Page 1

WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015 | MACEANDCROWN.COM | Vol. 57, Issue 22

Monarchs fall to VCU. C2

Virginia Beach Police Department

Virginia Beach Police Investigate Use of Force on Teenager

Josh Whitener Assistant News Editor

The use of pepper spray and a stun gun on a local Virginia Beach teenager was caught on video, which resulted in a police investigation. Brandon Wyne, 17, can be seen screaming and writhing in pain on a video recorded from the car Wyne was riding in on January 10. The driver, Courtney Griffith, told WTKR the officers conducted a traffic stop at 9 p.m. in the 1900 block of Darnell Drive, which is located near Diamond Springs Road, because Griffith’s license plate light was out. Upon conducting the stop, the officers allegedly smelled marijuana. The video depicts the interaction

between Wyne and officers. Wyne is initially uncooperative with officers, stating that he is a minor and demanding his mother’s presence. Griffith is also heard requesting for the officers’ sergeant to be present. “Step out of the vehicle,” one officer says. “I’m going to get out, I’m going to get out,” Wyne finally concedes. An arm reaches into the car and tries to pull Wyne from the vehicle. An officer yells, “Get out!” and then proceeds to pepper spray Wyne before then stunning him twice with a Taser. “We are heavily investigating this video and all of the circumstances,” Police Chief Jim Cervera said after a meeting at the Convention Center. “I am not overly comfortable

with what I saw on that video, I can tell you that. It’s not good.” The video was posted to the Facebook profile of Courtney Gee and has been viewed more than a million times. According to a news release Thursday, the awareness of the four-minute video prompted Virginia Beach Police Department to place an officer on administrative duty, and the department has begun an internal investigation. Brian Luciano, president of the Virginia Beach Police Benevolent Association, told the VirginianPilot that the officer’s actions in the video appear to be in line with the department’s use-of-force policy. But he said the investigation still must conclude.

“Be patient, and don’t judge it just by what you see,” Luciano said. “There’s always more to the story. We would caution the officers to just do the right thing, to do what they’re trained to do and not worry about politics.” In a traffic stop, the people in a vehicle have a legal obligation to comply with an officer’s orders, Luciano added. Police did retrieve 5.5 ounces of marijuana and a scale from the vehicle during the stop that night. Griffith was charged with misdemeanor possession of marijuana, which has since been dismissed by a judge as of April 1. Macie Pridgen, a spokesperson for the Commonwealth’s Attorney, told the Virginian-Pilot that

a 17-year-old was also charged on that date with misdemeanor resisting arrest, felony possession with intent to distribute marijuana and felony assault on a law enforcement officer. She could not provide the teens’ name or whether it was the one depicted in the video. A 17-year-old teen is currently being detained in juvenile detention. The felony assault charge has since been reduced to a misdemeanor. The video has sparked an outcry online and has alarmed the family of the teen. The police investigation is still ongoing.

Michael Copon visits ODU. B1 The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


A2

Face In The Mace Mace & Crown Staff : Sean Davis Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@maceandcrown.com

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2014| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Hashtag #ODU to see your face in the Mace. Instagr a m

Brian Saunders Copy Editor briananthony93@gmail.com David Thornton News Editor news@maceandcrown.com Veronica Singer Arts & Entertainment Editor artsandentertainment@maceandcrown.com Nate Budryk Sports Editor & Distribution Manager nbudr001@odu.edu Zachary Chavis Photography Editor photo@maceandcrown.com Rashad McDowell Technology Editor technology@maceandcrown.com

Elijah Stewart Senior Graphic Designer estew010@odu.edu Jason Kazi Advertising and Business Manager advertising@maceandcrown.com Noah Young Digital Content Manager webmaster@maceandcrown.com Jugal Patel Digital Editor jpate016@odu.edu

Staff Writers: Alex Brooks Alyse Stanley Amy Poulter George Plank Jasmine Blackwell Jessica Perkins Josh Whitener Libby Marshall Michael High Matt O’Brien Ross Reelachart

Staff Photographers: Dawit Samson Jason Kazi Joshua Boone Joshua Caudell Nicolas Nemtala Schyler Shafer Shamon Jones

Mace & Crown is a newspaper published by and written for the students of Old Dominion once a week throughout each semester and once in the summer. Originally founded in 1930 as the The High Hat, the paper became the Mace & Crown in 1961. The Mace & Crown is a primarily self-supporting newspaper, maintaining journalistic independence from the university. All views expressed in this collegiate paper are those of the author, not of the University, Mace & Crown, or the editors. Phone: 757-683-3452

T w it t er


NEWS

For even more campus crime information, visit maceandcrown.com.

Crime Log

Jason Kazi | M&C

Administration Responds to Adjunct Concerns David Thornton News Editor Over the past several years, difficulties faced by adjunct professors, including low pay, excessive hours and lack of benefits, have become one of the most discussed subjects in the world of higher education. On February 25, in conjunction with National Adjunct Walkout Day, a “ring-in” staged by adjuncts brought this issue home to ODU. But what exactly is an adjunct? What is their plight? And what has been the response of ODU’s administration? Adjuncts are essentially considered to be part-time faculty instructors. Their positions are referred to as “contingent,” meaning they have to be officially re-hired every semester based on need. Other contingent faculty members include full-time non-tenure-track professors and graduate student teaching assistants. Adjuncts tend to fall into two categories. The first is the true parttimer. These professors are generally experts in their fields, brought in to teach a couple of classes and share their experience with newer generations. They tend to have full-

A3

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

time jobs from which they derive the majority of their income. At ODU, many of these adjuncts can be found in the Strome College of Business, and in the Frank Batten College of Engineering and Technology. They teach for a variety of reasons: to supplement their income, to maintain ties to the university, and to give back by helping students who are entering their respective fields. Many of these adjuncts have full-time, established careers outside of academia. But the second category of adjuncts are those for whom teaching is a calling, who want to make academia their careers. These adjuncts are frequently found teaching liberal arts and general education courses. For many of them, education is their only source of income. And many are barely scraping by. According to a 2010 survey conducted by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, to which over 20,000 contingent faculty members responded, the median pay for a three-semester course was $2700. At ODU, adjuncts are paid more than that – around $3000. Multiple adjuncts at the ring-in stated that three classes per semester was a full time workload.

The Mace & Crown

This means that, assuming they don’t teach summer courses, adjuncts make about $18,000 a year. That comes out to roughly $8.75 an hour. That’s assuming 40-hour workweeks, which some say is lowballing it. In addition, according to the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, adjuncts rarely see wage increases over time, and more than half the respondents to the survey stated that they have been working as contingent faculty for more than six years. In addition to low pay, adjuncts also seldom receive health benefits, and rarely have office space of their own. Dr. Carol Simpson, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, said that students have indicated that they like having professors in offices where they have a reasonable chance of finding them, and admits that this can be very difficult for adjuncts. However, to address this issue, Dr. Simpson said that ODU has already included in its Master Plan, the primary outline for building and development on campus over the next few years, plans to increase the amount of office space in some academic departments, some of which will be made available to

@maceandcrown

Date/Time Reported

Location

Category

Disposition

03/29/2015 12:19am

Ted Constant Center

Liquor Law Violation

Investigation by NPD

03/29/2015 12:25am

Ireland House

Liquor Law Violation

Arrest

03/29/2015 1:52am

1500 Blk W. 39th St

Assault by Mob

Active

03/29/2015 6:55am

The District

Sexual Assault

Investigation by NPD

03/30/2015 10:25am

1400 Blk W. 39th St.

Harassing Communication

Judicial referral

03/30/2015 3:30pm 03/30/2015 5:08pm

Village Lot 3

Larceny from a Vehicle Larceny

Active

03/31/2015 3:55pm

Gresham East

Robbery

Arrest

04/02/2015 2:43pm

7-11

Fraud

Active

04/02/2015 5:58pm

Garage A

04/03/2015 8:31am

1300 Blk W. 39th St.

Vandalism

Active

04/03/2015 10:06pm

England House

Narcotics Violation

Inactive

04/03/2015 4:01pm

Islamic Center

Larceny

Active

04/04/2015 1:29am

The District

Curfew Violation

Arrest

04/04/2015 4:24am

The District

Assault - Simple

Active

04/04/2015 3:24pm

Village Lot 3

Vandalism

Active

04/05/2015 6:30pm

Village Lot 10

Narcotics Violation

Judicial referral

Raising Cane’s

Hit and Run Property Damage

Active

Active

For more details, visit maceandcrown.com

@maceandcrown


A4

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

adjuncts. In addition, many departments that rely more heavily on adjuncts, such as English and Math, have suites of rooms which adjuncts are able to use as shared office space. Dr. Simpson and Dr. Chandra de Silva, vice provost for Faculty and Program Development, took note of the ring-in. “I thought what they did was perfect,” said Dr. Simpson. “There was no negative impact on students, it was not disruptive.” Both she and Dr. de Silva expressed openness to engaging in conversations about these issues with the adjuncts. Towards this end, they have set

up a town-hall-style meeting for 2pm on April 29, in MGB 102. “It will be interesting… to get the different viewpoints, because different faculty will have different concerns,” Dr. Simpson said. “They wanted somewhere they could express their ideas,” Dr. de Silva said. “People are realistic about what can and can’t be done, but we’d like to hear more about what they’d like us to prioritize. There are very different groups.” Caleb Magyar, one of the adjuncts spearheading this movement, agreed. “We are absolutely a heterogeneous group,” he said. “We’re made

up of all sorts of people from all walks of life.” Both the adjuncts and the provosts are eager for the meeting. “We shot for Reading Day. The idea … was to try to catch a day when people wouldn’t have a teaching commitment at ODU,” Magyar said. “We wanted it before the end of the semester, and to maximize the opportunity for people to attend.” Dr. de Silva met with Magyar and a small group of adjuncts at the end of March to discuss the implementation of the meeting. They also discussed some initial concerns, including the possibil-

ity of representation in the faculty senate, which adjuncts currently do not have. They also discussed some possible solutions, such as adjunct advocacy groups organized within each college. However, neither side can move forward until they’ve heard from everyone. “Until we know exactly what the concerns are, there’s only so much we can do,” Dr. Simpson said. “We need to have a sense from the group, a reasonably large proportion, to see what it is they need.” “This is how to make sure adjuncts get a fair deal,” Dr. de Silva said. “This is not particular

to ODU. It’s a national problem. While it is difficult to totally resolve, we have some guidance in that some people have already been thinking about this.” Everyone seems to be in a holding pattern until the end of April. The adjuncts are gathering information, setting agendas, and soliciting feedback. The provosts are doing much the same. Until the town hall meeting, the fullest extent of the adjuncts’ concerns will not be known, much less what the university can reasonably be expected to do to help. But what is clear is that the administration is listening.

Say NO to the exploitation of Adjuncts at ODU! Adjuncts, like every other constituent group on this campus--students, full-time faculty, and staff--deserve fair pay and a voice. Now is the time to stand up!

Adjuncts deserve:

Planning to be in Richmond this summer?

• A fair and living wage. $50/hr sounds like a lot. But, if you only get one class a semester you qualify for food stamps and Medicaid. • Humane benefits: healthcare, time off, retirement. These are human rights. • A seat at the leadership table, just like every other group on campus. • Limited class size. Smaller classes = more learning.

Why not earn some credit?

Take that math class you need as a prerequisite or explore a new subject. With over 2,500 courses, you can indulge in topics like Curiousness, Field Archeology, or get credit for watching films in a History of Motion Picture course.

Summer classes run

May 18 through August 7.

Visit www.summer.vcu.edu for course listings and registration information.

The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe. You have to make it fall. Che Guevara

Summer Studies Office (804) 827-4586 summer@vcu.edu

Students: Show your support for ODU Adjuncts, and willingness to pay a little more for tuition, at a town hall meeting on Wednesday, April 29 at 2 p.m. in Mills Godwin Building 102.

Spend your summer working in a Virginia State Park! 

Park Interpreter  Maintenance Ranger  Office Support  Contact Ranger  Lifeguards  Food Services  Housekeeping Apply at www.dcr.virginia.gov/job 800-933-PARK (7275)

www.virginiastateparks.gov

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown

www.gread.org


Arts &

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

B1

Visit maceandcrown.com for area concert photos and reviews.

E N T ER T A I NM E N T

Michael Copon

Michael Copon Visits Campus Nicholas Rayfield Staff Writer Michael Copon spent eight months living in his ’82 pickup truck after he landed his big Hollywood break as Lucas Kendall, the blue Power Ranger in 2001’s “Power Rangers: Time Force.” He blindly moved to Los Angeles when he was 18 to pursue a career in acting. It was four and a half long years and 1,482 failed auditions after his role in “Power Rangers” until he heard “yes” instead of “no.” He finally made a breakthrough. Copon landed the role of Felix Taggaro in Warner Brothers’ “One Tree Hill,” and it was all because of his

guidance and his motivation: the “three P’s.” “The three P’s are simple,” he said on Thursday during his presentation inside Old Dominion University’s Strome Entrepreneurial Center in the Visual Arts building. “It’s simple. It’s all about persistence, passion and patience.” Copon spoke to a room packed with students of all different majors about his own methods in how to press on to accomplish personal goals and dreams while still being able to ensure self-happiness and satisfaction. The persistence to keep reaching for a goal or a dream, the passion to want to continuously do it and the

The Mace & Crown

patience to get to the final outcome is what Copon aimed to instill into the minds of his open-eared audience. “Surround yourself with people that are always going to hold you accountable,” Copon said in response to a student’s question about how to stay on track. “My mother was that person. She wouldn’t let me come back to Chesapeake until after I had done what I had said I was going to do. She was the one that held me accountable.” He humorously told his audience stories of calling home upset and his mother telling him to turn around and to keep trying until he did it. Since “One Tree Hill,” Copon

@maceandcrown

has had a dozen, both film and television, appearances such as his roles in “Bring It On: In It to Win It,” “The Scorpion King 2: Rise of a Warrior,” and “Hawaii Five-0.” He has opened Michael Copon Studios since returning back to his hometown in Chesapeake, Va. in 2012. In fact, he has produced independent and commercial films, music and is now developing new plans and ideas to release in regards to future projects that he and his team will be involved in. In a campaign to put his home state on the map – alongside hotspots like Los Angeles, New York City and Atlanta – all of his forthcoming visual projects will

@maceandcrown

be both filmed and produced in Virginia. With the ups and downs, from living in his car to getting paid lump sums of money up front, Michael Copon has successfully maintained the drive to continue to do what he loves to do. From acting to producing, and now running a business, he has stayed within the realm of his interest yet has adapted to new ways of fostering such a creative outlet. “You have to look past what is going to pay your car bill, what is going to make you financially secure. You have to look at what is going to make you happy.”


B2

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Tidal: A New Streaming Service in the Music Industry Carlito Ricafort Staff Writer

Watch out Spotify, there’s a new music-streaming service in town and it goes by the name of Tidal. Announced during a press conference held in late March, Tidal claims to be the “first artist-owned global music and entertainment platform.” What does this mean? Well according to The Guardian, Tidal’s parent firm Aspiro was bought by Jay-Z for $56 million in an attempt to rebrand the service as a means of putting the power back into the hands of the artists. In fact, Tidal has sixteen coowners, consisting of many Top 40 artists such as Beyonce, Alicia Keys, Daft Punk, Jason Aldean, J. Cole, Kanye West, Nicki Minaj, Coldplay and many more. This partnership sends a message

out, which echoes Jay-Z’s explanation of the service. “The challenge is to get everyone to respect music again, to recognize its value. Water is free. Music is $6 but no one wants to pay for music. You should drink free water from the tap - it’s a beautiful thing. And if you want to hear the most beautiful song, then support the artist.” Currently, Spotify has a “free” option that allows users to shuffle through a library of their preferred artists and a “premium” option that costs $9.99 a month to stream and download everything on their catalog. Tidal’s payment models consist of a regular $9.99 option similar to Spotify, and a pricier $19.99 option that offers higher-quality files (something Spotify does not have) and high-definition music videos. Without a “free” option, the

The Mace & Crown

amount of revenue given to artists through Tidal is much more than what Spotify could offer. In an infographic presented by Information Is Beautiful, it’s shown that for every time a song is streamed on Spotify, the label receives an average of $0.0016 and the artist is given roughly $0.00029. Many artists have expressed discontent because of Spotify allowing a “free option,” with Taylor Swift removing her catalog back in November, and current Tidal co-owner, Jason Aldean, following suit that same month. While Tidal promises that artists will receive more per stream than other services, no concrete rate has been given. The promise of more revenue to the artists is a nice touch, but it would only be beneficial if Tidal is able to become a main source of music-streaming for consumers. These days, there are plenty of op-

@maceandcrown

tions for paid music streaming such as Xbox Music, Beats Music (soon-to-be rebranded under iTunes), Rhapsody and of course, Spotify. Currently, there really isn’t much there to draw subscribers in besides the promise of exclusives and highquality music and videos for those willing to shell out $20 a month. Tidal has already experimented with exclusives with Rihanna releasing two singles on the platform, but are exclusives enough to convince people to switch to Tidal? The higher-quality streams may sound interesting, but what does “high-fidelity” really mean? Essentially, the files are not mp3 files but larger FLAC files, which stands for “Free Lossless Audio Codec.” The quality in the songs is much less compressed than a regular stream, but unfortunately the changes in quality

@maceandcrown

are hard to notice unless the listener has high-end speakers and a good ear. The CEO of Tidal has acknowledged this by saying “This service is not for everybody. Spotify is for everybody. You don’t even need to pay! But for quality, you have to pay.” Given the fact that Tidal is still in its infancy and many of the details are still unknown, it’s hard to make predictions on its success. While the ideology behind the service is definitely refreshing, it offers little incentive for users to want to use it. Jay-Z aims to revolutionize the music industry with Tidal, but unless Tidal can become a serious competitor against other music-streaming services, it seems as if Tidal is focused more on the artist than the users. Only time will tell who will come out on top.


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Sports Nate Budryk Sports Editor “I go with an awesome burger and a beer.” This is Dustin Clark’s favorite meal. This should come as no surprise seeing as how Clark, ODU hoops’ unofficial hype man is one of the Monarchs’ biggest fans in many ways. A season ticket holder, Clark recently rose to viral fame after his shirt-removal ritual garnered the attention of SportsCenter, perhaps the most visible sports program of any kind in the country. Clark, as many ODU basketball fans already know, is known for this ritual. Most home games, during one of the many TV timeouts found in college basketball today, Clark’s visage is broadcast on the Ted’s jumbotron, to the immense delight of the Constant Center faithful. His shirt remains on to begin with, but as the music volume increases and the TV time out nears its completion, Clark sheds the garment, inciting an eruption of cheers from the crowd. Clark, a 38-year-old Hampton Roads native, works in IT technical support, and despite not graduating from Old Dominion, (Clark is an ECPI grad) has been a season ticket holder for ten years who tries to make it to every home game. According to Clark, the tradition dates back further than expected. “It happened in 2010 at the CAA tournament. VCU’s band director took his shirt off. I had to show him up, so I did and the place went crazy,” Clark said. People have continued to go crazy ever since, as Clark’s celebrity on campus and throughout Monarch nation is as high as it has ever been. “He’s the man. Everybody thinks it’s awesome when he fires up the crowd. It’s just really funny and I think it’s a way to help get the ODU name out there,” said Zack Daniels, a senior from Richmond. It’s not only students who get a kick out of Clark’s shirt-shedding. His family and friends are also aware of the recent viral video and, according to Clark, “They cannot get enough.” “I love them. They love me too,” Clark said of his relationship with the team/coaches. “Jeff Jones is a hell of a coach, along with his staff. Thank you for the shirts.” Clark adds. Clark is a man with ambition, too. His goal is to create a section of the Ted Constant Center of like-minded Monarch basketball fans called the “No Shirt Mafia.” “It’s a group I’m

C1

For updated Monarch sports coverage, visit maceandcrown.com.

Dustin Clark: ODU’s Biggest Fan

Zack Chavis | M&C trying to start. There are a few friends who sit in the same section, 108, year after year, so I called them the noshirt mafia. My mom and dad are in

The Mace & Crown

the club, too. Been working on getting my dad and friends to do it too. Maybe next year.” Regardless of whether or not his

@maceandcrown

friends and family decide to join him in his shirt-doffing exploits, Dustin Clark is in too deep to stop now, as the team’s unofficial hype man awaits

@maceandcrown

the start of another season of Monarch basketball. So, shirt’s off to you, Dustin. Thanks for keeping the season light and fun.


C2

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Josh Caudell | M&C

Monarchs Struggle on the Mound in 10-2 Loss to VCU Matt O’Brien Staff Writer On a cold, windy Wednesday Night, Monarch baseball took on rival Virginia Commonwealth University in a non-conference game at home. Head Coach Chris Finwood has faced the Rams 4 times since he was an assistant there in 2000. Old Dominion, who shares the same record as VCU (17-13), had a lot of difficulty on the mound,

using seven different pitchers throughout the night. The Rams offense got off to a quick start and, was able to get the 10-2 victory thanks to 12 hits. The loss snapped a three-game win streak for the Monarchs. Starter Nate Matheson found himself in trouble early. Matheson surrendered his only two earned runs in the first inning. Rams hitters capitalized on some of his control issues, forcing him to throw 37

pitches in his two innings of work. The Monarchs ‘offense struggled to provide any run support until P.J. Higgins came to the plate in the 5th inning. Higgins smacked a line drive that bounced to the warning track, scoring the Monarchs’ only two runs. While they only produced two runs, putting the ball in play was not an issue for ODU’s bats. Higgins, along with teammates Connor Myers and Nick Walker each

had two hits. Eleven hits overall was not enough as ODU left too many runners on base and missed their opportunities. Ultimately, the pitching of these two clubs was the deciding factor. VCU starter Sean Thompson only gave up two runs on six hits in five innings of work. Thompson successfully kept the ball down in the zone, forcing many ground balls and limiting ODU’s offense. ODU’s relievers really struggled

to get outs and combined for 8 runs. Behind two three-run innings, the Rams’ bullpen held the Monarchs scoreless, able to secure the victory. Players were not available for comment after the game. Finwood and his team travels to San Antonio for a 3 game conference series against the University of Texas San Antonio.

Meet the Herd: Monarch Football plays Marshall in week 5 Nate Budryk Sports Editor The Marshall Thundering Herd is coming off one of its best seasons in program history. They averaged the third-most points per game in the nation, and allowed the 18th fewest. They were also 8th in the country in rushing yards per game. Behind the play of star quarterback Rakeem Cato, the Herd was able to reel off 11 straight wins to start the year, garnering them a national ranking of as high

as 23, before losing to Western Kentucky in week 12 by a score of 67-66. Included in that 11-game win streak was a lopsided win at Old Dominion. Marshall played a near-perfect game, beating up on the Monarchs 56-14. However, like ODU, Marshall is looking for its next quarterback and leader. With Cato graduating, it appears as though the quarterback job will come down to one of two redshirt juniors—Gunnar Holcombe and Michael Birdsong. Holcombe, the only one of the two to see game action a

The Mace & Crown

year ago, was 12-20 passing on the year for 119 yards. However, alleviating the loss of Cato somewhat is the return of star tailback Devon Johnson. Johnson had a terrific season in 2014, racking up 1,767 rushing yards, good for 6th in the nation and adding 17 touchdowns. Johnson is coming off an injury, though and his effectiveness will have to be gauged throughout the spring and training camp. Their receiving corps, however, was dealt a blow. Leading receiver from

@maceandcrown

2014, Tommy Shuler, whose 1,138 receiving yards were good enough for 17th in the nation, graduated, opening the door for several sophomores to step up. Deon-Tay McMannus and Angelo Jean-Louis look as though they will be the outside threats, with Hyleck Foster and Donquell Green being the options in the slot. On the defensive side of the ball, the Herd also will have to deal with the loss of graduated linebacker and leading tackler from 2014, Neville Hewitt, whose 123 tackles last year

@maceandcrown

was good for 14th in the country. Second-leading tackler Jermaine Holmes also graduated, leaving two glaring holes in the middle of the defense that must be filled. The Herd has four games to play before ODU travels to Huntington, W. Va. and by then, the picture as to what kind of team Marshall will be in 2015 should be a little clearer.


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Technology

D1

Visit maceandcrown.com for more video game reviews.

Google

The Unexpected Benefits of Hacking Ross Reelachart Assistant Technology Editor

Late last year on November 24, Sony Pictures Entertainment was the target of a massive breach in security when a group calling themselves the “Guardians of Peace” hacked into the Sony network and released all of the confidential information contained therein. The attack was thought to be a response to the release of the film “The Interview”. The released data not only included information about unreleased films and company salaries, but also included the personal information and emails of employees and their families. Even earlier in April, a massive security bug, dubbed “Heartbleed,” was found in a widely used security protocol that could have left some 17 percent of the web pages on the internet vulnerable to exploitation and hacking. Both of these incidents, and many others like them, have made the threat of hacking and loss of personal information a major issue in the age of the internet. But such threats and issues need not be an entirely bad thing. In fact, their widespread coverage has caused a definite shift in online behaviors and convinced many people that their security on the internet is something they personally need to be responsible for, and to be proactive in the security of their own personal information. Ironically, according to the Pew Research Center, the tipping point that convinced some Americans to beef up their own security measures was the disclosure that the National Security Agency gathered data about American citizens from technology companies and phone metadata from telecommunication companies. The bevy of hacking scandals and personal data

leaks in recent years only serves to reinforce the notion that the revelation of government surveillance started in the first place. A Pew Research Center survey, published on March 16, 2015, found that 34 percent of Americans surveyed have taken at least one-step to protect their personal information and data. Such steps include changing privacy settings on social media, or just using social media less often, avoiding or uninstalling certain apps, or simply choosing to speak in person more often. While the survey is keen to also mention the ways respondents have not improved, such as not using actual security technology like encryption or anonymous networks, the improvements that do exist illustrate that more people are taking their digital privacy and security more seriously. Even though the internet has grown to be a ubiquitous feature in nearly everyone’s life, it is still a fairly common occurrence to hear stories of lost personal data or “hacked” information from people whom most would assume are more than a little internet savvy. But simply growing up with and around digital media and the internet does not prepare a lot of people for the responsibilities they must bear in order to guard their data. The first important step that many people trip up on? Their password. SplashData is a security software developer and in 2014 they compiled a list of the worst passwords. Topping the list was the extremely lazy password of “123456”, followed by just “password.” The password has always been the simplest and most widespread form of security on the internet, being a system that is simple enough for every user to grasp while allowing for enough possible complexity to deter hackers. However the

The Mace & Crown

effectiveness of any one password is dictated by the owner’s ability to balance that complexity against their own ability to remember it, and that is when users become lazy. The laziness is compounded by the need for multiple passwords across multiple websites, then it becomes a case of a user using the same password for every website and once a hacker has successfully cracked one, they will have them all. It is important to note that even though “123456” and “password” are the top 2 most common passwords, combined they only account for roughly one percent of all passwords surveyed. Not only is this a tiny number of identical or similar passwords, but it is a significant drop from the 8.5 percent of 2011. This is evidence either that users are creating better passwords, or that users are becoming better at guarding them. The rise of “password managers”, pieces of software engineered to not only remember your passwords but to also create hacker-deterring passwords, can also contribute to this trend. It is highly recommended by many security experts that users consider using a password manager, such as SplashID Safe or LastPass, to help protect themselves. Another tip suggested by experts is the use of a “passphrase” instead of a password. Instead of using a single word, regardless of how simple or indecipherable it might be, consider using an entire statement or sentence complete punctuation and capitalization (Assuming there is enough room for it). Better yet, make this passphrase completely nonsensical, and make it a series of unrelated words that don’t match natural language. “Mouse Phone Shoe Rocket” is a much better passphrase than “Bedtime Story”, and

@maceandcrown

both have the potential to be magnitudes better than “dr@g0n783″. The reason for a complex password or a long passphrase is that hackers are creatures of efficiency, and prefer paths of least resistance. What this means is that hackers rarely do any “manual” hacking like in movies, and usually off load their hacking to a piece of software. That piece of software is not intelligent and simply uses brute force to crack a password by repeatedly guessing, using common password patterns and algorithms that predict common user behavior. When and if that method finds a password, that is what the hacker will hack. So a hacker’s primary “target” is simply the easiest and fastest person they can find, and not necessarily someone with something worth taking. A good password or passphrase is not “hackerproof”; they simply take much longer to crack and therefore are not worth a hacker’s time and resources. If a hacker is faced with a password that takes hours to crack or a passphrase that could theoretically take decades to crack, they will take the former. A hacker’s job can be made very easy, however, if a user’s password can be found freely somewhere on the internet, either inadvertently or accidentally. Where a password is a good technical method to improve online security, the other good method is good online habits. A password, PIN number or security question is useless if the user posts the answer somewhere on the internet, or leaves a trail of information that could reveal it. In response to government surveillance and the threat of hackers, online users have become much better at regulating their own behaviors and activities while on the internet. Now that more people are consciously aware of just how public the internet

@maceandcrown

is, and that even the “private” places of the internet could be monitored, they have taken steps to watch what they say about themselves. One of the first rules of the internet is to limit how much personal information they give on the internet. Ideally, a user would give none, but social media relies almost entirely on giving out as much personal information as possible. But even that situation can be mitigated with good privacy settings and remembering that some things are never to be given out in any situation, like phone numbers, addresses or social security numbers. The anonymity of the internet was, and always has been a sticky issue that could lead to compromised privacy and security. As users become smarter with their online habits, they have also become better at evaluating people they talk with and what they reveal to these people. Thanks in part to the “social” part of “social media”; many users are wise enough to only trust people they know in real life and their associated online counterparts. They also are gradually being trained to critically evaluate what they see and whom they talk to online by, in a roundabout way, the onslaught of hyperbolic news and continued coverage of identity theft. In due time, most people will have adjusted their online habits to be safer and learned to change their passwords on a regular basis. There will always be hackers and there will always be people who leave a hole in their security measures. But as long as we know of their presence, we as users can take equal measures to prevent them from being a threat to us. Just remember to be safe out there in the internet, and that there are steps you can take to thwart a hacker threat.


D2

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Five Technology Stories You Might Have Missed Rashad McDowell Technology Editor Technology and the news surrounding it, changes at a rapid pace in this day and age. What’s hot and fresh day can be taken as obsolete, stale and out dated in the span of a heartbeat? This can make tech news rather difficult to keep up with. So here’s a collect of tech stories that might have flown under the radar. Kinect Based Police Training Since 2010, Microsoft has been trying to get consumers interested their motion control video game peripheral, the Kinect. For the most part, it’s been hit or miss. A lot of customers ride it off as a novel, but generally unnecessary tool. But not Milo Range. The company specializes in simulation training products. They offer a use

of force that can be utilized by police and other armed response organizations. This is all achieved utilizing Microsoft’s Kinect. Commenter’s on a Kotaku story on Milo Range noted that most of the suspects in the simulations were people of color. In a climate where race relations and police over reach is a topic of continued discussion, this might come back to bit the company in the rear. Nevertheless, there is hope for the hapless Kinect. Key Sweeper Earlier this year, a device that allows users to track and log keystrokes made on a keyboard was developed by a Poland based security company. The device is discretely disguised as a USB wall charger for a mobile device. Once active, it can track keystrokes made on wireless keyboards remotely. The device can even send alerts to a mo-

Opinion

bile device if a certain string of keys are typed. This allows the hacker to focus on instances when a password or credit card number are typed. The device has an internal battery that will keep it running even if it is unplugged. It is being sold for £6. Water Repellent Metal In the battle against rust and corrosion, metal is getting a new leg up on its old adversary, water. Chunlei Guo and Anatoliy Vorobyev, scientist at the University of Rochester, developed a technique using lasers etching to change the properties of the metal. The process is so effective that it causes the metal to become ‘superhydrophobic’. Metal that undergoes this process doesn’t just repel water, it actually bounces water drops off its surface. Teflon, known for its high water resistance, takes advantage of

a special coating to keep water from penetrating. The problem with Teflon is the coating can wear away over time. In contrast, Guo and Vorobyev’s process actually changes the surface of the metal itself, imparting water resistance to the material in the etching. The pair was inspired to create their new laser etching process after working on making superhydrophilic materials, water attracting. Bitcoin Exchanges The way some people talk about Bitcoin, it wouldn’t be outlandish to believe that the crypto currency will one day supplant the U.S. dollar. Earlier this year, a fund of $106 million from the New York Stock Exchange, banks and venture capital firms was started to help start the first licensed Bitcoin exchange in the U.S. The exchange would only be able to operate in states

where approval has been given, which is about half of the country. Digital Nose With the help of his research team at the University of Cambridge, Dr. Andrew Koehl developed a microchip that can “sniff” out diseases. The chip, smaller than a quarter, can pick up chemicals the body emits when afflicted by certain conditions. It can “smell” cancer on an individual. The device was initially supposed to be able to detect toxic materials and explosives. Currently, the device can detect cancer, asthma, and tuberculosis. Commercial sale of the device is being handle by Owlstone, a company with a close relationship to Cambridge.

To submit your opinions about issues on campus, e-mail sdavi116@odu.edu

Leo Kim | Virginian-Pilot

AT RISK: The Story of Rising Seas and Sinking Cities Jugal Patel Digital Editor

The first time I felt like I really understood how much this university meant, I stood before the control panel of a 5-foot luminous omniglobe in the dimly lit lobby of Old Dominion University’s Physics and Oceanography Building. The digital panel offers a collection of intriguing visualizations of our planet from space. Beneath the surface, the visualizations are powered by thousands of data points gathered by satellites orbiting the Earth.

Some of the projected models were uploaded by scientists at ODU engaged in research on our global environmental systems. The visualization I was most interested in showed the fluctuating height of our oceans’ surfaces over time. Off the coastline of Southeast Virginia, a poignant cluster of red gathered, illustrating the all too familiar sentiment on the area’s vulnerability to changes to our global climate. At ODU, it began one year before I arrived as a freshman in 2011. President Broderick established the Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

The Mace & Crown

Initiative to establish the university as a regional, national, even international hub of intellectual capital to study climate change – more specifically though, sea level rise. Scientists across the world were warning that our reliance on fossil fuels to power our civilizations was fundamentally altering the environment on a global scale. The science behind what humans were doing to the greenhouse effect has been well established dating back to the 1700’s with Svante Arrhenius first positing that adding carbon dioxide to our atmosphere would have a substantial

@maceandcrown

effect on the global climate. Since then, our systems of monitoring changes to the planet have advanced to unprecedented levels. Scientists these days have an abundance of data sources to work with. And with years of accumulated knowledge on the Earth’s natural systems, they’ve reached an undeniable consensus that by using fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas to provide our electricity, we’re heating up the planet faster than we can adapt to its changes.

@maceandcrown

As stated by many of the world’s leading scientists in 1992—a group composed of mostly Nobel Prize Laureates, “Human beings and the natural world are on a collision course.” For Norfolk and the surrounding cities of Hampton Roads, the human side of the problem is flooding and its associated issues. Coastal Virginia has dealt with flooding for years, but the projected changes in store threaten to surpass what it can handle.


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM Scientists in the area working with sea level rise data from tide gauges and satellites have long noticed the accelerating trend of our ocean’s rise. ODU plays an interesting role in trying to deal with the imminent struggles we face as a society. As the intellectual nerve center of one of the most vulnerable regions in the nation, recent years have witnessed a shift in research focus towards working on the area’s problem of sea level rise. At biweekly seminars hosted by ODU’s Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, visiting scientists have affirmed that both the world and the region are undergoing significant changes. “The rate of ice loss is increasing,” said Isabella Velicogna, an international expert on sea level rise and scientist at the joint University of California at Irvine and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “I personally don’t see how this will change. The trend will continue.” According to Velicogna and her research team’s range of measurement systems, the melting of land-based ice in Greenland, Antarctica, and glacial ice caps throughout the world is continuing to accelerate faster than they should be through natural variability. Thermal energy trapped within our coal, oil and gas-fired blanket of greenhouse gases is expanding our oceans and melting the world’s ice. Such an effect now manifests itself off the coasts of Virginia—where the Sewell’s Point tide gauge at Naval Station Norfolk has been measuring an acceleration of sea level rise since the 1930s.

In coastal Virginia, the amount of sea level rise surpasses almost everywhere else in the United States.

The Hampton Roads region is the second most at-risk population center in the nation for sea level rise. The Norfolk and Virginia Beach metropolitan area also ranks 10th in the world for the value of assets exposed to flooding made worse by sea level rise. This is because, in addition to rising seas caused by expanding oceans and melting ice, land in the Hampton Roads is sinking through processes called subsidence. Subsidence accounts for half of the area’s relative sea level rise and land sinks in the region for a number of reasons – three primarily. As people extract groundwater, underground space that was once filled with water is emptied. This causes land to sink into the void that’s left. In areas such as Franklin and West Point measured levels of subsidence are amplified due to paper mills that use greater amounts of water in their industrial processes. Land around here also sinks through something of a seesaw effect caused by Canadian glaciers that recede off of the continent. As glaciers move away from the land and release pressure, the continental plate in Canada moves upwards while the southern portion of that plate in Hampton Roads’ mid-Atlantic region moves downwards. The third reason Hampton Roads is sinking is because of a 35 million year old meteor impact crater in the Chesapeake Bay. Over time, we’re slowly falling into that crater—further exacerbating what is our perception of rising seas. What the science means for Hampton Roads could be devastating. The real dangers are multidimensional—they can present themselves as long term nuisances that eventually form into almost daily hazards. Worse yet, they can present themselves as immediate threats through destructive storms and hurricanes. Flooding in Norfolk that occurs through regular tidal cycles, which are now at 9 events per year, are expected to increase to 182 events per year by 2045. Flooding through storm surges are another major concern. As storms come into the land off of coasts, they bring massive amounts of water with them—thus causing the sort of flooding we saw during Hurricanes Irene and Isabel.

The region’s leaders now accept that for Norfolk and Hampton Roads as a whole, rising seas off of our coastlines could be disastrous.

They could slash property values, destroy homes, flood streets, incapacitate emergency services, shut down schools, drive away businesses, inflict real damage on peoples’ lives… the list goes on. Because of the region’s vulnerability to the planet’s most pressing issue, people have taken notice. The White House and the Pentagon see the impacts of climate change on Hampton Roads as an issue of national security. Following a White House sponsored exercise at ODU aimed to simulate a whole of government and whole of community response to catastrophic events, a National Security official echoed the pressing need for adaptation. “The problem is urgent, we need to take action now,” said Judge Alice Hill. “But even if we reduce our carbon emission to zero, we still will have impacts that will come in the future.” Those impacts cause a great deal of concern due to the amount of critical national security and industry infrastructure in the region.

The Mace & Crown

Southeast Virginia alone hosts facilities owned by 18 federal agencies, including those of the DoD, CIA, FBI, NASA, Air Force and Naval bases, shipping facilities, among others. The nation’s communicators have shown interest too. From the Washington Post to the New York Times, NPR, the Associated Press and more, journalists have made their way to Hampton Roads to witness and document life on the frontline of climate change. Now seeming to understanding the gravity of the issue, major publications are taking the issue seriously than ever before. Papers such as the New York Times offer an expansive archive of environmental coverage related to climate change dating back years. Others such as the Guardian see climate change is undeniably, “the biggest story in the world.”

E1

Their soon retiring editor in chief for the past two decades, Alan Rusbridger, recently decided that he would go out with a bang. He would take a global journalistic superpower and focus it on the issue of climate change to change the world. That process is currently playing out as their coverage can be followed on the Guardian’s website. At home, the Virginian-Pilot also offers its own local archive of coverage related to sea level rise in the area. Their opinion pages have also long served as a platform for community discussion around the topic of climate change and its projected impacts on Hampton Roads As a media outlet that operates in one of the most at risk areas to our society’s largest challenge, we plan to tell this story.

While solving the problem of climate change may prove beyond what we as a society can handle, communicating this crisis is not. And in the modern world, not only must we have meaningful conversations about our shared future; we must act on them.

Map displays flooding from storm surge during Hurricane Irene | Source: ODU Geospatial Visualization Department

About RiSSC The Mace and Crown’s Rising Seas, Sinking Cities initiative is a collaboration that brings together different academic departments within Old Dominion University, entities in the community, researchers working on the sciences associated with climate change, and journalists working for the university’s student newspaper. To tell the story of how one of the nation’s most vulnerable areas is adapting to climate change with accuracy, we ‘ve spent months collaborating with ODU’s scientists and faculty in the Climate Change Sea Level Rise Initiative, Center for Coastal and Physical Oceanography, Mitigation and Adaptation Research Institute, and the Hampton Roads Intergovernmental Pilot Project. To innovate in the field of journalism, we’ve been working with the Geospatial and Visualization Department, the ODU Social Science Research Center, and the ODU Computer Science Department. At ODU, the shift in research focus began in 2010 with President John Broderick established the climate change and sea level rise initiative. The effort expanded to have the university become a national core of intellectual capital to study climate

@maceandcrown

change and sea level rise – focusing on how we can adapt to region’s projected issues. RiSSC is a platform created to inform and incite much needed discussion on this topic within the community. It’s also a push to innovate in the ever changing field of journalism. While today’s digital world has fundamentally changed the way we communicate—the tools available offer the ability to tell stories in groundbreaking ways. Because the story of climate change is so expansive, we want you to influence the discussion. Readers and members of the community have the ability to guide our processes by providing opinions in the form of comments and guest submissions. We’d also like for you to have a say in what we publish, who we talk to, and how we cover the issues associated to climate change. Responding to climate change will require our society to work together like never before. Though it may seem that we can only respond to this issue through little steps, small actions multiplied by millions are what change the world. Follow RiSSC on Twitter at @NorfolkClimate.

@maceandcrown


E2

STUDENT

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

For more pictures of recent events, visit our social media!

LIFE

Second Annual ODU Media Week. Jason Kazi | MC

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

SoMo at the NorVa. Josh Boone | MC

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown

E3


E4

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Relay for Life. Josh Caudell | M&C

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Relay for Life. Josh Caudell | M&C

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown

E5


E6

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Delta Zeta’s Turtle Tug. Josh Caudell | M&C

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

NoBoozaPalooza. Josh Caudell | M&C

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown

E7


Making a dierence one section at a time Now Paying Writers, Photographers, Videographers and Artists Meetings Tuesday 12:30 in the U-Center


Creative

F2

M&C| WEDNESDAY | 4.15.2015| MACEANDCROWN.COM

Submit your creative pieces by emailing artsandentertainment@maceandcrown.com

E NC L AV E

sudokucollection.com

Roses are Good by R.A.W

Roses are good Violets are the best Their misunderstood Neglected by the rest A strong Rose Blooms through the concrete But Violets, They blossom in the snow. Roses, Don’t know the taste of defeat Nor the burning of the cold Yes, A Rose’s love is deep But there’s something Only a Violet knows. If it’s love you want to keep, Then you must learn how to let go. Roses are red Violets are purple One is buried with the dead The other keeps the heart full

Break of the Day by Nate Fakes

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

The Mace & Crown

@maceandcrown

@maceandcrown


CREATE A RESUMÉ FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ON

Big Blue

Contact

Download

VA 757-683-3446

Biography

Involvement

Academics

Employment

Documents

Recommendations

Us adis deliquas in pernati officius que moluptaqui consequam in culparum vel im qui rem aut laute quiam, od unt aligent invent quae. Eque porest, et eosam, tectatur? Quae delectur ad ea ventia vel iderspit, quatiaere quatem facearc hiliquatur rae doluptia nate esto ipsum et omnihil iciaeptatem re aut ut eos etur, odic to blabo. Nam quatianihic tem fuga. Obit eaquati aboria que la nima id ullenisquae la voluptae lit hictae pore quas excea dipiet, quatiis voluptiore rem acepe prere, alia dolenis estrum voluptam, verferia voluptatem ut lia sita conempo rruptio es non con pla vent, corepero que officip suntotas ape et velestem quamus dit, vellupi deritatius utemolu ptatae pra dolupta ssustem facita dollacculpa dit quatis re ne est eos aut optaten daniam quo dent ommolo in re voluptatur? Xerum si consequia peliquo te nis dolore, con eum as autatur, occus incitae percit, quos audaeri optiore ctoremo ssenetu riorrum ullupta tescipienias erum lam, corehentem haritius rerovid unto tem quidem. Nam dolor a vellab incturio. Am dolupta con non exera natende dolut fugiam lamenda et eum aut ut voluptam hariamus re con num elit et eliti re volutecero

WHAT’S IN YOUR E-PORTFOLIO?

Summer Classes 2015 Hit the books and the beach. tncc.edu/summer (757) 825-2700

Summer is a great time to spend at Thomas Nelson! Finish Fast Our short 10-week, 8-week, and two fast 5-week summer sessions are a great way to complete classes in a fraction of the usual time. And with classes offered in Hampton, Williamsburg, and online, you’re sure to find a class that fits your busy life. So hit the books and the beach this summer with Thomas Nelson.

Classes start May 18, 26, and June 25. View the complete class schedule at tncc.edu

Registration is OPEN. Apply NOW!

Thomas Nelson does not discriminate against employees, students, or applicants on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law.

April 15  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you