, which make these the staples of Monarch wardrobes.

Photo by Clare Benedetto

Chelsea Mayo spotted sporting a deep blue sweatsuit.

Monarch Men’s Style: Dalton Mcanney Anika Williams Contributing Writer

Dalton Mcanney seated on the steps of Brock Commons.

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Photo by Anika Williams.

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At 22 years old, Dalton Mcanney considers himself a minimalist. In the current brisk weather he wears a simple Calvin Klein undershirt, a J. Crew denim button down and dark washed denim Levi 510’s. He also sports distinct brown oxfords from Banana Republic paired with fun fox socks from H&M and all nicely pulled together with an olive green scarf. The California native, a nursing major, says that although all-of-theabove articles of clothing were specific brands, he tries not to appear “branded.” He’s not a fan of wearing clothes with a particular name displayed for all to see and distinguish, unless he truly identifies with its look. Brands like Hundreds and Billionaire Boys Club are common among those who are currently on trend, but Dalton doesn’t concern himself with that. According to Dalton, “You can buy fashion, not style. Fashion is sold as a commodity, but style, style is some-

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thing that is individual and unique to a person.” Like many nonconformists, Dalton has his own style, which is something he builds and creates in his head instead of going out and buying something with a logo across it because it’s the next popular thing going around. “Fashion is being sold the illusion of style, and I try not to buy anything fashionable just because it holds a name,” Dalton said. When asked what store he would love to shop at for a day, he answered either Yves Saint Laurent or Base London because they have high quality clothing. For someone dedicated to their style like Dalton, it is important to invest in higher quality clothing because it lasts for a very long time, looks good and you can build your wardrobe forever maintaining your distinct style. Unlike trends, a style is something that does not change. It may be more expensive to buy more reliable and higher quality clothing, but in the long run it is definitely worth it.


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Sports

For updated Monarch sports coverage, visit maceandcrown.com.

SPORTS RECAP ODU WRESTLING MATCH COMING UP

ODU wrestling takes on Eastern Michigan on Sunday, Feb. 14 at 1 p.m. at the Ted Constant center. This match comes off the heels of a much needed victory over Navy, snapping a five-match losing streak. Directly after this match, they will take on American University.

MEN’S BASKETBALL TAKES NORTH TEXAS ON THURSDAY

The Monarchs go into this contest on Thursday, Feb. 11, coming off a 74-69 overtime victory against conference foe Charlotte. Trey Freeman looks to build off a career night where he put up 38 points. The game is at the Ted Constant, and starts at 7 p.m.

MONARCH BASEBALL KICKS OFF NEXT WEEK

ODU Baseball’s season opens on Feb. 19 in Myrtle Beach. The monarchs take on the No. 10 ranked North Caroline State Wolfpack. The game is the first in a series of the Caravelle Resort Tournament. Last season, ODU reached the C-USA tournament for the second consecutive year.

LADY MONARCHS PLAY TWO HOME GAMES THIS WEEK

The Women’s Basketball team is back in action on Thursday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. against North Texas and will be taking on Rice on Saturday, Feb. 20 at 4 p.m. These games come after a big 94-85 win against Charlotte in the Annual Hoops for The Cure game. The Lady Monarchs are 2-1 all-time against North Texas and a perfect 4-0 against Rice. Both are home games.

MEN’S GOLF TO TRAVEL TO CALIFORNIA

The ODU Men’s golf team will play in the Desert Invitational in Palm Springs, California on Thursday, Feb. 18. Their spring season kicked off last week on Monday, Feb. 8 in at The Farms Golf Club in Rancho Sante Fe, California.

NHL UPDATES

The Washington Capitals notched their 38th victory against the New York Islanders on. Alex Ovechkin got the game winner in a 3-2 victory on Thursday, Feb. 4. The Caps went on to defeat the New Jersey Devils in a 3-2 win on Saturday, Feb. 6.

ODU Baseball at a game vs. William and Mary on Apr. 30, 2013.

Photo by Rachel Chasin.

OLD DOMINION BASEBALL PREVIEW Matt O’Brien Sports Editor When you walk into Coach Chris Finwood’s office, the first thing you see on his desk is a clear plaque commemorating his 2014 season when he won C-USA coach of the year. Two vintage Louisville Slugger bats hang from the back wall. There are frames honoring the great Hank Aaron and behind his desk is a picture of Cy Young winner and Old Dominion Alum Justin Verlander. Next to his old gloves and catcher mitts are five different styles of ODU baseball hats. Finwood sits at his desk on a cold morning in his beanie ready to talk baseball. Finwood’s team was picked to finish fifth in the C-USA this season in pre-season rankings behind teams like Florida Atlantic and No. 8 ranked Rice University. “I don’t personally put any stock into preseason rankings, whether it’s individual or team rankings. They don’t get you any extra hits, doesn’t get any extra strikeouts, it does nothing for you when the umpire says play ball,” Finwood said. Senior outfielder Connor Myers, junior pitcher Sam Sinnen and sophomore infielder Zach Rutherford represented the Monarchs in the C-USA preseason honors. ODU was the only team in the conference to have three players chosen. “They are three good players we are counting on to have a good year for us,

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and we hope they can improve, but of course, it’s team effort,” he said. The Monarchs posted a 27-29 record last season– a season that featured wins over defending NCAA champion UVA and Rice. ODU baseball advanced to the conference tournament for the second straight season. “It shows your guys if you play well, you can beat anybody on your schedule. We have had some recent success against Virginia and we look to continue that this year at Harbour Park,” Finwood said. The landscape of this year’s team has changed as the Monarchs will have to adjust to some key losses at the plate. Infielders P.J. Higgins and Taylor Ostrich were drafted by major league teams and both posted .300

those big bats in the middle of the lineup. Kurt Sinnen comes into this season expected to take on a bigger role and was .247 hitter last season. Former relief pitcher Turner Bishop has been converted into a full time hitter and corner outfielder. Finwood expects some nice production in the heart of the order from the Virginia Beach native as he hit six home runs in fall play. “Turner has had a great fall for us. He’s always shown the potential to swing the bat, and I think trying to hit and take the mound in relief was a little much for him. I figured why not convert him and let him hit,” Finwood said. The last time Finwood converted one of his relievers it was Ben Verlander, who currently plays for the

On the opposite side of the ball... batting averages last season. ODU also lost Greg Tomchick on the mound and senior outfielder Josh Eldridge. “In college baseball you’re always wondering who is going to be on your team next year, especially when you are fortunate enough to have draftable players. As a coach, you always have to have contingency plans for when guys sign or don’t sign,” Finwood said. Finwood speaks very highly of those slotted to take the place of

Detroit Tigers and led the C-USA in home runs in 2013. On the opposite side of the ball, this year’s team is very hopeful on the mound after being riddled with injuries on the pitching staff last season. Adam Bainbridge returns as perhaps the Monarchs’ strongest arm. Bainbridge went 4-2 last season and posted a team best 2.39 earned runs against average. Nick Hartman will be slotted as this year’s closer, and his fastball was clocked in at 97 mph this fall. Jake Josephs (3-1) is back after be-

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ing injured on and off last season, and Victor Diaz is back and throwing after missing all of last season due to injury. Finwood also spoke very highly of some of his newcomers on the mound. Local Brett Smith from Grassfield high school looks to make an impact. Freshman Morgan Maguire will also see some innings. The Rumson N.J. native posted a 0.97 ERA in his senior season. “We are much improved on the mound without a doubt, and we are excited by our new pitchers this year,” Finwood said. When asked if there was any one guy who was going under the radar, Finwood cracked a smile and quickly responded with catcher and designated hitter Kyle Beam. Beam is a junior college transfer from Oregon. “He has a lot of power and has swung the bat very nicely as of late. He has a fantastic arm, and I think he is a guy that can surprise a lot of people. No one knows a lotabout Kyle just yet,” Finwood said. The Monarchs will start the season away in the Caravelle Resort Tournament in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. ODU opens the season taking on the No. 10 ranked team in the country– the N.C. State Wolfpack. “We’re not easing in to things by any means, but starting against these tough opponents will only help us better solidify the roles of some of our younger guys for the rest of this season,” Finwood said.


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Sports

For more photos of the annual “Hoops for the Cure” game, visit maceandcrown.com.

PHOTOS: LADY MONARCHS VS. CHARLOTTE 49ERS

Lady Monarchs take another win facing Charlotte on Saturday, Feb. 6.

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Photos by Joshua Boone


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Sports

For more photos of recent wrestling matches, visit maceandcrown.com.

The men’s wrestling team breaks losing streak. Photo by Jonathan Harding

ODU WRESTLING SNAPS LOSING STREAK TAKING DOWN NAVY 19-18 Jonathan Harding Contributing Writer

Lady Monarchs acting a fool on the sidelines.

Photos by Joshua Boone

MONARCHS DEFEAT 49ERS DURING HOOPS FOR THE CURE GAME Lyndsey Fields Contributing Writer Over the weekend, the Lady Monarchs knocked down another win against the Charlotte 49ers, 94-85, during their 14th annual Hoops for The Cure game in the Ted Constant Center. A crowd of over 3,000 fans attended to cheer on the team and support the fight against cancer by sporting pink Bon Secours t-shirts. The game was not only emotionally charged for the fans and survivors, but for many of the girls as well. “They encourage us, and our biggest thing is to inspire them to keep fighting. We want to go out there and fight and show them that they can get through anything,” Destinee Young said. The first quarter started slow with the Lady Monarchs only shooting 5-12 from the field and missing all of their 3-pointers. They were able to stay in the game with good defense

and double teaming, causing the 49er’s to slow their shooting. ODU’s Jennie Simms went to the free-throw line twice, which would turn into almost 10 chances throughout the game and allowed the team to end with a 4-point deficit to Charlotte’s 17 points. “We knew that they were going to come in and throw the first punch and we were going to have to retaliate,” Simms said. “Basketball is a game of runs. We were making our runs, they made their big runs and we responded to it.” After some time to gain composure, the Lady Monarchs came into the second quarter and dominated. The team began to find their flow, and the chemistry kicked in allowing them to take the lead. Destinee Young and Jennie Simms managed the floor well and seemed to find a comfortable pace for the team to run the ball effectively. “I like the way we responded at

timeouts. I loved that we stayed tough. I loved the way we had courage and the way we stayed together as a team,” Coach Karen Barefoot said when asked about her team’s change in mentality. The Monarchs continued to dish out points, assists and rebounds throughout the rest of the game, and there was very little Charlotte could do to stop them. Collectively, the ladies had a season-high of 22 assists to accompany their 42 rebounds, while the 49ers only raked in 13 assists and 31 rebounds. This should be no surprise since Old Dominion is home of two of the top 10 female rebounders in C-USA. This win pushed the ladies’ standings to 10-12 overall and 6-4 in CUSA. The Charlotte 49ers are now 12-9 overall and 5-5 in the conference. The Lady Monarchs will head to Denton, Texas to face North Texas on Thursday, Feb. 11.

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The Old Dominion Monarchs snapped their five-match, losing streak Friday night when they took down the Navy Midshipmen 19-18 in front of the 1162 fans who came out for military appreciation night. “Navy is a good team to wrestle. They brought in a tremendous crowd for this event,” ODU head coach Steve Martin said. “[Navy’s] Head Coach Joel Sharrat, we were teammates in Iowa… So, we will continue to do this dual on a yearly basis.” Starting off at 174, Brooks Climmons put the Monarchs off to a great start with a 6-1 decision over Navy’s Anthony Cable. “[The win] felt pretty amazing. It’s always good to give the home crowd something good to cheer about,” Climmons said. It was his first win at the Ted Constant Center. Navy’s No. 15 ranked Mathew Miller pinned No. 5 Jack Dechow in a surprising first period upset, giving the Midshipmen a 6-3 lead for the match. Michael Woulfe increased Navy’s lead with a major decision over Kaleab Fetahi at 197lbs to 10-3. “I think he got shell shocked a little bit,” Martin said of the Dechow. “We got that single up in the air and the kid lateral dropped us before he even knew what hit him.” Austin Coburn, wrestling up at 285lbs from his usual 197lbs weight class, secured the Monarchs three team points with a 6-4 decision, and Brandon Jeske added three more

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team points with a 6-5 decision to cut the Midshipmen’s lead down to 10-9 going into the intermission. Zach Davis scored a technical fall over ODU’s Josh Markham with only six seconds left in the final period to push Navy’s lead up to 15-10. However, Old Dominion’s All-American Chris Mecate and All-American Alexander Richardson won the next two matches to bring the match score even at 15-15. “That was a good win for me. The kid was a very tough opponent,” Macate said. “I’ve had a lot of bumps this season, my senior year… For me, it’s about building and getting better and not worrying about wins and losses. They’re going to come. I’ve had my fair share of both.” Navy won the next match to give them an 18-15 lead. With the match on the line, Seldon Wright defeated Michael Coleman 7-3 to secure a Monarch victory. When asked how he handled the pressure, Wright said, “I just went out there like I always go out there. I had my music playing, got in the zone and I wrestled.” Wright is a true freshman, hailing from Oscar Smith High School in Chesapeake, VA. Looking forward, Wright said, “I have 40 days till NCAAs and 30 days till MACs (Mid-Atlantic Conference). I got to keep grinding and training… I’m going to do great things.” ODU’s next home wrestling match is a doubleheader against Eastern Michigan and American on Sunday, Feb. 14 beginning at 1 p.m.


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Technology

To write for the technology section, contact: technology@maceandcrown.com

GAME REVIEW

A BRIEF

MOMENT IN TECH NEWS ERROR 53 Thousands of iPhone 6 users have been hit by an error message that leaves the phone completely unusable. The error is the result of having the iPhone repaired by a non-Apple repairer. Apple says that this error is for security reasons and to “protect our customers”.

CHURCHILL SOLITAIRE Former secretary of defense Donald Rumsfeld has released a new mobile game. Players climb the ranks at the Royal Military College at Sandhurst in 1893 by winning hands of twodeck solitaire. The game seems purposely designed to be unwinnable at times to mimic the tough decisions of Winston Churchill.

KOJIMA AND DEL TORO AT DICE SUMMIT Game creator Hideo Kojima and film director Guillermo del Toro will host a keynote address at this year’s DICE summit. Gamers are hoping that the pair will make some kind of announcement about their highlyanticipated, but currently-canceled, survival horror game “Silent Hills.”

ELECTRONIC RECYCLING, NOW FOR A FEE If you were hoping to recycle some of your larger electronics(“e-cycle”) at Best Buy, you’ll need to start paying. Starting on Feb. 1, Best Buy changed its policy on recycling TVs and computer monitors, and will now begin charging for the service. Smaller electronics, batteries and ink cartridges are still free to recycle.

Specialist Yamamoto prepares to fire on an alien mech.

Screenshot by Ross Reelachart

‘XCOM 2’ REVIEW: GOOD TO SEE YOU BACK, COMMANDER Ross Reelachart Technology Editor As the sequel to the critically-acclaimed 2012 game “XCOM: Enemy Unknown,” “XCOM 2” succeeds in all the ways needed to top its predecessor. Just like all the best sequels, “XCOM 2” fixes what didn’t work the first time, improves what did work and adds new features to complement what already exists. The story of “XCOM 2” fits thematically with the tough, no-nonsense gameplay that prided itself on the challenge and featuring permanent death. Set 20 years after the previous game, “XCOM 2” assumes that the player, and the XCOM organization, failed to protect the planet from an alien invasion. Now the aliens, known as ADVENT, have subjugated the Earth in a benevolent dictatorship. The player must lead what remains of XCOM and rally the Earth resistance forces before ADVENT completes its final goal: the mysteri-

ous Avatar Project. Firaxis Games knew that they had a winning formula on their hands when “XCOM: Enemy Unknown” became an award winner. The design of “XCOM 2” is more of an iteration on what worked the first time, instead of a complete revamp. The player still takes the role of commander of XCOM and must manage both the resources of the resistance and the individual combat encounters. On the micro level, combat is a

speed up what used to be a slower pace in the first game. Soldiers often start out “concealed” at the start of missions, allowing the player to move soldiers freely so long as they remain hidden to set up deadly ambushes. When set up just right, picking off a couple aliens without them even firing a shot is extremely gratifying. On the macro level, the player is tasked with managing the limited resources of a guerilla resistance force, and there are a lot of resources to man-

... picking off a couple aliens without them even firing a shot is extremely gratifying. turn-based affair where soldiers must be maneuvered around a hazardous battlefield. Not only are there aliens, robots and mutants to shoot, but the players must weigh the risks of certain actions as dice rolls determine the outcomes. It’s a winning, if challenging and sometimes frustrating, kind of strategy. The improvements

age and juggle. There are at least half a dozen different kinds of resources, and you never have enough to do everything. Tough decisions must be made to ensure success, whether it means focusing on short-term advancements or investing in long-term growth. Research magnetic guns now will yield better weapons in the field,

but that time could also be spent finding the weaknesses in enemies across the board. These decisions form the meat of “XCOM 2.” Winning is hard fought, and it is not by much, but it is always satisfying. One of the shortcomings of “XCOM 2” involves some bugs and minor annoyances of the previous game don’t seem to have been fixed. There was nothing game-breaking about the bugs, but they are odd and break the tone. One glitch I encountered did not interfere with gameplay; however, I spent the latter half of a mission with no animations. My soldiers teleported around the battlefield and simply caused damage to happen without actually firing any bullets. If you’re looking for a challenge on the PC, and you enjoy making tough yet interesting decisions, then “XCOM 2” will provide what you need. Just make sure you keep your soldiers alive, and you only take shots that you’re almost sure will land. Good luck out there, commander.

TWITTER DELETES TERRORIST ACCOUNTS In a push that started last year, Twitter has deleted some 125,000 accounts that were being used by or were in support of terrorist groups, specifically Daesh (also known as ISIS). The process was semi-automated and required actual people to read and find the offending accounts. Screenshot by Ross Reelachart

This soldier missed his shot and immediately died afterward.

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Technology

Visit maceandcrown.com for video game reviews and more.

A modified Fine Bros. thumbnail

Failure to Trademark ‘Reaction Videos’ Ross Reelachart Technology Editor The Fine Bros., one of the largest YouTube channels with 14 million subscribers, has earned the ire of the Internet by attempting to trademark the word “react” as it pertains to the popular genre of “reaction videos” on YouTube. While they cancelled their trademark plans less than a week after the announcement, the outrage the move generated is another reminder of the tenuous relationship between online content creators and trademark law. On Jan. 26, the Fine Bros. released a video on their YouTube channel announcing a new initiative called “React World.” Under this new initiative, other content creators would be able to license the Fine Bros.’ reaction video format for a small fee as well as release their video under the extensive Fine Bros. brand. The uninitiated “reaction videos” are a video format where the real time reactions of a person, or per-

sons, to some event is recorded for amusement. The Fine Bros. format usually consists of showing popular fads and videos to children and the elderly. Other creators often make their own reaction videos with only themselves. On the surface, “React World” could have served as a way for

which a lot of YouTubers do, you are potentially in a lot of trouble. If you don’t make reaction videos, but you care about free speech and keeping the Internet safe from ludicrous trademarks, you should be concerned as well,” Morrison said in a public post on his law office website.

prising the video game and Internet community are not on good terms with trademarking. Obviously, the backlash King and Sony earned was the result of disgust of their nakedly obviously attempt to control and cash-in on vague terms that were already in use

Then in 2014, “Candy Crush” developer King attempted to trademark the words “saga” and “candy.” smaller YouTube channels to reach a wider audience. While trademarking “React World” was innocuous, the attempt to trademark the word “react” proved to be too much for Fine Bros. The Internet backlash was enormous and swift. At the peak of the backlash, the Fine Bros. channel lost 90 subscribers a minute. Ryan P. Morrison, the “Video Game Attorney” offered his services to multiple content creators for free in order to combat the trademark. “If you make reaction videos,

The entire initiative and trademark filing was shuttered on Feb 1., but the damage had already been done. The entire debacle follows close on the heels of Sony’s attempt to trademark the term “Let’s Play,” which also describes an entire genre of videos available on YouTube and, generally, the Internet. At the same time, video game publishers Ubisoft and EA are in a trademark dispute over the word “ghosts.” Then in 2014, “Candy Crush” developer King attempted to trademark the words “saga” and “candy.” It is hardly sur-

by the world at large. The Fine Bros. situation seems more like a case of misplaced judgement and decisionmaking. As Morrison pointed out in his post, the process for gaining a trademark includes a “30-day opposition phase,” in which anyone can petition against the filing. If the Fine Bros. had merely kept quiet about the filing and waited 30 days, they might have successfully gained the trademark. Meredith Placko at geek.com suggests that Fine Bros.’ plan for “React World” was more of case of the company not having a grasp on the

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technicalities of the business world. “At best, it just comes across as horribly awkward. At worse, it’s smarmy and a ploy to take over the world of reaction videos on YouTube,” Placko said about the announcement video for “React World”. The democratization of the Internet has meant that many smalltime entertainers and content creators have the chance to be globally known and make a profit along the way. The fact there are people, including the Fine Bros., who are making comfortable livings off of YouTube videos is a testament to that. However, unlike the big businesses that are trying to co-opt and control the Internet culture, the small guys are just unprepared for the business side of what they do. So while the Fine Bros. might have had good intentions for “React World” and their “react” trademark, their methods could have used the help of someone who actually knew what they were doing.


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Opinion

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Read more student opinions online at maceandcrown.com.

Trendy or Trashy? Trends on Social Media That Are Way Out of Line Destiny Webb Contributing Writer Technological innovations have tremendously helped communication in today’s society, making it easy to share your everyday life with the entire world with just the click of a button. Massive use of social media gave way to many people turning to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to find the latest news, videos and trends. Although you can share yourself with the world, does it mean that you should? Dangerous challenges, over the top beauty trends and disrespectful posts has caused social media to be perceived negatively. Challenges are interesting to see on the Internet, but some of these challenges are dangerous. The fire challenge created in 2014 — where people poured flammable liquid onto their

bodies and lit themselves on fire — became a viral phenomenon. Though it may be funny to some, that challenge led to life-threatening injuries for young teens. More recently, social media users participated in the Kylie Jenner lip challenge in 2015. Young girls tried to self-plump their lips to mimic Jenner’s famous lip-injected pout. The Kylie Jenner lip challenge had its own problems as it led to pain, redness and swelling, which is probable to having long-lasting effects. Trying to look like other people on

stagram and Tumblr models, but it leads to the possibility of negative outcomes. Young girls wanting their “eyebrows on fleek” and spend their time trying to look like a “baddie” when there are often more important things for them to worry about– like enjoying their youth. Aspiring to be like women who post pictures of themselves half-naked may not be the best idea of a role model. There is no problem with wanting to show off your body on social media. If you’re confident, go for it! But a little modesty from time to time would be nice.

booty like Beyonce. It often discourages women toward thinking they are not good enough when they look at photoshopped pictures of perfectly crafted women who look unnatural. When in fact, plastic surgery is used by many models on social media to get the bodies they have. Even popular Instagram model Essena O’Neill took to social media on her YouTube channel to explain how phony Instagram models are and the pressures they have to gain likes and followers. Though beauty gurus seem to have it all, looks can be deceiving. It is im-

Trying to look like other people on social media is nothing new. social media is nothing new. Not only were young girls risking their own lips to look like a famous Jenner, but they continually risk their own self worth. Young teens aspire to many In-

Beauty trends on the internet also give unrealistic expectations for the average girl. Not everyone is going to have great, perky breasts, amazing eyebrows and a huge, bootylicious

portant to carefully decide what you post on social media, because it can come back to haunt them. YouTubers Raven Elyse and Vicky Logan were dragged on social media for posting

racist comments on their Twitter accounts, which led many of their followers to despise them. Not only does it happen to people in the public, but also to students around the country, including right here at Old Dominion. In March 2015, two students put on face masks in a Facebook post with the hashtag “#HandsUpWeCanShoot” referring to the tragic death of Eric Garner in 2014. It was a disgusting post that will have lasting effects on the campus community. People must be more aware of the material they post on social media. No one is perfect, and like all things, social media is a learning process. It is a great outlet to have fun, express yourself and communicate, but it should be used in a way that is positive and respectable.

By Pink Sherbet Photography from Utah, USA [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Self-Care at College Should Not be Viewed as a Luxury Star LaBranche Contributing Writer According to studies done by the National College Health Assessment, mental health issues among students are growing. It’s a common joke that college students are overworked, exhausted and living off of caffeine and fear. The reality is that many students are dealing with mental health problems while earning their degrees. But all students, whether dealing with mental health problems or not, should be practicing regular, fulfilling, unapologetic self-care. A person can practice self-care through activities such as partici-

pating in a hobby, going to a relaxing place or spending an afternoon unplugged. Self-care also includes tasks as simple as taking a shower, eating a hot meal or getting a good night’s sleep. While these tasks might be obvious, college life can lead to students making the decision to forgo some of the most needed activities for the sake of school work. Pulling all-nighters, eating from vending machines and digging through a pile of dirty clothes for something to wear are everyday happenings. Feeling rundown and exhausted is considered normal. Between school work, extracurriculars, a job and a social life, students are often left drained by the time exams

roll around. College is difficult. It’s not easy to earn a degree, and it requires a great deal of work. But at the same time, getting a degree should not require sacrificing your body or your mental health. Manage your time, prioritize your activities and take care of yourself while you are at Old Dominion University. When it comes to college work, you will not be performing at your best if you are tired, hungry, stressed out or all of the above. Taking care of yourself not only results in feeling better personally, but it will help you in class and doing homework. Your basic needs have to be met regardless of what you’re trying to accomplish,

but especially when doing something as demanding and complicated as earning a degree. Some people act as if using your time to take a shower is permissible, but taking the time for a hobby, like playing video games, is ridiculous. However, doing something that you enjoy, especially if it’s not directly related to school work, is a needed part of self-care. Giving yourself time to recharge from the intellectually draining activities of college is just as important as washing your hair. Taking care of yourself mentally and emotionally is on the same level of taking care of yourself physically. In an age where everyone posts their latest victories on Facebook and

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leaves out their struggles, it may seem like your peers are achieving more, pushing themselves harder and are overjoyed to do it. Many people are overwhelmed and struggling while in college. Self-care might seem like obvious and small tasks, but it can add up to making all of the difference when problems pop up or exam time rolls around. Taking time every day to make sure you are taking care of yourself is essential to being successful personally and in your college career. It’s not self-indulgence or being spoiled, but making sure you are taking care of yourself so you can reach your full potential.


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Creative

E NC L AV E

Submit your creative pieces to the Creative Enclave by emailing editorinchief@maceandcrown.com. WeeBees

Sky Welkin is an ODU alumnus. For more information on Sky and his art visit skywelkin.com.

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The Mace & Crown

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@maceandcrown


Feb 10th  
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