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Dear Colleagues, The Marketing and Communications department is here to serve the students, faculty, and staff of Lyon College by driving and preserving the continuity of College brands, pushing exposure of the College through multiple media channels, and assisting in the production of College publications. We are more than happy to assist your department, program, or group with press releases, publicity, web content, document design, and proofreading. Documents that represent Lyon College or any entity within the College must be submitted to the Marketing Department for approval, including mailers, posters, event programs, catalogues, banners, etc. This process ensures that the proper logos, fonts, and colors are used. We do not want to control the message of your documents, but we will be proofing for grammar and punctuation. We steadily receive requests for assistance. To manage these requests, we have set up marketing@lyon.edu and ask that you submit all requests to this email, similar to the way IT requests are handled. Please include your desired timeline for deliverables, contact person, and imagery concepts you have. If a face-to-face meeting is required, please schedule that with me (eric.bork@lyon.edu) through the Outlook calendar. You should submit your requests as early as possible before the due date. The further out we know about your needs, the easier it is for us to oblige and produce a high-quality product. While everyone’s event, publication, and design need is important, the Marketing and Communication Department has to prioritize allocation of our time and resources; major College events and publications may take priority over those of less immediate impact. Again, this is why it is important to get the necessary info/request to us as soon as you know your needs. Thank you,

Eric Bork, ’07 Director of Marketing and Communications

Questions? email Marketing@lyon.edu


LYON COLLEGE STYLE GUIDE AND VISUAL STANDARDS The following style guide serves as a quick reference for those producing correspondence, programs, and other texts in print or on the Web. It is based on the Modern Language Association’s Style Guide and The Associated Press (AP) Stylebook. For news releases, the AP guide should be followed. The Visual Standards section covers policies for use of the Lyon logo and seal.

5 GENERAL RULES 6 Font and Alignment 6 Line Breaks 7 Abbreviations 9 Capitalization 11 Punctuation 13 Numbers 15 Spelling and Usage Tips

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19 CORRESPONDENCE AND PROGRAMS 20 Composing Correspondence 20 Addressing Letters and Envelopes 21 Forms of Address for Envelope, Letter, and Salutation 22 A Model for a Full Block Style Letter 23 Program Style Guide 24 Recital Programs

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27 VISUAL STANDARDS 28 Lyon’s Visual Identity 29 Official Color Palette 30 The Lyon College Seal 32 The Lyon College Institutional Mark 32 Guidelines 36 Typography 39 Lyon College Stationery 38 The Lyon College Tartan 39 The Lyon Athletic Logo Published Spring 2016


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section one

General rules

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FONT AND ALIGNMENT Use a standard font (preferably Times New Roman, 12 point font) for letters and the body of programs and other texts. Use the tab key to align information. Do not use the space bar.

LINE BREAKS Hyphenating words Do not use the automated hyphenation function of your word processor. Unless space is an important consideration, it is best not to hyphenate. Where it is necessary to divide a word, consult your dictionary if you are in doubt about where the hyphen should go. Breaks between pages At the end of a page, do not separate a title or subtitle from the text that follows it. A paragraph at the end of a page should cover at least two lines of print before the break; otherwise begin the paragraph on the next page (the “widows and orphans” function of your word processor should do this automatically).

Do not divide names of persons, dates, and abbreviations. Do not separate titles, initials, and professional and scholastic degrees from the names. If initials are used in place of both a person’s first and middle names, include a space between them but do not divide them over a line. If necessary, you can break the name before the last name.

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Dr. U. R. Wellborn but not Dr. U. / R. Wellborn

Dr. U. R. / Wellborn nor Dr. / U. R. Wellborn

Do not divide a day of the month from the name of the month.

February 10

but not February / 10


Abbreviations When in doubt, spell words out! Include an unfamiliar abbreviation in parentheses after a proper noun before using it on the second reference. Board of Church Advocates (BCA) Personal Names Some individuals are known primarily by initials in place of a first and/or middle name. Such initials should be followed by a period and a space.

Q. A. Black

John D. Rockefeller

Use a comma before abbreviations such as Sr. or Jr., but do not use one before II or III.

Frank Lyon, Sr.

but not Homer D. Simpson, III

Use a comma after Sr. and Jr. if the sentence continues on past the name: Frank Lyon, Sr., gave the College a water cooler. And Frank Lyon, Sr.,’s first gift to the College was a water cooler.

Social and professional titles Abbreviate these titles when they precede a name: Mr., Mrs., Dr., and all military titles. Spell out other professional titles, including Professor, President, Reverend, and Honorable. Never use Reverend or Honorable except with a full name, in which case the title should be preceded by the word “the.” For subsequent references use only the last name.

George Washington served as president. Dr. Deep Thinker, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

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Do not abbreviate professional titles when standing alone or in apposition to a name.

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Words Walmsley

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The Reverend Lotta Words The Honorable Bill Walmsley

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Academic degrees Use abbreviations for the common academic degrees: bachelor of arts – B.A. bachelor of science – B.S. master of arts – M.A. master of fine arts – M.F.A. master of science – M.S. doctor of philosophy – Ph.D. doctor of education – Ed.D. Note that no space is inserted after the periods unless the sentence continues on. Class standing Do not capitalize a class designation. Several freshmen attended the workshop.

Many seniors enroll in internships.

Also note that the singular form of the class standing is always used for adjectives. Three freshman team members

Seven senior women

Geographical names In text, always spell out and capitalize the names of countries, states, counties, bodies of water, mountains, and the like. Use two-letter post office abbreviations only when ZIP codes are included in mailing addresses or in tables, figures, and citations. Always spell out United States when using it as a noun. When using it as an adjective, you may abbreviate it to U.S. with no space after the first period. Do Not Abbreviate • Words such as association, avenue, department, institute, or street, except in addresses. • Use the ampersand (&) only if used by a company in its official name.

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Johnson & Johnson

Use the percent sign (%) only in scientific, technical, or statistical copy. If the percentage is less than one, precede the decimal point with a 0.

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Procter & Gamble

President Weatherman is right 99 percent of the time. The cost of living rose 0.6 percent.


Capitalization Names Proper nouns, or names, are always capitalized. Names of people, buildings, places, associations, and organizations are capitalized. Joe Blow Brown Chapel Batesville

Class of ’67

Student Government Association

Geographical regions are capitalized; directions and points of the compass are not.

Leaders of Western Europe studied the stars in the east. Many students go south for spring break. This book traces the development of the South after 1960.

Names of ethnic and national groups are capitalized. Arab Americans Ming dynasty

Latinos

but black, e.g., a prominent black banker

Terms denoting socioeconomic level are not capitalized. blue-collar workers the middle class

Titles A professional title that immediately precedes a personal name is treated as part of the name and should be capitalized. If you use the title by itself or after the personal name, it becomes a generic term and should be lowercase.

President Chester Arthur announced Dean Ronald McDonald wrote

the president announced the dean wrote

The same principle applies to other generic terms that are part of place or organization names. Department of Fine Arts but, the fine arts department

Print the college logo on college stationery.

Each element of a position title is capitalized, except for articles, prepositions, and conjunctions. Such titles are used in apposition to the name; they do not precede the name. Dr. Roman Greco, Associate Professor of Language and Literature

Mrs. Willu Needajob, Director of Career Placement

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Exception: Lyon College; subsequently, the College. This is a traditional form of reference employed by an institution within its own literature. However, do not capitalize college when it is used as an adjective.

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thereafter, the center thereafter, the board or the trustees

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The Derby Center Board of Trustees

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Academic Courses and Subjects Capitalize the names of specific courses but not of general subjects or fields of study, except for the names of languages.

She is majoring in Spanish and business. He met the English requirement. He graduated with a B.A. in fine arts. She is registered for International Business Practices.

Events and Designations of Time Capitalize historic periods and events, holidays, and official names of Lyon College events:

World War I Homecoming 2010

Memorial Day Groundhog Day

the Industrial Revolution Arkansas Scottish Festival

Do not capitalize informal terms such as baccalaureate, commencement, fall semester, summer school, or finals week. Capitalize days of the week and months, but not the seasons. Sunday April spring

Do not capitalize a.m. or p.m. (Note that no space follows the first period.)

Titles of Works (books, articles, plays, lectures, musical compositions, albums) Capitalize the first letter of the first and last words (no matter the part of speech) of the title and subtitle and all other words, except articles, conjunctions, prepositions. Italicize titles of books, plays, journals, very long poems, long musical compositions, paintings, sculptures, movies, and television and radio programs.

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Gone with the Wind Evangeline Don Giovanni I Love Lucy

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Enclose in quotation marks titles of shorter works, which may or may not be part of a longer work, such as chapters, short stories, poems, essays, articles, episodes of television programs, short musical compositions, photographs, lectures, papers, and theses.

“The Raven” “America, the Beautiful”

“Better Health for Your Puppy” “Andrea Dawn: Thespian or Straussian?”


PUNCTUATION

Apostrophe Form the possessive of most singular common and proper nouns, including those that end in s, x, or z, by adding an apostrophe and s. This also applies to letters and numerals used as singular nouns, and to abbreviations. Charles Dickens’s writing income tax’s effect 2010’s election DVW’s speech

bachelor’s degree

Form the possessive of most plural common and proper nouns by adding only an apostrophe. dogs’ dinners the Diazes’ house

Form the possessive of the following types of nouns with only an apostrophe: • Nouns that name a group or collective entity but are treated as grammatically singular

politics’ true meaning

the United States’ position

Names that end in an unpronounced s:

Descartes’ philosophy Arkansas’ weather

Punctuate the year of a graduating class with an apostrophe.

Class of ’76 Kurt Hummel, ’94

In making the plural of figures, do not use an apostrophe.

the late 1600s

Comma Use a comma before the words “and” and “or” in a series (except in news releases).

Our flag is red, white, and blue.

Place a comma after digits signifying thousands, except when referring to years, page numbers, large serial numbers, house or building numbers, room numbers, ZIP codes, telephone numbers, heat units, or decimal parts of numbers. 3.14159265

Place a comma before and after the state following a city.

The man from Tulsa, Oklahoma, was tall.

Always put a comma after the abbreviation e.g.

Janice loved her accessories, e.g., shoes, purses, hats, bracelets, and rings.

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in the year 2001

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4600 degrees

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3,350 students

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When writing dates, place a comma between the day and the year, and after the year.

July 4, 1776, was our nation’s birthday.

Do not place a comma between the month and the year when no day is mentioned.

July 1776 was very hot.

Dash If your word processing program doesn’t have a dash, indicate a dash by typing two hyphens with no spacing. MS Word will automatically convert the hyphens to a dash. In no case should you use a single hyphen with spaces on each side to indicate a dash. John--quite a conservative--always wore gray. But not John - quite a conservative - always wore gray.

Ellipses Indicate an omission within a quotation with an ellipsis (three periods with spaces before, between, and after them). Since the dots stand for words omitted, they always go inside the quotation marks or block quotation.

“I . . . tried to do what was best.”

If the omission occurs at the end of a complete sentence, put a period in its usual position, followed by the three spaced periods indicating an ellipsis.

“He was tired at the end of the evening. . . .”

If the omission leaves out an entire sentence or more, follow the pattern above and start the second sentence after a space following the fourth period.

“He was tired at the end of the evening. . . . His wife still wanted to celebrate.”

Quotation Marks Commas and periods are placed inside the closing quotation mark. He said, “I am leaving.” Colons and semicolons are placed outside of the closing quotation mark. He spoke of his “little cottage in the country”; he might have called it a mansion.

The question mark, the dash, and the exclamation point are placed within the quotation mark when they refer to the quoted matter only.

He asked, “When did you leave?”

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The question mark, the dash, and the exclamation point are placed outside the quotation mark when they refer to the whole sentence.

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What is the meaning of “the open door”?


Use single quotation marks ONLY for quotations printed within other quotations. If several paragraphs are to be quoted, use quotation marks at the beginning of each paragraph, but at the end of the last paragraph only.

Numbers Use numerals for • All exact numbers above ten, including ordinal numbers such as 101st • Statistical and tabular work • Decimals • Percentages, e.g., 6.5 percent, not 6 ½ percent • Latitude and longitude • Degrees of temperature • Dimensions • Measurements and proportions Spell out approximate numbers—that is, round numbers in even units. Nearly three thousand people attended the inaugural football game. If several numbers occur in a connected group within a sentence, write all numbers, including those under ten and round numbers, in figures.

I have requisitioned 16 reams of paper, 120 tablets, and 8 boxes of pencils.

Always spell out numbers that begin a sentence.

Sixteen guests were present.

However, if the numbers would require more than two words when spelled out, rearrange the wording of the sentence if possible.

Do not include the decimal point or ciphers in even amounts of dollars that occur in the body of the text. $124

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$7 $10.50 $1,321 20 cents

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Money Write all amounts of money in numerals.

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The exhibit was attended by 4,431 students. Not Four thousand four hundred thirty-one students attended.

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When amounts under $1 appear in the body of the letter, write the word “cents” after the figures. 20 cents Write indefinite sums of money in words.

a few million dollars

Time, ages, and pages Always use figures with a.m. or p.m. Do not include the minutes for exact hours.

11:30 p.m.

8 p.m., not 8:00 p.m.

Centuries and decades may be expressed in words or numerals. the 1900s, not 1900’s

the twentieth century

Spans of years are written as follows: 1861-65, 2001-08 but 1996-2016.

Similarly, a range of pages is written as follows: pp. 137-49 but pp. 137-206. Fractions Ordinarily spell out a fraction that stands alone. Use figures, however, if the spelled out form is long and awkward or if the fraction is used in a technical measurement or a computation. A two-thirds majority is needed.

You should multiply by 3/5.

Two numbers together. If two numbers form one item, spell out one of them—usually the shorter— expressing the other in figures.

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two 8-room houses 300 five-page documents


SPELLING AND USAGE TIPS Lyon College After initially identifying Lyon College in a text, in subsequent references you may use the College (not the college). This capitalization is a traditional form of reference employed by an institution within its own literature. However, do not capitalize college when it is used as an adjective, e.g., the college campus. Campus buildings and facilities Refer to the College Catalog for the full names and descriptions of campus buildings. When referring to the location of events, the full names may be shortened (Brown Chapel, Alphin Building, Derby Center).

Alumni refers to two or more graduates; alumnus refers to a male graduate; alumna refers to a female graduate; alumnae, refers to two or more female graduates.

Emeriti refers to two or more retired professors holding emeritus rank; emeritus refers to a male; emerita refers to a female.

GPA: This abbreviation is acceptable on first reference for “grade point average.”

Theatre is the spelling used at Lyon College in reference to its theatre department and programming.

Graduate and officiate are intransitive verbs. That means they cannot have direct objects: Bob graduated from high school. Not Bob graduated high school.

The ship’s captain officiated at the wedding. Not The captain officiated the wedding.

I only run for exercise. (It’s my only form of exercise.) I run only for exercise. (Otherwise, I never, ever run.)

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Among and between: Use “among” only for three or more. Use “between” only when there are just two.

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Only: Make sure this modifier is placed next to the word you really intend it to modify:

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Amount and number: Use amount only with a singular noun. Use number with plural nouns.

the amount of work

the number of classes

As and like: “As” is a conjunction. It should be followed by a clause containing a subject and a verb. “Like” is a preposition. It should be followed by an object to make a prepositional phrase. She sings like a screech owl. Not She sings like a screech owl does.

She’s pretty as a picture. (is = understood verb) Not She’s pretty like a picture.

Each other and one another: “Each other” is used when speaking of two people. “One another” is used when speaking of three or more.

Unique: This word cannot be compared. Something either is or is not unique. It can’t be almost unique or very unique. One thing cannot be “more unique” than another. Nothing can be “most unique.” If it is one of a kind, it is unique. If it isn’t one of a kind, it isn’t unique.

Data: This word is the plural of the Latin word “datum.” No one uses “datum” any more, but when “data” is used as the subject of a sentence or clause, the verb must be plural. The data prove that low-income students are most at risk of dropping out. Not The data proves . . .

Media: This word is also plural. The singular form is “medium.” “Media” must always take plural verbs and pronouns. Television is a medium of communication.

The media should try to be accurate with their usage.

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Alright, irregardless, and alot: These are not standard English words. The correct words are “all right,” “regardless,” and “a lot.”

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Electronic terms:

• • • • •

dotcom email instant messenger IM Internet

• • • • •

online URL World Wide Web website webmaster


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When in doubt, consult a dictionary. • accept/except • advice/advise • affect/effect • alter/altar • bare/bear • breath/breathe • canvas/canvass • capital/capitol • cite/sight/site • cloth/clothe • coarse/course • complement/compliment • consul/council/counsel • continual/continuous • core/corps/corpse • criterion/criteria • disinterested/uninterested • eminent/imminent • fewer/less • further/farther • hanged/hung • imply/infer • its/it’s • lead/led • lie/lay • loose/lose • passed/past • precede/proceed • principal/principle • prophesy/prophecy • rein/reign • secede/succeed • sit/set • stationary/stationery • than/then • their/there/they’re • to/too/two • your/you’re • whose/who’s

G U I D E

Words Commonly Misused or Misspelled

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section two

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Correspondence and programs

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COMPOSING CORRESPONDENCE

When contacting people whom you do not know personally by email or letter, use the following wording: • To an individual: Dear Mr. Johnson (or Ms. or Mrs.) • To a group (more common in a “reply all” email): Gentlemen Ladies

If it is a group of both males and females, skip the greeting line. Instead, substitute the subject of your message:

Refer by title and last name to the person for whom you are corresponding:

Close with your full name and job title:

Concerning the upcoming meeting . . . Concerning breakfast on Saturday . . . President Madison asked me to let you know . . . Dr. and Mrs. Madison look forward to . . . Susie Wonderwoman, Administrative Assistant Isaiah Incredible, Director of Information Technology

ADDRESSING LETTERS AND ENVELOPES

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Envelopes Recommendations include the following: • Single space the address lines. • Use the two-letter abbreviations for state names. Periods should not be used at the end. • Leave two spaces between the state abbreviation and the ZIP code. • Foreign country names must appear in full as the last item in the address.

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Inside address • Spell out the word designating the type of roadway: Street, Circle, Avenue, Alley, etc.) • If a directional (north, etc.) appears before a street name, use an initial (N, S, E, W) followed by a period. • If a directional appears after the street name, spell it out (Penny Lane South). • Use abbreviations for apartment (Apt.), Suite (Ste.), and similar designations. Bulk mail USPS regulations require all caps and no punctuation. Fortunately, Lyon College’s mailing capabilities include a program which makes the necessary conversions to standard capitalization and punctuation. Simply specify which mailings require bulk mail formatting.


FORMS OF ADDRESS FOR ENVELOPE, LETTER, AND SALUTATION Name and Title Salutation Mr. Sherlock Holmes Dear Mr. Holmes Mrs. Jennifer Lopez

Dear Mrs. Lopez

Ms. Louisa May Alcott

Dear Ms. Alcott

Dr. Jerry Johnson

Dear Dr. Johnson

Dr. Brenda Starr

Dear Dr. Starr

Professor Gabe Kotter

Dear Professor Kotter

The Reverend Elmer Gantry

Dear Mr. Gantry

The Reverend Dr. Billy Graham

Dear Dr. Graham

The Honorable Oliver Wendell Holmes

Dear Mr. Holmes

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Goldwater

Mrs. Lucy (McGillicuty) Ricardo, ’67 and Mr. Ricky Ricardo

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo

Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Welby

Dear Dr. and Mrs. Welby

Dr. Pamela Piper and Dr. Peter Piper

Dear Drs. Piper

Dr. Beth Casey and Mr. Curtis Casey

Dear Dr. and Mr. Casey

Dr. Julie Kildare, ’84 and the Reverend Holy Waters, ’92

Dear Dr. Kildare and Mr. Waters

President Aaron Long

Dear President Long

Dean Severus Snape

Dear Dean Snape

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Mr. and Mrs. Barry Goldwater, Jr.

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Ladies

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Ms. Elizabeth Tudor II Mrs. Mary Stuart

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Mr. Jimmy Connors Gentlemen Mr. Arthur Ashe

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A MODEL FOR A FULL BLOCK STYLE LETTER July 20, 2016

Lyon College Attn: Ms. Fonda Letters P.O. Box 2317 2300 Highland Road Batesville, AR 72503-2317 Re: Letter Style This is a full block letter style. Every line of the letter begins at the left margin. This style is recommended for formal correspondence. For consistency, the inside address should match the envelope. The inside address should consist of two or more lines. Notice that the attention line is placed in the inside address. The ZIP code is typed two spaces after the state abbreviation. If you are doing a bulk mailing, simply notify the mailing office so that the address labels can be converted to USPS’s preference for that form of mail. Here are some rules recommended by the U.S. Post Office:

• • • •

Use the two-letter abbreviations for state names. Leave two spaces between the state abbreviation and the ZIP code. Single space the address lines. Foreign country names must appear in full as the last item in the address.

The salutation of the letter is determined by the first line of the inside address. When the first line is a company name, substitute the subject of your letter for the salutation. When the first line is a person’s name (Mrs. Sally Jones), the salutation is “Dear Mrs. Jones.” When the first line is a title (Personnel Manager), the salutation is “Dear Sir or Madam.” Depending on the formality of the correspondence, the salutation should be followed by a comma (less formal) or a colon (very formal). For further information on correct forms of address, please consult pages 11 and 12 of this style guide.

Sincerely,

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The complimentary close is typed two spaces below the final sentence, with the sender’s name and title four spaces below the close.

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Mary Todd Lincoln First Lady


PROGRAM STYLE GUIDE Use a standard font (preferably Times New Roman, 12 point). Use the tab key to align information; do not use the space bar. All programs should include the following: • The Lyon College name and seal should appear on the program cover. • Purpose of the gathering Lyonhearted: A Gala in Appreciation of Dr. and Mrs. Frank Lyon, Jr.

• • •

Lyon College Alumni Dinner

Date Time Location

Style for listing individuals’ names and titles: (see p. 3 of this guide for further information) List given name and surname. Generally speaking, omit extra initials. Gerald Brown NOT S. Gerald Brown or Gerald R. Brown If an individual is known by initials, in place of the given name, include a space between the two initials.

J. R. Ewing

If an individual is commonly known only by a nickname, place it in quotation marks, following the given name.

Cornelius “Chip” Smith

For the first reference, list honorific, first and surname, position title. For any subsequent references, list honorific and surname.

Dr. Ray Ovlight, John D. Trimble, Sr., Professor of Politics Dr. Ovlight The Reverend Julie Bell, Campus Minister Ms. Bell

For alumni, include class year after surname and a comma.

For married alumnae, include maiden name.

Mrs. Barbra (Streisand) Brolin, ’67

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NOT Mr. and Mrs. Barton Golden, ’61

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In the case of couples, if one or both are graduates, the given names of each must be listed. Mrs. Linda (Bird) Golden, ’61, and Mr. Barton Golden, ’61

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Mr. Dooley Noted, ’01

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Married couples may be listed in these ways (note that the woman is listed first when her given name is included):

Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Smart Mrs. June (Carter) Cash, ’71, and Mr. Johnny Cash, ’70 Mrs. June Cleaver and Mr. Ward Cleaver, ’65 Mrs. Harriet (Richards) Nelson, ’60, and Mr. Oswald Nelson

Married couples may be listed in these ways, when one or both hold professional titles:

Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Welby Mrs. Jane Welby and Dr. Marcus Welby, ’45 The Reverend Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Gantry Dr. Eliza Quinn and Mr. Edward Quinn The Reverend Zelda Gillis and Mr. Dobie Gillis Dr. Diane Doolittle and Dr. Darren Doolittle

RECITAL PROGRAMS Programs for musical performances require particular style elements. • Use a standard font (e.g., Times New Roman, 12 point) • Use the tab key to align information. Do not use the space bar. All programs should include the following: • Performer’s title, name, and instrument Ms. Marilyn Horne, mezzo soprano

Dr. Van Cliburn, piano St. Louis Symphony Orchestra

Accompanist’s title, name, and instrument

Ms. Edith Biggs, organ

If the performer or accompanist is listed again in the program, only the title and last name are used.

Ms. Horne Dr. Cliburn Ms. Biggs

Concert title

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• • •

A Night at the Opera

Date Time Location


For multi-movement pieces, enter the information as follows: Title 1 I. Movement II. Movement Title 2 I. Movement II. Movement III. Movement IV. Movement

Composer (Dates)

Composer (Dates)

When performing a selection from a larger work, enter the information as follows: Movement or Selection

Composer From Larger Work Title (Dates)

If two pieces are to be performed as a set, do not separate the pieces in the program: Piece 1 Composer (Dates) Piece 2 Composer (Dates)

If both pieces are by the same composer, enter the name and dates only once. If the pieces are not part of a set, separate the information with a line space: Piece 1 Composer (Dates) Piece 2 Composer (Dates)

If a recital or concert has multiple players (e.g., a junior recital), list the players’ names after the piece to be performed (this is also appropriate when a guest is playing on a specific piece):

S T Y L E C OLLEGE LYON

Dates • Enter birth and death dates in the following format: (1900-90; 1892-1963). • If a composer is still alive, list only the birth date: (b. 1963). • If the exact birth or death date is not known, enter the most accurate information as follows: (c. 1400-70 or c. 1475-1515). • Be sure to check the accuracy of all dates.

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Title Composer (Dates) Performer, instrument Performer, instrument

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section three

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Visual standards

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Lyon’s visual identity Lyon’s visual identity reflects the qualities that make the College distinctive, and it conveys the Lyon brand to the world. The promise of academic excellence, Christian commitment, and development and growth within a caring community—these and other attributes of the College are underscored in a meaningful way for thousands of people around the world when they see the College’s Institutional Mark and other Lyon visual identity elements and colors. Great colleges extend and protect their distinctive identities as a pragmatic business imperative and a tangible link between administrations, faculties, and students of the past, present, and future. Consistent and coordinated use of Lyon College visual identity elements, regardless of the medium, is important for maintaining the College brand. All College departments and College-sanctioned organizations should use Lyon’s visual identity elements for formal and informal communications, advertising, and promotional purposes in accordance with the guidelines presented here. A strong and consistent visual identity helps shape the way key constituents view Lyon, now and in the future. The Lyon College Visual Standards have been developed to provide all Lyon College employees and associates with the guidelines required to maintain the College’s visual identity. Marketing experts confirm that presenting a consistent graphic identity is critical in building brand recognition and trust. The success of the Lyon College visual identity system depends on consistent use of these standards by everyone involved in the creation of Lyon College communications, including external suppliers such as advertising and design agencies, as well as internal Lyon College communications and IT professionals.

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The Lyon College Visual Standards policy covers the College’s emblems, names, and logos. These elements are registered with the Patent and Trademark Office of the United States and may only be used according to the guidelines provided or by express permission of Lyon College’s Marketing and Communications office.

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Official color palette Lyon College’s official color palette—Lyon Navy, Crimson, and Gold—are bold hues that complement each other. These are the College’s official colors:

Lyon Navy Lyon Crimson Lyon gold

Pantone #289c Pantone #202c Pantone #116c CMYK: 100, 72, 0, 65 CMYK: 27, 100, 94, 36 CMYK: 0, 18, 100, 0 RGB: 0, 22, 50 RGB: 133, 28, 26 RGB: 255, 207, 1 Web: #001632 Web: #851C1A Web: #FFCF01 The goal is to closely match the colors as each would appear on coated paper in each medium—screen printing, embroidery, plastics, clothing, etc. The Office of Marketing and Communications can assist in selecting the proper color.

Lyon College deliberately selected Navy, Crimson, and Gold as its official colors. Blue hues are associated with depth and stability—symbolizing trust, loyalty, wisdom, confidence, and intelligence. Blue represents knowledge, power, integrity, and seriousness.

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We must maintain a balance of colors to ensure all the College’s materials are consistent and pleasing to the eye.

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Yellow hues are associated with joy, happiness, intellect, and energy. Yellow produces a warming effect, arouses cheerfulness, and stimulates mental activity. Bright, pure yellow is an attention-getter, which is the reason taxicabs are painted this color. In Celtic heraldry, yellow indicates honor, loyalty, and generosity. Using yellow evokes pleasant, cheerful feelings. When overused, however, yellow may have a disturbing effect; studies show that babies cry more in yellow rooms — that’s why you should minimize the amount used.

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Red hues are associated with energy, strength, power, and determination. In heraldry, red indicates courage, vigor, willpower, leadership, and courage.

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Color ratios Lyon College intentionally limits the amount of color to be used per page of document. Lyon Navy should be employed for large coverage areas such as book covers, banners, or folders. Crimson may also be used with the express permission of the Marketing and Communications Office. When using the official colors together, limit the use of Crimson to 30% per page, and Gold to 10%. Excess amounts of Crimson can result in a very warm, off-putting design and can easily be lost in the stack of other red-themed materials from other institutions within the state. Gold should be used only as an accent to highlight certain elements in a design.

Lyon College Seal The Lyon College Seal is restricted for use by the Board of Trustees and the Office of the President, with limited exceptions. As the official insignia of the College, the College seal may not be altered in any way. Documents displaying the College seal convey that they are officially sanctioned by the Board of Trustees or the Office of the President.

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The seal is not to be used on departmental stationery, interior signage, advertising, or promotion except as authorized by the Board of Trustees or the Office of the President. The College seal may not be used on vehicles or license plates.

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Exceptions for use of the seal include jewelry, high-end commemorative gift items, and official academic or College-related materials such as certificates, diplomas, commencement and convocation programs, and select graduation-related items, including announcements and diploma frames. Product exceptions must be approved through the Office of Marketing and Communications and the Office of the President.


Internal requests for use of the seal on College materials must be submitted to the Office of Marketing and Communications for initial review of compliance with Visual Standards.

The Lyon College seal takes the form of a coat of arms—a unique heraldic design on a shield. The coat of arms forms the central element of the full seal which includes the shield, supporters, crest, and motto. The shape of the Lyon College coat of arms is inspired by the Great Seal of the State of Arkansas.

S T Y L E C OLLEGE LYON

The Celtic Cross, symbolizing Lyon’s Scottish and Presbyterian traditions, serves as the central element to subdivide the coat of arms into four quadrants and symbolizes Lyon’s religious commitment. The open bible reinforces Lyon’s Christian values. The lion rampant is adapted from the Scottish banner and symbolizes the College’s Scottish Heritage. The lion has always enjoyed a high place in heraldry as the emblem of undying courage, and hence that of a valiant warrior. The rampant lion is also adapted in a similar manner for the Lyon College athletic teams. The pattern of four stars, taken from the center of the Arkansas flag, represents the four flags which have flown over this state, and therefore symbolizes Lyon’s location and original name, Arkansas College. The lamp symbolizes learning and wisdom, and the oak-leaf laurel symbolizes excellence and wisdom.

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The College’s original motto—Perserverantia Omnia Vincet Deo Volente (Perseverance conquers all, God willing)—and the date of the founding of the College are incorporated into the circular band surrounding the coat of arms.

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The lyon college institutional mark

The basis of the Lyon College Graphic Identity is the logo, which is made up of two components: the shield and the wordmark.

Guidelines

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• The Lyon shield must be used with the Lyon wordmark. • All academic and administrative units of the College must incorporate the College Institutional Mark into their official communication vehicles. Athletics may use the spirit mark. (See Athletic Brand Standards) • The mark must be reproduced from artwork provided from the Office of Marketing and Communications. • The Lyon College Institutional Mark may not be altered or changed in any way. • The mark may not be incorporated into or combined with any other mark, symbol or graphic to create a new mark. • The Lyon Institutional Mark may not be used as a graphic screened in the background, cropped, stretched, blurred, or distorted in any way.

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Clear Space The Institutional Mark must stand alone with sufficient clear space around it to allow it to be visible and to clearly show that it is an individual mark.

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Please contact the Lyon College Office of Marketing and Communications for assistance when the Institutional Mark may need to be smaller than the minimum standard for specialty products.

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Size Use the Institutional Mark at a size that is legible, significant, and appropriate for the size of the piece being produced. Legibility suffers if the Institutional Mark is reproduced too small; therefore, minimum size requirements have been established. When the Institutional Mark is used, the total width should be no smaller than 1.5 inches.

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Institutional mark implementation The Office of Marketing and Communications enforces proper usage of the logo and must approve the design of any and all college-funded publications that may reach an outside audience, whether they are alumni, potential students, or community members. This oversight also extends to publications on lyon.edu. The Office of Marketing and Communications is happy to provide production assistance as needed. The mark should be displayed in either the official Lyon colors or in Lyon Navy or White for one-color process. If a full color mark cannot be used, a 1-color mark should be used. The colors must match the official Lyon Navy colors – Pantone Matching System (PMS) #289c. All marks must be reproduced from the official artwork, available from the Office of Marketing and Communications.

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Occasionally, it may be necessary to use a simplified version of the Lyon Wordmark. This can be done only with the express permission of the Office of Marketing and Communications. Any simplified version of the wordmark should never omit either the word Lyon or College — both components are integral for brand awareness, and any further simplification could damage our brand identity.

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Background colors

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When choosing a background color, be sure there is sufficient contrast between the background and the wordmark. On a dark background, when the symbol is in full color (navy, crimson, and gold) the wordmark should be in white. The full color institutional mark should never be displayed on a crimson background—doing so causes details of the mark to disappear.

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Typography A consistent approach to typography reinforces the effectiveness of the Lyon College Visual Identity. With consistent use, these typefaces will create a strong and recognizable identity for Lyon College. Times New Roman is a serif typeface for use in printed documents such as correspondence, programs, offset printed brochures, posters, etc.

Times New Roman Arial is a sans serif typeface that is legible in all print materials and especially on screen. Arial should be used in conjunction with Times New Roman to avoid visual monotony—particularly in type-heavy publications. If, for instance, the body of a document is done in Times New Roman, Arial should be used for headlines.

Arial In limited circumstances, Century Gothic and the Lato type family may be used for small blocks of type, such as short paragraphs or headlines.

Century Gothic Lato Script fonts should be used very sparingly, and only for highly formal, particularly conservative design pieces such as invitations, Christmas cards, very special announcements, and certificates. You must consult with the Office of Marketing and Communications about selecting an appropriate script typeface before any work is done. For select events and advertising campaigns, other typefaces may be considered. Again, you must consult with the Office of Marketing and Communications prior to beginning the design process.

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In general, you should never use more than 2 different typefaces in a single design.

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Lyon college stationery Consistent and coordinated use of Lyon College visual identity elements on stationery is a vital part of preserving and enhancing the value of the Lyon College brand. Lyon has one official academic and administrative format for letterhead, envelopes, and business cards.

I N S T I T U T I O N A L A D VA N C E M E N T

Eric Bork

Director of Marketing and Communications

Nichols Administration Building 2300 Highland Rd. Batesville, Arkansas 72501 OďŹƒce: 870.307.7242 Fax: 870.307.7000 eric.bork@lyon.edu

2300 Highland Road Batesville, AR 72501 OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

| T: 870.307.7201

| F: 870.307.7001

|

president@lyon.edu

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The Lyon College Institutional Mark can be printed on the back of business cards, at extra cost upon request. Previous versions of business cards may be used until current stock is depleted.

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To place an order, email marketing@lyon.edu.

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2300 Highland Road, Batesville, AR 72501

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The lyon college tartan

The Lyon College Tartan is one of the proudest symbols of our Scottish heritage. It is registered with the Scottish Register of Tartans. Arkansas College, along with Bob Walker and Russ Spalding, worked to design the Arkansas College Tartan in 1990. In 1994, it was renamed the Lyon College Tartan. The tartan has been specifically designed to represent the College and is reserved for use only in very specific situations as jointly determined by the Office of Marketing and Communications and the Director of Scottish Heritage.

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Because a Tartan is a woolen cloth woven in a particular pattern, that is nearly impossible to duplicate in print, you should refrain from including the Tartan as a primary element in print and digital medias. The tartan should not be used on stationary, signage, or any other type of printed material without express permission from the Office of Marketing and Communications and the Director of Scottish Heritage.

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No one may alter the colors or pattern of the tartan in any way.


Use of the lyon athletic logo

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The Lyon College Athletic Logo, a lion rampant with an oversized L, is for use only by the athletic program. It is not to be used on business cards except by athletic personnel. If you believe you have a true need to use this logo, you must first obtain written permission from the Athletic Director and the Director of Marketing and Communications. Refer to the athletic brand standards guide on lyonscots. com for more information.

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Lyon College Style Guide and Visual Standards  

The Lyon College Style Guide is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents, correspondence, programs, and other texts in pri...