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2019 Media Pack

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Project News

www.psbnews.co.uk October 2018

SIGNIFICANT COMMUNITY PROJECT REACHES PRACTICAL COMPLETION

HLM ARCHITECTS £11.5M GREENMEAD AND RONALD ROSS SCHOOLS COMPLETED

FORRESTBROWN

TAX CREDIT MEANS UNIQUE PROJECTS NEEDN’T BE SINK OR SWIM FOR CONTRACTORS

CALEDONIAN

A multi-disciplinary construction consultancy has reached practical completion on a significant community project in Norfolk.

JP Chick to preserve the original 19th century brick and flint structure during the refurbishment and extension, which began in February 2017.

Daniel Connal Partnership, with offices in Norwich, Colchester and London, acted as quantity surveyors and project managers on the £4 major redevelopment of the 200-year-old Grade II Wells Maltings complex on Staithe Street in Wells-Next-the-Sea, North Norfolk.

The striking extension has been enveloped in brass cladding with a characteristic flint wall on the southeast facade. The building materials were chosen to complement the local surroundings and for their robustness and suitability in a coastal environment.

With building work completed, the interiors are now being finalised, with Wells Maltings opening in stages to the public over the summer months before being launched completely in September.

Wells Maltings is a significant asset to North Norfolk and we hope that it will be used as widely as possible by locals and visitors alike.

Once fully open to the public, Wells Maltings will provide a state-of-the-art community, heritage and arts facility to the town, with visitors being able to enjoy a ‘user-centred’ heritage and learning centre, state-of-the-art theatre and cinema space, café and bar, box office, Visitor Information Centre and a number of community spaces. Robert Dale, Senior Partner at Daniel Connal Partnership said: “We are thrilled to have been involved in this ambitious project from the very start, and to see it through to completion is really exciting.”

GRADE A SOLUTION TO OVERCROWDING IN SCHOOLS

Daniel Connal Partnership worked with architects Chaplin Farrant, contractor Robson Construction and engineers

KAWNEER

WORKS WITH POLAR NE TO HELP HEALING AT A PIONEERING AUTISM CENTRE

Director of Wells Maltings, Simon Daykin said: “We are absolutely delighted with the new Wells Maltings complex and really appreciate the hard work and professionalism of all those who have been involved. Wells Maltings is a significant asset to North Norfolk and we hope that it will be used as widely as possible by locals and visitors alike.” With considerable experience working on heritage lottery projects, Daniel Connal Partnership also provided cost advice to the Well Maltings Trust in support of their successful Stage 1 Heritage Lottery bid in 2013, which kick- started the project.

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Cladding

Upward extensions with Eurobrick Adding floors to buildings can be a complicated process, particularly as far as the foundations are concerned, but lightweight cladding systems can help to simplify the process. Eurobrick has been leading the brick slip cladding sector for nearly 30 years and has seen an increase in upward extension projects, which are a great solution where space is limited. Director Richard Haines outlines the challenges faced on some recent projects that chose to build upwards, “Recently, our systems have been used in two challenging upward extension projects that have given older properties a new lease of life as residential apartments. One of those projects was on Norwood Road in South East London and involved the redevelopment of an existing commercial building. The original building included a large ground floor retail unit with snooker club and offices above. The proposal was to demolish the upper floors and build nine new residential apartments over the retail unit.

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This project was particularly challenging because the retailer had to continue trading throughout the build. And although they wanted to add two floors above the retail unit, the existing foundations and structure of the building could not be altered. A lightweight solution was required so Eurobrick’s P-Clad system was specified. The new parts of the building were constructed with an insulated timber frame with an exterior sheathing. This is a faster construction technique than traditional building methods and was important for minimising disruption to the retailer and its customers. The project was finished externally with brick and render. Our P-Clad system was used with a special order brick slip alongside render panels to create a distinctive mixed finish to the building.

Pechiney House was the second ambitious project, involving the conversion and redevelopment of a 2-storey office building into residential apartments by adding a 4-storey upward extension to the existing building. This time Eurobrick’s X-Clad system was the lightweight solution that helped to simplify the process. It was attached to a ply panel on the lightweight steel frame construction, reducing the overall weight of the upward extension considerably. The resulting redevelopment of 42 new residential units, including studios and 1 & 2 bed apartments, was completed at the end of last year. The mixed palette of finishes, using both bricks and timber, created a contemporary look that was sympathetic to the original building.”

The new parts of the building were constructed with an insulated timber frame with an exterior sheathing. This is a faster construction technique than traditional building methods and was important for minimising disruption to the retailer and its customers. Eurobrick provide flexible brick cladding solutions for all types of projects offering a quick, easy and robust solution. Brick slip cladding is durable and will weather and age in the same way as conventional brickwork, requiring little to no maintenance. Eurobrick’s systems are BBA certified and they also offer a 25 year product guarantee. For more information please visit www.eurobrick.co.uk.

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Features

In each issue of Public Sector Building News we cover the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Doors + Windows Drainage & Plumbing Education Energy Efficiency + Renewables Exhibitions Fire, Safety & Security Heating, Ventilation + Air Conditioning Hospitals + Healthcare Housing Insulation & Acoustics Interiors Kitchens, Bathrooms & Washrooms Landscape Design Leisure Lifts, Stairs & Balustrades Maintenance & Refurb Sealants, Paints & Coatings Street Furniture Technology & Software Water & Waste Management

Finance & Planning Case Study

Tax credit means unique projects needn’t be sink or swim for contractors When recreation centre Sapphire Ice & Leisure opened in Romford this January, it became the UK’s first example of an ice rink built on a floor wholly and directly above a heated swimming pool. In building design and construction terms, this posed a number of unique technical challenges. Guided by research and development (R&D) tax credit specialists ForrestBrown, two firms working on the project – architects Saunders Boston and mechanical and electrical company Kershaw Mechanical Services – received a financial boost from the government that allowed them to invest in business growth. The project was Havering Council’s largest single investment (£28m) in a borough-wide improvement programme. Work began in 2013 when Saunders Boston were briefed to design a building that would include a 25m, 8-lane swimming pool and National Standard ice rink, alongside other fitness facilities. The Cambridge-based architects did not have the luxury of a large plot of land, so the initial challenge was to find a way of fitting two facilities with fixed, regulated sizes into a limited build space in the heart of Romford.

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With the working concept agreed on, the architects were presented with a number of technical challenges to address. The priority

was to ensure that the two markedly different climates – warm and cold – could co-exist on stacked floors. The condensation risk needed to be analysed in detail, and specialists were enlisted to crunch the numbers. The building’s heating and ventilation system was designed and built by Kershaw Mechanical Services. The main challenge they faced was that they again needed to accommodate extremes of temperature and humidity, which they solved with two major plant rooms for the specialist equipment. With little by way of a precedent on which to base this project, it was R&D-intensive for both contractors, who explored brand new solutions and collaborated with a number of external experts. Both contractors were relatively new to R&D tax credits at the time of this project, and had previously believed that their work might not meet its eligibility criteria. Working with ForrestBrown, they both secured cash payments for R&D undertaken on projects including Sapphire Ice & Leisure. The R&D tax credit schemes, administered by HMRC, are designed to incentivise businesses to enter the unknown and create innovative products, processes or services. Successful R&D tax credit applications result in a corporation

tax rebate, paid in cash, for qualifying projects. Emily Williams, senior tax manager at ForrestBrown, who handled the claims for both contractors, said: “As the Sapphire Ice & Leisure example shows, construction firms are frequently undertaking R&D during projects. Companies often view this simply as part of the job – solving problems to get things done – whereas R&D is viewed as something done by people in laboratories.

As the Sapphire Ice & Leisure example shows, construction firms are frequently undertaking R&D during projects. Companies often view this simply as part of the job – solving problems to get things done – whereas R&D is viewed as something done by people in laboratories. “The number of construction companies actually claiming R&D tax credits is still much smaller than those who qualify, so any project that presents scientific or technological challenges that need solving is definitely worth an initial conversation. Only by discussing projects with specialists, who can clearly explain the government’s guidelines, do many of our clients see that they are eligible.”

Construction In Education Case Study

Grade A solution to overcrowding in schools Here Paul Lang, Caledonian’s CEO, looks at how off-site construction can help alleviate the shortage of school places, through shorter build schedules that minimise disruption to the students, campus and the local community. Research recently conducted by a leading procurement specialist has revealed that an additional 435,646 pupils will be joining the UK’s secondary school system in 2020, requiring over 14,500 additional secondary classrooms, each with 30 pupils, across the country. These 14,522 secondary school classrooms would need to be built over the next three years in order to cope with the increase in pupil numbers. In practical terms, this would equate to over 400 brand-new 1050-pupil secondary schools across the country. Also, according to a separate report published by a major UK political party in 2017, just over one in five existing schools (21%) were over capacity across all year groups,

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and a further 20% were at capacity, making it clear that classroom overcrowding is becoming a bigger and bigger issue. LEAs, therefore, need to extend existing establishments and invest in new facilities quickly to accommodate the increasing number of pupils. However, with a shortage of funds and resources available, new schools, and supporting campus buildings, must be cost-effective and built within short timescales. They also need to be of guaranteed high quality and low maintenance so that the LEA achieves value for money. SMART construction Compared to building using traditional methods; the education sector benefits enormously from off-site construction. More than 80 to 90% of the work can be completed in a factory, like our Newark-based facility, a quality controlled environment, unaffected by the weather or skills shortages on site. This

significantly reduces the likelihood of delays to the project. In addition, offsite offers minimal disruption to the surrounding community by ensuring a rapid build and cutting down significantly reducing deliveries and activities to site.

Suitable to more than just schools, off-site construction delivers a raft of benefits in all sectors – residential, hotels, communal buildings, further and higher education, retail, commercial outlets and health, amongst others.

requiring less need for working at height. Modular is also more economical and kinder to the environment, with a dramatic reduction in waste and the consumption of materials such as cement, compared to traditional build methods. It is for these reasons that the education sector is starting to recognise and embrace the benefits of off-site construction. So much so that we have recently been awarded a position on the £50m Education and Skills Funding Agency Framework to act as lead designer and principal contractor for new schools, academies and other educational facilities. Outside of the classroom

of off-site construction outside of the classroom is Ashville College in Harrogate. We developed a striking new £2.5m sports complex, featuring a projecting entrance pod, and a large, open area gymnasium space, with full-height windows to maximise natural light. This was a challenging project because the new sports complex was positioned between two existing buildings, and within the school campus, thus requiring a very precise footprint. As a result, the accuracy of design and installation were key factors taken into account before the college chose an off-site solution. There was also a very strict timescale amongst other contractual obligations, all of which were achieved on time, within budget and before the new school term began in September. Complete school built off-site

Suitable to more than just schools, off-site construction delivers a raft of benefits in all sectors – residential, hotels, communal buildings, further and higher education, retail, commercial outlets and health, amongst others. Offering a full turnkey solution, we design and build to an exacting specification, offer a wide range of finishes and roofing options, and produce a design that fits seamlessly alongside any existing structures.

We have worked on several projects within the education sector; including a £13m turnkey contract to build an extension of the existing boarding facilities at ACS Cobham International School, which was designed by Broadway Malyan. We were responsible for the manufacture and construction of the modular components of the new facility, which provided an additional 113 bed spaces, all in premium single and double rooms. It also incorporated supervisor accommodation, study areas and common rooms to complete an eye-catching four-storey building.

Manufacturing off-site, in itself, creates a safer workplace, being a more controlled environment,

Another great example of an educational establishment that has fully embraced the benefits

Up to 80% of the building was manufactured in our facility, before being delivered to site for rapid

The design and build of Farnborough Academy in Nottinghamshire was probably one of the biggest off-site projects that we have completed within the education sector. The 7005m² academy, effectively a whole new school with full campus facilities, houses more than 1000 pupils. The project was on a very demanding timescale and, as it needed to be delivered alongside an active secondary school, off-site construction was identified as the most effective method of meeting the requirements.

assembly, meeting the demands of a tight 42-week programme. Overall, the off-site solution specified achieved a time saving of six months compared to a traditional build and included the manufacture of 141 modules, on-site construction and internal fit-outs. Preferred option This and some of our other recent projects are testament to the fact that off-site construction is also proving a popular choice for entire schools and campus facilities outside of the classroom. With many educational establishments throughout the UK opting for modular solutions for communal, sports and leisure facilities.

We believe that offsite construction will continue to be embraced by local authorities and education bodies for the foreseeable future. We believe that off-site construction will continue to be embraced by local authorities and education bodies for the foreseeable future. The Government has already stated in its November budget statement that it will favour offsite manufacturing on all publicly funded construction projects from 2019, and that augurs well for tackling the ongoing problem of school places.

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Healthcare

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL GALWAY SELECTS FORMICA® LAMINATE IN €18 MILLION DEVELOPMENT As part of a newly completed 75bed ward block, Formica® laminate has been selected for the interior door facings, fitted furniture and integrated panel systems (IPS) of University Hospital Galway. Moloney O’Beirne Architects were commissioned to work on the hospital’s €18 million development and specified Formica laminate due to its performance credentials. The impact resistant qualities of the surfacing material, its ease of maintenance and availability in a wide range of decors being primary factors. Laminate is often favoured for high traffic areas such as hospitals due to its hygienic qualities. Cleanliness is vital to ensuring high quality patient care and failure to meet required standards can lead to the spread of infections, the closing of wards and impact the health of patients and staff. Since Formica laminate is inert and does not support microbial growth, it is ideal for applications where cleanliness and hygiene are of paramount importance. As a completely sealed surface, Formica laminate is impervious to liquids and easy to clean and maintain. In a sector where budgets are often tight and the maintenance cost of material come under scrutiny, surfacing that offers value for money without compromising on functionality is understandably favoured by architects and facility managers.

to fitted furniture and to over 400 door facings. Delivering seamless design integration to the IPS panels is Formica laminate in the grey tone of Folkstone. The colours chosen for the project were selected for their soothing attributes in order to help calm patients and reduce stress.

with the minimum of effort while offering aesthetic options to potentially complement recovery.

Formica laminate’s durable surfacing assists in the design of environments where a high level of hygiene is essential. In a wider context the material also enables hospitals to look better for longer

CHORLEY HOSPITAL GIVES CHILDREN A YOUNIQUE® EXPERIENCE The refurbishment of a 1930s building by Frank Whittle Partnership Ltd, into a children’s educational centre is the first of its kind in the UK. The architects specified Younique® by Formica Group for the washrooms at this ground breaking NHS experience centre at Chorley & South Ribble Hospital. The new Learning Inspiration Future Employment (LIFE) centre offers the young people of Lancashire the opportunity to learn about various hospital operations while gaining a greater understanding of the NHS. In the washrooms, the use of Younique by Formica Group’s digitally rendered panels has enabled the project team to create a fun design feature with an educational theme on the toilet doors. Formica® laminate has also been used for the lockers and an integrated plumbing system to provide a consistent aesthetic.

DAVID BAILEY FURNITURE SYSTEMS COMPLETES TWO MAJOR HOSPITAL FURNITURE CONTRACTS IN WALES David Bailey Furniture Systems is thrilled to have been chosen to supply furniture for two substantial hospital furniture refits based in Wales. The £6.5 million upgrade to maternity and neonatal services at the Prince Charles Hospital in Mid Glamorgan and the £5.8 million state-of-the-art refurb of the renal unit at Swansea’s Morriston Hospital.

www.formica.com

In the instance of University Hospital Galway, Formica laminate in the colours of Seed, Thistle and Sandstone have been applied

Selected by Interserve Building as its hospital furniture partner for both of these prestigious projects, David Bailey Furniture Systems was tasked with sourcing fixtures, fittings and equipment to the value of over £90,000. As part of the £6.5m upgrade to maternity and neonatal services at Prince Charles Hospital in Mid Glamorgan, David Bailey supplied and fitted base and wall storage units, as well as worktops and drugs cupboards in over 60 different rooms. A further 84 rooms at Morriston Hospital in Swansea

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RRN918067 Formica QP.indd 1

03/08/2018 09:33:20

benefitted from being fitted out with similar storage units from David Bailey’s healthcare furniture range this spring, following the recent £5.8m state-of-the-art refurb of its renal unit.

We are thrilled to be breaking into the welsh market, we’ve worked in some of the UK’s most prestigious hospitals and health centres, but Wales is fairly new - and exciting - territory for us. Trevor Gillman, Managing Director for David Bailey Furniture Systems, said: “We are thrilled to be breaking into the welsh market, we’ve worked in some of the UK’s most prestigious hospitals and health centres, but Wales is fairly new - and exciting territory for us.” A colour scheme of crystal white was chosen for the fitted base and wall

storage units, as well as worktops and drugs cupboards to give a clean and welcoming appearance for parents using the maternity and neonatal services at the Prince Charles Hospital. Work on the site for the hospital furniture makeover commenced in March, and was completed in good time in May. The 84 refitted rooms at Morriston Hospital in Swansea are now bedecked with white coloured units and grey worktops to lessen the clinical feel for repeat visitors at the renal unit. Trevor, added: “2018 has got off to an encouraging start for us, thanks not just to these healthcare furniture contracts in Wales but to several other significant hospital furniture refurb projects we recently secured. This spring we are also excited to be launching another complementary range of furniture to sit alongside our hospital and healthcare offering.” 19


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Project

£11.5M Greenmead and Ronald Ross Schools completed An exemplar of colocation and inclusive design maximising a constrained site

Award winning architects HLM, working with Wandsworth Borough Council and Neilcott Construction Group, have completed an £11.5 million new facility for Greenmead and Ronald Ross Schools. Co-locating a mainstream primary; Ronald Ross Primary School, together with an SEN primary; Greenmead, has its challenges, particularly on such a constrained site. However the decision to co-locate the schools enabled both expansion of the specialist accommodation to support a growing need within the borough, and it also provided the opportunity to design shared facilities. HLM produced a design that offers

an environment capable of meeting the needs of all pupils in mainstream and specialist settings. Both schools are rated ‘Outstanding’, having their own identity and unique requirements in terms of teaching and specialist facilities. At the same time however, the schools identified areas where shared or joint facilities would promote inclusion and result in improved facilities for all users. Situated at the heart of site and between the schools is a shared hall which best exemplifies the inclusivity focused design principles. Each school has their own separate circulation routes that congregate at the hall. Flexible partitioning enables this space to be configured for multi-use, assemblies, dining, performances and joint events. Passive environmental principles informed the design with the shared hall and the Greenmead classrooms best exemplifying this through the incorporation of high-level clerestory windows mounted within a southfacing saw-tooth roof configuration. In terms of dedicated facilities, Ronald Ross has a range of teaching areas for small groups of children, as well as food technology, music and ICT rooms. Greenmead has a range of specialist facilities, including a hydrotherapy pool and sensory rooms, as well as more conventional recreational and classroom spaces.

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Each school has its own external space specifically designed for the needs of each group of pupils.

Active play and social spaces are directly accessed from the ground floor accommodation with the upper floor teaching spaces having access to a roof terrace for outdoor learning and community involvement. A key consideration of the design was the existing schools’ strong links with the local community, which the design team ensured was retained and strengthened. The new design includes a multi-use games area that is accessible to local young people outside school hours, while the hall complex has been designed so that it can be used by the community at large. The hydrotherapy pool is also located in this area and, as with the former Greenmead pool, can be let to more specialist users.

excited by the potential for the shared facilities to foster social inclusion; and we hope that pupils, teachers, parents and the wider community will enjoy using their new facilities.”

We found ourselves continually reviewing our decisions and where necessary, HLM were quick to accommodate any changes. The parents and pupils at Ronald Ross Primary School are proud of their new building. Abigail Brady, Headteacher said: “The school community were

involved in the design process from the start of the project. HLM initiated a careful consultation, involving the whole school community. What has been impressive is to watch how our needs and preferences have come to fruition in the building itself, and the impact this has had on the quality of teaching and learning. We found ourselves continually reviewing our decisions and where necessary, HLM were quick to accommodate any changes. The parents and pupils at Ronald Ross Primary School are proud of their new building. The learning spaces fit the needs of our teaching staff who have found moving from the 1950s to the present day, to be a revelation.”

This was a demanding and complicated project, but also one that offered the opportunity to add value to the educational facilities available to the people of Wandsworth. Richard O’Neil, Chairman of HLM, said: “HLM has extensive experience in designing educational facilities and brought this knowledge to bare at Greenmead and Ronald Ross school. This was a demanding and complicated project, but also one that offered the opportunity to add value to the educational facilities available to the people of Wandsworth. We are particularly

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The Industry The Public Sector accounts for an estimated 40% of the total spend on Construction in the UK. In the coming years this will further increase which will lead to a predicated spend of £75bn in 2021. At a local government level construction is the single largest category of procurement expenditure. Gaining contracts in this industry, be it as a product manufacturer or a contractor, is a rewarding as contract values are often high and often lead to further contracts.

Profile for Lapthorn Media

Public Sector Building News - 2019 Media Pack  

Public Sector Building News - 2019 Media Pack