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WEDNESDAY | 9.30.2015 | MACEANDCROWN.COM | Vol. 58, Issue 5

Jugal Patel gives speech on the Rising Sea Levels of Norfolk on Sept. 18.

Sean Davis

Students Recruited to Brainstorm Adaptation Ideas Sean C. Davis Editor-in-Chief

The Virginia Sea Grant held a student discussion on Sept. 18 to address the local effects of sea level rise and brainstorm solutions. Their ideas, which ranged from relocating the campus to Suffolk to housing international students on the USS Wisconsin during major flood events, reflected the unprecedented challenges of adapting in one of the country’s most threatened cities. The event, “Engaged Students: Adapting to Sea Level Rise” was led by the Mace & Crown’s own Jugal Patel and Michelle Covi, outreach director for the Climate Change and Sea Level Rise Initiative. Covi explained that the goal of the event was to get an idea of what students think is important to protect and how to do it. “We’re going to put it into a report, and we’re going to share it with the city and… the university because young people have not been that represented in our planning process,” she said. Students were split into four groups led by faculty and graduate students, which discussed and developed ideas. After each discussion session, the

groups shared their ideas and Covi recorded them. Patel gave a presentation explaining the projected effects of sea level rise in Norfolk over the next few decades.

“Most planners and state and federal agencies expect about two feet [of sea level rise] by the middle of the century,” -Jugal Patel

“The 2050 projections are a little bit clearer because the further you go out into the future, the range of uncertainty widens… But it depends on how we move forward, how we continue with our energy usage and whatnot.” The presentation included a video from “Flood of Voices” project in which Tuere Brown, an area elementary school teacher, tells the story of having to evacuate six students during a flood event. “I corresponded with the mom, and we had the idea to meet just two streets away. I could see her truck and she could see me but we never made it

to each other,” she said. “All the things I had [in the car] were damaged that day… [including] the books that the kids carried.” The discussions that followed included the lack of hurricane readiness and the challenges with evacuating residents when normal traffic is often impeded on the bridge-tunnels. New Orleans, the only metropolitan area in the country more vulnerable to sea level rise, was an often-evoked example. “A lot of the actual damage that occurred [in Hurricane Katrina] wasn’t because of the size of the storm. It was because of a lack of preparedness… and… a lack of infrastructure in the areas that were affected,” said SGA Vice-President Bret Folger. “Things like infrastructure, and even just community preparedness, neighborhood preparedness; those are things that are priceless when dealing with an event like that.” Perhaps the most talked about issue was ODU’s location amongst several flood-prone bodies of water. “This could be one of the most vulnerable campuses in the nation,” Patel noted. Student suggestions ranged from halting future building in Norfolk, to

sacrificing the most endangered parts of campus and even a full-on relocation to Chesapeake or Suffolk where recurrent flooding isn’t such an issue. Students also talked about the lack of communication from the university during and in the lead up to flood events. It’s not uncommon for students to receive text alerts for flood warnings but no word on the cancellation of classes. They suggested that university emergency personal could better utilize social media to keep students up to date. Although it got a pretty big laugh when it was brought up, the proposal to utilize the USS Wisconsin, which is docked next to the Nauticus museum downtown, for flood relief was perhaps one of the smartest suggestions. The ship is technically a storm surge barrier, so it could be used to protect an area from waves. But that’s not the best part. “You can use it as a shelter; you can use it for hospital evacuation; you could make a contract with ODU [to house] international students,” explained one student who was a naval officer. “There are 3000 beds available there, and it’s designed, and it’s all in place and it’s all still usable because

they have an internal power plant.” The student also noted that the ship would survive a storm surge better than most homes and that fully loaded, the power plant could run for up to five years. “The law changed last year so there’s no legal restrictions for the use of that vessel,” she said, before giving a detailed explanation of how it could be done. In the ever-so-appropriate words of Vice-President Folger, thinking outside the box “is necessary at this point.” The event was also attended by members of the League of Women Voters and Sierra Club organizer Zach Jarjoura who encouraged students to take action and vote with these issues in mind. The event capped off ODU’s Public Service Week which featured s number of other engaging events.

This article is a part of the Mace & Crown’s climate change and sea level rise blog, Rising Seas, Sinking Cities (RSSC), which Jugal Patel frequently contributes to.

ODU Counseling Helps At-Risk Students Jacob Hall Contributing Writer Almost all students will feel stress, anxiety, or depression at some point during their school career. For one student last year, those feelings became too much as events led him to a decision: to overdose. “I was prescribed to take two

[Xanax] a day if needed,” an ODU student who wished to remain anonymous said. “One day I took 20 all at once and didn’t care what would happen. I was ambivalent to the consequences.” Anxiety and depression, in addition to the stresses of college, can lead to serious dangers when left unchecked. ODU counseling services

offers help for students with problems such as depression, anxiety and drug abuse. Incidents like overdosing aren’t uncommon; the counseling services had a total of 62 crisis interventions last year. “Depression, anxiety, and Phase of Life are all up at the top here at Old Dominion,” Andrew Jatau, a

counselor, said. Phase of Life refers to the overall move to college and the stress and problems that can come with that. Out of the students diagnosed at the counseling center last year, 36.41 percent have anxiety disorder, 40.98 percent have depressive disorder, and 15.93 percent struggle with Phase of Life. Both depression and anxiety are

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blanket terms for a number of more specific problems that students could face. While these may seem like large percentages, it is important to note that the total number of students seeking help last year was 672, compared to 742 the year before. (cntd on A3)


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Face In The Mace Mace & Crown Staff : Sean Davis Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@maceandcrown.com David Thornton Copy Editor Dthor013@odu.edu Josh Whitener News Editor news@maceandcrown.com Amy Poulter Arts & Entertainment Editor artsandentertainment@maceandcrown. com Zachary Chavis Photography Editor photo@maceandcrown.com Ross Reelachart Technology Editor technology@maceandcrown.com Sabrina Brooks Senior Graphic Designer sbroo029@odu.edu Jason Kazi Advertising and Business Manager advertising@maceandcrown.com Jugal Patel Digital Editor jpate016@odu.edu Matt O’Brien Sports Editor mobri013@odu.edu Chris Circeo Distribution Manager ccirc001@odu.edu

Staff Writers:

Adam Flores Alex Brooks Amy DeLaura Connor Norton George Plank Jessica Perkins Michael High Veronica Singer

Staff Photographers:

Brian Vliet Dawit Samson Jason Kazi Joshua Boone Joshua Caudell Schyler Shafer Shamon Jones Mace & Crown is a newspaper published by and written for the students of Old Dominion once a week throughout each semester and once in the summer. Originally founded in 1930 as the The High Hat, the paper became the Mace & Crown in 1961. The Mace & Crown is a primarily self-supporting newspaper, maintaining journalistic independence from the university. All views expressed in this collegiate paper are those of the author, not of the University, Mace & Crown, or the editors. Phone: 757-683-3452

Hashtag #ODU to see your face in the Mace.


NEWS

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For previous months’ crime logs, please visit Maceandcrown.com. CORRECTION FOR PREVIOUS EDITION

“A sentence in the article ‘Out of the Darkness Brings Suicide Prevention into the Light’ published on 9/16/15 acknowledges the death of Tiffany A. Whitley Lewis and may have unintentionally confused readers due to its language. It was she and not her mother, Pricilla, who died in June.”

CRIME LOG SEPT. 21ST

A hit and run incident was reported to have occurred on September 21st between 9:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. at this approximate location. The case remains active.

SEPT. 26TH

A robbery was reported to have occurred on September 26th at 3:42 a.m. at this approximate location.

SEPT. 21ST

A vehicle theft was reported to have occurred on September 21st at 12:00 p.m. at this approximate location.

SEPT. 23RD

A vehicle theft was reported to have occurred on September 23rd at 5:10 p.m. at this approximate location.

SEPT. 26TH

A shooting was reported on September 26th at 8:44 p.m. at this approximate location.

SEPT. 25TH

A robbery was reported to have occurred on September 25th at 9:00 p.m. at this approximate location.

ODU Counseling Helps At-Risk Students (cntd. from A1) After finding out about the overdose, the student’s girlfriend immediately called 911. The student, who was still coherent, willingly left with the ambulance to head to the hospital. “The doctor said because my metabolism was so fast, that’s what kept me from being in serious danger,” said the student. He was involuntarily admitted to the Virginia Beach Psychiatric Center after a psychiatric screening at the hospital. After about five days he was sent in front of a magistrate to determine whether he should stay longer. “I told them I want to stay voluntarily,” said the student.

Once the student got out of the psychiatric center, he knew he had to keep things up to prevent another incident from occurring. Even though he had been participating in therapy previously, he realized it hadn’t been working as well as it should have. “I figured ODU has services available to me,” said the student. “I might as well take advantage of them.” The student soon entered the counseling center on campus and sought the help he needed. After entering the center, he had to fill out a questionnaire to describe his problems as well as to help the center see the severity of them. After this, he was able to speak to a counselor.

“It was a professional and somebody to talk to that knew the situation I was facing,” the student said. “I was able to vent and that’s what I needed at the time. Nobody outside of my close circle knew, and talking to a new person about it helped.” Any student is able to schedule a consultation with the counseling services. The student is able to meet with a counselor where they can discuss their problem and receive help on it. After the consultation they may be advised to return for more intake appointments. It is always up to the student on whether or not they want to return at any time. In addition to walk-ins, the center

participates in a number of outreach services to reach the student populace such as dorm visits for screenings and open houses. “We want to let people know the counseling center is here, and what services we offer,” Brent Vallee, a counselor who is also in charge of outreach, said. The counseling center is aware of the difficulty that can come with using the center for the first time. The outreach programs aim to get students comfortable with the staff and also inform them about the different types of problems they can face. They work to assure the students that these are not inconsequential issues.

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The student has seen a large turnaround in his life, with most, if not all, of the problems being resolved. He is now finishing up his last year at Old Dominion and is on the right track to graduating. “If you are struggling with anything they can help you with, it’s free and an easy process to get help,” the student said. “I would say they really do care about the students’ well-being.” If you feel you need help with any issues related to mental health contact the Office of Counseling Services at 757-683-4401. The counseling center is located in room 1526 of the Webb Center.


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NEWS

Check out more election information at maceandcrown.com!

SGA Hosts Roundtable Discussion on Sexual Violence Josh Whitener News Editor The Student Government Association hosted an open forum to discuss ideas to spread awareness of sexual violence. On the heels of an on campus incident, SGA and other student organization representatives engaged in two moderated round-table discussions. The brainstorming session initiated a discussion about what student organizations can do to reach students to convey the seriousness of sexual violence. Comments on the incident that occurred during freshman movein provoked students to suggest new, alternative ideas to promote awareness. Both Dr. Ellen Neufeldt, vice president for Student Engagement & Enrollment Services, and Dr. Don Stans-

berry, dean of students and associate vice president of Student Engagement and Enrollment Services moderated their respective groups. “One of the things that was so impressive to me was the student leadership in that moment and how we said this is not who we are as a campus,” Neufeldt said. Several ideas were brought up for discussion. Many of them were suggested events from previous semesters or ongoing efforts such as “First Class,” a program designed to introduce information on sexual assault to incoming students. “No Zebras, No Excuses”, a theatrical presentation by the acting troupe “No Zebras, No More” presented at ODU last April, was suggested as a returning option. “I think them coming was awesome

and more relatable than just having an administrator or someone just talk about sexual prevention,” Daphne Allen, vice president of Campus Engagement for the Panhellenic Executive Board, said. John Harrington, president of Tau Kappa Epsilon, discussed the idea of using banners for a positive purpose. “We could counter that,” Harrington said. “Fight fire with fire and put up our own banner and instead of hate, we put love in it. Not everyone is going to want to go to No Zebras or the Title IX thing. If they’re walking to class, they’re going to see these things.” Many admitted that they learned about the national “It’s On Us” campaign through Snapchat, which emphasized the importance of social media as a tool for support. The repre-

sentatives agreed that many students would not go out of their way to attend sexual assault presentations. Corey Overstreet, engaging issues director for ODU Student Activities Council, contributed to the issue. “The fact that articles are even coming out saying it’s not a big deal and ‘why is everyone making this a big deal?’ It is a big deal. You’re referencing sexual assault and violence. Yeah, it’s a touchy subject but it’s something that needs to be brought up and talked about,” Overstreet said. The discussion ended with a serious hypothetical situation. Stansberry posed the question to a predominantly male group. “As an [assaulted] man what would you do?” Stansberry asked. “Where would they go?” According to the National Sexual

Violence Resource Center, “one in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college” and “more than 90% of sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault.” “Probably inside their own heads,” Harrington said. Some wondered if men knew of a place they could go if they were a victim of sexual violence. Some even wondered if there was anything they would do considering the stigma attached to male victims of sexual assault. The hypothetical question brought baffled silence to the table. “I wouldn’t say a word,” Harrington said. If you or someone you know is experiencing relationship violence or sexual abuse, please contact ODU Police Department or ODU’s Women’s Center for help.

Student Organizations

Encourage Voter Registration David Thornton Copy Editor

Students encourage voter registration in front of the Webb Center Josh Boone

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With the clock ticking down until Oct. 13, the last day for voter registration, a number of ODU student organizations are making it their goal to register as many student voters as possible. On Nov. 3, Virginia will be holding elections for numerous seats in both houses of the state legislature. On Tuesday, Sept. 22, ODU’s Student Government Association led by example. During their “SGA Day” event, each co mmittee of the student government operated a booth that informed students about their individual roles and missions. The committee for Legislative Affairs and Diversity used theirs to inform students about the upcoming election, test their general knowledge of voting and register students to vote. Rachael Edmonds, director of the committee, quizzed students about elections and voting, handing out tshirts for correct answers. Monique Williams, another member of the committee, walked students through the process of registering on a laptop. Together, they helped 50 students learn how to register to vote. They used a system known as TurboVote, which not only aids people in registering to vote, but also sends out alerts via text and email reminding voters of upcoming elections. It can also walk voters through the process,

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informing them what identification to bring, where their polling place is located and helping to obtain absentee ballots. Other organizations use this program as well, including the ODU College Democrats. “It’s a nice program for letting students know about upcoming elections,” Charles Christie, president of the ODU College Democrats, said. This year, they’ve helped register about 150 students to vote. “It’s good for an off-year election,” Christie said. In the recent weeks, they have set up a table in the main lobby of the Webb Center during activity hour. Many ODU students were not old enough to vote in the 2012 presidential election. The voting process is foreign to them. In addition, a great deal of them are unaware that an election is even occurring this year. “Some of them, I’m confused when they don’t know,” Williams said, referring to the number of students who could not answer the general election questions. Some of the questions included naming the date of the next election, or the name of a candidate. One student at the SGA Day event was aware of the Nov. 3 elections, and planned to vote absentee. “We have a small town,” Elizabeth Heath, a sophomore, said, noting that she personally knew some of the local candidates. However, she said that she didn’t know much about the state-

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level candidates. “The media that most people engage with is national, so not a lot of people know about these smaller Virginia state elections,” Christie said. “What really affects you most are these small decisions in Richmond.” In addition to helping students register to vote, he’s encouraged students to get involved in the campaigns. So far, he’s helped students become volunteers or interns with three different campaigns. The College Democrats are also hosting phone banking events for some of the campaigns before the presidential debates. They provide scripts, and teach students how to campaign for candidates over the phone. “It’s one big democratic call-fest,” Christie said. Another student organization, the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice, will be hosting multiple voter registration events in the month of October. The biggest obstacle to encouraging students to vote in off-year elections is the lack of information and general sense of apathy. “If you want a progressive president with a progressive agenda, they can only be as successful as states allow them to be,” Christie said. “The progressive policies can or can’t happen depending on how involved you are in the years leading up to an election.”


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NEWS

Check out more election information at maceandcrown.com!

WHO ARE YOU VOTING FOR? HOUSE OF DELEGATES BY DISTRICT

21- CHESAPEAKE/ VIRGINIA BEACH

76- CHESAPEAKE/ VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT SUSAN B. HIPPEN

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN S. CHRIS JONES

SUSANHIPPEN.ORG

REPUBLICAN RON A. VILLANUEVA RONV21.COM

SCHRISJONES.COM

80- CHESAPEAKE/ NORFOLK

81-CHESAPEAKE/ VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT MATTHEW JAMES

REPUBLICAN BARRY D. KNIGHT

DELEGATEMATTHEWJAMES. COM

REPUBLICAN UNOPPOSED

DELEGATEMATTHEW JAMES.COM

GREEN PARTY J.B. “JEFF” STAPLES JEFF481VA.COM

77- CHESAPEAKE

78- CHESAPEAKE

79- NORFOLK

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN J.A. “JAY” LEFTWICH

DEMOCRAT STEVE E. HERETICK

HERETICKFORDELEGATE.COM

83- NORFOLK/ VIRGINIA BEACH

84- VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN CHRIS P. STOLLE

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN GLENN R. DAVIS

LIONELL SPRUILL, SR. LIONELLSPRUILLSR.COM/

82- VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT WILLIAM W. “BILL” FLEMING BILLFLEMINGFORVA.COM

REPUBLICAN JASON S. MILYARES

JAYLEFTWICH. NATIONBUILDER.COM

CHRISSTOLLE.COM

REPUBLICAN UNOPPOSED

GLENNRDAVIS.COM/?WPRDP

JASONMIYARES.COM/

85-VIRGINIA BEACH

89-NORFOLK

90-NORFOLK

100-NORFOLK

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN SCOTT W. TAYLOR

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN DAUN SESSOMS HESTER

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN JOSEPH C. “JOE” LINDSEY

DEMOCRAT WILLIE C. RANDALL

SCOTTTAYLORVA.COM/

RANDALLFORDELEGATE.COM/

REPUBLICAN ROBERT S. BLOXOM JR.

SENATE BY DISTRICT 5- CHESAPEAKE/ NORFOLK

6- NORFOLK/ VIRGINIA BEACH

7-NORFOLK/ VIRGINIA BEACH

8 -VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT KENNETH COOPER ALEXANDER

DEMOCRAT LYNWOOD W. LEWIS, JR.

DEMOCRAT GARY T. MCCOLLUM

DEMOCRAT H.D. “DAVE” BELOTE

REPUBLICAN RICHARD H. OTTINGER

REPUBLICAN

FRANK W. WAGNER

REPUBLICAN BILL R. DESTEPH, JR.

SENATORKENNETHCALEXANDER.COM/

REPUBLICAN UNOPPOSED

HTTP://LYNWOODLEWIS.COM/

GMCCOLLUM.COM/

WAGNERVASENATE.COM/

VOTEBELOTE.COM/

BILLDESTEPH.ORG/

14- CHESAPEAKE/ VIRGINIA BEACH

DEMOCRAT UNOPPOSED REPUBLICAN JOHN A. COSGROVE

JOHNCOSGROVE.NATIONBUILDER.COM/

OTTINGERFORVA.COM/

TO FIND OUT YOUR DISTRICT, AND FIND INFORMATION ON OTHER DISTRICTS, VISIT THE VA DEPT OF ELECTIONS AT ELECTIONS.VIRGINIA.GOV. The Mace & Crown

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NEWS

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Sankofa Keynote Places Importance on Past and Future Meng McLendon Contributing Writer

The Sankofa Keynote address was held Thursday, September 22 at the Ted Constant Convocation Center, promoting an inner look at individual black lives and inspiring messages of momentum and change for the future. The address brought together students from Old Dominion University and several key speakers. The Sankofa address is an annual event to unite the black population within ODU’s community, especial-

ly the students. During this event, nearly 200 attendees and speakers addressed the meaning of Sankofa: to look back at the past and move forward with understanding. This was emphasized by ODU president John Broderick during his discourse on inclusivity within the campus. Amongst other speakers in attendance at this event were Christopher Ndiritu, ODU Student Government president, and LaWanza Lett-Brewington, a representative of the Coalition of Black Faculty and Adminis-

trators. “The way out is back through,” Lett-Brewington said “…collectively we can make change.” Another speaker, Tanesha Boulden, this year’s National Pan Hellenic Council president, illustrated that the Sankofa symbol is a bird flying forward while looking back, holding an egg in his mouth. Boulden then went on to explain that the bird is a representative of all audience members. “It can represent four or more years at ODU, trying to push through, trying to balance, trying to find our iden-

tity,” Boulden said. The evening address was capped off by a speech offered by Portsmouth Mayor Kenneth Wright. Mayor Wright brought the meaning of the Sankofa to students through closing remarks. “The past is not dead and gone, but walks with us as we move through life,” Wright said. Wright also commented on the fulfillment black students should feel. “Being black in America is something that each and every one of you should be proud of,” Wright said.

Wright’s words were gentle reminders to the audience that put into perspective the issues that black ancestors faced, the issues that black students face today and that moving forward will continue to work for our successors. “Embrace the spirit of Sankofa and use it to strengthen our communities and make this world a better place,” Wright said.

A tree planting ceremony was performed to dedicate the garden-- a foreshadowing of the forest Hamada hopes to grow surrounding the garden.

ODU

ODU Dedicates Garden to Hiroyuki Hamada Stef Wasko Contributing Writer Martial arts students and alumni gathered with the rain clouds around a graveled patch of cherry trees and azalea bushes to dedicate the garden to Hiroyuki Hamada on Monday, Sept. 21. Hamada founded the first accredited martial arts school in the United States at Old Dominion University 50 years ago. Hamada flew from his home in Japan for the ceremony and to celebrate the special anniversary of his branch of Dai Nippon Butoku Kai with his ODU martial arts family. Stephen Downs meticulously planned and constructed the small, rectangular garden in Hamada’s honor. Every boulder, azalea bush and cherry tree in the small rectangular plot was thoughtfully placed. For the

project, Downs studied and followed the Japanese traditions of Sakuteiki or “the art of stone setting.” Downs spoke at the dedication ceremony about the principles exhibited in the garden. “There is asymmetry,” said Downs. “Because imbalance is what creates all movement and energy.” He continued by emphasizing the characteristics of simplicity, venerability, mystery, otherworldliness, stillness and peace in Hamada’s garden. Downs, along with Patricia King, the landscape coordinator at ODU, travelled to North Carolina to handpick 5 specifically shaped boulders, which symbolize the 5 decades of Hamada’s teaching at the university. Hamada hopes to see the small, simple garden expand. As a symbol of the landscape’s future, Hamada led

a panel of university leaders in a treeplanting ceremony. He announced that he and ODU President John Broderick have discussed planting more cherry trees and azaleas in the area. Hamada dreams of eventually converting the flat, grassy landscape behind the Diehn Center into a small forest of philosophizing and reflection. “I hope that this will become a special place for the campus to enjoy sublime serenity and self reflection,” Hamada said. Hamada first opened his school of martial arts training in 1975 at Old Dominion University. After years as a martial arts instructor and faculty emeritus of exercise science sport, physical education and recreation, Hamada retired and returned to Japan. There he serves as president of

Dai Nippon Butoku Kai in Japan and Chairman of the DNBK International Division. Even after seven years, Hamada’s love and influence still resonates with his students and the ODU campus. “Training day after day I realized that what I was learning was far greater than kicking and punching,” said Kimberly Baylor, a past student of Hamada who hosted the dedication ceremony. “I was learning a way of life. How to excel and go beyond mediocracy. How to serve for the greater good. How to be determined and persistent. How to cultivate my mind, body, and spirit to a higher level so that I can overcome obstacles, handle adversities, and to elevate my total being.” Students at the event echoed Baylor’s sentiments. Many of them de-

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scribed training with Hamada with the word “intense” as they smiled at each other in reminiscent agreement. Hamada too expressed his own reminiscence of his time at ODU during his speech set to crescendoing violin and piano music. “I feel the invisible tears in my heart joy at seeing them here on this beautiful campus,” Hamada said as he looked out on the gathering of students sporting blue blazers with the school’s emblem on their chests. Hamada’s students have stepped up to continue teaching through Dai Nippon Butoku Kai on the ODU campus. The new garden now joins with them as a symbol of Hamada’s dreams and legacy.


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NEWS

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GARDEN DEDICATION

Hamada Garden located adjacent ot Diehn Fine and Performing Arts Building.

Dedication Plaque for the Hamada Japanese Garden.

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Arts &

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E N T ER T A I NM E N T

Isaiah Williams,

a Monarch Musician with Motivation Larenz Johnson Contributing Writer Isaiah Williams, known by his stage name Isaiah Jeremiah, stood outside of the University Webb center looking around. There was something surprising about him; he didn’t have the cliche rap image of gold chains and cockiness. Instead, a shy and humble confidence was present, wrapped in a black 3 Strikes shirt and matching hat. Isaiah is a 21-year-old senior at Old Dominion University where he majors in communications. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he later moved to Virginia, but his New York upbringing led to his musical influences. “It’s just the culture, in my household all you know is the hip-hop scene and the R&B scene,” Williams said. Rap came to Williams at a young age, with his earliest memory being a freestyle performed when he was in fifth grade. While rapping with some friends, his mother caught him using profane lyrics, which he called “one

Courtesy of Faded Decade.

of the scariest moments” of his life. Williams recounted his mother’s response. “She just laughed and walked in the house, but it was scary because I thought I was going to get the craziest beating of my life,” Williams said. Music took the back burner when he went on to play football with dreams of making it to the NFL, though he maintained his interests in music. As a senior in high school, Williams was scouted by Coastal Carolina and Norfolk State University. His decision ended up being Norfolk State, where he played football for one year before transferring to Old Dominion. This transfer led to the return of music as his primary focus, feeling the urge to be more involved with music. Williams didn’t start recording music until January 2015, taking time to study the craft of making music and getting comfortable with an original flow. “I was trying to make everything

connect, everything cohesive, so it didn’t sound like I’m a new artist,” Williams said. His influences range from New York rap icons like Fabolous and 50 Cent, to new age artists Kendrick Lamar and Virginia rapper GoldLink. The main goal of Williams’ music is to make people smile. “If you’re bobbing your head and smiling and saying those are dope lyrics and a dope beat at the end of a song, that’s my goal, I can check that off,” Williams said. Along with this goal are hopes that he inspires people to get up and do things, instead of letting life pass them by. “I don’t know who said it, but you really do miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take, and I came to grips with that this summer. I felt like I was taking chances with my music, but now it’s to a point where I can’t let my shyness prevent me from talking to someone that can make me a better person,” Williams said.

Meeting at the Crossroads with Gary Clark Jr.’s ‘The Story of Sonny Boy Slim’ Adam Flores Staff Writer

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records.

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Bluesman Gary Clark Jr.’s latest album, “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim,” continues the legacy of blues guitar that has been around for more than a century. Released on Sept. 11, Clark infuses a plethora of musical styles into his brand of blues. This genre has also helped to shape virtually all other mediums of music since its African American beginnings. “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim,” the follow-up to his critically acclaimed debut “Blak and Blu,” is a definitive album that follows in the stylings of blues greats like B.B. King, Buddy Guy and Eric Clapton. Though this is only Clark’s second full-length studio album to date, the album affirms the Grammy award-winning singer, songwriter and guitar virtuoso is here to stay. “The Healing” is the exposition of what his music means as he belts out in his lyrics, “This music is my healing,” and “When this world upsets me, this music sets me free.” Other tunes such as “Grinder,” “Church” and “Shake” demonstrate the musical diversity we hear throughout the

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crossroads of this 54-minute blues journey. The 31-year-old Austin, Texas native is known for his trademark distorted guitar sound and impressive vocal range that can soar into falsetto with ease. Clark’s influences reside in jazz, soul and country as well as hiphop. Upon listening to “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim,” one can hear much more in his sound such as R&B, gospel and Motown mixed within this 13-track collection. With childhood influences such as Curtis Mayfield and The Jackson 5, Clark’s musical journey started at age 12 when he learned to play the guitar. As a teenager, he found work playing small gigs in the Austin area and eventually met with Clifford Antone who was proprietor of Antone’s, an Austin music club. By age 17, Clark won the Austin Music Award for Best Blues and Electric Guitarist on three separate occasions. As a result, Kirk Watson, the Mayor of Austin, proclaimed May 3 as Gary Clark Jr. Day. Clark has gone on to play numerous music festivals alongside the likes of B.B. King, Jeff Beck and ZZ Top. He

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has also collaborated on songs with musical trendsetters such as Sheryl Crow, Alicia Keys and Foo Fighters. In a recent Rolling Stone interview, Clark’s intuition into the new record and his music influences met with this response: “It really was just the sounds in my head,” Clark said. “I wasn’t really listening to anything. I just wanted to be completely open and not be stuck saying I am gonna go in this direction or that direction.” As Clark went into the studio to lay down tracks for “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim,” he had some ideas and grooves as he notes, “I basically came in here with the bare minimum. First two weeks, I just banged around, sat on the drums, played bass.” The result is a musical compilation that, for Clark, should defy the recording industry’s sophomore slump that plagues some up-and-coming artists after a successful first album. “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim” promises to carry the torch for the blues as a new voice of the genre and crossing over into other categories the album soulfully embraces.


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More photos from the Landmark Festival on maceandcrown.com.

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MIGUEL & WALE AT LANDMARK MUSIC FESTIVAL

Artist Miguel performs at the Landmark Music Festival in Washington, D.C.

Josh Boone

Wale and Miguel perform at the Landmark Music Festival in Washington, D.C.

Josh Boone

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E N T ER T A I NM E N T

Megan Snyder Contributing Writer

Revealing - Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret

Meet Kip Andersen, a young and avid environmentalist. He recycles, takes short showers, turns out lights when he’s not using them and rides his bike everywhere. He supports environmental organizations like Greenpeace and the Sierra Club with monthly donations. However, after a friend’s Facebook post led him to a United Nations report that claims that animal agriculture accounts for more carbon emissions than all transportation—that’s cars, trucks, trains, planes and boats combined— Andersen realized that far more had to be done to reduce his

impact on the earth. Described as a meeting of Davis Guggenheim’s 2006 documentary “An Inconvenient Truth” and Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s more recent “Blackfish,” “Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret” is the result of Andersen’s investigation into the environmental movement, a seemingly noble cause that harbors a dark secret. While giants in the campaign to save the planet encourage people to replace leaky faucets and switch from incandescent light bulbs to more ecofriendly compact fluorescents, none were addressing what the Worldwatch Institute argues contributes “51 percent of all worldwide greenhouse gas

emissions,”— livestock and their byproducts. But why? According to the slew of credible sources provided in both the film and on the “Cowspiracy” website, the meat, dairy and egg industry is “the leading cause of species extinction, ocean dead zones, water pollution and habitat destruction.” Perhaps the most harrowing story told in the film isn’t that of the cows, but of Sister Dorothy Stang, the American nun who was shot and killed by Brazilian landowners for speaking out against the deforestation of the Amazon for cattle grazing. Upon learning of this and over 1,000 other deaths resulting from the fight

to expose animal agriculture as the number one threat to the environment, Andersen admits to fearing for his own life, but knew that the truth had to be revealed. The multibillion dollar, government-sanctioned animal agriculture industry naturally has much to hide and even more to lose. Farmers rely almost entirely on the support of corporations to sustain production while the corporations have forged close and long-lasting relationships with federal departments, such as the Food and Drug Administration. When activists like Stang and Andersen jeopardize this business, they are often silenced, be it through financial-

Courtesy of A.U.M Films

ly crippling lawsuits, new legislation or violence. To combat these forces and inflict as little harm onto the environment as possible, Andersen along with experts in climatology and the environment suggest simply boycotting animal products and eating a plant-based diet. By abstaining from buying and eating these products, people can put a halt to and even reverse the damage that has been inflicted our land, atmosphere and waterways. A new cut of “Cowspiracy” featuring executive producer Leonard DiCaprio is now streaming on Netflix.

Future-Retroism: ‘Jurassic Park’ Becomes ‘Jurassic World’ George Plank Staff Writer

Courtesy of Universal Studios

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With the overwhelming success of “Jurassic World,” audiences showed that they were excited to see that after a 22-year wait, the park was opened at last. But how does this new jaunt through the park compare with the thrill ride audiences were taken on with the release of “Jurassic Park” in 1993? Based on the manuscript of the Michel Crichton novel, “Jurassic Park” shows what can happen when science goes unchecked. A philanthropist named John Hammond, played by the late Richard Attenborough, has created an entire theme park on an isolated island centered on dinosaurs. Hammond selects a team of professionals to assess and hopefully officially endorse the park. Among their ranks are two paleontologists fresh off of a raptor dig, a chaos theorist, a lawyer and Hammond’s grandchildren. At first, everything seems business as usual, but after a run in with a sick triceratops things begin to go downhill. None of the dinosaurs can

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be seen from the cars and when they try to coax the Tyrannosaurus Rex into appearing, the trams shut down. Meanwhile, an agent from another company is trying to steal company secrets from Hammond and manipulates the automated computer systems to shut down, resulting in the failure of the island’s security. The security collapse coupled with an inbound hurricane spells disaster for the guests as the Tyrannosaurus Rex escapes and begins to terrorize those on the tour. The paleontologist and Hammond’s grandchildren are separated from the others as they are forced to walk back to the visitor center. The chaos theorist is picked up by a company jeep and the lawyer has an unfortunate accident in the bathroom. The rest of the film is a suspenseful rollercoaster while the parties try to make it back to the welcome center and restore power to the island, all while avoiding raptor attacks. While it was not the first movie to use computer-generated animation, it showed what was possible on another scale. As a rule of thumb, any time

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a full dinosaur was seen on screen it was computer-generated. Spielberg, being completely devoted to the craft, fully utilized animatronics, puppets and had a strong respect for practical effects. In total, there are only 15 minutes of screen time with dinosaurs; six minutes are computer generated and the remaining nine minutes are completed with practical effects. “Jurassic World” is the sequel that Jurassic Park deserved. It returned to the basic concept of an amusement park filled with dinosaurs. The other two sequels delivered on the presence of dinosaurs, but almost never even mentioned the existence of the park. While the newest episode had a tendency to rely heavily on computer animation, it kept the idea of the theme park alive and well. With the box office success of “Jurassic World,” a sequel is already in the works. Hopefully, the series will continue to innovate and future iterations will continue to bring something new to the table each time. All the while, as Hammond put it, sparing no expense.


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E N T ER T A I NM E N T

Courtesy of Chrysler Museum of Art.

Hank Willis Thomas Brings

‘Black Righteous Space’ to the Chrysler Shannon Jay Staff Writer The Director of the Chrysler Museum, Eric Neal, introduced Hank Willis Thomas to a packed house at the monthly Third Thursday event on Sept. 17. Thomas is back at the Chrysler with “Black Righteous Space,” an interactive video installation featuring audio clips spanning from comedians to Civil Rights speeches, controlling and warping a kaleidoscopic Confederate flag. The traditional red, white and blue color are replaced with the Negro Liberation Movement’s color scheme. When the audio ceases, a microphone stands in front of the screen, inviting the viewer to speak and manipulate the animation with their commentary. “[It’s] inspired by those in the past, who have used their voices to make social change. I’m really interested in how we can use our voices to change the story, and remake symbols that have been used to oppress us, to relegate us,” Thomas said. From 1915 to present day, mainstream depictions of women and African Americans flashed on the screen. Without words, it’s a mystery what the stereotypical and misogynistic images are attempting to say. This project encourages the viewer to always consider how images we buy into on a daily basis affect our deepest ideologies. Thomas’ work often looks to the

past to give new context. One sculpture in particular, “Hands Up!”, took on a whole new meaning 6 months after completion with the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. “All of a sudden, something… based off a moment of subjugation…50 year ago, is speaking to a moment of uprising and defiance in the 21st century,” Thomas said. While much of Thomas’ work is his point of view as a Black American, he examines varying perspectives in his work. In collaboration with Jim Ricks and Ryan Alexiev called “Truth Booth,” an interactive speech bubble that allowed viewers to tell what Thomas refers to as “their own version of the truth.” “Truth Booth” traveled around the world to Ireland, Afghanistan, and even a presidential debate. This was not Thomas’ first time speaking at the Chrysler. He was here three years prior to speak about his contributions for the “30 Americans” exhibit in 2012. Through advertising, which Thomas said is “the most powerful language in the world,” he discusses topics that advertising campaigns can’t explore as responsibly. After the murder of his cousin, Thomas revisited photographs taken from his cousin’s funeral, utilizing the tagline from MasterCard advertisements as a way to discuss the irony of being marketed to while mourning. Other works in the “Branded”

series steer away from taglines and Thomas’ personal experience, and shift to examine the correlation of logos in what he referred to as an “age of branded consciousness.” “Logos act as our generation’s hieroglyphs,” Thomas said, “because they are imbedded with so much meaning, they can actually be used to tell different stories.” He tells these tales through eye opening imagery, like Nike swooshes scarred on a man’s chest. An image projected behind Thomas from the same series – an iconic bottle of vodka alluding to a slave ship, packed with bodies, captioned “Absolut Power” – as he discussed the “creation of blackness.” “I recognize race as a fiction,” Thomas said as he discussed the “Us vs. Them” mentality the illusion of race breeds. “It’s something that is untrue but dictates so many of our lives, and we’re still allowing that kind of language to define us.” While “Branded” reinterprets logos though Thomas’ art, his series “Unbranded” removes these logos and taglines so advertisements can tell a different tale. “I’m interested in how things that were status quo at some point shift,” Thomas said. Experience “Black Righteous Space”, at the Chrysler Museum until Oct. 4.

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Leah Baucom displays fashion.

Clare Benedetto

Monarch Style: Leah Baucom Clare Benedetto Contributing Writer

Name: Leah Baucom Major: Communication Year: Sophomore Spotted: Constant When Leah Baucom was spotted on the first day of Autumn this month, she was already geared up for Fall fashion and ready to take on crisper air. Baucom donned a classic red plaid flannel shirt, black combat boots laced over black skinny jeans, a fringed book bag, gold earrings and matching bangle bracelets. For a splash of color, her nails were painted a coral blue. She was sporting a striking combination of winged eyeliner and dark crimson lipstick. She said that she regularly takes risks by trying out “all different kinds of lipstick colors and eyeliner.” Baucom did indeed have the change of season in mind when she chose this outfit, she admit-

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ted. She had to accommodate the recent waves of cooler air coming in, but didn’t want to have to resort to a clunky sweater yet. Baucom describes her wardrobe as “90 percent black, grey and white.” Neutral colors are her palette of choice, and black is her favorite color, but she likes to spark up her outfits with bright accents. The most cherished item in her wardrobe is a pair of eggplant-purple Doc Marten boots. Boyfriend jeans were cited as her current favorite trend, and Zendaya and Vanessa Hudgens are Baucom’s style inspirations. Interestingly, a style trend she would like to see come into fashion again would be the hippy style of the ‘70s, as she “admires the lines and colors in some of the popular clothing of that time.” If Baucom was given the chance to raid the closet of one celebrity, she would choose Rihanna.


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Embrace the Culture Festival Celebrates Fourth Year in Norfolk

Zach Moeller Contributing Writer

A park alongside the Elizabeth River went from a seven-acre patch of grass to a meeting ground for unique individuals during the Embrace the Culture festival on Sept. 19. With no admission charge, hundreds of people from all over the seven cities came together to celebrate the ever growing indie culture that is sprouting up in Norfolk. The fourth annual festival, which took place in Town Point Park, created a space for individuals of all walks of life to come together and share art, crafts, food, music and all around good spirits. Vendors set up stands

to sell vinyl records, handmade hula hoops, jewelry and vintage t-shirts. Musicians could also share their craft in designated “Busker Zones” where they were allowed to play for anyone walking by. The ETC festival also included pingpong and air hockey tables that were free to play. Next to the tables were comfortable chairs with giant cloth checkerboards where attendees could challenge others to the game, or simply sit back and enjoy the atmosphere. Music was a huge part of the day, which was evident by the multiple stages set up around the park. ETC had an array of artists performing. Among emerging local talent, big-

ger names like The Dahus and KOA played sets throughout the afternoon. All performances throughout the day were general admission. Fans could choose to get up close to the stage or lounge in the complimentary hammocks on the back of the lawn. With many different bands performing throughout the day, it wasn’t easy to see all 17 artist’s sets. At 6 p.m., husband and wife duo Johnnyswim took the main stage, creating a unique mixture of blues style and raw rock ‘n’ roll. The crowd sang along loudly, and applauded at the conclusion of every song. ETC had no shortage of great food, either. Food trucks and pop-up vendors were scattered throughout the

park. Representatives from some of Norfolk’s favorite eateries were present, including Belmont House of Smoke and Cogan’s Pizza. Barbecue and pizza were not the only options, however, as you could also purchase festival standards like funnel cakes, french fries, soda, and varieties of beer. The day peaked right as the sun set and The Mowgli’s took the stage. The seven-piece group, hailing from southern California, wasted no time as Katie Jayne Earl thanked the audience for having them, and proceeded to jump straight into the set. The Mowgli’s kept everyone in attendance happy with their upbeat tunes. Fans close to the stage jumped

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up and down, screaming the lyrics in unison with the band, as those who had been sitting down got up to dance. The setlist included some of their hits, such as “I’m Good” and “San Francisco.” As the park cleared, leaving nothing behind except for the hum of generators and the occasional piece of trash, festival patrons headed towards the exits talking about how pleased they were with the day’s turnout. From listening to great music to seeing the unique crafts on sale by local artists, Embrace the Culture helped to do just as its name suggests.


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Sports

For updated Monarch sports coverage, visit maceandcrown.com.

ODU Delivers Striking Blow to University of Alabama

Charles Sims Contributing writer

ODU men’s Soccer runs upfield to attempt a goal.

Jon Harding

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On a windy, rainy Friday night, Old Dominion University Men’s Soccer (4-1-1) defeated University of Alabama at Birmingham (3-6-0) in Norfolk three goals to one. Resulting from this victory, ODU now stands in a four-way tie for first place in the C-USA men’s division with UAB falling to last place with two interconference losses. The No. 16 ranked Monarchs controlled the pace from the start, and continued to do so for the entirety of the first half. Recent preparation and practice helped the Monarchs, with their striker force communicative and effective. It also bears repeating that for the first half, ODU was playing against the rain, and into a moderately strong breeze increasing the impressiveness of their performance. ODU’s first two shots on goal were aimed at top middle shelf, but were

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stymied by the wind, allowing for UAB’s keeper to advantageously stop them. However, this would not always prove consistent. In the 7th minute, ODU took an early lead following a beautiful shot from left striker number 21 Niko Klosterhalfen, and the tempo from then on favored the Monarchs. ODU’s passing and swing game was almost poetic. In the 19th minute, UAB’s keeper was caught slipping due to the slick, inundated field. It lead to an open net second Monarch goal from number 10 Jessie Miralrio, his first of two. A series of penalties against the Blazers caused tension on the field close to the end of the first half, but also would help Miralrio to score ODU’s third and final goal of the game with an assist by Klosterhalfen. ODU’s offense was able to control the pace of the second half, stemming purely from their lengthy possession time. In fact, UAB only aver-

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aged three shots on goal the entire first half, compared to ODU’s nine. ODU’s keeper Alex Tiesenhausen displayed determination in a tense moment for the Monarchs. Tiesenhausen took a cleat to the chest during a dangerous offside play, but was able to continue playing for the rest of the game. ODU’s defense as a unit allowed for very few good touches from the UAB offensive, resulting in a first half shut out. The second half saw a rise in aggressiveness and intensity from the UAB offense, as their shots on nearly tripled. UAB finally got on the board with nine minutes left in the game, but it would not be enough to materialize a comeback. UAB had numerous chances to score but ODU’s defense outplayed them. The Monarch’s offensive speed and coordination resulted in a crucial win at home. ODU takes on VCU at home next week on Wednesday night, September 30th.


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Sports

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ODU FOOTBALL

ODU suffers a tough loss at home.

Josh Boone

ODU will hope to bounce back after a tough loss at home .

Brian Vilet

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Technology

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Car being charged. Stock

Building a World for Electric Cars Audra Reigle Contributing Writer Transportation is evolving just as much as everything else that one may or may not come across in their everyday life; video games, cell phones and cameras are just three examples of these changes. Electric cars are one of these new modes of transportation. With the rise of electric cars, car charging stations are popping up so that drivers can pull over and charge their cars, sometimes frequently. To try and eliminate the number of stops these electric cars and hybrids have to make, the United Kingdom has implemented a new technology in their roads that will charge these cars as they drive. These new roads will use magnetic induction technology. This is the

same technology seen in wireless phone chargers. There will be cables buried underneath the road to generate electromagnetic power to be picked up by the car and turned into electric power. The roads would be able to detect when a car is coming onto the road to start the process. A similar technology is already being used in South Korea for their shuttle buses. Locally, Tesla has recently opened a supercharging station. The station is located in Norfolk in the JANAF Shopping Center on East Virginia Beach Boulevard. There are six stalls for Tesla Model S cars to use for free. The stalls can charge a Tesla Model S car in 30 minutes, or if the car’s charge has been used up completely, it can be charged in approximately an hour. With the rise of electric cars, power

companies could be affected too, depending on how many people in a given area were trying to quickly charge their cars. The one homeowner with the Tesla Model S who wanted to charge his 85 kilowatt per hour car could do so, and the power company wouldn’t have to do anything as the power lines and transformers would be adequate enough for one person. If his neighbors got electric cars too, though, the power company would have to do something so that the power wouldn’t go out as a result of these homeowners quickly charging their cars. New substations would need to be built to help distribute the power better to prevent loss of it for homeowners in the vicinity of the charged car. The infrastructure for these electric cars has allowed charging sta-

tions to rise up at homes, workplaces and other public locations. Hybrid vehicles do not need to be plugged into a charging station to be charged, but electric cars that do need to be plugged in need a place to do so. There are three types of charging stations – the AC Level 1, the AC Level 2 and the DC Fast Charging – that people can use to charge their cars. The amount of time it takes to charge a car depends on how much of the battery has been used, how much it can hold, the type of battery in the car and the type of charging station being used. All three types require some sort of electrical installation. The AC Level 1 charges the car through a 120 volt plug, and the cord set for this is distributed with most electric cars. This type of charging is typically only used when a 120 volt

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plug is available. This type of charger only adds two to five miles of range to the car per hour of charging time. AC Level 2 chargers require 20 to 100 amps of electricity, but because they can charge a car overnight, these are the ones most commonly installed at homes. A person can use either AC Level 1 or AC Level 2 equipment to charge their cars. This type of charger can add ten to twenty miles of range per hour of charging time to the car. The DC Fast Charging allows for a car to be charged at public stations or on heavy traffic corridors; this is also called DC Level 2. Inductive charging has recently been introduced, and it doesn’t require a cord to use. These charging stations operate at a similar level as the AC Level 2 charging station. In twenty minutes, these cars can add about fifty to seventy miles


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Technology

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Fleek |Fleek| Adjective When something on an individual’s person is of an exceptionally high quality Your pants are on fleek this evening. Courtesy of Mace & Crown.

Kickstarter Roundup, September 2015 Ross Reelachart Tech Editor When the term “crowdfunding” is brought up, the very first thought that appears in the mind is the site that can be credited with pushing the crowdfunding concept into the spotlight: Kickstarter.com. Patronage is not a new concept by any means, as the great artists of the Renaissance often received the patronage of powerful individuals and the church so that they may create their masterpieces. But Kickstarter, and other crowdfunding sites like Indiegogo, have brought patronage into the modern age where anyone with money to give can give anyone with an idea the chance to bring their idea to life. Recently, Kickstarter underwent a major shift as a company. Previously, it was Kickstarter Inc. Under this classification, Kickstarter was a forprofit corporation that was mandated to think of the shareholders first and foremost. This was not in line with the mission of Kickstarter, which was to serve artists and creators with their projects, free of the constraints of typical corporate contracts and notions of mass appeal. Now it is Kickstarter PBC, or “Public Benefit Corporation”, which is still a for-profit classification. But now

Kickstarter is obligated to consider the societal impact of their decisions and actions, and not just consider the shareholders and profit. So now that Kickstarter is mandated by a legal classification to think of society and culture alongside profit, it stands that the projects it hosts should rise to that expectation of positive social impact. Below are a few, real Kickstarter projects that might just be a force for good in the world, and a few that might not… quite live up to that lofty expectation. The RePhone Kit The RePhone is “an open source and modular phone kit.” What that means is the makers of RePhone are aiming to make and release a series of phone and electronic parts that can be put together easily by the average consumer to fit their custom needs. What starts as an assemblage of seemingly random circuit boards, touchscreen and antennae can be put together to make a functional phone or other kind of small electronic wearable device. RePhone is the not first project to tackle the idea of a make-your-own phone. Phonebloks is a concept by designer Dave Hakkens, which inspired a team to try and make the concept a reality, that preceded RePhone and tackles the same idea. Both aim

to compete against the established corporate business of existing smart phones. As it stands, smart phones are only available only from a few companies. They are expensive, frequently saddled with features that not everyone wants or needs, frequently lacks features that some people do want and are subject to obsolescence on a nearly yearly basis. A modular phone, however, can better suit a user’s needs and upgrades can be done on a part-by-part basis instead of replacing the entire phone. Hopefully this can also be done much cheaper than full smart phones as well. “Luvit” “Luvit” bills itself as a “real-life like button.” It is basically a button with an electronic counter that can be mounted on walls, or placed anywhere for that matter. Every time the button is pressed, the counter goes up by one, and not much else happens. So in a sense, it IS like a “real-life like button”. The Kickstarter page of “Luvit” is filled with the kind of marketing jargon that is so often associated with corporate marketing, but this time it is being used for an independent technology project. “Luvit” proudly proclaims that “The Luvit approves, disapproves, rates and/or compares

based on your needs,” and that it is easy, smart and secure. Yet it is all in service of a button with a counter on it. As cool as the idea of a “real-life like button” sounds in theory, there is nothing that it cannot accomplish that a sheet of paper with check boxes can do for a fraction of the price and without the need to mount several buttons on the wall for people to press at their leisure. Wordnik Wordnik.com is an already existing website that purports to be the “world’s biggest online English dictionary.” It has begun a Kickstarter project to “add a million missing words to the dictionary.” This is not to say that Wordnik will add a million missing words to any official dictionary. Instead Wordnik aims to use a teachable piece of software to find words on the internet, and then define them according to their usage on the internet. On the surface, Wordnik’s goal sounds admirable and even reasonable. A study published in the scientific journal Science by Harvard researchers in 2010 found that “52% of the English lexicon—the majority of the words used in English books— consists of lexical ‘dark matter’ undocumented in standard references.” As modern English is a fast-evolv-

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ing language, accelerated by the anarchy of the internet, new words enter into the language at an alarming rate. It’s a not infrequent occurrence to be on social media, or the internet in general, and come across a piece of text or a word that elicits the thought, “Is THAT what kids are calling it nowadays?” Wordnik argues on its own Kickstarter page that their mission is not as superfluous as it sounds. It brings up the common annoyance of wanting a word to describe a certain situation, but not having the tools to find it. Their example is “pandiculation,” which describes the act of yawning and stretching when you first wake up. “Pandiculation” is defined on Wordnik and Wiktionary, but not in any official dictionary. While it would be nice to finally have a source for obscure words, or a place to find the words for obscure situations, Wordnik might be opening a Pandora’s Box of anarchic language by looking to define a “million missing words.” First, a missing word is not a problem if the writer has enough other words to describe something. Second, this is a world where “birb,” “bae” and “fleek” are in common usage. Does the world really need to officially define those kinds of words?


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Opinion

To submit your opinions about issues on campus, e-mail sdavi116@odu.edu

RAPE! Now That I’ve Got Your Attention… Josh Whitener News Editor Survivors will tell you that rape takes from you. There’s a piece of you that disappears that you don’t think you’ll ever get back. You’re more untrusting. You’re angrier. You wear a lot of clothes but you feel bare, exposed. You’re angry. You don’t understand why being in an elevator is making you breathless and shaking. You’re angrier. Since I’ve joined the Mace and Crown, I’ve written nine articles that are either about or relate to rape or sexual assault. I investigated a sexual assault on our campus. I questioned fraternities on what they do to fight off the stigma of being nesting grounds for potential rape. I extensively interviewed and befriended a student who had been raped, who let me tell her story. Writing on this subject has been the most rewarding, difficult experience of my life both professionally

and personally. But I’m tired of it. I learned a lot. I learned more than I can ever describe. Along the way some things happened in the world outside of our ODU subculture. Rolling Stone wrote a false article wherein their source lied about being raped, setting back the validity of real rape victims. Emma Sulkowicz carried her mattress around Columbia University. Bill Cosby… well… you get the idea. You know what I learned the most? Rape isn’t about sex. It’s about power. When you’re talking about spreading awareness about one person taking another person’s rights away, their choices away, their identity away through sex and violence it’s not simply flyers and hashtags. How do we do that now, though? My research has led me to a highly concerning fact. The perpetuation of rape culture is like a hidden ethos. It’s become so ingrained in our society,

especially on college campuses, that it’s a normalcy. There’s a hidden phenomenon in our country: rape culture. What is rape culture? The best way for me to describe it is that aggression by males towards women for the purpose of sex is considered the norm. But it’s much broader and more complex. As with drug culture or frat culture, rape culture is a part of our society. Anthropologist Peggy Reeves Sunday has researched the differences between campus cultures in her study “RapeProne Versus Rape-Free Campus Cultures.” Sunday presents that “the outstanding feature of rape-free societies is the ceremonial importance of women and the respect accorded the contribution women make to social continuity, a respect which places men and women in relatively balanced power spheres.” We’re not just talking about spreading awareness of sexual assault. We’re

talking about contributing to women’s rights. Recently, the SGA hosted a small brainstorming session with various other student organizations such as fraternities, sororities, and administration officials. The discussion was meant to spur ideas which could help spread awareness of sexual violence on campus. Read about it here. What they discussed will not have the intended impact they desire. Although I hate to bring up the incident on 43rd street, it’s a relative topic. By talking to students, mostly freshman, I discovered that no one was really bothered by the banners and what they represented. It didn’t affect them one way or another. So what’s worse: the rape or the apathy? You give presentations on the dangers of sexual assault. You have a speaker come in and talk to classes. You write informative messages on the sidewalk. You wear ribbons. You

write articles. But you can’t do that now, can you? I believe most college campuses are apathetic. I don’t think it’s our fault, either. I think it’s just our generation. To not focus on these issues is a lot easier than facing some ugly facts. Whether we admit it or not, there is a culture perpetuating rape. To tap someone on the shoulder and tell them that politely? I think we’re well past that. Someone once told me that by writing those articles I did more good for complete strangers than I would ever know. That one of those articles could have motivated someone to come forward about this rape, or that it could have deterred someone from making that choice. At the very least they told me that by reading even one, a survivor who’s pushed this pain down could have seen that there were others out there that could find help. They said maybe I made someone less angry.

Queer Column: “Why,” The Word that Makes Civil Rights Equity Cringe Connor Norton Staff Writer ‘Why?’ It sounds like such an innocent question, asking for the clarification of a discussion or topic that might have been difficult to follow or new. And yet, this word has earned the bane and hatred of many an Equity activist from any marginalized community. The reason being, society has turned to using this word, whether knowingly or not, as a weapon of dismissive ignorance, and it has to stop. All too often, when organizations and communities bring forward policies, plans, and movements to support marginalized communities there are the nay-sayers that always say “well why is that important?” “Why do we need something like that?” “Why does that even matter?” Keep it the same, nothing is bothering anyone on a large scale, why rock the boat? But that’s just the problem, while the boat is big and not rocking (as far as the massive majority of the white cisgendered community is aware) to the marginalized minority and intersectional communities every little wave is earth shattering and every ‘why?’ is an ignorant response to a very real problem. For many years, the Trans* community has been historically marginalized and oppressed within their own Queer community. As such, no

matter the victories of the LGB community, Trans* issues are still often ignored and forgotten as even issues of consideration. The Williams Institute based in The University of Los Angeles has been the only type of institution to release any statistics on Trans* populations in the U.S. is because the U.S. Census and other Government Institutionalized surveys do not recognize or survey people outside of the normalized gender binary. And what is the question the general public and government ask when groups like the ACLU ask for the inclusion of gender nonconforming identities on the census? “Why?” This dismissive attitude also does another dangerous thing, it ‘others’ an entire community and normalizes the idea of a gender binary. By doing this we marginalize individuals uncomfortable with the gender binary, forcing them to conform to a ‘norm’ we as a society have created. Constructed societal norms have been the bane of true inclusivity, as a young queer man myself I have often been asked ‘why do you identify that way?’ ‘why do you use that word?’ most times from my own community. The fact of the matter is, every time someone asks why they invalidate an entire identity and community; and ultimately other them. America has done this relentlessly with minority communities; when Queer

people first came out we spent 30 years having to answer uncomfortable questions and always validating our identity to countless curious masses. African American rights activists from the #BlackLivesMatters constantly have to answer why they fight so hard and why there is so much anger behind their movement. None of those activists owe any more of an answer to why they feel afraid to walk the streets of THEIR country than I owe to anyone who asks me who I fuck. Acceptance doesn’t mean agreeing with a perspective, it means understanding there is a community different from your own; and they are valid and deserve equity. Reactive logic is the bane of equity, and the signs of it coming can always be seen when the superior majority begins asking ‘The big W.’ Nothing positive, or lasting, has ever come from the use of research, time, and discussion when it has been held in the wake of terrible or traumatic experiences. The movements of #BlackLivesMatter should be a clear example. Countless Black Lives have been ended by the police entrusted to protect them, and so little work has been done to address and attack the institutional racism they have suffered; there is no more time to discuss, there is only time to act, to feel, and to respond. This same trend has been seen throughout history, and

will continue to repeat itself as long as society doesn’t listen to the creaks in the boat and only reacts when the boat has sprung a leak. When you are sailing, the boat is making weird noises or not responding normally, and you are in the middle of the ocean; you don’t ignore these issues, you take the steps to fix them before there is a leak. Proactive action has always proved to protect and advance society for as long as it’s been seen. There is a deliberate use of the word ‘action’ vs. ‘logic’ in this because it is when the issue has not arisen, that we can best mobilize to address it. As LGB community members make progress, the awareness of gender identity equity is being made more clear by the angrier and louder protests like the one that occurred at The White House’s Pride Celebration in June of 2016. We are at an integral timeline where action can still be proactive, and can stop another outcry. Many Trans* lives have already been silenced, but we have yet to hear of them often because of their marginalization in the media….if history has taught anything, it’s that it won’t be long before their time comes. How come it always takes the day when news and media reports on countless murders and deaths against a community before any action is taken? It doesn’t have to be….if proactive action is given priority to reactive

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complacency. Today, Gender Identity rights are on the forefront of discussion; in Higher Education, in the military, in health care and beyond. But it’s tricky, there is an uphill battle against one of the oldest societal norms established: the gender binary of girls and boys. Today, almost 10 percent of our country’s population is made up of Queer identified people, and that comes from the progress of seeing positive visible representation, government support, and policies that simply voice the awareness of an alternative culture to the established normalcy. This is a call to action, a simple question that is asked to any administrator, student, or equity activist that has ever wanted to ask the question ‘why?’ Just think and ask yourself “why do you need to know?” The answer to that question should always be ‘you don’t.’ Instead start asking “how can I help?” “what do you need?” The time has passed for our generation to waste time explaining our identities to our peers, and the older generations…the time has come for us to hold them all accountable. There is no more time, or reason, to have to waste time explaining our issues to death; too many people have died because we decide to wait too long and have ‘discussions’ about why there is an issue…the issue is here and it’s time to DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 9.30.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

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Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler

The Mace & Crown

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Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler

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