Luxe Magazine - November/December 2021 Southeast

Page 1

SOUTHEAST


creators of luxury fitted cabinetry

kingdomwoodworks.com



This dinner The Sub-Zero, Wolf, and Cove Showroom will help you create a kitchen that’s uniquely yours. On-site chefs, product experts, and inspiring designs will help you envision the possibilities for your home – and all of the delicious moments to come.


started here. SCH E DUL E A S H O W R O O M AP POI NTM ENT

3280 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30305 • 404-973-0660 • subzero-wolf.com/atlanta 127 West Worthington Avenue, Suite 180, Charlotte, NC 28203 • 800-935-2617 • subzero-wolf.com/charlotte


In-store interior design & 3D modeling services.1 Quick Ship program available.2

Preface. Modular sofa, designed by Studio Roche Bobois. Equilibre. Cocktail table, designed by Antoine Fritsch & Vivien Durisotti. Bilboquet. Occasional tables, designed by Kateryna Sokolova. Dune. Rug, designed by Emmanuel Gallina.


French Art de Vivre Photo by Flavien Carlod and Baptiste Le Quiniou, for advertising purposes only. 1 Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2 Program available on select items, subject to availability.




hunterdouglas.com

©2020 Hunter Douglas


FEEL LIGHT TRANSFORMED™ Innovative window treatments with PowerView® Automation transform the natural light in your home to create the perfect mood, whenever the moment.

Silhouette® Shadings with PowerView® Automation


L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M 888-889-8891 / INQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM


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AMAZONITE QUARTZITE

Every room in your home deserves the warmth of stone. Explore our vast inventory of more than 10,000 first-quality slabs and you’ll find the perfect selections to take your design to the next level.


100% MADE IN EUROPE @LegnoBastone


CUSTOM DESIGNED FURNITURE FOR YOUR FLOOR Phone: 239.206.1898 | www.LegnoBastone.com


carefully curated interiors andreaschumacherinteriors.com


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NEOLITH® STRATA ARGENTUM Space | NEOLITH® Urban Boutique Milan (Italy) | Designed by Héctor Ruiz | Photography: Nacho Uribe Fotógrafo

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D O U G L A S

Who doesn’t want to live well? To be perfectly at ease, in comfort and style? Whatever living beautifully means to each of us, Hunter Douglas believes home is an important factor. Dedicated to designing products that are beautiful to look at while also delivering a host of practical benefits, the company’s goal is to bring greater convenience, increased comfort and enhanced style to your time spent at home. You can view the entire collection and

Hunter Douglas PowerView® Automation

find a Hunter Douglas dealer near you at hunterdouglas.com.

From scheduling your shades to automatically reposition at specific times, to setting them in motion with your voice or the remote control, PowerView offers the ultimate in modern-day convenience.


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Opposite page Pirouette® Window Shadings Upper left Silhouette® Window Shadings Upper right Luminette® Privacy Sheers Lower left Design Studio Side Panels and Shades Lower right Alustra® Woven Textures

Fusing Form with Function Elevated Style

Light Transformation

Energy Savings

Smart Shades

A well-dressed window adds the perfect finishing touch to any decor. With an extensive portfolio of innovative shade designs, gorgeous fabrics, beautiful colors and specialty options like top-down/bottom-up, Hunter Douglas invites one to embrace creativity.

Natural sunlight adds life to a room, but left unchecked, it can cause fading and damage to flooring and furnishings. Shades uniquely designed with sheer fabric facings actually diffuse raw sunlight, casting a beautiful glow across the space while providing UV protection.

Up to 30 percent of a home’s heating and cooling energy can escape through windows. With their exclusive cellwithin-a-cell design, Hunter Douglas honeycomb shades provide superior room insulation, helping to reduce your energy consumption and utility costs.

With PowerView® automation, shades can be scheduled to automatically reposition throughout the day to create the perfect balance of light, privacy and insulation … morning, noon and night. And it easily integrates with other whole-home automation systems.



Handcraf ted C ook ing R ange s & Suite s , Steel Cabinet r y, Fine Wood Work ing & Appliance s Par is • Ne w York • Miami • L os Angele s www.L eAtelierPar is .com

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Thermal Steel Windows and Doors

arcadiacustom.com


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WHY WAIT FOR

LUXURY?

Especially when it comes to gourmand-worthy food …


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Signature Kitchen Suite is making sure that you never have to. With its ultimate muse—the forward-thinking home chefs they’ve dubbed “Technicureans™”—in mind, SKS has continued to craft purposeful designs with precision, innovation and flexibility. Its full line of luxury products invites one to experience the art of being True to Food™. Craft a favorite dish or experiment with a novel culinary idea, and celebrate great ingredients, with unmatched cooking accuracy.

48-inch Pro-Style Wall Hood & Pro Rangetop with Sous Vide and Induction

24-inch Undercounter Convertible Refrigerator/Freezer Drawers

SUITE VERSATILITY For those who love to explore the art of cooking, performance is important. But so is flexibility. Signature Kitchen Suite combines them both once more, with its new 24-Inch Undercounter Convertible Refrigerator/Freezer Drawers. The two drawers offer six modes: pantry, fridge, bar, seafood, meat or freezer. When anything and everything can rest at its ideal temperature, one never has to worry about the quality of ingredients come prep and cook time. The brand has also recently launched its Undercounter Dual Zone Wine Refrigerator and new Combination, Single and Double Wall Ovens with Steam-Combi, as well as a 36-inch All-Gas Pro Range and Rangetop. It continues to grow its full suite of possibilities for the Technicurean.

signaturekitchensuite.com |

sksappliances |

sksappliances




CONTENTS

NOV DEC 2 02 1

56

EDITOR'S LETTER

Scene 62

D E S I G N D I S PAT C H The little black book of all things new and fabulous in the local community.

Radar 70

H E A LT H Y H O M E Creating a house that embodies peace, beauty and wellness is paramount today.

72

H E R I TAG E Luxe reflects on the lasting legacy of father-son duo Philip and Kelvin LaVerne.

76

HUE The latest color trends make the case for bold, painterly palettes.

84

GIVING BACK These stateside design companies are making their mark in a philanthropic way.

Market 98

M AT E R I A L Creatives share their mood boards of the moment.

108

TREND A peek into three new—and very posh—members-only clubs.

116

SPOTLIGHT Collections of beautiful objets make for intriguing cabinets of curiosities.

Living

LUXESOURCE.COM

124

K I TC H E N + B AT H A cultivated kitchen is all about personalizing functionality and design.

134

THE REPORT Threads of intimacy and wanderlust lend fresh perspective to entertaining.


LIAIGRE AT R HUGHES ATLANTA DECORATIVE ARTS CENTER 351 PEACHTREE HILLS AVE, NO. 320, ATLANTA, GA 30305 R-HUGHES.COM LIAIGRE.COM


EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO HAVE, BUT DON’T WANT TO SEE.

Whisper-quiet window treatments automated to match the temperature, lighting conditions, or suit your mood.

Music emanating from thin air through speakers that mimic the look of the drywall theyʼre in, blending seamlessly into the décor.

Digitally monitored, contaminant-free, purified, fresh air to breathe in every moment of every day.

Fine art, mirrors, custom frames, and anything imaginable that conceal and reveal any TV display. True pixel perfection.

The ability to communicate with all your entry points from anywhere in the world. Smart, seamless, and secure.


Robust and ubiquitous network infrastructure both inside and out supporting the uncompromising demands of your truly connected home.

On-site energy generation, energy storage, and dynamic load management to take back control of your power grid.

Bespoke outdoor technology solutions with a level of control and elegance to rival your indoor living space.

W H E R E D E S I G N + T E C H N O LO GY M E E T 404.585.0323

|

W W W. A M I N D F U L H O M E . C O M


CONTENTS

FEATURES

152

164

174

180

Perfect Landing

Modern Remix

The Ties That Bind

Coming of Age

For a bucolic, Belgianinfluenced refuge on Atlanta’s northern outskirts, everything started with the setting.

Bold engineering, a convivial floor plan and playful décor take a 1970s Charlotte abode into the 21st century.

Atlanta fiber artist Adana Tillman’s colorful quilt portraits connect a timeless craft tradition to contemporary identity.

A designer and his cadre restore and refresh a 1920s Nashville cottage for a genteel homeowner.

Written by Kathryn O’Shea-Evans Photography by Lisa Romerein

Written by Kelly Vencill Sanchez Exterior Photography by Chris Edwards Interior Photography by Michael Blevins

Written by Monique McIntosh Photography by Gregory Miller

Written by Hilary Masell Oswald Photography by Zeke Ruelas

ON THE COVER: Designer Jason Arnold updated the architecture and interiors of this 1929 Nashville home while preserving its historical character. “We put an edgy

spin on the entry,” says the designer, who complemented the space’s original black and white marble floors via a clean-lined metal table by Micah Farrer of Obsidian Ironworks complete with a white-oak top from KS Millworks in Dalton, Georgia. The arched mahogany door was sourced through Dale Incorporated. Page 180

LUXESOURCE.COM


T H E K E N SINGT O N WALK CO LLE CT IO N Celebrating the beauty and heritage of British design Jerry Pair, ADAC, 351 Peachtree Hills Ave., Suite 508, Atlanta, GA 30305 404.261.6337 zoffany.sandersondesigngroup.com @zoffanyusa A PRO UD M EMB ER O F S AND E RSO N D E S IG N G RO UP


S PAC E S

F O L D | S L I D E | SW I N G L AC A N T I N A D O O R S .C O M 1 1 - 97 7 73


Avera® Walk-in Closet in Cloud

Built-in beauty, LED lighting and push-to-open drawers. Discover the effortless functionality that only Avera Custom Closets offers. Schedule your free virtual, in-store or in-home design consultation today at containerstore.com/custom-closets.

©2021 The Container Store Inc. 52317 Photography by Horderly.


Our AmericAn StOry BegAn

in

1904 with hAnS heiStAd.


W

E EATHEREN ATHEREN ESTATE E STATE FURNITURE

D

An American Story made in maine

LEARN HOW AT WEATHEREND.COM • 800.456.6483 AvAilABle At JAnuS et cie® ShOwrOOmS

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PAMELA LERNER JACCARINO VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF DESIGN DIRECTOR

Pam Shavalier

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Brittany Chevalier McIntyre

ART DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Heather Carney

MANAGING EDITORS

Candace Cohen

Kelly Phillips Badal, Colleen McTiernan

HOMES EDITORS Kate Abney Grace Beuley Hunt Lisa Bingham Dewart Mary Jo Bowling Paulette Pearson Jennifer Pfaff Smith Shannon Sharpe DIGITAL

SENIOR WEB EDITOR

Ileana Llorens

DIRECTOR, CONTENT DISTRIBUTION

Amanda Kahan

MARKET

SENIOR STYLE + MARKET EDITOR

Kathryn Given

MARKET EDITOR

Sarah Shelton ART

ART DIRECTOR

Maria Pluta

JUNIOR ART DIRECTOR

Kimberly Solari Brown

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Jamie Beauparlant

ASSOCIATE GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kyle Anderson

SENIOR RETOUCHER

Christian Ablan

ADAM I. SANDOW CHAIRMAN

ERICA HOLBORN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Michael Shavalier

CHIEF DESIGN OFFICER

Cindy Allen

CHIEF SALES OFFICER

Kate Kelly Smith

CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

Sean K. Sullivan

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT + DESIGN FUTURIST

AJ Paron

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL

Bobby Bonett

VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Lisa Silver Faber

VICE PRESIDENT, PARTNER + PROGRAM SUCCESS

Tanya Suber

VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Laura Steele

VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS

Katie Brockman

SANDOW DESIGN GROUP OPERATIONS SENIOR DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC OPERATIONS

Keith Clements CONTROLLER

Emily Kaitz

DIRECTOR, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Joshua Grunstra

SANDOW was founded by visionary entrepreneur Adam Sandow in 2003 with the goal of building a truly innovative media company that would reinvent the traditional publishing model. Today, SANDOW is a fully integrated solutions platform that includes leading content, tools, and services, powering innovation for the design and luxury industries. Its diverse portfolio of media assets includes Interior Design, Luxe Interiors + Design and NewBeauty. Materials Innovation brands include global materials consultancy, Material Connexion, game-changing material sampling and logistics platform, Material Bank, and materials reclamation program, Sample Loop. SANDOW brands also include research and strategy firm, ThinkLab. In 2019, SANDOW was selected by the New York Economic Development Council of New York to become the official operator of NYCxDESIGN Week, beginning in 2020. sandowdesign.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS 800.723.6052

sandowdesign.com

CORPORATE HQ 3651 NORTHWEST 8TH AVENUE, BOCA RATON, FL 33431 | 561.961.7600

luxesource.com


KRYSTA RODRIGUEZ Actress, Stage & Screen Founder, Curated by Krysta Rodriguez DRESS IN: TA M B O U R I N E T R A P S

JOIN US IN SUPPORTING THE ARTS

Use code LUXART2 by December 31st, 2021 and 3% of your order will be contributed to help support the arts Visit artistictile.com/arts for details

CHICAGO

DA LL A S

NEW JERSEY

NASHVILLE

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NJ SL A B GA LLERY

SAN FRANCISCO

844-302-9366

A RT IST ICT ILE .COM

B R I N G I N G A R T TO

L I F E


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Talent Made Tangible ICREATE BRINGS YOUR VISION TO LIFE WHEN ONE THINKS OF KRAVET, fabric certainly comes to mind. But the centuries-old industry icon doesn’t only specialize in luxury textiles nowadays. In fact, it has continued to enhance the Kravet Furniture offering, most recently evolving into the interior designer’s ultimate bespoke resource. While Kravet Furniture already provides some elements of customization in its line, ICreate takes the possibilities a step further. Between Kravet Furniture and CuratedKravet, the options have expanded to make extensive customization a reality, but with quick answers and insights from an expert team. It promises to revolutionize the industry. Sara Kravet, vice president, elaborates on ICreate’s unique appeal: “It still allows designers to be as creative as they want, while streamlining the business. This is a moment where we can make things simpler.” In other words, no more design complications, convoluted communications and long waits. Now, designers can see their dream to fruition easily.


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beds From silhouette and headboard treatment to platform trim, base and finish, every detail is up for choosing on your ICreate bed. A multitude of luxurious options make the perfect starting point.

chests and dressers Select your silhouette, base, face and finish. Then, embellish with hardware options, including styles from popular brand Modern Matter by Addison Weeks.

tables Whether you need a side, cocktail, console or dining table, ICreate invites you to select your finish, add decorative details and see your unique design in person a short while later.

lighting Mix and match elements of a table lamp to your liking via CuratedKravet, with 10 striking silhouettes, 11 rich glaze colors, three base styles, two shade shapes and three finials to choose from.

Ottomans, office furniture, lampshades, mirrors and carpets can also be custom-designed within the ICreate Program. kravet.com |

kravetinc


KATE KELLY SMITH EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT + MANAGING DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE + OPERATIONS

Scott MacClements

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, BRAND STRATEGY

Sean K. Sullivan

NATIONAL SALES DIRECTORS ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Michelle Blair HOME FURNISHINGS DIRECTOR

Blaire Rzempoluch NORTHEAST DIRECTOR

Amy McMillan Tambini WEST COAST DIRECTORS

Lisa Lovely, Carolyn Homestead MIDWEST + SOUTH CENTRAL DIRECTOR

Tanya Scribner John Baum Janice Hyatt Frank G. Prescia

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER SALES ASSISTANT SALES + MARKETING COORDINATOR

INTEGRATED MARKETING Samantha Westmoreland INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR Vanessa Kogevinas INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER Haley Minchew INTEGRATED GRAPHIC DESIGNER Antoinette Childs

DIRECTOR, DIGITAL STRATEGY WESTERN

PARTNER + PROGRAM SUCCESS Jennifer Kimmerling PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGER + TEAM LEAD Brittany Watson SENIOR PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGER Molly Polo PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGERS Lauren Krause, Susan Mallek DIRECTOR, PARTNER SUCCESS

PROGRAM SUCCESS MANAGER + ANALYTICS SPECIALIST,

Victoria Albrecht Greta Wolf CONTENT EDITORS Heather Schreckengast, Matthew Stewart PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MANAGER Jody M. Boyle LUXE PREFERRED

NATIVE CONTENT EDITOR + TEAM LEAD

NATIVE

VICE PRESIDENT, PROGRAMMING + EXPERIENCES

James Nolan

REGIONAL SALES DIRECTORS Adrienne B. Honig Karlee Prejean AUSTIN + SAN ANTONIO PUBLISHER Jim Wilson CHICAGO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell DIRECTORS Tracy Colitte, Carolyn Funk, Taylor Greene COLORADO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell PUBLISHER Terri Glassman DIRECTORS Travis Gainsley, Katie Martin DALLAS + FORT WORTH PUBLISHER Rolanda Polley DIRECTOR Leslie Shelton GREATER NEW YORK PUBLISHER Trish Kirsch ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, NEW YORK Donna Herman ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, CONNECTICUT Amy McMillan Tambini DIRECTOR, NEW YORK Maritza Smith DIRECTOR, HAMPTONS Michelle A. Giannone HOUSTON PUBLISHER Amy McAnally DIRECTOR Carol Lamadrid LOS ANGELES ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Athena MacFarland DIRECTOR Virginia Williams ARIZONA PUBLISHER DIRECTOR

MIAMI, PALM BEACH + BROWARD, NAPLES + SARASOTA

Stacey Callahan Jennifer Chanay, Susan Goldstein, Susan Preville PACIFIC NORTHWEST PUBLISHER Debby Steiner DIRECTOR Cathy Cruse SAN FRANCISCO PUBLISHER Lisa Lovely DIRECTOR Sara McGovern SOUTHEAST ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sibyl de St. Aubin DIRECTOR Suzanne Brandt SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER Alisa Tate ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kali Smith REGIONAL PUBLISHER DIRECTORS

CIRCULATION + DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR Alison Parks

@luxemagazine Luxe Interiors + Design , (ISSN 1949-2022), Arizona (ISSN 2163-9809), California (ISSN 2164-0122), Chicago (ISSN 2163-9981), Colorado (ISSN 21639949), Florida (ISSN 2163-9779), New York (ISSN 2163-9728), Pacific Northwest (ISSN 2167-9584), San Francisco (ISSN 2372-0220), Southeast (ISSN 2688-5735), Texas (ISSN 2163-9922), Vol. 19, No. 6, November/December, prints bimonthly and is published by SANDOW, 3651 NW 8th Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33431. Luxe Interiors + Design (“Luxe”) provides information on luxury homes and lifestyles. Luxe Interiors + Design , SANDOW, its affiliates, employees, contributors, writers, editors, (Publisher) accepts no responsibility for inaccuracies, errors or omissions with information and/or advertisements contained herein. The Publisher has neither investigated nor endorsed the companies and/or products that advertise within the publication or that are mentioned editorially. Publisher assumes no responsibility for the claims made by the Advertisers or the merits of their respective products or services advertised or promoted in Luxe. Publisher neither expressly nor implicitly endorses such Advertiser products, services or claims. Publisher expressly assumes no liability for any damages whatsoever that may be suffered by any purchaser or user for any products or services advertised or mentioned editorially herein and strongly recommends that any purchaser or user investigate such products, services, methods and/or claims made thereto. Opinions expressed in the magazine and/or its advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Publisher. Neither the Publisher nor its staff, associates or affiliates are responsible for any errors, omissions or information whatsoever that have been misrepresented to Publisher. The information on products and services as advertised in Luxe are shown by Publisher on an “as is” and “as available” basis. Publisher makes no representations or warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the information, services, contents, trademarks, patents, materials or products included in this magazine. All pictures reproduced in Luxe have been accepted by Publisher on the condition that such pictures are reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the photographer and any homeowner concerned. As such, Publisher is not responsible for any infringement of the copyright or otherwise arising out of any publication in Luxe. Luxe is a licensed trademark of SANDOW © 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the Publisher. ADDRESS SUBSCRIPTION REQUESTS AND CORRESPONDENCE TO: Luxe, PO Box 808, Lincolnshire, IL 60069-0808. Email: luxe@omeda.com or telephone toll-free 800.723.6052. ®

®

®



“We chose Western Window Systems because they have the ability to do large openings. I particularly like the fact we could do an 11-foot-tall sliding panel system with the multi-slides.” – Tim J. Droney, General Contractor


westernwindowsystems.com

Moving glass walls and windows for all the ways you live.


LETTER EDITOR’S

Standing beside artist Will Ryman’s towering LongHouse 6 sculpture at LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton.

Full Bloom

Pamela Jaccarino VP, Editor in Chief @pamelajaccarino

LUXESOURCE.COM

photo: lena yaremenko.

This past summer, I had the pleasure of visiting LongHouse Reserve, a 16-acre reserve and sculpture garden in East Hampton founded by the brilliant textile designer, Jack Lenor Larsen. Amongst the more than 60 contemporary sculptures, I was particularly taken with artist Will Ryman’s colossal, and fanciful LongHouse 6, an improbable, exaggerated 24-foot-tall cluster of six roses and fallen petals rendered in stainless steel, resin and painted in cadmium red light. The rose remains an idealized symbol for romance, natural beauty and perfection. Yet, Ryman designed his petals with bumps and irregularities. You can clearly detect its hand-worked quality, and his hint to embrace fading beauty, ephemera and the temporary nature of all things. As we forge ahead into the end of another “strange” year for the world, I hope that you will seek out and embrace beauty in all its forms. For artistry and design will always be in bloom, one way or another.



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Health, Wellness, Sustainability, Innovation MAKING IT EASIER FOR PEOPLE TO LIVE HAPPIER, HEALTHIER LIVES. The kitchen has long been known as the heart of the home. Perhaps that is because it keeps the home, and all who live within it, nourished. And perhaps the appliances central to its design have a far nobler purpose than merely storing, cooking and cleaning. That is certainly what Beko believes. The brand feels that the perfect appliance can empower people to lead healthier lives, while technological advancements—like the use of recycled materials and carbon-neutral manufacturing—help the planet to be healthier, too. The Beko

team is deeply committed to technologies that perform at the lowest levels of energy with the smallest impact on the earth’s resources, because of its overriding belief that you can’t lead a healthy life without a healthy planet. In business for more than 66 years, with products sold in 140 countries, 28 production facilities and 40,000 employees globally, Beko has been a household name in Europe for many years. But recently, the brand has expanded into the United States, bringing its commitment to health and wellness to even more homes.


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Preserve Your Produce, Preserve the Planet Imagine keeping your fruits and veggies fresh for up to 30 days, reducing trips to the store and pressure on your grocery budget. Best of all, with less food going bad and ending up in a landfill, it benefits Mother Earth as well. It almost sounds too good to be true, but Beko’s EverFresh+® food-preservation system does just that. Here’s how: • A series of crispers use breathable smart materials and other advances to maximize humidity and minimize moisture loss. • Active Fresh Blue Light™ recreates photosynthesis conditions to preserve the vitamin C in produce, which keeps it tasting its best. • An energy-saving ProSmart™ inverter compressor helps maintain vibrancy and nutritional qualities. • In keeping with Beko’s pledge to make wellness attainable for all, the EverFresh+® system is available throughout the line of Beko refrigerators, not just the top-end models.

beko.com/us-en |

bekoappliancesusa |

beko_usa |

bekoappliancesusa


P R O PROMOTIO M O T I O N PROMOTION

BE INSPIRED FLATTERED FAVORED ADMIRED DISCOVERED HONORED ADORED CHEERED BE . Luxe Interiors + Design’s annual RED Awards recognizes and honors excellence, innovation and the best residential architecture, interior design and landscape architecture projects across the country. For 2022, Luxe is launching its first RED Awards for Products to recognize the best-designed products across 12 key home categories.

RESIDENTIAL E XCE LL E N C E IN DESIGN AWA R D S

202 2

THINK YOUR PROJECT HAS WHAT IT TAKES? IS YOUR PRODUCT A DESIGN MASTERPIECE? SUBMIT AT LUXEREDAWARDS.COM Submissions Open: October 4, 2021 through December 2, 2021 Winners will be revealed in the July/August 2022 issue of Luxe Interiors + Design.


CANVAS ART HARPER GREY / BLUE

COSMOPALITAN CT156 MULTI

SAFARI KRP02 BROWN / BEIGE

MONARCH COLLECTION P2975 MULTI


SCENE W R I T T E N B Y K AT E A B N E Y

LAUNCH

WATERWAYS BY EMILY DAWS TEXTILES Johns Island, delivering what she calls “a fresh, modern twist on traditional coastal design.” Her latest launch, Waterways, “mirrors the rhythmic and organic patterns of the wetlands and the elements that make them up,” she says. Here, Luxe learns what moves her. emilydawstextiles.com What inspires you? The meandering marshes, the beautiful blues and bright greens, the colors of the coast. For me, this is home. How have you interpreted the Lowcountry landscape through Waterways? With Salt Marsh, for example, it’s as if you’re standing along the wetlands looking out to the horizon. It’s how the grasses look in perspective; those simple strokes. Another, Harbor, captures the effect of choppy water. River Reef is very popular; what were the visual influences? It’s an example of a shell terrazzo. I was inspired by oyster sidewalks on Kiawah Island; I took that texture and abstracted it.

SHELF LIFE

OF COMMON ORIGIN: NEW ARCHITECTURE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH What makes a residence “Southern,” and why do those hallmarks hold such sway over American architecture today? Recently released from Wythe Press, Of Common Origin: New Architecture of the American South, attempts to answer that question through refreshingly personal interviews with firm principals throughout the region: Summerour Architects and Bill Ingram Architect in Georgia; Jeremy Corkern Studio, Paul Bates Architects and Tippett Sease Baker in Alabama; Pursley Dixon Architecture and Ruard Veltman Architecture in North Carolina. Collectively, these conversations reveal a reverence for hand rendering, quality materials, skilled craftsmanship, proportion, harmony, inheritability and that evernebulous notion of “Southern hospitality.” Author and Montgomery native Barrett Austin most notably muses on one aspect these talents almost unanimously share: Alabama roots. amazon.com

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LAUNCH PHOTOS: PRODUCT PHOTO COURTESY EMILY DAWS TEXTILES; PORTRAIT BY MARGARET WRIGHT. SHELF LIFE PHOTOS: BOOK COVER PHOTO OF JEREMY CORKERN STUDIO PROJECT BY ROB CULPEPPER; PHOTO OF PURSLEY DIXON ARCHITECTURE PROJECT BY CHRIS EDWARDS.

Emily Daws’ eponymous line of textiles is a form of Lowcountry storytelling, pulling influences from the natural and man-built surroundings of her adoptive Charleston. Ranging from by-the-yard Belgian linen and eco-friendly wallcoverings to pillows, draperies and premium cotton shower curtains, Daws’ items are produced from a sunny studio on Spanish moss-draped


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BRIAN COLEMAN X KNOTS RUGS

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Charlotte-area artist Brian Coleman long craved getting his paintings off the canvas. Transferring them to the floor was the unexpected part. Calling the act of creating “a need, and a form of therapy,” Coleman’s gestural works are evocative and emotional— interpretations, he says, of memories and future visions. But for the former graphic designer, they’re also a celebration of shape and form—a fact that’s fed their fandom. Now, his first collaboration with U.K.-based Knots Rugs (available at Couture Knots in Charlotte) puts that artistry underfoot. Patterns include Wood Structure, with architectural influences; an abstracted interpretation of Lake Wylie, South Carolina, scenery; and a modern diptych that can be used alone or as a duo. At right, he shares the foundations of this fresh flooring venture. knotsrugs.co.uk; briancolemanart.com

What sparked your collaboration with Knots Rugs? They are specifically interested in artists, and they think of rugs as just that: art. These are not typical patterns you see in a showroom; they’re actual paintings translated into rugs. Tell us about the Nepalese artisans reproducing your brushstrokes in wool and silk. If you look at the pictures of the process, it’s incredible—they’re at the loom every day, and the quality shows. These can take up to six months to knot by hand. The results look just like my paintings; it’s unbelievable. What’s next for you? Rugs are just the beginning. I’d like to do a large indoor mural or collaborate with a furniture maker. I’m currently exploring sculpture, taking some elements of the paintings into three dimensions. I’m excited to see where things go.

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Drawing upon Richmond jeweler Hali Emminger’s globally influenced accessories line, Hechizo, Red Rocks Tileworks’ spunky new collaboration seamlessly complements the brand's simpler specimens. Emminger’s exclusive terra cotta creations comprise two slim border tiles, two sets of five mini accent pieces and a duo of tiles with integrated wall hooks. redrockstileworks.com

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NYC- and Toronto-based Misette tapped Nashville ceramicist Sarah Cihat for a holiday 2021 lineup of hand-cast porcelain pieces that chicly accompany its core tabletop collections. Cihat’s contributions include six organically shaped evergreen plates and bowls tipped in 22-karat gold, plus a verdant new colorway for her Stellar Globe vase. misettetable.com

Designer Hannah Crowell joined forces with Brooklyn-based Flavor Paper to produce this limited-edition Nashville-focused toile wallpaper, which visitors to The Virgin Hotels Nashville might spy en route to the on-site speakeasy. Irises, mockingbirds and other local iconography— including Crowell’s famous grandfather, Johnny Cash—all make an appearance. flavorpaper.com

fab collab photo by jon day photography; styling by hannah franklin, hannah franklin interior stylist. music city makers photos, from left: courtesy red rocks tileworks, by kate ince and by caroline allison.

NEW TILE, TABLEWARE AND A TWIST ON TOILE FROM NASHVILLE CREATIVES OF NOTE


Est . 1978

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HOLIDAY HAVENS

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PERFECT FOR VISITORS OR STAYCATIONS, THESE NEW HOTELS ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST ARE TOTAL DESIGN DESTINATIONS.

GEORGIA A stone’s throw from the city’s historic district on the edge of the emerging Eastern Wharf, Thompson Savannah (above) interprets the Hostess City’s timeless character through a modern lens. Architecture by Atlanta firm Smallwood is marked by dramatic geometry, floor-toceiling glass and sculptural lighting, but softened by Studio 11’s interior additions—including tactile finishes, showy stones, supple leathers and herringbone hardwoods. hyatt.com/savannah

TENNESSEE Making a statement in the Music City’s SoBro district, the new Hyatt Centric Downtown Nashville’s (above) residential-esque guest suites offer glamorous dressing tables, millwork closets, Shaw Carpets and five-piece bathrooms complete with freestanding tubs and Kohler fixtures. The lobby sets the eclectic, cosmopolitan tone with custom baroque wallpaper capturing Tennessee’s state tree, the tulip poplar, along with curated art. Adding to the coziness is a listening lounge for vinyl records. hyatt.com/nashville

NORTH CAROLINA The team behind Blackberry Farm had a tall order when transforming High Hampton (left), the iconic Cashiers, North Carolina, Inn first developed in 1860. Formerly a summer camp-style haunt for well-heeled Southerners, the retreat’s recent refresh included its transition to a year-round haven. The elegant, cabin-like interiors repurpose antiques among modern upholstery and a mix of commissioned artworks. highhampton.com

ALABAMA A bespoke boutique option newly bowed in Huntsville’s tony Twickenham district, 106 Jefferson (right) rises on the historic site of a Victorian-era hot spot. Tailored, Southern and a touch cheeky, its design combines moody lighting, reclaimed wood, lush mohair and burnished brass with an array of works by international artists. Guest rooms go plush with sumptuous linens and luxe amenities. 106jefferson.com

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With mod, retro-tropical interiors that read Memphis Milano-meets-Palm Beach, one of Charleston’s newest boutique properties, The Ryder Hotel (left), channels the idyll of destination resorts—or at least the sunny disposition of locales with milder winters. Designer Cortney Bishop’s scheme brings warmth to subtropical Charleston’s brief chill with palm-print Mokum wallcoverings, custom Moattar rugs and a dreamy pastel palette. Bishop strove for an energetic yin and yang in the design—cocooning, but also stimulating—a spirit perhaps best experienced by settling into Little Palm bar’s sage-colored booths for cocktails of sherry and whiskey. theryderhotel.com

holiday havens photos, clockwise from top right: courtesy thompson savannah, by katie charlotte, courtesy 106 jefferson, courtesy high hampton and courtesy hyatt centric downtown nashville.

SOUTH CAROLINA


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photo: beach drips, courtesy black crow studios.

H E A LT H Y

Luxe celebrates the power of design through a familial collaboration, notable brands giving back, wellness at home and the latest color and paint trends.


THE NEW RESTORATIVE HOME IS TRENDING…AND HERE TO STAY. W R I T T E N BY H E AT H E R C A R N E Y

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HOME

Well & Good

“Most of us spend 90 percent of our lives indoors, and two-thirds of that is in our homes,” says designer Tamara Magel. “Yet very few of us consider the impact on our well-being.” It’s a staggering and pertinent statistic that has inspired Magel and others to make wellness a cornerstone of their design philosophies: How can we build a house that not only looks good but also creates a sense of peace, beauty, security and comfort? For Magel, this started with adopting a 10-step healthy living approach. “A truly healthy home goes beyond clean materials; it incorporates our basic human needs for light, clean air and food, a quiet environment and a peaceful atmosphere,” she explains. In her work, this translates to non-toxic and eco-friendly paints, natural stone and elements (water, clay and grasses), natural

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light sources and feng shui. “I tend to use less furniture and larger pieces to create ease of flow from room to room,” she says. “I start with symmetry and add strategically placed organic curves.” Symmetry is also key for architect Don Ruggles, an idea he explores in his book Beauty, Neuroscience & Architecture, where he maintains that the most fundamental geometric pattern is the three-point facial pattern—two eyes and a mouth. What may seem like an abstract concept for the home is actually quite relevant: “The three-bythree pattern occurs over and over again in architecture and art,” says Ruggles. “Your brain will intuitively process it in an efficient way, which creates less stress and more rest.” The architect mentions the classic fireplace set up, in which the firebox opening is the center, and the mantel forms the upper left

and upper right of the design. Notice the pattern once, and you’ll see it everywhere: a headboard with two nightstands; the kitchen range and hood framed by cabinets; a front door surround; and so on. In California, architect Jennifer Hoppel is championing beauty and sustainability. With her firm, Burdge Architects, she just completed the first carbon-neutral luxury estate in Malibu, aptly named Zero One. “You don’t have to sacrifice design or luxury to achieve a structure that is good for you and the environment,” she says, noting the residence’s intentional siting, outdoor courtyard, sustainable garden, FSCcertified wood and even its less sexy (but no less important) ventilation system that promotes healthy air. “Being green is not this big, scary endeavor,” says Hoppel. “It’s attainable. It’s the way of the future.”

photo: rikki snyder.

Designer Tamara Magel employs a 10-step healthy living approach when planning spaces, such as this living room in the Hamptons, emblematic of a growing design movement focused on well-being.


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Past Perfect ARTISTRY AND ANCIENT TECHNIQUES COMBINE TO CREATE FURNITURE THAT STANDS THE TEST OF TIME.

Father-son duo Philip and Kelvin LaVerne often buried their works in special soil, which would age the metal and give it the appearance of antiquity, like the piece shown here.

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It’s been more than 30 years since the last piece of furniture left Philip LaVerne Galleries, but the demand for the richly detailed tables, consoles and cabinets has only grown. This wouldn’t surprise their creators, a father-and-son team who knew they were crafting pieces with an enduring appeal even as they made them. Philip LaVerne and his son, Kelvin, were able to use their prodigious artistic gifts to create sculptural bronze and pewter pieces prized by designers and collectors. Their story begins in the late 1800s when Philip’s father, Max, immigrated to Brooklyn from Eastern Europe. “Max was a muralist, and he painted the ceilings of lobbies and churches,” says Evan Lobel, the owner of Lobel Modern NYC and co-author of a forthcoming book about the LaVernes. “When Philip was a child, Max would take him to the library, open an art book and ask his son to copy the images there. From an early age, Philip had a great talent and appreciation for art.” Those skills and inclinations were passed to Kelvin who, after graduating from art school in the 1950s, joined his father in creating one-of-a-kind pieces and selling them in a Midtown Manhattan showroom. The surfaces of their furniture frequently carry vignettes

photo: ryann ford.

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weeks in soil the artists described as coming from the “Far East,” allowing it to oxidize and develop colors. The LaVernes monitored the process, encouraging hues with chemicals and setting them with wax when they achieved the desired shade. When unearthed, they would freeze or torch surfaces to develop patina or brightness. “The LaVernes were really advanced for their time. Their techniques, which they said were inspired by ancient practices, were never divulged,” says Merrill. “They were essentially painting with bronze and pewter, doing things that aren’t easily copied.” In 1987, Kelvin closed the studio doors and took up photography. But, more than three decades later, the LaVerne legacy continues to grow. According to Darin Geise, owner of Coup D’Etat, the singular nature of the work explains its enduring popularity. “People have a new appreciation for LaVerne pieces, and they are having a moment,” he says. Lobel agrees, noting: “They used to run magazine ads calling their pieces the ‘antiques of the future’—and they were absolutely right.”

Current prices for LaVerne pieces, like the rare Tao Cabinet (below) and a table from their first series focused on historical civilizations (left), bear out the statement. Todd Merrill notes recent auctions that have seen LaVerne works command top dollar. “In early 2000, Sotheby’s sold a Bathers cabinet for $90,000,” he notes. “If you had one today, you could ask whatever you wanted for it.”

LaVerne Everlasting DESIGNERS ON TODAY’S APPEAL OF THESE VINTAGE PIECES. “ At once avant-garde and traditional, a LaVerne work is always a fantastic focal point to any interior. The burnished bronze and verde gris patina adds a touch of deceptive antiquity and the plateaux quietly reveal a bas-relief scene akin to the face of an antique coin.” –JON DE LA CRUZ

“ W hat drew me to their furnishings is that they can work anywhere—either in a traditional or a modern interior. They are just as beautiful in either setting.” –JENNIFER COHLER MASON

“ T he craftsmanship of a LaVerne piece is amazing. Every detail is elegantly articulated and every time you study it, you see something new. You have to wonder, how did they do it?” –JACK LEVY

table inset: richard powers. console: courtesy lobel modern nyc.

HERITAGE RADAR

depicting life in ancient civilizations or scenes from mythology. “They were a very intellectual family,” notes Lobel. “They were interested in history, religion and music. Their designs were inspired by the subjects they loved deeply.” Their top-secret techniques created a look that’s immediately recognizable. Todd Merrill of Todd Merrill Studio describes the process in his book, Modern Americana: Studio Furniture from High Craft to High Glam, as a multistep endeavor involving hand carving a design in bronze and overlaying that with thin layers of pewter and more bronze. After that, a piece would be buried for six

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WHETHER RICH AND PIGMENT-PACKED OR SOFT AND RESTFUL, THE SEASON’S HOTTEST HUES UPLIFT ON IMPACT. LUXE ROUNDS UP A BEVY OF PAINTERLY INSPIRATION. P R O D U C E D BY G R AC E B E U L E Y H U N T, B R I T TA N Y C H E VA L I E R M C I N T Y R E A N D S A R A H S H E LT O N

Regal purple isn’t for the color-shy, but designer Kati Curtis’ use of Benjamin Moore’s Wild Mulberry in a Rye, New York, vestibule makes the case for bold saturation— especially in micro doses. “People are afraid of painting small spaces vibrant colors for fear it will make them feel smaller, but the opposite is true,” she says. “Rich tones open up rooms and give them more beauty and depth!” katicurtisdesign.com

gutter eric photo: credits piasecki. here

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Flying Colors

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design Antonio Citterio - bebitalia.com


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The Great Indoors

Note Worthy BEHOLD THE FRESHEST GREENS TO MARKET.

NATURE-NODDING GREENS ARE THE ORDER OF THE DAY. GARDEN CLUB “Green is my favorite color in all areas of my life,” shares Chicago-based designer Alexandra Kaehler, who accordingly envisioned her pantry as an emerald jewel box. Leaning into her home’s leafy setting, Kaehler selected Benjamin Moore’s Essex Green, favoring a high-gloss finish over lacquer for the character of its brushstrokes. “I love the concept of bringing greenery inside,” continues the designer, noting that clients are increasingly sharing in her penchant. “After being stuck inside our houses, I think people are extra hungry for an outdoor connection, and translating that idea indoors visually is really comforting.” alexandrakaehler.com

OLIVE SPRIG A versatile, grown-up green. ppg.com

BREEZEWAY Minty chic with a silvery tone. behr.com

Benjamin Moore Essex Green

INTO THE WOODS In a surprise to designer Marie Flanigan, Harry Potter spurred a chic color scheme— specifically, the series’ Forbidden Forest, which Flanigan’s young client requested her bedroom elicit. “Her inspiration was a lush, deep wood, and we used a moody palette to execute that,” Flanigan says. After reviewing four kindred paint samples (her own best practice), the designer opted for Sherwin-Williams’ Rocky River, pulling its strong saturation across the trim and ceiling. “Evoking nature breaks the divide between the indoors and outside,” she explains. “Here, the green envelops you and makes you feel like you’re sleeping among the trees.” marieflanigan.com

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GUACAMOLE Energizing and grounding all at once. glidden.com

EVERGREEN FOG A hint of gray gives a cool effect. sherwin-williams.com

GARDEN CLUB: DUSTIN HALLECK. INTO THE WOODS: COURTESY MARIE FLANIGAN INTERIORS.

Sherwin Williams Rocky River


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DESIGNERS SHARE THE HIGH-IMPACT BLUES IN THEIR FAN DECK. Farrow & Ball Hague Blue

–JANIE MOLSTER, janiemolster.com

“We knew Farrow & Ball’s Light Blue, with its serene properties and silvery gray tones, would lend depth of character. The room has a wall of windows facing a river, so it offers the gentlest nod to the natural surroundings.” “ Using a vibrant Benjamin Moore New York color found in a State of Mind painting as the background is a favorite design trick of mine. For this scullery, Benjamin Moore’s New York State of Mind was the perfect hue to highlight blue chip contemporary art by Bridget Riley, Lee Ufan and Tom LaDuke—and the lacquer adds another wow factor!” –CATHY AUSTIN, catherinemaustin.com

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– H EIDE HENDRICKS, hendrickschurchill.com

Farrow & Ball Light Blue

janie molster photo: gordon gregory. hiede hendricks photo: tim lenz. cathy austin photo: brie williams.

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“The pigments in Farrow & Ball’s Hague Blue are always consistent, staying true to tone regardless of exposure. The saturation makes it a fabulous foil for a dynamic contrast, say lemon yellow or petal pink. Paired with caramel leather and a Persian rug, it sings as the backdrop for this gentleman’s study.”


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HUE RADAR

Beyond the Beige SUBDUED ROSY TONES ARE THE LATEST NEUTRAL.

Match Maker Whatever paint color you crave, there’s a new tool to nail down the perfect shade. Enter ColorShop peel-and-stick paint samples. How it works: Online, paint-seekers select colors from top brands and the next day, extra-large samples coated in real paint arrive at their doorstep. Thanks to damage-free adhesive backing, samples conform to corners, adapt to textures and can easily be moved from room to room, or across different lighting exposures. Consider it a shortcut to color confidence—without the mess. colorshop.com

Farrow & Ball Bone 15

Bone 15

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Bone 15

BEYOND THE BEIGE PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BRANTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY, MALI AZIMA, PAIGE RUMORE. MATCH MAKER PHOTO: COURTESY COLORSHOP.

Maximalist color has gone mainstream in recent years, and the notion of “neutral” has evolved in turn. Just ask designer Nina Magon, who saw designing a bedroom at the 2021 Kips Bay Palm Beach Decorator Showhouse (top) as an opportunity to show the world that pink can be just as restful as the usual suspects. “Color is so important right now because it elicits emotions,” she muses, adding of Benjamin Moore’s Rosy Tan, “we wanted soft and cozy, and I think we nailed it.” Designer Stephanie Sabbe credits the success of this color family as a neutral canvas to its natural connotations. In her clients’ Nashville multipurpose room (bottom left), she used Benjamin Moore’s Pumice Stone, which nods to a sunbaked desert. Beyond sea and sky, “anything in earth tones is calming,” she insists. “For everyday living, surrounding yourself with fresh colors like these brings happiness,” chimes in designer Melanie Turner, who outfitted her clients’ Atlanta living room (bottom right) in Benjamin Moore’s golden Windswept Canyon. After decades of greige living, designers and clients are in agreement: dusty shades of peach, mauve, rust and rose offer a thrilling alternative.


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DOORMAN

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Stormy beginnings: Thirteen years ago, Alex Geriner, founder of furniture company Doorman, discovered an old cypress door that had been salvaged from Hurricane Katrina. Inspired, he repurposed it into a bed. Do the hustle: Geriner began selling other repurposed pieces, and soon, “It became this fun side hustle,” he says. Five years later, he fully committed to the company. Thinking global, staying local: Doorman is rooted in the Crescent City, but focuses on the bigger picture. “Home is more than just four walls and the roof. It’s the planet that we stand on,” he says. Beyond recycling: Geriner pivoted from repurposing old pieces (“reclaimed wood is hard to find these days,” he notes) to broader environmental initiatives such as working with nearby lumber mills that sustainably harvest trees and turning to renewable energy. “Solar power is about 80 to 90 percent of our production energy,” Geriner adds. Modern history: “We pay homage to the style of New Orleans,” says Geriner, “but we’re bringing it into the 21st century.”

photo: courtesy doorman.

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ARCHITECT: Matt Thomas BUILDER: Brimley Development PHOTO: Werner Segarra Photography Inc

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If you think your high standards for quality come at the expense of environmental friendliness, think again. Our seed-to-window approach to crafting world-class windows gives us control of every step, from how we manage our own wood supply to how we reduce waste by making use of everything. In other words, you can have your stylish cake, and eat it too, thanks to windows that never compromise. SierraPacificWindows.com 800-824-7744 A Division of

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Ahead of the curve: When Tracy Hiner launched Black Crow Studios, an art-driven custom wallpaper company, she set the path for the digitally printed mural companies that would follow in her footsteps. Doing more: “I was disillusioned with the luxury design industry,” she says. “Things happening in the world weren’t being addressed.” So Hiner started donating 20 percent of her Caliber Collection proceeds to a gun buy-back program. Rebellious streak: “I started thinking I could do this with all my collections,” she says. In 2019 the designer launched Rebel with a Cause, which she describes as a way to keep making art while making a difference. No limits: Hiner donates 50 percent of her personal profits to a range of charities. Each of her wallpaper collections is dedicated to a different cause, including justice programs, inner city arts and animal rescue. “I found charities that mean something to me,” she says. “I want to make the biggest impact.”

DUCHATEAU Soul searchers: In 2006, Benjamin Buzali and Misael Tagle started talking. They had noticed the difference between aged European hardwood floors versus that of new stained wood. “There’s a cannon to wood that’s changed over time,” explains Patrick Bewley, vice president of marketing. “There’s a soul to it.” Soon the luxury flooring company, DuChateau, was born. Thinking differently: DuChateau uses a combination of smoking, water bath and hand-scraping techniques, which not only creates the desired aged-inplace look, but it’s also sustainable. “We’ve always stayed away from formaldehyde and products with emissions,” explains Bewley. “And we’ve never used wood that’s illegally harvested.” Upping the ante: The company’s DuGood Initiative followed suit a decade later. “We were heartsick by the California wildfires,” says Bewley. In a partnership with the National Forest Foundation, DuChateau plants one tree for every floor sold. A portion of those trees goes to forests impacted by the wildfires. Fierce ambition: “We’ve planted more than 25,000 trees,” says Bewley. “Sustainability is our core value.”

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photos: courtesy black crow studios and duchateau.

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NOTABLES S O P H I ST I C AT E D.C U R AT E D. S T Y L I S H .

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GR AMERCY Gramercy’s attention to detail and curated style enable you to find the perfect pieces to make every room feel special. A stroll through this shop will leave you with a smile and greater appreciation for luxury home goods. shopgramercy.com

BILTMORE ® With more than 100 decorated trees, the sparkle of thousands of ornaments and an array of joyful and festive displays, Christmas at Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina, is the ultimate holiday experience for you and your family. biltmore.com/christmas

Whether you’re renovating a single room or building your dream home, Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery offers the best selection for every space. Your favorite brands are showcased in stunning displays, and a dedicated consultant will work with you one-on-one to help select the perfect products for your home. build.com/ferguson


699 Miami Circle, Atlanta, GA 30324 foxgloveantiques.com 404. 233. 0222


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DISCOVER CONNECT INSPIRE Onsite or online, Atlanta Market is here to help you discover new products, connect with new resources, and get inspired with emerging trends, fresh designs and industry insights. Housing the nation’s largest gift product mix complemented by a broad selection of home décor, Atlanta Market features more than 8,000 brands across all categories, including lighting, accent furniture, rugs, wall décor, casual furniture, linens and more. Restock, reenergize and rediscover your passion this January.

THE PREMIER GIFT, DÉCOR & LIFESTYLE MARKET

Hamza Chair by Arteriors

Debby Console by Global Views

Washington Round Coffee Table by Worlds Away Milton by Carrier and Company x Loloi

SIMPLICITY SPEAKS VOLUMES

LIA SHIN, Design Director C + H Interiors Atlanta, GA 770.455.9554 candhinteriorsatl.com candhinteriors

“I’m noticing an increased desire to see objects in the most refined and purified ways, using palettes of white and neutrals that swirl with botanicals and are infused with natural materials. The perfect blend of the inner and outer world captures the essence of this moment. It’s also an approach that can sway traditional or contemporary.” Shin’s Atlanta Market Anticipation: “I love to shop at JDouglas every market, for the amazing lines it represents. The showroom always looks so polished!”

VARIETY IN THE VISUAL

ASHLEY ROSS, Founder and Principal Muse Noire Interiors Charlotte, NC 704.625.6237 musenoire.com muse.noire.interiors

“Visual texture evokes curiosity, encouraging the viewer to interact with something beyond the sense of sight. After 18-plus months of socially distancing ourselves, I am excited to discover this trend that makes me want to get up close and personal with design! I’m seeing this in cane backing, hair-on-hides in the most unusual places and a sculptural approach to everyday furniture—that is no longer limited to accessories.” Ross’ Atlanta Market Anticipation: “This will be my first AmericasMart event, and I am thrilled to visit new showrooms, but I’m equally excited to find out if Leftbank Art carries the party over from High Point to Atlanta!”

Atlanta Market is open to the trade only, January 11 to 18, 2022. Register online at AtlantaMarket.com


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Finn Throw by Pom Pom at Home

Moroccan End Table by Chelsea House

Mister M Red and Yellow Disc Floor Lamp by Currey & Company

Avalon by Azzurro Living, available at CODARUS

APRIL TOMLIN, Founder April Tomlin Interiors Nashville, TN 423.424.6664 apriltomlin.com apriltomlininteriors

SANCTUARY IS IN

BOLD POPS OF COLOR

“Now, more than ever, your home needs to be your haven. Whether it be a functional nook where your children are inspired to both work and play, an outdoor living space that is an extension of your home or a peaceful spot to which you can retreat for some much-needed solace at the end of a busy day, being intentional about creating spaces that speak to your needs and designs is essential.”

“Go big or go home, I say! Bold pops of color are making an appearance everywhere. From case goods to lighting, splashes of brighter shades are making a statement in every facet of the industry. One of my personal favorite ways to add it into a space is through lighting. Not only is it an attention grabber, but also, it can act as a piece of art. It’s like a two-for-one special!”

EVAN MILLARD, Co-Founder and Principal Modern Remains Nashville, TN 615.730.9068 modernremains.com modernremains

Showrooms: Tuesday, January 11 – Tuesday, January 18, 2022 Temporaries: Wednesday, January 12 – Sunday, January 16, 2022

Millard’s Atlanta Market Anticipation: “I’m looking forward to visiting the showrooms for Chelsea House and Currey & Company, but I also always stop by Dixon Rye in Westside Ironworks when in Atlanta.”

Register Today at AtlantaMarket.com @AmericasMartATL | #AtlMkt




P R O M O T I O N

| NATIO NAL |

DISCOVERIES FRESH.DESIGN.FINDS.

CIRCA LIGHTING In this ornamental series by Julie Neill, the Talia presents ripples of light that dance through handblown glass orbs. Its sculptural presence results in a radiant transformation for any design scheme. circalighting.com

ARCADIA CUSTOM Arcadia Custom offers limitless design options through its three product lines: the timeless elegance of Steel, the modern profile of Aluminum or the distinct craftsmanship of Wood. Bring custom windows and doors home, with Arcadia Custom. arcadiacustom.com

SUN VALLEY BRONZE The handmade, sand-cast barn door track from Sun Valley Bronze is offered in white or silicon bronze and brass in 12 beautiful, hand-applied finishes. Standard and custom lengths are available. Made in the United States. Price upon request. sunvalleybronze.com

MATOUK Feather features an exquisite combination of appliqué and embroidery, applied on Matouk’s finest 1,000-thread-count Giza Egyptian cotton percale. matouk.com


P R O M O T I O N

THE CONTAINER STORE Built-in beauty, LED lighting and push-to-open drawers—you can have it all. Discover the effortless functionality that only Avera Custom Closets from The Container Store deliver. Schedule your free virtual, in-store or in-home design consultation today. containerstore.com/custom-closets

SCANDIA HOME Bringing the best of European-style comfort into homes for 50 years, Scandia Home is committed to superior comfort, uncompromising quality, enduring style and a total white-glove experience. Its down products are the luxury standard. Discover where the difference lies, at Scandia Home. scandiahome.com

INCEPTION SHADES BY J GEIGER From the makers of J Geiger, Inception Shades offers premium hardware, versatile automation options and sleek profiles without visible wires or screws. Better still, its shades can be installed quickly—faster than any other shade on the market. Learn more on the website. inceptionshades.com

NEW MOON The Laseda rug in Tibetan wool and Chinese silk is a hand-knotted piece by New Moon. It features a moody palette of sumptuous charcoal, taupe and platinum silk on a field of ivory Tibetan wool. It is the ultimate in luxury underfoot. Price upon request. newmoonrugs.com



MARKET MATERIAL

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Explore designer-crafted mood boards, modern collectibles worthy of display and exclusive hangouts to make your own.


MATERIAL MARKET

Set the Mood TASTEMAKERS DREAM UP FRESH INSPIRATION BOARDS.

photo: william and susan brinson.

P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N A N D S A R A H S H E LT O N

ECLECTIC MIX CRISTINA CASAÑAS-JUDD AND GENERAL JUDD, MEANDGENERALDESIGN.COM Clockwise from top left: Marisol Fabric in Midnight by Radish Moon / johnrosselli.com. Chilean small clay pottery on string. Chilean handwoven tapestry. Maple Flooring in Ebony / nydreeflooring.com. Esker Weave in Navy/Cream and Jadestone by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa / kravet.com. Matrix Tape in Black / fschumacher.com. Perch Vinyl Wallcovering in Smokey by Me and General / wolfgordon.com. 1950s Braun Colorette Camera. Background: Echo Vinyl Wallcovering in Taupe by Me and General / wolfgordon.com.

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MASTERCOOL

P R E S E R V I N G T H E TA S T E O F N AT U R E REDEFINE PERFECTION

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MATERIAL

photo: julia lynn.

MARKET

SOUTHERN CHARM ANGIE HRANOWSKY, ANGIEHRANOWSKY.COM Clockwise from top left: Club Yellow Linen / fermoie.com. Emile Velvet in Leaf Green by Jane Churchill / cowtan.com. Khemarin Silk in Muted Clay / jimthompsonfabrics.com. Fontainebleu Rug by Doug and Gene Meyer / hollandandsherry.com. Sunrise Fabric in Spice by Larsen / cowtan.com. Satchel Linen / fermoie.com. Café Brush Fringe in Toast / kerryjoyce.com. Necklace / jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Brolo Tile / walkerzanger.com. Singita Wallpaper in Green by Lee Jofa / kravet.com. Brinjal No. 222 Paint Sample / farrow-ball.com. Background: Ashante Fabric in Cinnamon / alamwar.com.

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D E N A LI , I VO RY/ I ND I GO

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800. 863.0 4 4 2


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photo: chris dibble.

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AMERICAN DREAM MAX HUMPHREY, MAXHUMPHREY.COM Clockwise from top left: Gingham Window Covering in Black; Grain Sack Window Covering; Gingham Window Covering in Gold and Cross Window Covering in Charcoal, all by Max Humphrey / hartmannforbes.com. Swiss Cross Tiles in Bright White Matte and Lapis Gloss / annsacks.com. Text Message Fabric in Newsprint / pollackassociates.com. Flag Fabric in 001 / fermoie.com. Carpet Slipper Linen / fermoie.com. Backdrop: Floral Stripe in Moss by Max Humphrey / chasingpaper.com.

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E X P E R I E N C E

V I S U A L

C O M F O R T

SERAFINA SMALL TIERED SCONCE I N H A N D - R U B B E D A N T I Q U E B R A S S A N D C R Y S TA L DESIGNER: AERIN

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MATERIAL

photo: jasmine anwer.

MARKET

WARM EMBRACE JEAN LIU, JEANLIUDESIGN.COM Clockwise from top left: Allora Leathers in Phantom Gray, Southern Alps and Moon Walk / cortinaleathers.com. Corcea White Oak Flooring / legnobastone.com. Onyx Brioche Stone / stone.boutique. Ginger Mohair in Foxtrot Cream by Donghia / kravet.com. Concrete Basin Sample in Brick / kastconcretebasins.com. Toile de Terrain Fabric in Clay / brookperdigontextiles.com. Tropea White Oak Flooring / legnobastone.com. Mariner Fabric in Rust / loriweitzner.com. Shaye Field Tiles in White/Pink / annsacks.com. Handcrafted Tile / bddw.com. Glaze Sample / natanmoss.com. Duval Jute Tape in Ivory / fschumacher.com. Handcrafted Tile / bddw.com. Rope Sample / windychien.com. Backdrop: Artist Canvas Linen in Terracotta / us.delecuona.com.

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Moto Collection by Ann Marie Vering

BOSTON

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COSTA MESA

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Delray Beach, FL | $12,500,000 Premier Estate Properties Inc. Pascal Liguori — +1 866 502 5441 WEB ID: BSPK8

Finding your home is a personal process of discovery, and the accomplished global network of Luxury Portfolio International® member companies are ready to assist in the journey. Explore over 50,000 of the world’s finest properties marketed on luxuryportfolio.com each year. Enter the property Web ID for more detail.

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©2021 Luxury Portfolio International.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Offering is subject to errors, omissions, change of price, or withdrawal without notice. All information considered reliable; however, it has been supplied by third parties and should not be relied on as accurate or complete.


Did you hear? Members-only social clubs are making a comeback. WRITTEN AND PRODUCED B Y S A R A H S H E LT O N

Bougie Beachside The Boca Raton hotel is back and better than ever. Originally built by famed architect Addison Mizner in the 1920s, the South Florida ocean-facing luxury resort and beach club’s recent remodel and rebrand marks the return of the golden era of R&R. The Flamingo Grill, pictured here, was concepted by the restaurant gurus from Major Food Group and is exclusively open to club and resort guests only. thebocaraton.com

Clockwise from top right: Pluma Tilia Eau De Nil Lampshade with Flamingo Lampstand / $2,355 / houseofhackney.com. Le Palmeraie Wallpaper in Crème / Price upon request / pierrefrey.com. Stella Minaudière in Pale Pink / $675 / rafe.com. Bembo Side Table in Leather Mint / Price upon request / oriorfurniture.com. Livingston Barstool by Egg Designs / $2,450 / ngalatrading.com. The Delray and The Nightingale Cushions / $311 each / evieandskye.com. Water Stem Glass in Green / $180 / emporiosirenuse.com.

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PHOTO: THE BOCA RATON.

TREND MARKET

MEMBERS ONLY



TREND MARKET

City Respite

Clockwise from top right: Noir Moon Marble Slap / $60 per square foot / artistictile.com. Luna Kaleido Series / From $2,800 / gabriel-scott.com. Reynaux Curve Dining Side Chair / From $633 / rh.com. Ledge Console / Price upon request / simonjohns.com. Cape Cod Watch / $7,375 / hermes.com. On Reflection Candle and Crystal Holder / $249 / leebroom.com. Hanna Mirror / $1,090 / arteriorshome.com.

PHOTO: NATALIE BLACK.

One of the buzziest new Manhattan hot spots to mingle, dine and network at is Scott Sartiano’s Zero Bond. Founded as “a community of contemporary forward thinkers,” the 20,000-square-foot NoHo loft dates back to 1818 and, while boasting modern interiors by Studio Sofield, there are references to the city’s rich cultural DNA, with original art by Keith Haring and Andy Warhol hanging on the walls. zerobondny.com

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Hip Hideaway

Clockwise from top right: Graduated Faceted Sunstone Beaded Necklace / $2,375 / jacquieaiche.com. Soria Tile in Camel/Umber and Tenerife Tile in Sahara/Cognac / From $19.16 per square foot / granadatile.com. Roree Boots in Natural / $990 / isabelmarant.com. Ceramic Ridged Stool in Tuscan Orange / $1,440 for set of two / seasonalliving.com. Cove Sofa in Clay / $4,245 / fredrigbystudio.com. Aster Blanket by Senem Oezdogan / $217 / zigzagzurich.com. Ceramic Disc Orb Pendant in Green Clay and Oxide Red / 1,450 / incommonwith.com incommonwith.com.

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PHOTO: CRISTINA FISHER.

Soho House, the British-born club that was established in 1995, has put down roots on Austin’s South Congress Avenue, making it the brand’s first-ever Lone Star State property. With houses around the globe, this location offers a Texas-modern vibe with a mix of contemporary Spanish aesthetics. The new build boasts a third-floor terrace, shown here, a rooftop pool, dining, drinking and lounge spaces, 46 bedrooms, a cinema, and a music room, to boot. sohohouse.com


the serrano collection rugs that inspire feizy.com


Teak Warehouse has been manufacturing and supplying luxury outdoor furniture to architects, designers, landscapers, hotels, resorts, and private residences for over 25 years. All products are in stock, fully assembled, and available for nationwide delivery. Sunbrella® cushions are free with deep seating purchases as shown on our website.

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SPOTLIGHT MARKET

Cabinet of Curiosities EXPLORE THIS SEASON’S COLLECTION OF OPULENT OBJETS. P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N A N D S A R A H S H E LT O N P H O T O G R A P H E D BY W I L L I A M A N D S U S A N B R I N S O N

EARTHLY DELIGHTS Formed millions of years ago, Studio Greytak’s geological masterpieces artfully juxtapose the elaborate ornamentation of a French curio cabinet from ABC Home. Malachite Botryoidal on Pink Cast Glass Base (top) and Colombian Quartz on Cast Bronze (bottom) are created first by Mother Nature and then composed by Montana’s John Greytak. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and an example of how pressure can produce stunning results. studiogreytak.com; abchome.com


MARBLED MARVELS Michigan-based maker Erika Stefanutti, founder of Parvum Opus, describes her hand-marbled paper obelisks, architectural models and shadow boxes as “aesthetically pleasing collector’s objects fit for a Wunderkammer.” Inspired by the Grand Tour era when travelers would acquire mementos from far-away places, the objets are a testament to how tangible items act as visual reminders of memorable experiences while also celebrating the spirit of handmade craft. Here, a grouping of marbled finds is displayed in an early20th-century glass-front cabinet from Brooklyn-based City Foundry. parvumopus.com; cityfoundry.com

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SPOTLIGHT MARKET

EXISTENTIAL EXPRESSION Like many creatives before him, fashion designer-turned-artist Rogan Gregory looked to the female being as muse for his “Fertility Form” series. The stainless steel and bronze sculptures—nestled in an antique velvet-lined cabinet from ABC Home—are made of multiple parts stacked together and represent the many different cycles of life. These pieces, along with the salt & pepper shaker set (bottom center), exemplify Gregory’s focus on lines, proportion and asymmetrical harmony. r-and-company.com; abchome.com


NATURAL WONDERS En masse or on their own, Creel and Gow’s Stone and Mineral Spheres captivate, as do the many other exotic finds in the Upper East Side’s treasure-trove storefront. Ranging from rock crystal and zebra agate to green fluorite and orange calcite, each sphere is mounted on custom brass stands in varying heights. Seen here in an oak cabinet from antique purveyor Olde Good Things, the colorful, solid globes beg to be collected and arranged. creelandgow.com; ogtstore.com

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SPOTLIGHT MARKET

ALL AGLOW From the classic Hurricane to the towering Leech Bowl—named after the medicinal crawler the vessels were designed to hold in British apothecaries in the 18th and 19th centuries— KRB owner Kate Rheinstein Brodsky commissioned these eye-catching glass forms in vibrant colors (shown here in amber, amethyst and brilliant blue) to delight modern collectors. Perched on the Leech Bowl is a papier-mâché snake by artist Mark Gagnon, and all objects rest atop a midcentury wood cabinet from Olde Good Things. krbnyc.com; ogtstore.com


BEGUILING BLOOMS Elizabeth Hayt’s whimsical floral creations stem from the natural world, yet nod to escapism, Surrealism and Art Nouveau influences. Made of brass, velvet, vintage millinery and Swarovski crystals, the maximalist, colorful Roses and Lilies add a jolt of playfulness to a vintage brushed-steel apothecary cabinet sourced by City Foundry. elizabethhayt.net; cityfoundry.com Cosima velvet by Colefax & Fowler throughout, cowtan.com

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Textures Nashville Showroom

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510 Merritt Ave, Nashville, TN 37203

Featuring our 3/4” Rift & Quarter White Oak

(615) 228-2922

Select & Character Mix, 3” X 24” Herringbone,

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Light Wire Brush, Custom Color, and 20 Sheen

@textures_nashville

Conversion Varnish. Design by Lilly Taylor Interiors. Photography by Caroline Sharpnack.


LIVING KITCHEN

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REPORT

The season of festivity calls for dining table artistry and imagining today’s cultivated kitchen.


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photos: emily followill.

LIVING KITCHEN

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BATH


The Cultivated Kitchen A TAILORED SPACE DESIGNED FOR FUNCTIONALITY IS THE ULTIMATE LUXURY. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N


BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

BON APPÉTIT “This is a legitimate cook’s kitchen, but it doesn’t necessarily look like one,” explains Harrison Design’s Karen Ferguson of the area she designed for a serious Atlanta-based home chef. With the client’s wish list in hand—sous vide, induction cooktop, steam oven, compost bin and more—Ferguson set about understanding how her client would use these features to deliver a dream kitchen.

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The design scheme started with a dynamic quarter-figured sycamore wood wall, which conceals appliances like the refrigerator, freezer and juice bar. To warm up the space and continue the organic feel, Ferguson opted for an oak island with delicate walnut dovetail details and a handsome butcher block. She added walnut hardware throughout for cohesiveness. Varying the materials palette, the designer incorporated patinated metal for the hood, cabinetry and backsplash, which also hides a storage compartment.

But the pièce de resistance is a custom glass panel flanking the range that features gold wallpaper and fabric on the backside— a decorative focal point in the room. Notes of rose gold and brass in the fittings and finishing details balance the gray tones and brighten up the space. Ferguson’s best advice for a flawless kitchen is to ensure client conversations about functionality happen upfront. “Tell me how you plan to live and cook in the space, and then I can show you how to use it beautifully,” she says. harrisondesign.com

photos: emily followill.

In an Atlanta kitchen, Harrison Design’s Karen Ferguson worked with Block & Chisel on the cabinetry and included Fusion Blue Quartzite on the countertops. A Wolf range, rose gold Dornbracht faucets and Lutron shades complete the look.


Leather Shown: Notting Hill Tomato Location: The Chloe Hotel, New Orleans, LA Designer: Sara Ruffin Costello


For the latest and greatest in dishwasher technology, look no further than Miele’s new G 5000 line. The high-performance series offers an AutoOpen function that leaves the door slightly ajar at the end of the program to ensure excellent drying for plastics and glassware. Interior baskets can be continuously moved around and repositioned, and an optional third rack is ideal for cleaning cutlery. It’s offered in a 24-inch size and as well as an 18-inch model for smaller spaces or secondary kitchens. mieleusa.com

SMART & STYLISH

Sub-Zero’s Designer Series Undercounter Refrigeration allows for easy customization when integrating these appliances into a space. The 24-inch Wine Storage and Beverage Center units, shown, feature integrated door hinges and toe kicks for a seamless, sleek look. Plus, Wi-Fi enabled options allow for remote temperature controls and alerts when someone leaves the door open. subzero-wolf.com

PURE VISION

Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen has combined form and function for a classic kitchen staple: the countertop container. The sandblasted oak-andblack ceramic vessels are perfect for storing favorite ingredients, slicing bread on the lid, or simply displaying on the counter to enjoy. marchsf.com

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PHOTOS: COURTESY RESPECTIVE COMPANIES.

BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

WASHED UP


DESIGN

T H AT

INSPIRES.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE • INTERIOR DESIGN HILTON HEAD | BLUFFTON | SAVANNAH courtatkins.com | 843.815.2557


BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

Known for his minimal yet spirited and artistic expression, French architect Jean Nouvel launched a new design with Danish kitchen company Reform. A play of light and dark, the Reflect collection includes delicately fluted cabinets that are available in metal or black with a high-gloss treatment while the countertops come in a range of materials including stainless steel. This straightforward yet considered approach makes for a beautiful collaboration. reformcph.com

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photo: courtesy reform.

MOOD BOOSTER


BRING YOUR VISION TO US The experts at Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery are here to help create a home that’s as extraordinary as you are. Any project, any style, any dream—bring your inspiration to Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery. Visit build.com/ferguson to schedule your personalized showroom experience today.

YOUR LOCAL SHOWROOM: BUCKHEAD ALPHARETTA FAYETTEVILLE

©2021 Ferguson Enterprises LLC 0821 2902829

Calumn 4 light Chandelier


BATH +

Boffi

SILVIA FRIGERIO, Managing Director “For me, the key word is ‘tailor-made,’ which is something I come back to every time I design a kitchen. When working on this Los Angeles project, I requested a list of the appliances the homeowners use daily, as they are avid cooks, and then incorporated pocket doors to conceal small appliances, double ovens and a coffee machine. The result is both sculptural and modern.” boffi.com

Snaidero

REBA SAMS, Designer

Bakes & Kropp

MARY DIMICHIN, Senior Designer “The range wall is a focal point in this Long Island, New York, kitchen, so we selected walnut drawer fronts and polished metal details to encourage the eye to that area. Wood is a nice contrast to the white cabinetry without being too harsh. Don’t overlook these finishing touches, along, of course, with storage!” bakesandkropp.com

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“Today’s designs are about fluid spaces that flow from the kitchen into other living areas, as open floor plans remain a popular request from clients. This Arizona space reflects the ideology of the kitchen as part of the dining room and living room. Modern clean lines with handless cabinetry and fully integrated appliances that look like cabinetry create a seamless appearance.” snaidero-usa.com

snaidero photo: jeff zaruba. boffi photo: marco petrini. bakes & kropp photo: courtesy bakes & kropp.

RENOVATING YOUR SPACE? THREE PROS SHARE WHAT TO KEEP TOP OF MIND.

LIVING

KITCHEN

KITCHEN UPGRADE


Furniture • Rugs • Accessories • Lighting • Art • Interiors

Atlanta

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Spanish Fort


REPORT THE

photo: courtesy sarah espeute.

LIVING

“Entertaining has become more intimate and personal,” says artist-designer Sarah Espeute, whose hand-embroidered table linens depict playful tableaus of shared meals. “Above all,” she adds, “there’s a desire for novelty now—a wish to travel through the table—hence the word ‘tablescape!’ ”

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Food for Thought TRANSPORTIVE TABLETOPS ARE THE NEW BEATING HEART OF THE HOME. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY G R AC E B E U L E Y H U N T


REPORT THE LIVING

TABLE TALK

Artist Sarah Espeute doesn’t take setting the table too seriously. Just look to the chorus of snails, turnips, wildflowers and the like, which flit between hand-stitched place settings on her whimsical linens. From a shared studio space in Marseille, France, Espeute embroiders these convivial scenes on thrifted, often century-old bed sheets conceived anew.

For Espeute, the joy in her chosen medium lies in its dualisms—her linens are nostalgic and modern; dressy and lighthearted; decorative and utilitarian. She admires blurred boundaries in design. “Multidisciplinary artists with a broad practice have reinforced the idea that there is no limit in creation,” she says, citing the work of painters like Cy Twombly and Raoul Ubac, and the architecture of Luis Barragán and Carlo Scarpa, amongst others, as inspirations. While a multidisciplinary artist herself (Espeute designs furniture and paints), there’s something about the handmade character of embroidery— and the act of gathering around the dining table—that comforts and captivates her imagination. “I think embroidery really touches people,” she muses, adding, “it’s wonderfully sentimental.” oeuvres-sensibles.fr

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table talk photos: courtesy sarah espeute. french lessons photos: matthieu salvaing, courtesy rizzoli. the huntress photo: sofi perazzo.

Like many strokes of ingenuity, Oeuvres Sensibles (meaning “sensitive objects”), Espeute’s line of tablecloths, runners and napkins, was born from necessity. Coveting unique cushions and curtains for her own home, she turned inward, resourcefully picking up an embroidery needle—and the stars aligned. When a friend gauged her interest in creating a tabletop textile for an art exhibition, “I imagined a trompe l’oeil meal and things took off from there!” she recalls.


FRENCH LESSONS

Dior Maison artistic director Cordelia de Castellane has catalogued her flair for hosting in a new book: Life In A French Country House: Entertaining For All Seasons (Rizzoli). Previewing the bounty of inspiration within, here, de Castellane shares two of her signature moves for a sui generis fête. On linens. I love to order embroidered vintage tablecloths on eBay and dye them in my washing machine. How cool is it to have formal linens dyed a shocking hot pink? Contradiction keeps design interesting.

A tabletop vignette displays de Castellane’s maximalist tendencies. “The Saint-Louis crystal glasses and Clichy vases set the stage for this winter table—I even cheated by dipping certain flowers in dye!” she notes.

THE HUNTRESS

“My grandmother used to set the most impeccable tables,” recalls Federika Longinotti Buitoni. “To this day, I remember the gorgeous ceramic parrots she used as centerpieces, and the homemade clementine ice cream that she served on perfectly carved clementine skin. I learned never to underestimate the details, as this is often all people remember.” With such early-seeded reverence for the art of entertaining, the fact that Longinotti Buitoni grew up to found Collecto—a retailer dedicated to aggregating the finest tabletop wares from around the globe—is apropos. Traversing Italy for delicate glassware, France for Limoges porcelain and Mexico for handmade pottery, Longinotti Buitoni is building a veritable melting pot of luxury, artisan-driven homewares, with a new service wing offering bespoke, soup-to-nuts dining and kitchenware curation. Grandmother, we posit, would approve. collectoworld.com

On decor. You don’t need flowers to create an exciting centerpiece. In summer, I’ll fashion a runner out of ripe tomatoes only. For the holidays, I’ll fill crystal bowls with colorful candies. And there is no more beautiful focal point than candles—lots and lots of them in different shapes and sizes.


REPORT THE LIVING

ART OF THE EDIT STYLIST MIEKE TEN HAVE DISHES ON ENTERTAINING AU COURANT.

Trick for charming guests: My mother always serves a little bit of soup in a teacup or finger bowl as an hors d’oeuvre. I think it’s such a clever and a fun way to repurpose tableware that isn’t used very often anymore—and more interesting than cheese and crackers! Finds you’re crushing on now: I collect a lot of antique plates, but my contemporary Alberto Pinto faux bois chargers are a favorite. While a classic motif, the scale makes them look more modern than grand-mère. I almost always reach for colored glassware—amethyst, emerald and aquamarines are my go-tos. And nobody does unique block prints like Gregory Parkinson. His colors are so luscious and interesting. Always in your pantry: I have tapers in every color of the rainbow. I mix them up seasonally and according to the table’s scheme. Hosting faux pas: Serving dinner too late. On Mieke’s holiday table: Gregory Parkinson’s hand-loomed pine zest ikat napkins (top), Pinto Paris’ faux bois buffet plate (center), Nason Moretti’s Idra twisted striped water glass (above) and vintage crystal-and-sterling swan salt and pepper wells from Chairish (right).

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Best hostess gift: Not arriving early! Go-to for mixing things up: It’s fun to dine in an unexpected area, like a little card table in the living room. Moving locations introduces a feeling of novelty and excitement.

PORTRAIT: DONNA DOTAN. GOBLET: COURTESY ARTEMEST. PLATE: JACQUES PÉPION. NAPKINS: COURTESY GREGORY PARKINSON. SALT SHAKERS: COURTESY CHAIRISH. DREAM WEAVING PHOTO: COURTESY MALAIKA.

Advice for a spirited table: I focus on the mix of patterns and styles more than anything else. I have a collection of tableware, textiles and decorative objects (fanciful salt cellars, for example) and I love to use them in interesting combinations, particularly mixing aesthetic eras and cultures. I don’t like when tables are too “pretty.” There should be contrast.


Atop Malaika’s hand-printed Carnation place mat and flanked by the delicately embroidered Julia napkin rests a new pottery plate produced for the brand by artisans in the village of Tunis in Fayoum.

DREAM WEAVING

“From the outset, we were determined to create a business model with social impact,” says Goya Gallagher, who alongside Margarita Andrade, co-founded Malaika—a Cairo-based atelier championing traditional Egyptian crafts. At launch, the company covered embroidery tuition for local women, but the mission expanded with their retail success. In 2018, the pair opened Threads Of Hope, a free trade school, which trains community members for Malaika employment.

In both motif and materiality, the brand’s offerings—from silk-screened place mats to intricately stitched napkins and handmade pottery—celebrate the abundance of Egypt’s natural and cultural history. Ultimately, they hope this cycle of preserving heritage craft extends beyond the hands that create, down to the consumer. Notes Gallagher, “every piece in our collection has been carefully designed as a timeless family heirloom to pass on for generations to come.” malaikalinens.com


The Pet-Friendly Boutique Hotel where

Sophistication and Gracious Hospitality Reach New Heights

844.480.2534 Highlands, NC theparkonmain.com 2108.067


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In every issue, the Southeast edition of Luxe Interiors + Design showcases the CREATIVITY AND DIVERSITY of Atlanta, Birmingham, Charleston, Charlotte and Nashville design. We celebrate the communities of designers and architects, artisans and manufacturers, retailers and showrooms all over the state who honor the Southeast’s history while driving innovation. With this in mind, we are recognizing the professionals and businesses that champion Luxe Interiors + Design. Through our pages, digital channels and events platform, we highlight the importance of great design, provide resources and new opportunities to support our partners, and honor our SHARED COMMITMENT TO THE SOUTHEAST, the storyteller of the American design industry. Take in the beauty of design with SOUTHEAST: A SOUTHERN STATE OF DESIGN.

Inaugural Partners: ADAC | Elizabeth Ferguson Design | Kelly Caron Designs Nashville Design Collective


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BELOVED BRANDS Over the years, ADAC has drawn in the most coveted and influential industry movers. Here are a few of the legendary brands it carries: • Ainsworth-Noah • Century Furniture • Ernest Gaspard & Associates • Jerry Pair • Kravet • Schumacher • Theodore Alexander

EXPLORE + ATTEND

ADAC

404.231.1720 | adacatlanta.com |

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When one discusses southern design, it is impossible to forego mention of the region’s preeminent design center: ADAC. Celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, the Atlanta institution has been changing the landscape of design since architect and developer John C. Portman, Jr., established it in 1961. Since it opened that year, it has evolved from two one-story buildings to several buildings with multiple floors and a grand atrium. It has become known not only as a resource for the industry to shop, but also a place for networking and learning. Designers, architects and builders use ADAC as their personal sample library (with 26 basing their studios there). The rest of the design mecca’s 550,000-square-foot campus houses more than 65 showrooms with furniture, fabrics, rugs, lighting and more, and two restaurants. Altogether, these spaces play host to more

To experience the best of ADAC, one should consider the showrooms and products they want to explore, but also the events. “Each year, we host signature industry presentations, celebrity and media happenings, networking opportunities and more, but two events define our annual calendar: DESIGN ADAC and DISCOVER ADAC,” says the center’s general manager, Katie Miner. “The first takes place in the spring and the second in the fall, but each is equally exciting for ADAC and the industry as a whole. From panels and presentations to major product launch announcements, there is so much to discover about design during our annual three-day markets.”

than 150 events each year. It’s the center of the design world in the Southeast, indeed.

“The power of design is everlasting. We look forward to inspiring and encouraging the next generation of creatives in the Southeast.”

IN A LEAGUE OF LEGACY In November of 2018, ADAC was acquired by International Market Centers (IMC) and its parent company, Blackstone. IMC is the largest operator of premier showroom space for the furnishings, home decor and gift industries.


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Top left A fourth and fifth floor, as well as an atrium design, were incorporated in 1982. The then-new skylight-filled roof brought natural light to the living walls ADAC is known for today. Top right The iconic sculpture, South Music by Angel Orensanz, was installed on the campus in 2007. It has become a beacon for which the design center is recognized. Bottom In 1978, the second and third floor were added and the garage created. Opposite top In 2021, ADAC cerebrates 60 years of creativity, collaboration and design. Opposite bottom One of John C. Portman, Jr.’s first ventures, ADAC opened in 1961 as a two-building complex, with brick screens in front of each structure. Photography Courtesy of ADAC


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“Southeastern style is classic and timeless, yet mixed with a clean, modern edge.”

VISIONS OF THE SOUTH Sprawling estates on rich fields of grain, wraparound porches, sloping staircases, large windows and Greek-inspired columns … when one thinks of home in the South, such images come to mind. “These do play a role in our work,” Buffy says. “As for interior design, the tone is hospitable and engaged in telling the story of the inhabitants.” A commonly shared love of gardening, cooking and sharing the fruits of that labor leaves its impressions, she notes. “You can see this in many of my own kitchen layouts, which lend themselves to big meals and entertaining.”

RICH HISTORY + TREASURED MUSES Buffy shares some of her top sources of inspiration.

ELIZABETH FERGUSON DESIGN 706.773.3295 | elizabethfergusondesign.com |

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Upon being asked to describe design in the Southeast, Elizabeth Ferguson’s answer is poetic. “Our region is set apart by talented designers who seamlessly create authentic environments where people will gather to celebrate. They are retreats with personality and warmth, where friends come together, families are raised and the beauty of everyday life unfolds.” The designer, who goes by “Buffy,” would know. Born and raised in Newnan, Georgia, she would later attend University of Georgia for fashion merchandising and then Auburn University for apparel and textile design, before opening her namesake firm in West Point. Of her decision to settle in that particular locale, she says, “It allows me to experience the joy of small-town hospitality, but easily access all of the design resources in Atlanta.” And such is the magic of the whole region; no matter how much global influence it gains, the South never loses its quaint charm.

•T he Swan House in Atlanta, built in 1928 •K ing + Duke and St. Cecilia in Atlanta, two gorgeous restaurants designed by Auburn graduates Will Meyer and Gray Davis •B obby McAlpine’s poetic architectural style ntiques and Garden Show •A of Nashville • I nstagram accounts like @betsybrowninc, @schumacher1889, @thedesignatelier and @hollandmacrae


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Top This Lake Rabun sun room is sure to become the favorite gathering place. Left In a Newnan, Georgia, home, this family gathering spot is on the terrace level. Right A casual dining space embraces stunning Lake Rabun views. Opposite top Neutral in color but rich in textures, this primary bath is warm, inviting, relaxing. Opposite bottom Varying textures and visual interest lend this Nashville primary bedroom a total sense of retreat. Photography Top & right by Marc Mauldin; Left by Emily Followill; Opposite top & bottom by Gieves Anderson


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“Hospitality must be in the heart of every styled Southern home.”

MIX + MATCH À LA LOWCOUNTRY “We are using a lot of mixed materials right now,” Caron says. “We’re resourcing traditional elements, like tabby and oysters, in a more sophisticated way. We also incorporate various finishes and styles to craft light fixtures that feel refined but very Lowcountry, and large porch overhangs and outdoor living spaces continue to define the region.” The designer also practices eclecticism in her preference for old versus new. “Even if the client wants most everything to be new, we still need a moment of charm—an old chair, chest or the like. There is too much history in the South to ignore such details!”

FABULOUS FUTURE

KELLY CARON DESIGNS 843.815.4737 | kellycarondesigns.com |

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Tucked into the Lowcountry region, just north of Savannah, there is Kelly Caron Designs. Known for traditional interiors with a modern, coastal twist, the firm is, in some ways, a reflection of its namesake’s storied Southern background. “I’m from Boone, North Carolina, a small town rich with history,” Kelly Caron says. “But my family vacationed in the Bluffton/Hilton Head/Sea Island region throughout my childhood. I love both areas equally, but I ended up in Bluffton.” It’s proven the best of both worlds for her creative mind, as it connects to High Country mountains and Lowcountry waterways alike. “Nature is my ultimate inspiration,” she elaborates. “The colors and textures, and how they shift on the journey from mountains to the coast, influence me greatly.” Architecture, too, is a muse. As of late, emphasis on the grand fireplace mantel is a signature feature in trending design concepts by Caron.

Upon being asked what she’s excited about for her firm’s next few years, Caron says, “We are planning an online interior design boutique, Vanity at Home. The name stems from my belief that your home should be fabulous always and you should be proudly vain about that!”


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Top Diverse yet complementary finishes frame a circular upholstered booth and table in this modern seaside kitchen. Left By blending textured materials and coastal color palettes, the KCD team elevates the role of fireplace hearth and mantel in this outdoor paradise. Right Seamless design transcends windows and doors, with an understated outdoor living elegance that melds perfectly with the spectacular ocean backdrop. Opposite KCD creates in tandem with refined, Southern-style architectural details. Here, lofty ceilings pair with a warm, welcoming palette. Photography Lisa Staff Photography


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“Southeastern style is rooted in tradition, but we are breaking the rules left and right! We mix high and low, old and new, and modernize 100-year-old homes.”

TO DRIVE CREATIVITY Quinn sheds light on his local (and online) musts. •H appenings: The Antiques and Garden Show of Nashville is handsdown a favorite for sources of unlimited inspiration and interesting panels. We also love Scott Antique Markets in Atlanta, and of course, High Point is always a highlight! •F eeds: We enjoy many great Southeast-centric Instagram accounts. @bungalowclassic, @amiecorleyinteriors and @sarahbartholomewdesign are must-follows. Also, some NDC talent is on there: @robinrainsinteriordesign and @robinrainsantiques!

NASHVILLE DESIGN COLLECTIVE 415.254.2510 | nashvilledesigncollective.com |

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Within the up-and-coming and creative Wedgewood-Houston (WeHo) neighborhood of Nashville, one can find quite a few unique design showrooms. And 14 of them are a part of Nashville Design Collective. Led by co-owners Anne Puricelli and Matthew Quinn, who established it after recognizing their desire to join forces in all things design, the center boasts 50,000 square feet on more than 2 acres. “Our husbands may have needed a little convincing over a few bottles of wine, but now, what was once an old mop factory is a vibrant space where industry pros find inspiration in many a lovely brand,” Puricelli says. Indeed, from Artistic Tile and Circa Lighting to Peacock Alley, the offering is luminous. That’s a good thing, because Music City only grows as a design mecca of the South. Quinn notes, “We are seeing transplants from California, New York and Chicago, who are bringing a fresh wave of energy and talent.”

DIXIELAND LEANINGS “The South is typically defined by traditional, stately Southern architecture and design,” Puricelli shares. “Think columns and chintz! But we are so much more. The modern South pays homage to our traditional roots while also weaving in the best of contemporary and European design. to the region. Today, you really see a blend of almost all styles; it is what makes driving through any Southern neighborhood a journey of the senses.”


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Top Nashville Design Collective’s lobby was designed to be a space for trade professionals and clients to gather, lay out plans, attend/host events or simply sit and take it all in. Left The showroom hallway is truly where the creative magic happens! It is lined with glass windows to give guests a sneak peek into the overflow of inspiration waiting in each space. Right NDC is honored to house a wonderful roster of top luxury brands. Opposite To pay homage to the mop factory the building originally housed, the main shape of the exterior structure was preserved. Photography Nathan Kirkman


P R O PROMOTION M O T I O N

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS ADAC Elizabeth Ferguson Design Kelly Caron Designs Nashville Design Collective VISIT LUXESOURCE.COM TO LEARN MORE



Perfect Landing An Atlanta residence with Belgian farmhouse roots brings its owners an indoor-outdoor aura within a timeless envelope. W R I T T E N BY K AT H R Y N O ’ S H E A- E VA N S P H O T O G R A P H Y BY L I S A R O M E R E I N

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Architecture: Peter Block, Peter Block Architects Interior Design: Beth Webb, Beth Webb Interiors Home Builder: Shaba Derazi, Derazi Homes Landscape Architecture: Lucinda Bray, Floralis Garden Design & Landscape Architecture


In the stair hall of this Atlanta home by designer Beth Webb and architect Peter Block, a snaking wrought-iron rail by Calhoun Design and Metalworks harks back to old Europe. The team knew it would be important to install bountiful windows to give sunlight free rein, “so you feel the light changing as the day passes,” Block explains. The hardwood flooring is by Crafted Supply; walls are by Domingue Finishes in Houston.


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ommuting from Belgium to Atlanta each day would be an impossible feat. But for these homeowners, capturing a little slice of the European countryside within Atlanta’s northern city limits came down to two things: hiring a design team capable of delivering just that and finding the perfect plot of land for their visions to take flight. “We’ve always been drawn to the idea of the Belgian farmhouse,” reveals the wife, underscoring her affection for the style’s steep rooflines, light-asair interiors and authentic materials in largely pale finishes. When, after three years of searching, she and her husband finally happened upon a dreamlike wooded site, they set about creating just such an Arcadian retreat. “We wanted a home that felt like it had always been there—a structure that’s timeless and would develop a beautiful patina over time. I didn’t want someone to drive by and get the sense it had been built in 2020,” she says. Fortunately, the homeowners looked to Peter Block, an architect noted particularly for his manner of interpreting history and rooting residences to the land as if they’ve had generations to settle in. For the manor-like abode his clients requested, Block found inspiration in the celebrated vernacular of Belgian architect Bernard De Clerck, along with the work of two preeminent English architects of the Arts and Crafts era: C.F.A. Voysey and Sir Edwin Lutyens. “There’s a bit of the old in it, and there’s certainly a bit of the new,” Block says of the residence, which was built to his specifications by general contractor—and frequent collaborator—Shaba Derazi. Working with project manager Jim Basham, Derazi realized a series of spaces progressively more connected to the outdoors, including a loggia and spacious porch made more comprehensive thanks to sliding glass doors. From there, landscape architect Lucinda Bray’s considerate additions— limelight hydrangeas, roses, specimen maple trees and sweeping meadow grasses—help knit the new plantings to the native ones beyond. Casting a magical scene that would instantly impart the charms of old-world Europe, Block turned to natural materials: among them, a cedar shake roof, wire-brushed European oak floors and limewash brick, which he notes is a “living” finish. “When you use good materials, they just get better over time,” explains Block, who teamed up with residential designer Richard Burgess and architect

Bryan Busch on the project. “These materials age well. And they’re what make this house look like it could have been built 100 years ago.” One of the most impressive elements from Block’s arsenal was Marmorino plaster for the walls—hewn of crushed limestone, marble and lime putty, the combination was used in ancient Rome and Renaissance-era Venice. “The way the light hits them, they’re always changing. The finish has an amazing, warm texture to it,” the wife notes. Freerange light was indeed key for Block, who designed the residence so that a majority of its rooms feature windows on at least two sides. “You feel the light changing as the day passes, but the rooms don’t get dark,” he notes. The couple enlisted designer—and textural wizard—Beth Webb to whip up interiors that could stand up to such architectural grandeur but also “be amazingly comfortable,” Webb says. Take the dining room, with its ring of plump slipcovered chairs ideal for a lingering dinner party. “If you’re going to put the effort into a dinner at home, you don’t want your guests feeling uncomfortable and wanting to get up after 30 minutes,” she notes. Even the spa-like soaking tub in the primary bathroom was carefully chosen for its cozy factor. “I always insist that my clients get in the tub and sit on the furniture before we purchase it,” Webb says, “because every body is different.” The interior color palette is equally cosseting: an easygoing blend of creams (“solution-dyed acrylics that are so incredibly resilient, you can pour bleach directly on them,” Webb says); breezy, barefoot browns; and blacks that punctuate each room like an exclamation point. Here, Webb found an unlikely muse for the home’s hues in her clients’ inherited art collection, most of which comprises works produced by the wife’s late grandparents— he, a renowned artist; she, a printmaker. “It really inspired the design schematics of the entire house,” Webb says of the museum-worthy hoard, which includes commanding terra-cotta figures with an almost monasterial quality. At the culmination of all of this, the couple enjoys a homestead where deer meander throughout the grounds and hawks whirr across the sky, and the property does make a convincing case for a medieval parcel on the pastoral outskirts of Brussels. Sums the wife, “We wanted a home that felt connected with the outside. And I think we achieved that exactly. As Peter would say, it ‘just kind of came out of the ground.’ ”

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Above: Webb selected Visual Comfort & Co.’s Piaf Grande chandelier specifically for its subtlety. “I didn’t want it to compete with the view,” she says of the living room’s chief fixture. “Thanks to its thin and delicate arms, it more or less recedes.” The Boris sofa and Bonnard ottoman both are by Bungalow Classic, the former upholstered in Lee Industries’ Belize flax linen, the latter in the same brand’s Serengeti natural hide. Bernhardt’s Odeon chair wears Nobilis’ Rif textile. Opposite: The Arden Expansion dining table by Suzanne Kasler for Hickory Chair goes from round to oval, ideal for dinners with immediate family as well as hosting a whole crowd. Surrounding it are Bungalow Classic’s Paulette side chairs, which wear Perennials’ hard-wearing Rough ’n Rowdy textile. The nine silkscreen prints, framed by Brooks & Black Fine Framing, Inc., are part of the clients’ family collection.


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Janus et Cie’s Arbor dining table and armchairs deliver a timeless pairing on the patio, where the latter are cushioned for lasting comfort. The subtle diamond pattern of the Dash & Albert indoor-outdoor rug converses with walls of limewash Wood Mould brick Block sourced from Cherokee Brick. The Tennessee gray crab orchard flagstone flooring is from Alliance Stone. Limewash cedar planks span the ceiling above.


“ Having no unused space was such an important factor for this project. These clients use every inch of their home.” home.” –BETH WEBB

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Above: “The wife requested a spa-like, Zen retreat,” Webb says of the airy primary bathroom, calling the results “spectacular.” Block’s placements of shuttered windows smartly provide privacy while allowing sunlight to flow through. The freestanding tub and For Town collection bath faucet, designed by Laura Kirar and Michael S. Smith for Kallista, respectively, appear almost to float above the Ann Sacks-sourced Statuary marble floors. Opposite: Paired with Bungalow Classic’s iron Martini table, just large enough to hold a cocktail, the primary bedroom’s plush Ralph Lauren Home armchair and ottoman form an idyllic perch for afternoon reading. Draperies of diaphanous Ulster linen with Houlès trim soften the ethereal light of the bucolic grounds, which were manicured close to the house by landscape architect Lucinda Bray.


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An allée of hornbeams forms a virtual poolside procession: Bray’s vision for providing structure as a foil for the natural woodlands beyond. On the patio, a Janus et Cie cocktail table centers a foursome of RH’s comfortable Belgian Slope Arm outdoor lounge chairs, slipcovered in a Perennials performance weave to stand up to the elements. Andrew Crawford Ironworks fabricated the fire screen to complement the stucco chimney by Lazar Stucco Inc.


Architecture: Lindsay Hance McCullough, Lindsay Hance McCullough AIA Interior Design: Holly Hollingsworth Phillips, The English Room Home Builder: Jeff Stanwick and Stan Dunham, Stanwick Dunham Builders Landscape Architecture: Laurie Durden, Laurie Durden Garden Design


MODERN REMIX A 1970s Charlotte abode gets a faithful—yet playful— makeover, propelling its style into the 21st century.

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Slats of quarter-sawn ash permit filtered light into the living room of this reimagined 1970s Charlotte residence, where interior designer Holly Hollingsworth Phillips combined classic and contemporary pieces like a Platner chair reupholstered in Opuzen sheepskin and a curved sofa by TOV. The Jonathan Adler floor lamps and oval cerused oak coffee table are both from Slate Furniture + Art Collective. The souk-style wool rug is by Stark.


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idcentury modern was one of architect Lindsay Hance McCullough’s first “design languages,” and she’s had a soft spot for it ever since. So she was intrigued when clients Kippy and Blake Thompson asked her to have a look at a house they’d purchased on a leafy Charlotte street. With a second floor that cantilevered over masonry walls, it stood out from its traditional neighbors. “Though built in 1973, it had a real midcentury feel,” McCullough recalls. But there was something more to it: It closely resembled a nearby home by noted North Carolina architect A.G. Odell. “The basic design was very similar,” says McCullough. Though she couldn’t prove this house was by Odell, she suggested to her clients that they take it back to what the original architect might have envisioned—albeit using today’s technology. “It’s a great house,” she told Kippy, adding, “Let’s pare it down so that it can go forward as its true modern self.” The couple, who had raised their daughter and son in a sizable Georgian-style home, were ready not just to downsize, but to embrace a more informal lifestyle. Kippy threw herself into researching midcentury homes. “Now I’m obsessed,” she says with a laugh. McCullough, meanwhile, began systematically exploring how to update and refine every inch of the residence to give her clients a more casual floorplan that would work perfectly for entertaining, while also adding a main suite, family room, dining room and covered porch on the ground floor. The Queen City isn’t known for its modern architecture, so the architect reached out to general contractor Jeff Stanwick, who had experience with midcentury homes. After looping in his firm’s co-principal, builder Stan Dunham, the duo “rose to the challenge of fabricating architectural details that aren’t often seen here,” McCullough notes. “From the exterior slat rainscreen walls to the sculptural stair, Jeff and Stan exhibited a willingness that was critical to rebuilding this house.” Under McCullough’s guidance, Stanwick and Dunham swapped out the hipped roof for staggered, flat planes more in keeping with the era, and teamed the original section’s 8-foottall rooms with soaring spaces in the addition. Clerestory windows and floor-to-ceiling glass

sliders let in light and open up the rooms to embrace views of the verdant grounds, which landscape designer Laurie Durden terraced for structure while bringing in new plantings and mature trees, including Japanese pagoda, for privacy. That sense of orderliness is even more pronounced at the front of the house, where pea gravel plays up the clean lines of the architecture. During planning, the team expanded to include interior designer Holly Hollingsworth Phillips, who had worked with Kippy previously. Soon, the material palette inside began to take shape: riftsawn white oak for the cabinetry, character-grade white oak for the floors and Calacatta marble for the backsplashes. Two spaces got special scrutiny: the nondescript staircase and kitchen. After McCullough came up with a modern, open stair built on a single stringer, she and Phillips put their heads together to produce a show-stopping kitchen that keeps clutter to a minimum, thanks to a hidden scullery where Kippy can stow small appliances and dirty pots and pans. “Kippy loves to cook, and from the get-go she wanted the kitchen to be super clean and spare,” McCullough says. Adds Phillips, “Now she has open shelving and plenty of counter space so that she can clean up in a flash. It was a real change from having a zillion different sets of china. But it’s their new house, and they wanted to live a little cleaner.” Phillips, who calls herself “a true maximalist,” reined in her penchant for color- and pattern-filled interiors to create restrained backdrops that mix modern and traditional pieces, though well-chosen pops of bright hues and graphic prints add interest. “I love wild and crazy colors, and had Kippy been on her own, it might have been more gray or beige,” she explains. As it turns out, her client so embraced the idea of taking risks in the new house that she personally selected the large-scale wallpaper print for the main bedroom, to which Phillips added Tom Dixon copper pendants as complements. All told, the couple loves having a home that suits the next chapter of their lives. “We use every bit of it,” Kippy says. “There’s room for when our college kids bring friends over, there’s outdoor dining and a covered deck with a TV and fireplace. It’s way more fun to entertain here than any house I’ve lived in.” And for that, she gives much credit to McCullough and Phillips. “I’d never have gone in this direction if we had started from the ground up,” she adds. “I can have fun with this house forever. It’s a unique gem in this neighborhood.”

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Architect Lindsay Hance McCullough specified the towering Marvin windows throughout the house. “I always want to introduce as much daylight as possible,” she says. The homeowners often spend their evenings in the study, which features Benjamin Moore’s Simply White on the fireplace, a pair of Anthropologie’s Tripod chairs and an Arno sofa by TOV. The Worlds Away coffee table rests upon a high-pile Stark rug.


“ T H I S I S A M O D E R N HOUSE, BUT SEEING THE LUSH LANDSCAPE OUTSIDE HELPS IT NOT FEEL COLD O R TO O S PA R E .” – L I N D S AY H A N C E M C C U L L O U G H

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Above: Fabricated by Masterpiece Staircase & Millwork, the new central feature of the once-dark entrance hall consists of floating white-oak treads supported by a single steel stringer, offering a minimalist look. “The interior reveals itself; it’s not just one big space,” McCullough says. “I think it’s nice when you can discover what’s around this corner or that corner.” Right: Caesarstone counters, Calacatta Delicate Gold marble from Harkey Tile & Stone and rift-sawn white oak sound a modern note in the kitchen. The Agnes pendants over the island and the Graphic Grande chandelier in the adjoining dining area are both by Aerin for Visual Comfort & Co. Carl Hansen & Søn wishbone chairs sourced from Design Within Reach surround the clients’ own dining table. The wall ovens are by Thermador.


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Right: McCullough custom designed the black-granite sink, fabricated by Instyle Stone + Tile, for the powder room, complementing it with Ashford black waterjet mosaic marble tile from Renaissance Tile & Bath. Phillips, in turn, added the blushcolored Thibaut grasscloth wall covering. “When you do a quiet palette and then bring in some color, it makes it a little more important,” she notes. The marblerimmed wall lights are by Tom Dixon and the rose-toned mirror is from Anthropologie. Opposite: Catherine Martin’s bold La Palma wallpaper for Mokum connects the main bedroom to views of the landscape. “I don’t necessarily love a statement wall, but this was the perfect place for it,” says Phillips, who accented with a Tom Dixon copper pendant. “It offered more of a focal point than if we had covered the whole room in it.” The bedside chest is by Woodbridge Furniture.


The Ties That Bind

Atlanta fiber artist Adana Tillman’s expressive contemporary portraits link quilt-making traditions with modern life. W R I T T E N BY M O N I Q U E M C I N T O S H | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY G R E G O R Y M I L L E R


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In her Atlanta studio (opposite), contemporary fiber artist Adana Tillman assembles modern quilt portraits that capture the personalities, style and diversity of her peers. The artist ever has a sketchbook in tow (left), and thoughtfully gathers fabric from an array of sources. Tillman uses tracing paper (below) to create her own sewing patterns, patchworking a palette that combines graphic shapes and funky motifs with the more florid elements of the Baroque.

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t takes many hands to make a quilt— even when not all those hands touch it. For Atlanta fiber artist Adana Tillman, each stitch and slip of fabric embodies the inherited tales and talents of those who came before her. Like so many contemporary artists elevating this timeless craft to the caliber of fine art, Tillman is coopting a rich cultural heritage to create something entirely her own. “I see quilting as an old art form translated through time,” she explains. “I’m bringing it into a more modern age, creating something we can relate to today.” Taking cues from current street fashion— including the sculptural silhouettes of its elaborately styled coifs—Tillman’s prismatic portraits portray her peers in joyous, vibrant color. “Young black people are so multifaceted, and I really want to show that,” continues the artist, who always keeps a sketchbook on hand. “This work is really about incorporating my community, and what I’ve seen and experienced.”


Once she has fleshed out the blueprints for her figures, Tillman (right) stitches the textile fragments together and sandwiches each assemblage to cotton backing. The artist employs embroidery stitches to add extra dimension to their backdrops, rendering sharp geometric shapes or dreamy, free-form waves. Recently, her repertoire has expanded to include shibori dying and sun printing techniques, along with more complex beadwork.

Though trained formally, attending a fine arts institute in her native Ohio from age 11 to 13, Tillman came by her interest genuinely, owing to her mother’s lifelong passion for the craft. “Everywhere we’d go, we’d look up a local quilt shop,” the artist recalls of her childhood. “Our attic was stacked with fabrics.” Reared on the iconic children’s book Tar Beach, she also became fascinated with the “story quilts” of Harlem-born artist Faith Ringgold, whom her mother helped her meet. Today, Tillman’s practice is the creative descendant of all of these influences, combining traditional painting principles with the classic embroidery stitches and lyrical linework learned from her mother—while innovating with color-blocked collage work. Collectively, these give her figures their dynamism and dimensionality. For each piece, Tillman deconstructs the composition into different sewing patterns, using them as blueprints to cut out each appliqué. Equal care is taken when selecting the textiles themselves, some of which are donated from friends in her mother’s quilting circle, others unearthed over hours of riffling through the racks of independent fabric stores. The most precious specimens are those she procured on a trip to Tanzania with a friend (“I brought a whole separate suitcase just for fabrics,” the artist reveals). On the heels of a group show at Swan Coach House (she’s also exhibited at Art Basel in Miami), Tillman is experimenting with shibori dyes, sun printing and even more complex beadwork. “Embellishment is just another form of self-expression,” she notes. Success, she says, is when her work attracts the attention of multiple generations: both the quilting stalwarts drawn to her technical expertise and the young viewers who recognize themselves in her edgy portraits. In both cases, Tillman’s work is proof positive of quilts’ enduring power to connect, stitch by stitch.

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Coming of Age The thoughtful overhaul of a stone cottage in Nashville’s Belle Meade neighborhood blends century-old charm with au courant style. W R I T T E N BY H I L A R Y M A S E L L O S WA L D | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY Z E K E R U E L A S

Interior Design: Jason Arnold, Jason Arnold Interiors Home Builder: James Maciuk, Sage Construction, LLC


Designer Jason Arnold insisted his client retain the original black and white marble floors in the entryway of his Nashville home. “Those historical details are something you can’t replicate,” the designer explains. “When you walk into the house, it has a sense of presence and age.” To complement the room’s classic good looks, Arnold placed a custom metal table by Micah Farrer of Obsidian Ironworks, a vintage burl-wood stool and a Hector Finch sconce with leather shade.


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he 1929 home that would eventually become Patrick Lowry’s residence always had charm. Reminiscent of an English stone cottage and located in the desirable Belle Meade neighborhood close to downtown Nashville, it boasts a historical appeal that’s nearly impossible to manufacture. “It was owned by the same family since it was built in the 1920s,” Lowry says. “It had been through three generations and hadn’t been updated since 1955, when the family added on to it. Talk about character.” To preserve that nearly-century-old allure while elevating the home’s functionality and style, Lowry called on his friend and designer, Jason Arnold, who had also designed his previous home in nearby Green Hills. “Patrick wanted a clean look, a livable feel,” Arnold explains. “He loves to entertain, so we needed to create a layout that could accommodate a lot of people or feel good for just an intimate little dinner party.” Arnold’s team recreated a set of as-built plans based on the home’s existing layout, then set to work reimagining the floor plan and flow. He preserved the location of the front door and the original black and white marble floors in the entry: “Those historical details are something you can’t replicate,” Arnold explains. “When you walk into the house, it has a sense of presence and age.” He also kept the location of the living room but swapped out most of the remaining spaces to create better circulation throughout. From that striking entry, for example, guests can peer through the dining room to the oak- and maple-shaded backyard, which was subtly finessed by landscape architect John Thompson. And though Arnold expanded rooms, openings and passageways to give the residence a more modern feel, he eschewed an open floor plan to preserve a sense of intimacy in each space. With the layout puzzle complete, Arnold enlisted help from residential designer of record Dale Gabardi and builder James Maciuk to execute his vision. After Gabardi handled drawings required for permit approval, Maciuk brought the blueprints to life. “James always says, ‘We can figure that out,’ ” reveals Arnold. “I can draw it and dream it, but unless you have someone who can actually do it, you’re dead in the water. James can always make it happen.” The team delivered on this combination of innovative style and careful construction

throughout the home, but it’s perhaps most notably on display in the handsome kitchen. One of the first decisions Arnold and the homeowner made was to forgo upper cabinets. (Well, the designer talked his client into it: “He said, ‘Trust me; it’ll be more dramatic,’ ” Lowry recounts, adding, “And I do love it.”) Less of a cooking and prep space and more of a service area, the room gets functional support from a large pantry that houses the oven, ice maker, sink and extra storage. On the kitchen’s back wall, a large slab of dramatic Danby marble, which Lowry and Arnold favor for its warmth and veining, appears almost as an art installation. The marble also covers the sleek brass island, a showstopper in the room. “I love brass. I’m a brass person,” Arnold says with a laugh. Tired of the typical “marble waterfall” island, he conceived an idea for “something to give the room more patina,” he adds. The island hides a couple of appliances and provides additional storage, all while offering excellent space for serving up appetizers. The approach Arnold took in the kitchen— timeless materials, clean lines, a few surprises— extends to every other room of the house. The tonal, textural aesthetic begins with pieces the client brought from his previous home, which Arnold complemented with sumptuous new fabrics, an earthy color palette, antiques and art. In the dining room, which opens to the kitchen, a simple but elegant grasscloth wallcovering in a muted tone defines the space without drawing too much attention. “When you put texture on a wall,” Arnold says, “it envelops you, wraps its arms around you.” The same rang true for the main bedroom, where Arnold advocated hard for preserving the original wood paneling. “I think James and Patrick were scheming to tell me it was damaged during construction, but it survived,” the designer says. Victorious, he painted the walls gray to give them a more modern feel; now, they lend a sophisticated backdrop to the velvet-upholstered bed and wood and metal décor. With fresh style poised to last 100 years more, the home delights both its owner and designer. Lowry says he especially loves the quality of natural light, the way the house welcomes his guests and the main suite with its warm, relaxing aura. For his part, Arnold relishes the way a person experiences the home: “It’s a big house, but it doesn’t feel big,” he explains. “It has an intimacy to it, and that’s just right for a home with such history.”

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The living room’s moody palette begins with Farrow & Ball’s Hardwick White on walls. Lush velvets—seen in an olive green Lee Industries folding screen, plus a Hickory Chair sofa and club chair—add sumptuousness. Arnold tempered these with clean-lined counterpoints, including Arteriors’ midcentury-inspired Griffith chandelier, an abstract oil-oncanvas by Giuseppe Napoli and a leather-topped iron coffee table forged by Farrer.


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Above: Arnold accented the kitchen’s white-oak cabinetry—crafted by Keystone Millworks in Cumming, Georgia—with Richelieu knobs in antique brass. When the designer discovered the vintage brass lantern sconce, he immediately knew it would stand out against the room’s pale walls, which feature Farrow & Ball’s Strong White. The polished nickel bridge faucet is by Brizo, through Ferguson. Opposite: Custom iron counter stools with cushions of Joseph Noble leather align beneath the kitchen’s unlacquered brass island, which was custom crafted by Keystone Millworks in collaboration with Larry W. Stone Custom Metals. A single Visual Comfort & Co. pendant makes a simple statement against the fluid veining of Danby marble from Stone World. The oil portrait is vintage.


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Above: A Phillip Jeffries manila hemp wallcovering establishes the tonal vibe of the dining room. Arnold sourced the French antique pine trestle table from Sacred Heart Antiques in Round Top, Texas, opting to surround it with tailored chairs that made the move from his client’s former residence. A Lee Industries banquette completes the seating setup beneath a linear chandelier also crafted by Farrer. The flat-weave beneath is from Nashville Rug Gallery. Opposite: Builder James Maciuk oversaw creation of the living room’s streamlined plaster mantel by artisan Zoli Szabo; Arnold complemented the piece with a custom framed antiqued mirror from Bennett Galleries and an ochre vessel from Atlanta’s Dixon Rye. The Queen Anne-style mahogany armchair in the midground juxtaposes a contemporary painting the homeowner found at A. Shaw Style. The brass reading lamp is by Visual Comfort & Co.


Above: In the main bathroom, Carrara and black marble floors from Renaissance Tile & Bath lay the foundation for a custom white-oak tub by Keystone Millworks, softened by Pindler wool panels. Honed soapstone from Triton Stone Group tops the tub surround as well as the vanity, which wears Benjamin Moore’s Edgecomb Gray. A classic zinc hanging lantern and more contemporary nickel pendants— all by Visual Comfort & Co.—add to the ambience. Opposite: Arnold persuaded his client to preserve the paneled walls of the main bedroom, which was previously a den. Now painted Farrow & Ball’s Plummet, they lend cool contrast to Hickory Chair’s Muse bed in caramel velvet and a claw-base mahogany demilune. The bust is a signature Arnold addition: “I have a thing for them,” he says. “I just love a cool texture, an unusual face.”


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ADAC proudly announces the

2021 SOUTHEAST DESIGNERS & ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNERS

ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR

Paul Bates of Paul Bates Architects

RESIDENTIAL DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

Betsy Brown of Betsy Brown Inc.

CONTRACT DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

Blackberry Farm Design

Judged by an esteemed panel of judges, the awards were presented at a celebratory gala on September 23. The announcement of three winners, selected from 22 finalists, marked the culmination of three days of annual industry events known as DISCOVER ADAC.

ADAC

@adacatlanta | #adacatlanta More info at adacatlanta.com

351 Peachtree Hills Ave, Atlanta Monday – Friday | Open to the Trade & Public


D O O R M A N D E S I G N S .CO M | ( 5 0 4 ) 4 0 8 -1616

T H E CO L I S E U M C LU B C H A I R Designed and built in New Orleans, and shown with Palm Orleans outdoor rated fabric. Available for indoor and outdoor use.


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GROUNDBREAKERS Groundbreaker, innovator, pioneer—no matter the term, the people, products, companies and concepts on the following pages have made an indelible imprint on their respective fields. From striking aesthetics and unique perspectives to signature skills and materials that make their mark, these groundbreakers all share one mission: to inspire and aspire. Mastering their “it” factor to leave a lasting legacy in the world of design.


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G ROU N D B R E A K E R S | SOUTHEAST “Couture Knots curates the most complete collection of contemporary rug lines to the design trade.”

NOT YOUR NEIGHBOR’S RUGS Nikrooz says that while initially his colleagues in the rug industry doubted that the customizable model he’d devised would work, a revived valuation of one-of-a-kind pieces has worked in his favor. “The direction of the business and clients seem to be toward designs and rugs that are bespoke and ‘not your neighbor’s rugs,’” Nikrooz says. He is currently working with Knots Rugs in the U.K. to launch local Charlotte artist Brian Coleman’s work on the medium of hand-knotted rugs.

A SURE THING During the pandemic, designers and homeowners alike experienced furniture shortages, but Nikrooz says rugs proved to be a dependable step in the furniture chain. Since the raw materials for rugs tend to be sourced from the same area where they’re produced, issues that would typically cause a delay are eliminated.

COUTURE KNOTS 704.819.6972 | coutureknots.com |

coutureknot

Designers have traditionally spent hours in showrooms sifting through massive inventories of rugs before finally finding something that—fingers crossed—will look good in a space. “I always thought that this was extremely inefficient and the end result was not always perfect,” says Ali Nikrooz, president and owner of Couture Knots. Inside his showroom in Charlotte, North Carolina, Nikrooz displays a rack with hundreds of rug samples that, upon selection, can be handwoven in Nepal to fit the exact specifications of a room. About 20 years ago, Nikrooz visited a family member in Europe who was hand-knotting rugs and ultimately inspired him to introduce the contemporary designs to the U.S. market. Now, through Couture Knots, Nikrooz facilitates orders between international craftspeople and local and regional designers who, he says, “are greeted by appointment and treated as friends, whether in person or virtually.”

Above Hudson by Knots Rugs is available at Couture Knots in several colorways. Styling by Hannah Franklin Interior Stylist. Top Carolina Design Associates used the rug featured in this space as inspiration for the palette, textures and artwork. Photography Above by Jon Day; Top by Dustin Peck



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HIGH-IMPACT UPDATES Kelly shares her clients’ must-do mini renos. • Wellness tech: Integrated healthy home technology can address things like indoor air and water quality, acoustic wellness and our natural cycle of physical and mental behaviors throughout a 24-hour period. • Multifunctional rooms: A new appreciation for spending time at home has led to carving out small nooks for lounging, working remotely or for class-work. There’s also a greater focus on how a room is spaceplanned. We want to bring efficacy, added storage and organization to our spaces. Mudrooms, drop zones and home gyms have become more important than ever.

K7 INTERIOR DESIGN

615.513.8937 | k7interiordesign.com |

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In a tech-obsessed world, undistracted moments are hard to come by, but captivating interiors can have the power to turn people’s attention away from their devices in order to connect

STEP OUTSIDE As Kelly’s clients redefine the functions of their homes, making the most of alfresco space seems essential. “We’ve noticed a trend toward taking advantage of outdoor areas by incorporating comfortable lounging areas and expanding outdoor kitchen and dining opportunities.”

with their surroundings. “Being in the present is a beautiful thing,” says Kimberly Kelly, founder of K7 Interior Design. “I want to give my clients a space that allows them to be lost in the moment and to focus on themselves and their families.” The Nashville-based interior designer curates pieces from different eras and design movements, also drawing inspiration from her travels to Finland and Scandinavia. “Understanding historically where we’ve been creates a strong creative foundation for contemporary design,” she says. Kelly likes to pair rich, patterned textiles with unexpected light fixtures. She also stresses the importance of balancing natural light and shadow in a room in order to create depth.

“I really like reinventing the wheel. I’m forever in search of new products and interesting ways to apply them in my work.”

Above This dining room was designed with a table to seat a family of seven beneath a Victorian chandelier. Top Inside this kitchen, where a walnut island and custom-designed server complement Dutch blue cabinets, light filters through William Morris lace drapes every morning. Left Even with 12-foot-tall ceilings, this parlor feels private and cozy thanks to a soft contrast between light and shadow. Photography Paige Rumore


© MARY CRAVEN PHOTOGRAPHY

A MODERN VIBE WITH A PAST 615.513.8937 | K7INTERIORDESIGN.COM

LIVE HERE 615.210.0599 | CKEVINCOFFEY.COM


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G ROU SEC ND TB IORN EA | TITLE KERS OR | SOUTHEAST REGION “We aim to serve our clients well and build a legacy of architecture that enhances our world.”

REINVENTED RESIDENCES In response to the pandemic, architects are seeing market trends that put an emphasis on having home offices and conjoined kitchen, living and dining areas. “Functional demands of homeowners and their families have changed, allowing us to transform our design style, concept and function,” Dietrich says. “This has created new architectural forms, spaces and experiences.”

SHIFT TOWARD SUSTAINABLE

LOGAN DESIGN GROUP 404.274.4275 | logandesigngroup.com |

logandesigngroup

Logan Design Group is expanding its service from luxury homes to new senior living communities and schools with construction on a few projects beginning as early as 2022. With these new ventures, Dietrich is steadfast in maintaining “a continuous effort to develop architecture that not only meets the client’s needs but softens the environmental impact of the design on our neighborhoods, cities, countries and world.”

Designing a home that’s built to last is the core goal for any architect, but Dietrich T. Logan is making future plans that extend far beyond blueprints and floor plans. The founder of Logan Design Group and father of four says it’s his goal to create “a multigenerational company where my children and other family members can all play a role in its future influence and success.” The forward-thinking architect and developer, who’s based in Atlanta, Georgia, also leans into the latest technology, providing his clients with quick looks at their designs through three-dimensional modeling software that renders interior and exterior views from various angles with different colors and finishes. “We also take time, through travel and research, to learn new trends, needs and sustainable ideas, which are then implemented into our clients’ designs,” Dietrich says.

Top, Left & Right In this luxuriously designed Mediterranean traditional estate, the massive interior generates a perfect setting for entertaining. The intrinsic charm of the property can be found in its enormous windows and doors. Although large, the living spaces have been carefully thought-out to exude a warmth rarely achieved in a 15,000-square-foot home. Outdoor living around the pool, cabana and putting green wows further.


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G ROU N D B R E A K E R S | SOUTHEAST “For 40 years, we’ve been steadily focused on making meaningful homes for families throughout the southeastern mountains.”

MOUNTAIN MUST-HAVES Every PLATT project brings humility, simplicity and service, and all of the following design tenets: • Sensitive planning • Indigenous materials • Captured views • Abundant daylight • Simple comforts • Sustainable practices

SIMULATIONS + SHOWROOMS

PLATT 828.884.2393 | platt.us |

PLATT has been creating homes for families throughout the Southern Appalachian Highlands and beyond for four decades, and the firm is always looking for new ways to expand its offerings. As an early adopter of virtual reality, PLATT gives clients a chance to experience their homes long before breaking ground. “This makes us better designers and our clients more informed,” Parker says. Another recent launch includes PLATT HOME (platthome.us), a furniture and accessories showroom in downtown Brevard.

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Remote work has allowed people to live wherever they want, and towns that used to be considered vacation destinations have become more popular places for primary residences. Parker Platt has seen “an influx of people” moving to western North Carolina and rural areas. As a result of this migration to the southeastern mountains, Parker’s eponymously named firm has seen an increase in demand for architecture, construction and interior design services, through which PLATT provides “quality at a predictable cost on a predictable schedule.” During the pandemic, fresh air and outdoor spaces became a luxury, and PLATT puts an emphasis on creating alfresco experiences that can enhance a homeowner’s connection with nature. “We relate our projects to their settings so as to complement landforms, foster belonging and soften the boundaries between indoors and out,” Parker says.

Above This 13,000-square-foot, 300-acre private mountain retreat in Lake Toxaway sits among remarkable rock formations, overlooking the largest lake in the state. Top This contemporary waterside estate in Lake Toxaway combines modern design with indigenous mountain materials. Bottom This Lake Toxaway home was constructed from 170-year-old reclaimed timbers and was featured on the show Barnwood Builders. Photography Above & Top by Jerry Markatos; Bottom by David Dietrich


ARCHITECTURE CONSTRUCTION INTERIORS

PLATT.US PLATTHOME.US

Architect/Builder: PLATT | Photographer: William Abranowicz | Interior Designer: Cliff Fong | Landscape Architect: Westmore Design


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t comes but once a year. Celebrate accordingly.

EST. 1895

ASHEVILLE, NC



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