Luxe Magazine - March/April 2021 National

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Corail. Dining table, designed by Antoine Fritsch & Vivien Durisotti. Innovation and design: made from 3D-printed concrete, each Corail table is a unique piece with a customized shape and texture. Made in Europe


French Art de Vivre Photo by Flavien Carlod, Baptiste Le Quiniou, for advertising purposes only. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.


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CONTENTS

MAR APR 2 02 1

18

EDITOR'S LETTER

Radar 24

TA L K I N G S H O P Three interior decor proprietors illustrate the aesthetic of American style.

30

C O L L A B O R AT I O N Kelly Wearstler’s paint palette with Farrow & Ball makes waves as the company’s first-ever designer collection.

32

AMERICAN SPIRIT With a new business model and forthcoming releases, this Missouri-based textile and wallpaper brand is set for a banner year.

34

SHELF LIFE Doyenne Charlotte Moss divulges her floral tips and tricks.

36

H E R I TAG E A look at artisans who embrace the triedand-true practices of their craft.

Market 44

M AT E R I A L This season, classic stripes take a turn for the wild.

54

TREND Mother Nature offers boundless inspiration for chic picks.

62

SPOTLIGHT Vibrant pieces up the ante on outdoor living.

Living

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78

K I TC H E N + B AT H High-design alfresco kitchen spaces are the perfect recipe for the spring months.

92

THE REPORT Inspired garden rooms encourage comfort and creativity outside.



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CONTENTS

FEATURES

102

116

128

132

Save the Drama

Peachtree Paradise

Breaking the Mold

Light Touch

Marrying modern verve with English manor home eccentricity, a Hamptons retreat takes on a singular flavor.

Transforming a ground-floor unit of Atlanta’s most storied high-rise, a designer-homeowner embraces the best of bygone decades.

To drive her whimsical vision, a Los Angeles ceramicist turns to fantastical landscapes both real and virtual.

After a thorough yet subtle refresh, a grand Southern California dwelling embraces sunlight and the outdoors.

Written by Lisa Bingham Dewart Photography by Peter Margonelli

Written by Lisa Mowry Photography by Lauren Rubinstein

Written by Monique McIntosh Photography by Marianna Jamadi

Written by Maile Pingel Photography by Trevor Tondro Styling by Stephen Pappas Interiors Inc

ON THE COVER: In the dining area of designer Bill Musso’s own Atlanta residence, Driade’s steel-and-glass Anapo dining table cuts a slim silhouette against the

backdrop of a nearly 4,000-square-foot courtyard manicured by landscape designer Alex Smith. The filigree motif of Patterson Flynn Martin’s Arabesque rug adds flair underfoot. At right, a bronze-detailed goatskin sideboard—authored by André Arbus and sourced from Baker—gives the room gravitas. Page 116

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G IVE YO UR SPA CE THE FREEDO M IT N EED S Luxury for Life. VA R A N A B R E E Z E R U G 8 4 4 . 4 0 . STA R K | S TA R KC A R P E T. C O M


PAMELA LERNER JACCARINO VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Pam Shavalier

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Brittany Chevalier Mcintyre

SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Colleen McTiernan DIGITAL

Sarah Nance

MARKET

SENIOR MARKET AND STYLE EDITOR

Kathryn Given

MARKET EDITOR

Sarah Shelton ART

ART DIRECTORS

Candace Cohen, Maria Pluta SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Jamie Beauparlant, Kimberly Solari Brown ASSOCIATE GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kyle Anderson

SENIOR WEB EDITOR

SENIOR RETOUCHER

SENIOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

PHOTO RETOUCHER

Ileana Llorens

Amanda Kahan

Heather Carney

MANAGING EDITOR

Lori Capullo

HOMES EDITORS Kate Abney Grace Beuley Hunt Lisa Bingham Dewart Mary Jo Bowling Paulette Pearson Jennifer Pfaff Smith Shannon Sharpe

EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Christian Ablan

Michael Warnock

ADAM I. SANDOW

CHAIRMAN OF SANDOW

ERICA HOLBORN

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Michael Shavalier

VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL

Bobby Bonett

SENIOR DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC OPERATIONS

Keith Clements

CHIEF SALES OFFICER

Kate Kelly Smith

VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE SALES

Katie Brockman CONTROLLER

Emily Kaitz

TANYA SUBER

VICE PRESIDENT, PARTNER + PROGRAM SUCCESS DIRECTOR, PARTNER SUCCESS

Jennifer Kimmerling

PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGER + TEAM LEAD

Brittany Watson

SENIOR PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGER

Molly Polo

PARTNER SUCCESS MANAGERS

Lauren Krause, Susan Mallek

PROGRAM SUCCESS MANAGER + ANALYTICS SPECIALIST – LUXE PREFERRED

Victoria Albrecht

NATIVE CONTENT EDITOR + TEAM LEAD

Greta Wolf

NATIVE CONTENT EDITORS

Heather Schreckengast, Ethan Tucker PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MANAGER

Jody M. Boyle

SANDOW was founded by visionary entrepreneur Adam Sandow in 2003 with the goal of building a truly innovative media company that would reinvent the traditional publishing model. Today, SANDOW is a fully integrated solutions platform that includes leading content, tools, and services, powering innovation for the design and luxury industries. Its diverse portfolio of media assets includes Interior Design, Luxe Interiors + Design and NewBeauty. Materials Innovation brands include global materials consultancy, Material Connexion, game-changing material sampling and logistics platform, Material Bank, and materials reclamation program, Sample Loop. SANDOW brands also include research and strategy firm, ThinkLab. In 2019, SANDOW was selected by the New York Economic Development Council of New York to become the official operator of NYCxDESIGN Week, beginning in 2020. sandow.com


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EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & OPERATIONS

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NATIONAL SALES DIRECTORS ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

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Amy McMillan Tambini WEST COAST DIRECTORS

Lisa Lovely, Carolyn Homestead MIDWEST & SOUTH CENTRAL DIRECTOR

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ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER

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SALES ASSISTANT

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SALES AND MARKETING COORDINATOR

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WESTERN INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR

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CENTRAL INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER

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CIRCULATION AND DISTRIBUTION

REGIONAL SALES DIRECTORS Adrienne B. Honig Karlee Prejean AUSTIN + SAN ANTONIO PUBLISHER Jim Wilson CHICAGO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell DIRECTORS Tracy Colitte, Carolyn Funk, Taylor Greene COLORADO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell PUBLISHER Terri Glassman DIRECTORS Vivian Keesling, Katie Martin DALLAS + FORT WORTH PUBLISHER Rolanda Polley DIRECTOR Leslie Shelton GREATER NEW YORK PUBLISHER Trish Kirsch ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, NEW YORK Donna Herman ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, CONNECTICUT Amy McMillan Tambini DIRECTOR Maritza Smith HOUSTON PUBLISHER Amy McAnally DIRECTOR Carol Lamadrid LOS ANGELES ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Athena MacFarland DIRECTOR Virginia Williams ARIZONA PUBLISHER DIRECTOR

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Stacey Callahan Jennifer Chanay, Susan Goldstein, Susan Preville PACIFIC NORTHWEST PUBLISHER Debby Steiner DIRECTOR Cathy Cruse SAN FRANCISCO PUBLISHER Lisa Lovely DIRECTOR Sara McGovern SOUTHEAST ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sibyl de St. Aubin DIRECTOR Suzanne Brandt SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER Alisa Tate ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kali Smith REGIONAL PUBLISHER DIRECTORS

DIRECTOR

Alison Parks

@luxemagazine Luxe Interiors + Design , (ISSN 1949-2022), Arizona (ISSN 2163-9809), California (ISSN 2164-0122), Chicago (ISSN 2163-9981), Colorado (ISSN 21639949), Florida (ISSN 2163-9779), New York (ISSN 2163-9728), Pacific Northwest (ISSN 2167-9584), San Francisco (ISSN 2372-0220), Southeast (ISSN 2688-5735), Texas (ISSN 2163-9922), Vol. 19, No. 2, March/April, prints bimonthly and is published by SANDOW, 3651 NW 8th Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33431. Luxe Interiors + Design (“Luxe”) provides information on luxury homes and lifestyles. Luxe Interiors + Design , SANDOW, its affiliates, employees, contributors, writers, editors, (Publisher) accepts no responsibility for inaccuracies, errors or omissions with information and/or advertisements contained herein. The Publisher has neither investigated nor endorsed the companies and/or products that advertise within the publication or that are mentioned editorially. Publisher assumes no responsibility for the claims made by the Advertisers or the merits of their respective products or services advertised or promoted in Luxe. Publisher neither expressly nor implicitly endorses such Advertiser products, services or claims. Publisher expressly assumes no liability for any damages whatsoever that may be suffered by any purchaser or user for any products or services advertised or mentioned editorially herein and strongly recommends that any purchaser or user investigate such products, services, methods and/or claims made thereto. Opinions expressed in the magazine and/or its advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Publisher. Neither the Publisher nor its staff, associates or affiliates are responsible for any errors, omissions or information whatsoever that have been misrepresented to Publisher. The information on products and services as advertised in Luxe are shown by Publisher on an “as is” and “as available” basis. Publisher makes no representations or warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the information, services, contents, trademarks, patents, materials or products included in this magazine. All pictures reproduced in Luxe have been accepted by Publisher on the condition that such pictures are reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the photographer and any homeowner concerned. As such, Publisher is not responsible for any infringement of the copyright or otherwise arising out of any publication in Luxe. Luxe is a licensed trademark of SANDOW © 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the Publisher. ADDRESS SUBSCRIPTION REQUESTS AND CORRESPONDENCE TO: Luxe, PO Box 16329, North Hollywood, CA 91615. Email: subscriptions@luxemagazine.com or telephone toll-free 800.723.6052 (continental US only, all others 818.487.2005). ®

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RONDELLE CHANDELIER FROM THE LAURA KIRAR COLLECTION


LETTER EDITOR’S

Happy Place

As we approach one year of sheltering at home, I have to ask... how are you? There may be too many novel words and phrases added into our lexicon: “You’re on mute,” “Zoom fatigue,” “quarantini”— our emotions raw from it all. So, how to calm them? For me, it started with carving out a spot in my home that would evoke an indoor garden room of sorts. I chose a large wall in my office and collaged florals and other fantastical images that bring me pleasure. Surrounded by my art and design books, fresh flowers from the market and my art easel, I created a little slice of happiness for myself. My laptop, with so many Zoom’s logged on it, is not far off. A “make it work” moment for our times.

Pamela Jaccarino VP, Editor in Chief @pamelajaccarino

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photo: chelsae anne horton.

While we continue to remain in our homes for the foreseeable future, I hope that you, too, will find a place—be it a wall, a closet, an alcove or perhaps an entire room—that elicits joy. May this issue provide the inspiration you need to get started.





Walls


RADAR

TALKING

SHOP

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COLLABORATION

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AMERICAN

SPIRIT

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SHELF

LIFE

|

HERITAGE

Designers, artisans and shops look to their American roots, proving that home is always the greatest source of inspiration.


RADAR

TALKING

SHOP

American Amalgamate THREE STATESIDE SHOP OWNERS ON CURATING DESIGN. AS TOLD TO MARY JO BOWLING

Sartorial Influence Scotti Sitz

GARDE, LOS ANGELES AND SUMMERLAND, CALIFORNIA

I try not to go on social media. I don’t look at Instagram unless I have to. It allows me to focus on buying what I love for the store, and that is what sets the tone at Garde. If you walked into my shop right now, I hope you’d say: ‘Oh my God, this space is so beautiful. I want to live here.’ ” Our look has been described as minimal, organic and neutral. I don’t like the word ‘eclectic,’ but you could say I’m a believer of a ‘not decorated’ look. You should choose

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basics reflecting your personality, style and history; and that’s what our clients are looking for. They also want to learn something new and be inspired. My background is in fashion. I developed a minimalist aesthetic working for Calvin Klein and learned to appreciate textures and an architectural look at Giorgio Armani. After 20 years, I was eager to do something outside of the corporate world. I had always wanted a store, but I started working in interior design. While shopping for a client who wanted European decor, I discovered many things you couldn’t find here, and that’s how I decided to open a place of my own.

I want Garde to be approachable. Everything we sell has a story, and we enjoy telling that tale. A story is important, because there is so much out in the world, and many times you may purchase an item without really connecting with it or knowing what you’re buying. There’s also a whimsy and lightness about our pieces; they are often tongue in cheek, heartwarming or funny. It’s kind of like the fashion concept where you put together a Gap T-shirt and a Chanel skirt. We try to replicate that idea with furniture, presenting people with a livable, yet elegant style and a point of view that welcomes and educates.

photo: amy dickerson.

Scotti Sitz in her Los Angeles shop.


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TEL AVIV


SHOP RADAR

TALKING

Cris Briger (right) with her son, Charles Peed, in their West Palm Beach showroom.

Pretty Up

Cris Briger and Charles Peed CB: My family is well-traveled. We spent a lot of time in Europe, and we dragged our children to antique flea markets and every museum we could find. I never imagined that any of them would join me in a business like this. Now, my son Charles co-owns this shop, and another son, Pablo, recently joined in as well. CP: We started this store on the idea that we have a distinct taste and style, and that if we could bring one-of-a-kind things forward, someone would like it. Our look is ‘lived in’—a look where you would find comfort. But it’s also bold— we are not afraid of pattern and color. CB: We are bringing pretty back. We feel like it’s OK for people to have pretty rooms; a concept that seemed to lose favor for the last 20 years but is returning. The atmosphere here is easy and Latin as well as European influenced. It’s the idea of con gusto, which means ‘with pleasure.’ It’s not uptight; we set coffee cups on furniture, and we don’t put glass tops on the furniture. We have a lot of North American, European and Latin pieces, but the way we present them is with a more American attitude. We are known for taking something that’s ordinary and tired and bringing a fresh vibe to it. We also have a lot of classically inspired pieces we’ve commissioned—it’s a fascinating mix. CP: In Mexico, we found that a lot of artists were making things with papiermâché. We decided to put our own twist on it, commissioning botanicals, fruit and even a bust of Julius Caesar using the technique. We’ve also put our own spin on classic Mexican talavera pottery. We’ve commissioned plates and bowls with updated patterns that appeal to everyone, even our youngest customers.

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photo: sonya revell.

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SHOP RADAR

TALKING

Kate Rheinstein Brodsky in her Manhattan store, KRB.

Mix Master

Kate Rheinstein Brodsky It’s very American not to be afraid to mix things of different periods, styles and colors. The great decorators in this country never shied away from that, they just used whatever they wanted. In this sense, we are a very American shop. We show people how to put disparate items together—it’s one of the things that makes people pay attention to us. We create vignettes that give people a context for how to do it. For example, we might put a 19th-century English serpentine server with a contemporary sofa and then hang a modern painting by Mary Nelson Sinclair above it. The mix grounds the whole thing and gives it depth. It allows us to make antiques relevant again and to show that they have a place in today’s home. I learned about retail and style from my mother, Suzanne Rheinstein. She had a store in Los Angeles for 30 years and, as a young person, I went to her shop every day after school. After my homework was done, I’d help her out, everything from arranging displays to sending out mailings. I fell in love with retail there. When I started this store, it was a straight-up antique shop with a few home accessories. But a new space gave us more room and allowed us to try new things. We are now carrying 50 percent antiques and vintage furniture and the rest is new and handcrafted furniture, art and accessories. The handmade is compelling in home design, and I’m lucky to be able to create a platform for smaller artists and brands, as well as a colorful place full of interesting objects you want to get closer to and discover.

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photo: lesley unruh.

KRB, NEW YORK


Borea outdoor collection, design Piero Lissoni. www.bebitalia.com


COLLABORATION

Golden State

RADAR

KELLY WEARSTLER LENDS A WEST COAST PERSPECTIVE TO FARROW & BALL’S FIRST-EVER DESIGNER PALETTE.

Kelly Wearstler draws inspiration from the California landscape for her new paint collaboration with Farrow & Ball. Walls painted in Faded Terracotta (pictured) are reminiscent of a sunrise, while Citrona (above) grounds one of Wearstler’s colorful material palettes.

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Terracotta tiles baking in the afternoon sun. Billows of cool Pacific fog rolling inland. An asphalt highway steaming through the desert. These and other vivid tableaus shape designer Kelly Wearstler’s latest love letter to California: a collection of eight paints for Farrow & Ball’s premier designer collaboration. Dreamy and diffuse, the palette is equal parts upbeat and restful. “I’m optimistic for the year ahead,” shares the L.A.-based designer. “I wanted to introduce colors that were fresh and lively, yet still have a calming relation to nature.” Homebound like the rest of us, she looked to her proverbial backyard for inspiration. “Every hue has an emotional touch point to the California landscape,” Wearstler explains, citing Palm, a chalky green homage to her hometown’s iconic allées, and Citrona, a lemon groveinspired “contemporary take on chartreuse.” It was this same site-specific view to design that prompted the heritage U.K. paint brand to approach Wearstler for its first-ever designer palette. “Kelly shares in our process of taking inspiration from textures and colors around her,” says Charlotte Cosby, head of creative at Farrow & Ball. “This collaboration is so exciting because it brings California’s warmth and Kelly’s signature style into homes in a relatable way through our paint.” While the Golden State served as muse, experimentation is encouraged across the continent, pond and beyond. After all, there are no color rules, if you ask Wearstler. “I always say that living without color is like living without love,” she says. “Don’t be afraid to take risks.”

portrait: amy graves/getty images. paint vignettes: trevor tondro.

W R I T T E N BY G R AC E B E U L E Y H U N T


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PORTER TELEO’S ABSTRACT, GESTURAL DESIGNS EXUDE A WABI-SABI TOUCH. DONEC IN MAGNA ID LIGULA FAUCIBUS MATTIS SED NISL NUNC, W R I T T E N BY H E AT H E R C A R N E Y SIT AMET TEMPOR PORTTITOR POSUERE ET MAURIS. W R I T T E N BY N A M E H E R E

SPIRIT RADAR

AMERICAN

Maker’s Mark Headline Here

Wallcovering designs, such as Form (shown), Synergy (far, right) and Taking Flight (left), illustrate Porter Teleo’s fluid, expressive approach. “We create inspiration inside our studio every day,” says Bridgett Cochran (pictured below, left, with cofounder Kelly Porter).

Has there been an upside to the challenges of the past year? KP: Change can be met with frustration and hesitation or it can be met with excitement and innovation. We put ourselves through a process of learning and looked at every section of our business. What adjustments did you make? BC: We’re doubling-down on our textile line and releasing 15 patterns, including some of our best performing wallcovering designs, such as Kintsugi, Pétales and

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Form. We also pulled out of showrooms. We require a lot of one-on-one communication with designers. Removing the middle man has been rewarding and enlightening. Is there an advantage to being in Kansas City in that you’re more insulated from trends? KP: Insulation is exactly right. To create something new, you have to exclude the outer world. There is a theme of companies doing what’s trending, what sells. We never go down that path; we never play it safe. Every time we put a big piece of Japanese paper flooded with pigments on the table, the designers are so excited.

Why is supporting women integral to your brand? KP: With a majority of female employees, there is a respectful and supportive energy exchanged throughout the day. We’ve learned from covering each other on maternity leave. If life hadn’t thrown us curveballs, we wouldn’t have adapted and diversified in ways that have benefited us.

Love that! How does human touch shape your designs? BC: We mix color by hand. Our artists have the freedom to express an aesthetic. We explore, ‘How wild can this mark be? How opaque can this flower be?’ It matters, for the world and humanity, that our products are made in this way.

If Porter Teleo drapery is framing the windows at a dinner party, what should the guests notice? KP: Our patterns are never repeated. There will be highs and lows and pockets of pigment. It offers the sense of something larger, like experiencing fine art with positive and negative space.

photos: courtesy porter teleo.

Exploration and introspection are at the heart of Porter Teleo—artist Kelly Porter and interior designer Bridgett Cochran’s Kansas City, Missouribased textile and wallcoverings brand beloved for its painterly palettes and poetic motifs. With a new business model, fresh pattern releases and a second line with Schumacher on the way, this duo is poised for a big year.


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IN HER LATEST TOME, CHARLOTTE MOSS REMINDS US THAT FLOWERS NEED NOT BE FORMAL. W R I T T E N BY S H A N N O N S H A R P E

Quisque tristique massa ac cursus scelerisque. faucibus quam. Quisque laoreet vulputate diam. Sed vel porta lorem. Nam blandit eu ante id euismod. Cras eu sem vel purus luctus elementum.

Charlotte Moss wants you to relax and stop worrying— at least when it comes to curating florals in the home. As the celebrated tastemaker expresses in her new book, Charlotte Moss: Flowers, published by Rizzoli this April, when thinking about arrangements, it’s time to throw the rulebook out the window. “Flowers need not be formal,” says Moss. “It can be as easy as walking by the local grocer or going into your garden. Really it’s about the personal and what moves you.” Moss is, of course, known for her sophisticated interiors, but she says,

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“there’s an informality to a lot of it— relaxed and comfortable, yet elegant at the same time.” And that’s exactly her approach to blooms, a passion which began as far back as she can remember. “I was drawn to them because of my maternal grandmother,” she says. “The house always smelled divine, because flowers were just part of her life. So, of course, I followed suit.” One part unconventional manual (there are no rules) and one part motivational musings of past icons (think Bunny Mellon and Pauline de Rothschild), Moss’s compilation emphasizes that composition should reflect personality and highlight the innate beauty of the blossom—no matter the type. For example, a few

“When it comes to arrangements, people freeze up and are completely stymied,” says interior designer Charlotte Moss. “Really, it’s all about creating your own style. In life, it’s most important to surround ourselves with beautiful things.”

cabbage roses tucked into a small vase on a bookshelf look just as beautiful as a large centerpiece. “I go out and poke around the garden and just pick a few flowers that somebody might not even think of,” she says. “But it’s an arrangement to me.” Above all, florals are meant to bring joy, and what sparks happiness varies from person to person. “Experiment,” Moss advises. “The greatest things come about as a result of being confident and a little fearless and saying, ‘It’s my house and I’m doing what I please.’ ”

photo: brittany ambridge.

LIFE RADAR

SHELF

Garden Variety


EXTERIORS


EMPLOYING AGE-OLD TECHNIQUES, CREATIVES ANSWER THE CALL FOR MODERN HANDICRAFT.

RADAR

W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY B R I T TA N Y C H E VA L I E R M C I N T Y R E

GEORGE SAWYER LAURA PRESTON San Marcos, Texas

Artistic inclination: During my first cross-country trip in an Airstream that lasted for four years, I was looking for a small-space creative outlet. I came across modern quilters who were rooted in tradition on social media and was hooked. Name game: In John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley, “Vacilando” meant someone who is going somewhere, but doesn’t exactly know how. Similar to my journey, not all those who wander are lost. Enduring legacy: Quilting is very much alive and well in America. It’s exciting to think my quilts might still exist in 50 years as an heirloom. vacilandoquilting.co

Woodbury, Vermont

Origins: I was raised in my father’s chair-making shop, so working with wood and using hand tools was always a part of my life. Go-to materials: Maple, ash, pine, cherry and oak— the vast majority comes from within 25 miles of our shop. Made to last: What’s important to me is how properly using these manual methods can drastically improve the durability, flexibility, comfort and life of a chair. Life lesson: My father taught me where precision matters. There are a lot of tiny details in our chairs and it’s easy to get lost in trying to make everything perfect—but he trained me to trust my eye and recognize that the subtle differences and movement in our chairs make them feel alive. sawyermade.com

CHARLOTTE TERRELL Nashville, Tennessee

Southern charm: I was drawn to and influenced by the architecture, gardens and work of highly skilled artisans in my hometown of Columbus, Mississippi, where a wealth of preCivil War homes with murals and hand-painted finishes still exist. Process: Each bespoke mural wallcovering is custom made for a project and my client. All elements of the room are considered—the palette, windows, doors, furnishings and even the desired length of the “repeat” in the landscape scene. American craftsmanship: To me, it is an expression of our time and the individual artist who contributes to the enhancement, beauty and harmony of our surroundings in limitless variations. charlotteterrell.com

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photos: courtesy respective brands.

HERITAGE

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CUSTOM DESIGNED FURNITURE FOR YOUR FLOOR Phone: 239.206.1898 | www.LegnoBastone.com




AMBIENT PEBBLE COLLECTION BY HENRIK PEDERSEN LOS ANGELES · CHICAGO · MIAMI · DANIA BEACH · NEW YORK FLAGSHIP WWW.GLOSTER.COM


MARKET MATERIAL

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SPOTLIGHT

Outdoor living gets a refresh with happy stripes, punchy furnishings and picks inspiriting nature.


MATERIAL MARKET

Juicy Fruit PERFORMANCE FABRICS TURN UP THE HEAT WITH LUSH HUES AND GRAPHIC LINES. P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N W I T H S A R A H S H E LT O N P H O T O G R A P H Y BY F R A N K F R A N C E S

GARDEN STATE Clockwise from top right: Big Stripe in Rainforest / no9thompson.com. Stitched Stripe in Green / fschumacher.com. Traveler in Spa / sharris.com. Rule in Spring / maharam.com.

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MATERIAL MARKET

TROPICAL PUNCH Clockwise from top right: Camden Stripe in Elderberry by Peter Fasano / johnrosselli.com. Caribbean Stripe in 483 / zimmer-rohde.com. Hiking Ticking in Coral / fabricut.com. Spiaggia Stripe in 03 / osborneandlittle.com.

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BRINGING ART TO LIFE | Zephyr by CALIFORNIA

ILLINOIS

NEW JERSE Y

NEW YORK

TE X AS

SHOWROOMS NATIONWIDE | NJ SL AB GALLERY | (844) 837-5627

artistictile.com/luxe


MATERIAL MARKET

FRESHLY SQUEEZED Clockwise from top right: Pavillion in Navy / pindler.com. Oak Tree Stripe in Indigo / thibautdesign.com. Young and Lovely in Soleil Nocturne / dedar.com. Cabana Stripe in Yellow / fschumacher.com.

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Custom furniture maker since 1969


MATERIAL MARKET

ORANGE CRUSH Clockwise from top right: Strange Loves in Carrot Stick / dedar.com. Morning Glory in Melon / linkoutdoor.com. Jake Stripe in Tutti Frutti / perennialsfabrics.com. Cakewalk in Coral / larsenfabrics.com.

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IntroducIng the HENRY OUTDOOR PENDANT 800.826.4766

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vermont usa

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luxe@vtforge.com

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hubbardtonforge.com

All Designs and Images ©1989 - 2021 Hubbardton Forge, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Hubbardton Forge is the registered trademark of Hubbardton Forge, LLC.


L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M 888-889-8891 / INQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM


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CHRISTOPHERPEACOCK JESSIE D. MILLER INTERIOR DESIGN MEGAN LORENZ PHOTO


TREND MARKET

NATURAL BEAUTY Luxe gets up close and personal with marvels of the natural world. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY S A R A H S H E LT O N

Butterfly Effect

Clockwise from top, right: Entreé Multi-Color Wall Sconce / Price upon request / curreyandcompany.com.. Gemma Sunglasses / $520 / chloe.com. Giulietta Screen by Carlo Donati / $8,600 / essentialhome.eu. Henley Outdoor Accent Stool / $169 / frontgate.com.. Colette Outdoor Armchair by Rodolfo Dordoni / Price upon request / minotti.com. Cadence Fabric in Emerald by Stacy Garcia for Crypton / $53 per yard / calicocorners.com. Mirage Fabric in Ember / Price upon request / ericashamrocktextiles.com. Tourmaline Crystal Necklace / $48,00 / emilypwheeler.com.

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES.

By the numbers: There are upward of 17,500 species of butterflies in the world, with around 750 of those in the United States. Dressed for success: Thousands of scales and tiny hairs make up the insect’s wing. Some camouflage with their surroundings, while others employ decorative eyespots to deceive lurking predators. Fun fact: Butterflies taste with their feet. Need for speed: Skipper butterflies can reach speeds up to 37 mph.

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We Make

ELECTRIC

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bevolo.com • (504) 522-9485 • 521 Conti • 318 Royal • French Quarter • New Orleans


TREND MARKET

Coral Moment

Clockwise from top, right: Seashore Drop Necklace / $1,408 / grainnemorton.co.uk. Corail Outdoor Fabric by Caspari / Price upon request / pierrefrey.com. Gymmetria Plate 3 by Laboratorio Paravicini / $70 / collectoworld.com. Vimini Hand-Painted Vase by Margot Larkin / $380 / casabranca.com. Borea Chair by Piero Lissoni / $3,378 / bebitalia.com. Rattan Hurlingham Bookcase / $7,875 / soane.com. Jane Rattan Clutch Bag / $245 / kayudesign.com. Medusa Wall Light / $2,195 / julianchichester.com.

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PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES.

Natural habitat: Coral can be found in tropical and subtropical oceans in shallow waters of less than 150 feet deep. Bragging rights: The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest living structure, extending more than 1,400 miles. History lesson: The Romans believed coral possessed protective properties, and through the Victorian Era, it was common to see a small child wearing a coral necklace for protection. Superpower under the sea: Doctors are looking to coral reefs to develop treatments for cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.


MONTEREY COLLECTION Schedule a complimentary virtual design consultation or shop online. SummerClassicsHome.com/Luxe


TREND MARKET

Tree of Life

Clockwise from top, right: Woodgrain Velvet Pillow by Kevin O’Brien / $390 / abchome.com.. Edge Collection With Wood Texture / $968 / rockymountainhardware.com. Oil Bath For The Senses by Susanne Kaufmann / $76 / dermstore.com. Pakurigo Basket by Baba Tree / $200 / goodeeworld.com.. Root Outdoor Coffee Table / $1,799 / arhaus.com. Elevation Loveseat / Price upon request / lloydflanders.com. Uppark Fabric in Saffron & Rose / Price upon request / cowtan.com.. Paglia Low Bowl / Price upon request / alexanderlamont.com. Bamboo Wall Sconce / Price upon request / lanternmasters.com.

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PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES.

Metadata: Thirty percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in forest. Age is just a number: Research shows that trees evolved more than 300 million years ago. Fact-check: Dendrochronology is the study of data from the growth of tree rings. Gracious givers: Not only do trees provide us with oxygen, but they also clean our drinking water, remove pollution from the atmosphere, have a positive effect on mental health and aid in saving energy.


The Beckett Collection + Charlie Feizy

To find your local sales rep, please call 800.779.0877

feizy.com @feizyrugs


LLOYD NECK, NY | $19,500,000 Laffey Real Estate Philip Laffey — +1 516 359 1489 WEB ID: SGFC8

Well Connected.™ Finding your home is a personal process of discovery, and the accomplished global network of Luxury Portfolio International® member companies are ready to assist in the journey. Explore over 50,000 of the world’s finest properties marketed on luxuryportfolio.com each year. Enter the property Web ID for more detail.

LUXURYPORTFOLIO.COM

LONDON +44 20 7872 5525 CHICAGO +1 312 424 0400 SINGAPORE +65 6408 0507

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NORTH PALM BEACH, FL | $13,400,000 Illustrated Properties Real Estate, Inc. Jennifer Hyland — +1 561 632 4042

VERO BEACH, FL | $11,500,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Matilde Sorensen — +1 772 532 0010

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC | $9,900,000 Dunes Real Estate Mark Lynch — +1 843 842 0819

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PALM BEACH GARDENS, FL | $9,400,000 Illustrated Properties Real Estate, Inc. Jennifer Hyland — +1 561 632 4042

TUCSON, AZ | $4,900,000 Long Realty Company Leslie Heros — +1 520 302 3324

DENNIS, CAPE COD, MA | $2,500,000 Robert Paul Properties Cindy Harrington — +1 508 776 8181

WEB ID: MCBK8

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CHICAGO, IL | $1,495,000 @properties Layne Zagorin — +1 773 425 0039

JONESTOWN, TX | $1,240,000 Realty Austin Jeffrey Nyland — +1 512 626 8552

PORTLAND, OR | $1,150,000 Hasson Company Realtors Courtney LeBoeuf — +1 503 962 0440

WEB ID: DHSK8

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©2021 Luxury Portfolio International.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Offering is subject to errors, omissions, change of price, or withdrawal without notice. All information considered reliable; however, it has been supplied by third parties and should not be relied on as accurate or complete.


SPOTLIGHT MARKET

Sunny Outlook COOL AND COLORFUL, THESE ALFRESCO FURNISHINGS ARE AN ODE TO BEACHY, RETRO DAYS OF YORE. P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N W I T H S A R A H S H E LT O N P H O T O G R A P H Y BY F R A N K F R A N C E S

GROUND COVER Ideal for outdoor living, the Stripe Ombre Flatwoven Rug in Blue Jean by Perennials is resistant to fading from ultraviolet rays and uses acrylic yarns for a soft and plush effect underfoot. perennialsrugs.com

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SPOTLIGHT MARKET

BRIGHT LINE The idea for the Ribbon Chair by Laun was sparked by founders Rachel Bullock and Molly Purnell’s formal exploration of a single line. The layered aluminum tubes stack together to shape a solid display allowing for custom widths in an infinite combination of forms. launlosangeles.com

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DOMETIC.COM/MOBAR


SPOTLIGHT MARKET

HOT SEAT Austrian designer Harald Guggenbichler went back to basics when developing the Surprising Stool for Fermob with clean lines and a steel powder-coated frame. This smart, stackable design comes in 24 colors, including icy mint, shown, and makes for a perfect patio perch. fermobusa.com

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E x p E r i E N C E

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SPOTLIGHT MARKET

MADE IN THE SHADE Santa Barbara Designs pays homage to one of the 20th century’s most celebrated photographers with the introduction of the Slim Aarons American Icons Collection. The Poolside Gossip Double Decker Umbrella in Lemonade specifically references a famous Palm Springs, California, snapshot. santabarbaradesigns.com

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HA M I SH MACKIE HAMI M AC KI E SCULPTUR SC UL P T URE E LIFE IN BRONZE

Catalogue available, get in touch if you would like to be sent one. Sculptures shipped worldwide directly from my UK studio. www.hamishmackie.com • hamish@hamishmackie.com • + 44 (0) 7971 028 098


SPOTLIGHT MARKET

SURFACE LEVEL The launch of Bernhardt Exteriors, the company’s first foray into the outdoor arena, includes the stylish, midcentury-inspired Encinitas Cocktail and End Tables. The flecked terrazzo pieces feature minimalistic silhouettes and a sturdy construction that stands up to the natural elements. bernhardt.com

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Escape to a place where Perennials’ latest stain, fade and mildew-resistant fabrics & rugs make luxury living worry free. perennialsfabrics.com


SPOTLIGHT MARKET

LAY LOW Bold and graphic, Marni Moon Walk is the fashion brand’s collection of whimsical furnishings, accessories and objects devoted to exploring the universe. Made by Colombian artisans, the colorful PVC-and-metal Chaise Lounge invites guests to sit back and dream on. marni.com

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100 MILLION YEARS IN THE MAKING From the heart of the earth to the heart of your home

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Brazilian Fossil Quartzite / Brazil




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EUROPEAN BED & BATH LINENS

VISIT SCANDIA HOME AT THESE LOCATIONS:

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BIRMINGHAM, MI 237 Pierce St. 248.649.7673

ALSO FIND SCANDIA PRODUCTS AT: Pioneer Linens West Palm Beach, FL Feather Your Nest Austin, TX

Threadcount Miami, FL

Elizabeth Grace Home Cincinnati, OH

Block Bros. At Home Pepper Pike, OH Casa di Lino Dallas, TX

Kuhl-Linscomb Houston, TX

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The Linen Kist Avon, CO Lynnens Greenwich, CT

scandiahome.com

Longoria Collection Houston, TX Bonsoir Fine Linens Wellesley, MA

Bedside Manor Charlotte, NC

Gracious Home New York, NY

Gramercy Fine Linens Atlanta, GA

The Linen Gallery Omaha, NE


LIVING KITCHEN

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Offering the ultimate alfresco retreat, Luxe takes it outside with elegant kitchen spaces and luxurious “rooms” designed for backyard escapism.


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LIVING

KITCHEN

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BATH


Breath of Fresh Air SOPHISTICATED INDOOR-OUTDOOR KITCHENS DELIVER THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS.

photo: matthew williams, courtesy the brooklyn home co.

W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N

On New York’s Lake Canandaigua, Lyndsay Caleo Karol, cofounder and creative director of The Brooklyn Home Company, designed a practical pool house to accommodate her family’s easy summer lifestyle. Working alongside Bayer Landscape Architecture, a pool with a waterfall edge was also built to take advantage of the picturesque setting.


BATH KITCHEN

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LAKESIDE LIVING

LIVING

THE BROOKLYN HOME COMPANY

It’s all in the family for Lyndsay Caleo Karol, who began the successful design and development firm The Brooklyn Home Company—alongside brother Bill Caleo and artist husband Fitzhugh Karol—more than 14 years ago when they were tasked with fixing a dilapidated property with a few hundred dollars and some Home Depot tools. Fast forward to today, and many homes later, Caleo Karol knew her approach to updating her family’s idyllic retreat on New York’s Lake Canandaigua to include a new pool house would be much the same as in the beginning: honor natural materials, incorporate artisan details and look to the light. thebrooklynhomecompany.com This project was personal, right? Yes! I was lucky enough to grow up going to the Finger Lakes—one of the most beautiful areas of the country, in my opinion—but over the years, as our family grew, so did our need for space. When we tore out an old tennis court to build a pool, I knew that an accompanying structure was needed to house towels, help with outside eating and act as a crash pad for kids.

Does the kitchen get a lot of action? In the warmer months, we gather for most meals here and eat outside at the massive table under the pergola. The kitchen is where a lot of prep work and cooking happens. It has a sink, refrigerator, freezer and a lot of storage zones for snacks. I wanted the design to feel relaxed, simple and timeless with the white, bright paneling that continues throughout the pool house and natural bluestone flooring you see outside as well. It’s also important for us to add a handmade element and artist Natalie Page’s ceramic lighting hangs beautifully under the eaves.

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photo: matthew williams, courtesy the brooklyn home co.

Tell us about the pool house. When we can all be together, there can be 20 of us and everyone seems to end up in the pool, so I knew this building would be getting a lot of use! From the beginning, we understood the footprint here was pretty tight to work with and, just like in the city, we always go up. As soon as the ceiling was raised, the entire area became so much more inviting and a place you really want to hang out. Optimizing natural light with large windows and doors was also paramount.


Responsible Elegance www.neolith.com | @neolithbythesize

GLOBAL GRANITE & MARBLE: MO, KY & KS; MARVA MARBLE: VA, MD, NC, DC, WV, PA, DE, SC; OLLIN STONE: Southern CA; POMOGRANIT STONES: TX (Houston);

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BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

PATIO PERFECT

photo: courtesy caesarstone.

As the world of alfresco entertaining expands, Caesarstone has taken note. For the first time, the maker of luxury quartz surfaces has released a new line designed specifically for the outdoors. The highly durable material can stand up to extreme weather and is combined with stain resistant and easy-to-clean properties, making the Solaris Collection ideal for backyard kitchen set ups and grilling areas. Think: patio dining tables, counters, bar tops and backsplash details. The surfaces are available in three colorways—Clearskies, Palm Shade and Midday, shown, which has a soft organic look with a concrete finish. caesarstoneus.com

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NoirFurnitureLA.com


BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

ON TAP

HEATING UP

Barbecue on the mind? Look no further than the 48-inch DCS Series 9 Grill—an advanced cooking experience over the flame. With freestanding or built-in styles, this appliance features an infrared rotisserie, charcoal smoker tray and ample storage. A secondary cooking surface allows for a wide repertoire of options—slow cooking, roasting, sauces—and keeps food warm after searing. Turn up the heat with the 25,000 BTU burners, which allow for precise heat control from 300 to 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit. dcsappliances.com

Cocktails by the pool just got a whole lot easier thanks to Dometic’s introduction of the MoBar, the ultimate mobile beverage center. Offered in three sizes, the 550 model at left has dual-zone refrigeration that can house 40 bottles of wine or 155 cans with a removable retention ice bucket on top for another 22 bottles. A storage drawer and cabinet as well as side shelving allow for plenty of room for mixers, snacks and glasses. Cheers to that! dometic.com

ELEGANCE ABOUND

photos: courtesy respective companies.

Sherle Wagner International extends the luxury of indoor bathing to an outdoor environment with its elevated assortment of products like the handsome Grey Shower System. Inspired by refined English Country style, the designs are cast in solid brass with a 24-karat gold finish suitable for a range of climates and conditions. sherlewagner.com

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P R O M O T I O N

DESIGN HAPPENS HERE

Welcome to luxesource.com, where engaging design stories, stunning photography, and a robust resource directory combine to inform and inspire. Take a look around, and make yourself at home.

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BATH + KITCHEN LIVING

LA DOLCE VITA LUXESOURCE.COM

“We live outside all summer and my backyard is the joy of my life,” enthuses Artistic Tile founder and CEO Nancy Epstein of her otherworldly outdoor oasis in Tenafly, New Jersey. With a charming pergola wrapped in grapevines and limestone columns cloaked in jasmine, sitting in the serene surroundings feels much like being in Italy, a favorite travel

destination for Epstein. When the time came to update the area, a striking yet durable blue quartzite from Brazil was cut for the floors while a custom glass floral mosaic called Walden decorates the surface behind the sink. The layers of blue hues create a lovely effect that ties into the large swimming pool, just steps away. The sweet life, indeed. artistictile.com

photos: courtesy artistic tile.

In Nancy Epstein’s romantic backyard haven in Tenafly, New Jersey—a mere 5 miles from New York City—Azul Bochira quartzite adorns the floor, while Azul Bahia granite tops the bar counters and Walden tile adds a splash on the wall.


FURNITURE • LIGHTING • ACCESSORIES • OUTDOOR • C.O.M • TO-THE-TR A DE • HOSPITA LIT Y

80 0.274.7730 | PA L EC E K .C OM


S P E C I A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

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NATIONAL LOOKBOOK | OUTDOOR LIVIN G

LLOYD FLANDERS lloydflanders.com |

lloyd_flanders

At Lloyd Flanders, the tagline “Woven for Life” is more than an idea. The 100-plus-year-old creator of premier outdoor furnishings has built a legacy on giving homeowners and design pros the open-air pieces they seek, which today includes mixing and matching unique fabrics and finishes. But it has also ensured that every product embodies the driving principles of quality and sustainability. “Everything we make is crafted to be heirloom quality, made to be handed down through generations,” says Jess Flanders, who runs the company alongside Dudley Flanders and Warren Juliano. “We also use natural materials, like cellulose fiber, and can repaint to update

“Today, everyone wants a custom look. Homeowners aren’t interested in what’s available at big-box stores.”

finishes, providing more years of use. Plus, all of our teak products are certified by the FSC and made from sustainable sources.” They are indeed woven for life—for the life of a design, the life of the user, and the life of the planet.

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: LLOYD LOOM One of Lloyd Flanders’ standout offerings, the proprietary Lloyd Loom wicker is a natural fiber wicker fabric with long-lasting, high-performance Durium polyester coating for outdoor durability and flexibility. The continuous weave avoids burrs and cracking, and increases visual appeal by eliminating visible material ends. All that, and Lloyd Loom products are available in 20 custom finishes.

CARE + KEEPING •W here it starts: “The proper upkeep of outdoor spaces begins with the selection of high-quality products,” Jess says. “Strength of craftsmanship makes all the difference. We build to withstand full exposure to sun, rain and even snow.”

Top: The Catalina sofa and chairs in the Hickory finish perfectly complement teak tables in this Costa Mesa, California, space by Molly Wood Garden Design. Left: In this Charlotte, North Carolina, look by Lisa Mende Design, the Hamptons collection sofa and lounge chairs complement Weekend Retreat swivel gliders in the Pewter finish and teak accessory tables. Right: One might argue that the Terracotta finish and Essence lounge chair were made for each other.

•H ow to clean: Lloyd Flanders recommends the following routine to its clients: Vacuum or use a soft brush on woven material and cushions to remove organic particles and loosen surface soil, then rinse with a mild detergent and clean water.



S P E C I A L

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NATIONAL LOOKBOOK | OUTDOOR LIVIN G

UNIVERSAL FURNITURE universalfurniture.com |

universalfurn

It’s easy to understand why outdoor living spaces have become an essential part of the home. They not only extend usable square footage, but also invite one to create an open-air retreat. What isn’t so easy is the actual process of building these environments—and that’s mostly due to the intense demand on furnishings. This is where Universal Furniture comes in. “With more than 100 products to choose from in a variety of different materials and special-order cushion options from brands like Sunbrella, we provide the consumer with countless ways to make their space highly practical while meeting design goals,” says Neil MacKenzie, the company’s director

“Homeowners want flexible gathering spaces, especially now. Outdoor furniture for dining and conversation areas is taking priority.”

of marketing. Indeed, Universal’s array of choices helps homeowners and design pros alike to make the most of patios, decks and backyards.

MATERIALITY: AN A-TEAM ROSTER What goes into Universal’s immaculately crafted furnishings? Well … ll-weather recyclable wicker •A that is tested with full UV exposure for 7,500 hours owder-coated aluminum •P in Charcoal, Fog, Carbon and Chalk colorways, the scraps of which are recycled ast concrete reinforced •C with fiberglass • Grade-A FSC Certified Natural Teak • Seat cushions with antimicrobial foam to keep them from developing mold or mildew lipcovers and upholstered •S pieces wrapped in performance fabrics that are resistant to UV rays and fading, plus able to be cleaned with bleach wivels, swivel gliders •S and mechanisms that are salt-tested for 500 hours

Top: Coastal Living Outdoor’s Seneca dining table, Del Mar chair and Panama chair combine beautifully in this covered waterfront space. Left: The Chesapeake dining table and side chairs from Coastal Living Outdoor make this spot for family dinners or entertaining guests feel like a resort.



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photo: holly lepere.

LIVING

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REPORT


Fancy Free OPEN-AIR DREAMSCAPES ARE THE ORDER OF THE DAY.

Over the past year, exterior living spaces have proved as essential as interior ones, offering gathering grounds, peaceful refuge and a semblance of escape. Celebrating this spirit, Luxe shares tales of garden delights across the country, beginning with landscape designer Margie Grace’s own Montecito, California Shangri-La. Here, under the canopy of an 80-year-old oak tree, Grace crafted a “room” for coffee and contemplation by placing an antique faux bois dining set under the majestic sweep of its branches. “At 5 o’clock in the afternoon, the light comes up from under those leaves and acts like a spotlight on the table,” she says. “I think to myself, ‘It’s like the wood fairies live here.’ ”

WR I T T E N AN D PR ODU CE D BY GR ACE BEULEY HUNT At her Montecito, California property, landscape designer Margie Grace looked to Japanese principles in arranging public living spaces close to the house and quieter moments—like this perch for morning coffee—on the garden’s outermost “concentric circles.” Adds Grace, “It becomes a different kind of party the further you roam.” gracedesignassociates.com


REPORT THE

this page: moveable feast photo: the ingalls, courtesy rizzoli. opposite: taking root photo: michael stavaridis.

LIVING

MOVEABLE FEAST CHRISTOPHER SPITZMILLER WAXES POETIC ON A PRIZED OUTDOOR STAPLE. Fifteen years ago, when I purchased my home, there was no garden to speak of. But after a decade of improvements, I find that so much of our time is spent outside. One of my workhorses is a cider pressing table that first came into my life—like many things with style and practicality—through my mother. It quickly took on a new life as a portable garden table. We’re serial hosts at Clove Brook Farm, and in fair weather, we entertain outside whenever possible. For special occasions, we’ll move the table to whichever garden room is in its prime. We’ve used it for a Fourth of July lunch in the front yard beneath the shade of a maple tree, in

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the Dovecote Garden programmed as a bar for a summer cocktail party and for an evening dinner in our Sunken Garden when the Casa Blanca lilies are blooming. For that occasion, we styled the table to conjure a garden fantasy right out of John Singer Sargent’s painting, Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose. The roving cider press table appears in a number of different incarnations throughout my new book, A Year At Clove Brook Farm, which I hope will inspire people to get outside and seize the abundance offered by each season. There are no rules to outdoor living: I use my best dishes, glassware and silver. (No paper

plates or napkins here!) If you don’t have a vintage table, use what option you do have dressed in an interesting cloth. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to bring precious items outside. Using beautiful things in the garden makes an already enchanting setting all the more magical. christopherspitzmiller.com


TAKING ROOT “It’s like that saying about the shoemaker who can’t make his own shoes,” says Keith Williams of creating his West Palm Beach garden. For the landscape designer, such musings might surprise, but the more paint chips in your fan deck, the harder it is to pick a color. “I sketched so many versions that finally I said, ‘Let’s just order X amount of this and this,’ and when it arrived, I pieced it all together,” he demurs. What came of this approach is a series of small, graceful compositions set against an expanse of white pea gravel. In its organic simplicity, it nods to gardens of southern France, while stars like glossy fiddle-leaf fig and monstera— meticulously arranged to balance light, scale and texture—keep the feel firmly Floridian. While in its nascency, the garden hints at lushness to come. Plumes of rosemary and sage dance in the gravel, creating a sensory experience should you brush against them, espalier jasmine pops against the home’s stucco façade and newly planted palms reach skyward. Meanwhile, native pollinators—porterweed, Buddleia, Simpson’s stopper—lure butterflies, a favorite of the daughter Williams and his wife, Nicole, adopted last spring. As the couple awaited her birth, they began to notice butterflies everywhere, and when Colette came home, butterflies followed. “I’m a huge fan of green-on-green and normally, I don’t like color,” says Williams. “But I knew these flowers would be rewarding. Every day, she makes these crazy noises because there are butterflies all around us and she loves them.” nieverawilliams.com


THREE DESIGNERS CHAT ALFRESCO DECOR AND INSPIRATIONS.

LIVING

THE

REPORT

EN PLEIN AIR

BRIGETTE ROMANEK

CAROLINE GIDIERE

KEVIN SPEARMAN

Memorable oasis: Monet’s flower garden in Giverny. Durable textiles: Rose Tarlow for Perennials (above). Rugs for outdoor living: Ben Soleimani. Dream sculpture: Richard Serra. How to make a play structure elegant: With a custom design in natural colors that blend with nature—instead of bright swings, choose colors that are soft and seamlessly blend in. Best hardscape material: Concrete or a gorgeous stone (one that doesn’t get too hot in summer). Go-to flower: Jasmine, for its sweet, romantic scent—instant joy.

Chic bug repeller: Large terra-cotta pots of lavender. Dream lighting: Lum ‘Art (right). Newness to love: Aerin’s East Hampton Collection for Williams-Sonoma Home. The key to simple but beautiful outside decor: Parterre around loose, flowering plants. Tabletop ingredients: Bamboo flatware, rattan accessories and colorful printed cotton table linens, like those from Amanda Lindroth (left), which I coordinate with in-season flowers. Go-to garden book: David Hicks: My Kind of Garden. Integrate a swimming pool: With grass up to the pool’s edge. Finishing touches: Pots filled with boxwood or white impatiens, foot lanterns for candles in the evening and garden stools to rest your drink. Shade solution: Hornbeam pleached like umbrellas, as on the patio of the French hotel, La Bastide de Gordes. carolinegidiere.com

Trends du jour: Large fire pits for small gatherings and simply chic rectangular swimming pools. Patio favorite: I love rosemary in flower beds. It also looks great (and smells wonderful) in terra-cotta pots atop a dining table. Top plant for foliage: Bougainvillea for the unreal fuchsia color. Every outdoor room needs: A rug, a blooming plant and fun pillows.

Favorite plant for foliage: Olive trees. Best decking material: A recycled composite, which doesn’t mold. Brand you’re loving now: Belgian brand Tribù (left). How to enjoy a garden year-round: With heaters—and lighting in the trees as well as around stumps and pathways. Add warm drinks and a fire! romanekdesignstudio.com

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BIRMINGHAM

HOUSTON

Go-to furniture brand: David Sutherland—so chic and understated. The Franck Series is clean-lined and still classic. Hero decking material: Peacock Pavers, a concrete product that we use indoors and run outside around the pool for seamless cohesiveness. Bonus: The maintenance is easy and forgiving. Landscape architect you’d love to collaborate with: French landscape designer Jean Mus, who we did an amazing property with in Tel Aviv, Israel. kevinspearman.com

THIS PAGE: ROMANEK PHOTOS, FROM TOP: YE RIN MOK; COURTESY PERENNIALS; DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY; COURTESY TRIBU. GIDIERE PHOTOS, FROM TOP: MARIAH OLDACRE; COURTESY LUM’ART; COURTESY AMANDA LINDROTH; COURTESY AIRELLES GORDES, LA BASTIDE. SPEARMAN PHOTOS, FROM TOP: JONATHAN ZIZZO; COURTESY PEACOCK PAVERS; FRANCOIS HALARD; COURTESY DAVID SUTHERLAND. OPPOSITE: PARTY IN THE FRONT PHOTO: LESLEE MITCHELL.

LOS ANGELES


PARTY in the FRONT Enchanting and unexpected with an air of European chic, entry courtyards are having a moment. Here, designer Robin Rains, architect Douglas Enoch and landscape architect Anne Daigh discuss designing this Nashville jewel. Why a courtyard? DE: It’s an urban setting, so we wanted to make use of the lot. I grew up in the south, where there are many “surprise courtyards”—I love that idea of a surprise behind a gate. AD: Privacy was also very important; the clients wanted to sit outside in the mornings and have their coffee in seclusion. RR: Doug built this beautiful brick wall with an arched doorway and we commissioned a custom copper lantern to hang high above. It really beckons you in. Tell us about the design. AD: We planted two crepe myrtles, which create a pergola and make you feel like you’re in an outdoor room. Then we added structured landscape with dwarf

boxwood and billowing hydrangeas. The simplicity of the space—the way it wraps around you—is what makes it so charming. DE: Each of the four façades is symmetrical, so wherever you sit is a relaxing experience. RR: We carried the French limestone paving inside for seamless transition and chose Janus et Cie’s Amalfi iron canopy chairs, floating them in the courtyard as “sculpture furniture.”

What makes the room? DE: The pear espaliers, because they soften and echo the architectural symmetry. AD: Those pear trees create another level of rustic provenance. Plus, they actually produce beautiful green pears! RR: To me, the espaliers are another sculpture. Imagine going out into your courtyard to fetch breakfast? It feels like you’re in France. robinrains.com; enocharchitects.com; daighrick.com


P R O M O T I O N

| NATIO NAL |

DISCOVERIES FRESH.DESIGN.FINDS.

DOMETIC Serve and entertain guests in style with the Dometic Mobar, the ultimate mobile bar for any and every outdoor entertaining space. dometic.com/mobar

NOIR TR ADING The Ray Console is made from mahogany lumber and coated in Noir’s smoky pale finish with black highlights. The lightly painted finish accentuates the hand-carved curves that flow down the face of the console. Priced at $1,830. noirfurniturela.com

ZEPHYR Introducing Zephyr Connect—a groundbreaking app that lets users control their Zephyr hood from anywhere using their mobile device. With real-time diagnostics, videos, voice-command connectivity and helpful alerts, Zephyr Connect empowers customers to connect to what matters. zephyronline.com


P R O M O T I O N

HECTOR FINCH The Double Lucia Pendant in Aegean Blue is a simple yet elegant fixture that can be used in any living room space or throughout the kitchen, often placed over an island or low over a table or eating area. The overall drop, width and number of shades can be customized upon ordering. hectorfinch.com

UNIVERSAL FURNITURE Universal is excited to introduce Coastal Living Outdoor. Featuring over 100 pieces of casually sophisticated silhouettes paired with premium durability, Coastal Living Outdoor’s collection instantly transforms and enriches any patio, deck or other outdoor haven.

CHRISTOPHER PEACOCK

coastallivinghomecollection.com/outdoor

Christopher Peacock introduces his Hudson Collection. A clean aesthetic with special details, hardware and material selections, this more modern style is perfect for an urban apartment or a large contemporary, suburban home. Custom colors and hardware finishes available. peacockhome.com

J. TRIBBLE J. Tribble’s long history of building beautiful, custom sink bases now extends to repurposing antique treasures for modern homes. In addition to its signature designs, J. Tribble offers European antiques to be converted into truly unique sink bases. jtribble.com


“With Western Window Systems, we were able to put a lot of multi-slide doors in and still meet the energy objectives we were chasing.” - Dan Coletti, president, Sun West Custom Homes


westernwindowsystems.com

Moving glass walls and windows for all the ways you live.


Save the Drama

Channeling the grande dame of an English manor, a Hamptons home leaves a lasting impression. W R I T T E N BY L I S A B I N G H A M D E WA R T P H O T O G R A P H Y BY P E T E R M A R G O N E L L I

Interior Design: Tatum Kendrick, Studio Hus Home Builder: Ronan O’Dwyer, Abstract Builders


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he most meaningful designer-client relationships often span miles and generations. Such was the case for Tatum Kendrick, who reunited with a beloved East Coast family for the sixth time on their new Hamptons residence. The couple first hired Kendrick over a decade ago, back when her now Los Angeles-based firm had just launched in Manhattan. “They let me push the envelope and be experimental from the very beginning,” says Kendrick. “After six houses together, we have a real trust and shorthand established. They let us do what we do.” This time around, the homeowners were up-sizing—as was their family head count. To accommodate a growing brood of grandchildren, they had purchased a textbook shingled abode just a quick jaunt from the charms of East Hampton village. “It was much more classical with lots of built-ins and millwork,” says Kendrick, “but I didn’t want it to feel ‘Hamptons.’ The story in my mind was that it had been passed down through generations; a crazy British grandma type of house that I could layer in.” For inspiration, Kendrick turned—where else?—to old English country homes, the kind with paint- and pattern-saturated rooms. “In those old manor houses, you turn a corner, and something is different. I didn’t want things to feel match-y,” says the designer, adding, “It needed to be darker, moodier and sexier.” She established that vibe with a few initial moves. Working with general contractor Ronan O’Dwyer (whom she had collaborated with on two previous projects for these clients), checkerboard flooring was laid in the entrance and in the back of the house, and any remaining cherry floorboards were swapped out for oak. Beyond that, “I knew I wanted to paint the trim black and have a leopard runner on the stairs,” she says. Bold black paint and cheetah motifs appear again in the den, where Kendrick swathed the wainscoting in an inky shade and upholstered both the ottoman and floral sectional’s back pillows in animal print. She dubs that piece “a wackadoodle grandma sofa” and says of the leopard, “For me,

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it’s like a stripe—the perfect neutral. I love how it looks with graphic patterns and how timeless it is.” The mood in the dining room lightens a touch with shades of celadon paint, which she paired with an immersive leaf motif wallcovering. Against the more country-feeling backdrop, Kendrick worked in nods to the wife’s love of midcentury furnishings, such as the Danish chairs, a Guillerme et Chambron sideboard and a Gio Ponti-style light fixture, along with the monolithic Angelo Mangiarotti marble table that plays to the traditional architectural detailing. The living room stands out as an ethereal exception. “There was no way to make it feel moody,” Kendrick says of the airy, double-height space with its floor-to-ceiling windows. “So, we decided to turn it into a light box.” Leaning into the light, the designer chose a pale neutral tone for the walls and a crisper white for the traditional millwork. She swapped out the existing fireplace mantel for a modern iteration in a richly veined Arabescato marble. And for furnishings, she opted for a few key pieces with strong, organic forms— like the Noguchi Cloud sofa—arranged in an “asymmetrical, askew” layout. “The idea,” Kendrick explains, “was to feel like you were walking into a sculpture garden.” Peppered in though are antiques, or items that read antique, reinforcing the home’s collected-over-time ethos. For instance, she had the daybed (where Madame Récamier would have felt entirely at ease), custom-made and placed a bust of Julius Caesar, rendered in the same marble as the fireplace surround, on a column. “We blindfolded him to have a little fun,” she adds. Blindfolded Caesar notwithstanding, “I don’t try to shock or make a statement—I think of a story,” says Kendrick. “And that boils down to the purpose of design. The spaces you live within shape your energy, thought processes and feelings. With this house, we ran with that as we went from room to room.” From the dark, cozy den, to the dining room where high-style Italian design meets the English countryside, to the expansive prism of a living room, each space packs a distinct emotional punch. “It was,” says Kendrick, “so fun to create all these different pockets of personality.”


English country houses and their beguiling mix of old and new inspired designer Tatum Kendrick’s take on her longtime clients’ Hamptons home. In the sunlit living room, she juxtaposed a Noguchi sofa from Design Within Reach and Norman Bel Geddes lounge chairs atop a Stark carpet with a custom neoclassical-style chaise. The pattern of the Arabescato marble fireplace surround echoes the bust of Julius Caesar from 1stdibs.


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Above: General contractor Ronan O’Dwyer converted the garage into a guest dwelling with its own kitchen. As thoughtfully outfitted as the main residence, the space boasts Tabarka Studio tiles on the backsplash, Grigio Toscano marble countertops from ABC Stone, a Brizo faucet and a swing-arm sconce from 1stdibs. Opposite: “I have always loved this Scalamandré wallpaper,” Kendrick says of the dining room’s romantic covering. The furnishings span decades, from the 1960s Guillerme et Chambron sideboard, Finn Juhl chairs and Gio Ponti-style light fixture, to the marble Angelo Mangiarotti dining table from Studio Twenty Seven.


Left: Kendrick says she’s a fan of a good pantry, and the one she designed for her clients is no exception with its checkerboard flooring and celadon-hued millwork. The brass Van Cronenburg cabinet hardware “checks my inner fancy-lady box,” she notes. Opposite: Even a mudroom allowed Kendrick the chance to explore her passion for wallpaper. Above the classic wainscoting, she opted for an Hermès covering. A collection of artwork and vintage accessories bring a collected feel.


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“Leopard adds a layer of punk and sex appeal,” Kendrick says of the House of Hackney pattern she chose for the den’s sofa pillows and George Smith ottoman. “A home needs to get a little roughed up—nothing too precious or appointed.” The Jasper floral makes for a kicky contrast.


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Right: Against the den’s backdrop of traditional millwork painted in an off-black Farrow & Ball hue stands a custom chair and a vintage Jean Rispal floor lamp. “It’s an explosion of layers of wackiness,” Kendrick says of the space. Opposite: A 19th-century Biedermeier table anchors the upstairs landing. Underfoot is a Stark carpet that continues the leopard motif. Beyond is the entry to the main suite and a fireplace Kendrick retained but refaced with 4-by-4 tiles, her riff on traditional Swedish kakelugn stoves.


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Above: The Scalamandré wallpaper in a powder room “echoes a more classical European look,” says Kendrick. She paired it with a similarly classic marble-topped vanity from Urban Archaeology. Pierre Guariche sconces flank the oblong mirror from Monc XIII in Sag Harbor. Opposite: In the main bedroom, a cement-on-canvas piece by Hamptons-based artist Darius Yektai, above the custom bed upholstered in fabric from Harbinger in West Hollywood, speaks to Kendrick’s interest in sourcing artwork locally. Topping the vintage William Hinn nightstand is a Greta von Nessen lamp.


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LUXESOURCE.COM W R I T T E N BY L I S A M O W R Y | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY L A U R E N R U B I N S T E I N

On the ground floor of an iconic Atlanta high-rise, a designer trades bird’s-eye views for glam interiors and expansive outdoor space.

PEACHTREE PARADISE


Interior Design: Bill Musso, Musso Design Group Home Builder: Jeff Fagan, Janus Associates Construction Management Landscape Architecture: Alex Smith, Alex Smith Garden Design, Ltd.


F

ew residential buildings in Atlanta have the mystique of Park Place, the city’s first luxury high-rise. Boasting a prime Buckhead location on Peachtree Road, the 40-story skyscraper is famously home to superstar Elton John and has also housed Coretta Scott King and Janet Jackson. For designer Bill Musso and his husband, Bryan Cooke, a move to the iconic building meant a massive shift in their lives: giving up the lush gardens at their former Druid Hills villa. “We wanted to try condo life,” Musso says. “So, we lived on the 25th floor for a while and had an amazing view of Downtown. But Bryan missed his gardening—it’s his therapy—and the balcony wasn’t cutting it.” As chance would have it, a client of Musso’s wanted to buy the couple’s upper-floor home, and a bottom-floor residence with an expansive terrace was sitting empty. Luckily, Musso and Bryan were able to talk the downstairs owner into selling. Musso’s vision for a new floor plan, initially developed in concert with residential designer Robert Norris, effectively transposed a dated layout, placing the home’s public spaces in lock-step with stunning city views while capping each end with a well-appointed bedroom. Since the rest of Musso’s ideas were even loftier, he called on general contractor Jeff Fagan to bring them to fruition. To problem-solve the project’s many challenges, Fagan leaned on his robust background in residential design, also tapping an expert crew of craftspeople and structural engineers to relocate the residence’s utilitarian components—such as fire sprinklers and air-conditioning units—behind beautifying architectural features. In a dramatic move, the duo raised the ceilings to nearly double their original height: the result of Bill investigating—and later excavating—the unit’s 1980s-era dropped ceilings. Augmenting the floorto-ceiling glass on the unit’s southern exposure further enhanced continuity with the building’s soaring, 17-foot-tall lobby. And all the better to

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showcase a feature practically unheard-of for highrise living: a nearly 4,000-square-foot courtyard. While Musso and Bryan had acquired only a concrete slab, it was a blank slate that allowed landscape designer Alex Smith to get creative. “We designed raised planters throughout to give the illusion that we were actually planting in existing soil,” explains Smith, who planted clipped Korean boxwoods and unusual black mondo grass in containers as visual treats. Chinese Fringe trees flank the focal point for the entire garden: a modern prefab pergola nodding to sleek Miami style. Indoors, Musso drew inspiration from other cities close to his heart—notably New York, where he spent his childhood. “My grandmother would take us to Radio City Music Hall, which, like Rockefeller Center, she loved for its Art Deco details. Later, while in art school, I’d bring my sketch pad to draw the friezes on the building or the mosaics,” the designer recounts. “Art Deco is my favorite period of architecture,” he continues. “But it can be a bit stuffy, so I wanted to capture a modern version of that.” Colors reminiscent of the Roaring ’20s —such as antique gold and rose— team with streamlined 1930s elements, but other decades also get their dues. “I like 1970s glam; there was a lot of goodness then,” Musso expresses. “The ’70s can get a bad rap, but it was a great decade for color.” Complementing the home’s grand gestures— such as a black custom kitchen with glimmering brass backsplash—are Musso and Bryan’s sentimental additions: a beaded dog figurine recalling a memorable trip to San Miguel de Allende, petite crystal butterflies procured from a favorite Parisian luxury store, artwork by Belgian photographer Isabelle Menin and more. Theirs is a residence that successfully melds vacations with passions and practicality with everyday interests, offering the consummate snapshot of the couple’s life together up until now. Though with nearly a dozen shared residences behind them, Musso concedes, this is likely not his and Bryan’s last labor of love. “Maybe we have an addiction,” he laughs. “But I like to think of it as leveraging our talents.”


Black marble floors from Ann Sacks set a dramatic tone in the entryway of designer Bill Musso’s Atlanta home. Here, Aerin’s Iveala sconce, through Circa Lighting, casts a glow upon an Innovations vinyl wallcovering, Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona bench for Knoll and a fluted black door custom crafted by general contractor Jeff Fagan.


“Raising the ceilings by 8 feet made all the difference,” says Musso, who selected Randolph & Hein swivel chairs from Ernest Gaspard & Associates for the living room. Clad in a charcoal Liaigre fabric from Jerry Pair, they echo the dark oak floors and woodwork by Fagan. A piece by Belgian photographer Isabelle Menin introduces color to the mostly neutral palette.


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Above: By integrating Poliform’s Varenna cabinetry into the walls of the cooking space, Switch Modern architectural designer Chris Butler achieved what Musso calls a “hidden kitchen.” Waterfall-edge Calacatta Monet marble countertops from Marmi Natural Stone form a telltale focal point in concert with Graham & Brown wallpaper and brass hex tiles that will patina over time. Opposite: A Mary McDonald-designed rug for Patterson Flynn Martin anchors the dining room, where the subtle curves of Thomas Pheasant’s Shell chairs and a custom Venicem double pendant counter the angular architecture. Lush plantings by landscape designer Alex Smith and hardscaping components by general contractor Patrick Walker of Malone Construction Company frame a prefab Kettal pavilion in the courtyard beyond.


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Above: A Nella Vetrina vanity balances the proportions of Victoria + Albert’s Ravello tub in the main bathroom, whose Calacatta Gold, Nero Marquina and Emperador Dark marble floors were inspired by ones seen in a Verona church. Back-painted glass tiles, also from Renaissance Tile & Bath, clad the wall below 19th-century Italian engravings the couple purchased on London’s Portobello Road. Left: A wash of Sherwin-Williams’ Agreeable Gray enhances Fagan’s architectural details in the main bedroom. “This room reminds me of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers,” says Musso, who centered a vintage Venini glass chandelier above a custom bed dressed in C&C Milano linens. Holland & Sherry-trimmed wool draperies soften the lines of a customized Macassar ebony highboy by Dom Edizioni.


Walls of Sherwin-Williams’ Magnetic Gray in a metallic finish set off Barovier & Toso’s sculptural Colimaçon chandelier, lending a cosmopolitan feel to this guest bedroom. Bill tapped Bjork Studio to refurbish a favorite Barbara Barry bed with black lacquer and Armani Casa fabric, then turned to Century Upholstery to fabricate a custom stool in Romo’s Forenza velvet.


“ A R T D E C O I S M Y FAV O R I T E P E R I O D O F A R C H I T E C T U R E . I WA N T E D TO C A P T U R E A M O D E R N V E R S I O N O F T H AT. ” –BILL MUSSO

Above, left: Flanking a dining room door, Boyd Lighting’s Venice sconce strikes a minimalist note above a Baker-sourced side chair donning a yellow-green Glant tweed. In a guest bedroom beyond, Musso’s collection of Blanc de Chine ceramics forms a chic tableau above a jaunty Liaigre cabinet. Above, right: Innovations’ Nice wallcovering wraps the powder room, where a floating white quartzite vanity from Walker Zanger provides the foundation for an antiqued mirror by Echols Glass & Mirror. To the left, a candle-style sconce by Remains Lighting, a Thai hand sculpture from Chip & Company and Fornasetti plates provide moments of intrigue.

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Breaking the Mold

Embracing the weird and wonderful side of ceramics, an artist puts a personal spin on the medium. W R I T T E N B Y M O N I Q U E M C I N T O S H | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY M A R I A N N A J A M A D I


L

ike a mysterious, simmering cauldron, there’s always something bubbling in ceramicist Raina J. Lee’s kiln. The results never fail to surprise, whether it’s foaming glazes that crackle like the surface of the moon or the swirls of dreamy pastels and nebula neons. The Los Angeles-based Lee fully embraces her craft’s alchemical elements, reimagining classical forms with otherworldly glazes. “For me, making ceramics is just a big experiment with every possible surface, technique and color,” she says. This affinity for the unusual feels natural for the longtime video game aficionado. “The intense colors and shapes are inspired by video games, science fiction books and places with extreme natural landscapes, such as Iceland, Nepal, Utah and California,” she says. When developing silhouettes, Lee sometimes looks back in history, reconceiving traditional forms from Korean moon jars to Chinese scholar’s bowls from the Song dynasty before interpreting the shapes in her own way. Then come the mad scientist glazes, which the ceramicist gleefully enjoys making herself. “I find it interesting to juxtapose these really wild colors and textures on these very classical shapes, giving them a very modern context,” she says. Layering glossy with matte and craggy finishes, she tests different applications. The best part happens when the final vessel emerges from the kiln, as “you never know exactly how the chemicals are going to interact,” notes Lee. “But that’s where the surprise is.” The time afforded Lee during Los Angeles’ pandemic lockdown has allowed her to experiment in other ways—exploring matters of scale. This includes intricate pottery for ikebana, the traditional Japanese art of flower arranging. Combined with sculptural plantings, these pieces will “look like a gardenscape,” but with the miniature, lunar-like hills and craters of her signature volcanic glaze. On select occasions by appointment, locals can explore more pieces in Lee’s charming treehouse showroom. Perched in the backyard of her Mount Washington home, the whimsical gallery embodies her new life in clay. Like video games, her work has become “this place to go and have weird, interesting experiences every day.”


L.A. ceramicist Raina J. Lee displays her wares in an aerie on her property in Mount Washington (opposite). The forms she creates are often inspired by traditional shapes (below); however, the glazes she chooses are anything but—video games, science fiction and rugged natural landscapes influence her selections (left and bottom, left). Of the results, she says, “They can look far more painterly and interesting than you could ever imagine.”

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History shines in a Los Angeles home refreshed to bring in sunlight and garden views.

Light Touch


Architecture and Landscape Architecture: William Hefner, Studio William Hefner Interior Design: Rodrigo Vargas, Rodrigo Vargas Design Home Builder: Asher Alfasi, Bar Design and Construction


The coffee table by The Flemming Group anchors the family room of this Hancock Park home renovated by architect William Hefner. Cooper, the homeowners’ labradoodle, rests on a Royal Custom Designs sectional in a Dogwood Fabrics linen blend. Maxalto armchairs from Diva Group flank a Foscarini floor lamp. The rug is from Decorative Carpets by Stark.

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t had me at hello,” says the owner of a Hancock Park abode, recalling the moment she first stood in its entrance. “We wanted a Mediterranean-style home, and this one felt right. I thought, ‘This is it!’ ” Soon after, she connected with architect William Hefner, whose own nearby home she had spotted in a magazine several years before. “I reached out to him to come and see the house, and then he showed us his home, too.” With that, a team took shape— Hefner bringing on general contractor Asher Alfasi, and the wife calling on interior designer Rodrigo Vargas, a friend and neighbor. “This is a pretty grand house,” says Hefner of the 1925 Spanish Colonial Revival design. “There was wonderful character—stenciled beams in the living room, the wood-paneled library—so those well-preserved existing materials informed the project.” Originally built by architect Henry F. Withey, the home was immediately recognized as a prime example of the style, even garnering the cover of a 1926 issue of an early California homes magazine. Hefner’s renovation was complete but respectful. In keeping with local ordinances, the front façade was unchanged (it simply received rosemary groundcover and a few new olive trees). Still, with greater freedom at the rear of the house, the architect made significant, yet almost imperceptible, changes. “We broke the house down in terms of access to the backyard,” Hefner explains. “People didn’t live the indoor-outdoor lifestyle back then, and there was just a funny little door to the outside. We needed to connect the home to the landscape while preserving its original character.” Working with Nathalie Aragno, a principal at his firm, Hefner designed new steel windows and doors to link the primary rooms to the loggia and converted the old kitchen and staff quarters into a new two-story wing. On the ground floor are family spaces, while upstairs is the couple’s bedroom suite and a terrace—an added benefit of the new loggia. “This was pretty smooth sailing for a historic home renovation,” observes Alfasi, who replaced all of the drywall but didn’t touch

the ceilings. “It’s a very special house, like an old Italian villa. I still think, ‘Look at that, look at what we did!’ ” he says contentedly. “It’s magnificent,” adds Vargas of the renovation, explaining that he always strives to honor the architecture as well as his clients. In this case, it was especially meaningful, as the husband and wife are friends of nearly 20 years. To create the feeling of timelessness the wife wanted, Vargas started with neutrals. “I love the restraint of working with a limited palette and expanding it with texture that mirrors the architecture,” he explains. “A lot of the house’s details stand out now. Nothing is competing.” To furnish the home, Vargas and his associates, Danielle Fox and Heather Soliday, focused on custom pieces, like the living room’s coffee table, carpet and ebonized chests of drawers. They also crafted impeccable offices for the couple. The husband’s takes on an Art Deco vibe with its Macassar ebony tub chair and tuxedo-style sofa, while the wife’s office features a desk hand-painted by Ojai-based decorative artist Jacqueline Moore. The sole piece brought from the couple’s previous residence is the Indian chest in their bedroom. “I wanted this house to be a little eclectic,” shares the wife. The neutral palette continues on the loggia, designed to be a second living and dining room. It’s also where Hefner’s talent for garden design comes into view. “The idea was to keep things simple, so it’s just roses around the fountain, wisteria on the pergola, and cypress trees in the back. It’s serene and green,” he says, noting the work of his firm’s landscape architect Dennis Hardesty. While it may have taken time for the homeowners to find their ideal abode and bring it to fruition, the wait was well worth it. Not only is it everything they hoped for in terms of square footage and outdoor space, but it is also a mere 5 blocks away from their previous residence, which meant they didn’t have to say goodbye to the neighborhood and beloved traditions like progressive dinners—and now entertaining is a breeze. “The whole process was so rewarding,” adds the wife. “It’s one thing to see the plans but another to walk in and see the spaces. It was fun! It all just came together.”


The remodel preserved original details such as the ceiling and the fireplace in the living room. There, interior designer Rodrigo Vargas mixed a pair of Maxalto sofas with twin cane-back chairs and a gilded armchair—upholstered in a material by Edelman Leather—all by Rose Tarlow Melrose House. The custom stools and chests are by Mario Grimaldi International.

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Above: Vargas turned to The Flemming Group to craft the dining room’s mahogany table with sunburst top detail, surrounded by Mario Grimaldi International chairs slipcovered in linen from Thomas Lavin. The arrangement rests on a rug from Decorative Carpets by Stark. Centered above is a Visual Comfort & Co. chandelier. Opposite: Glossy black lacquer on the pantry’s cabinetry contrasts dramatically with the silver-leaf barrel-vaulted ceiling. Suspended above is an E. F. Chapman pendant for Visual Comfort & Co. The Top Knobs pulls are from Carter Hardware.


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Above: A Century wing chair and Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort & Co. floor lamp create a charming moment in the upstairs hallway. Draperies in a fabric by The Design Connection from The Flemming Group treat the French doors. The runner is from Decorative Carpets by Stark. Opposite: Decorative painter Jacqueline Moore embellished the desk by The Flemming Group in the wife’s office. The desk chair with nailhead trim is by Century. A lamp from Nicky Rising illuminates the room, while a Plum chaise in a Romo chenille from Thomas Lavin offers an elegant spot to perch.


“There was wonderful character, so those well-preserved existing materials informed the project.” –WILLIAM HEFNER

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In the main bedroom, rather than choosing matching night tables to flank the RH bed, on one side is a chest by Mario Grimaldi International, and on the other is a Jayson Home desk. The seating area comprises Schumacher tub chairs, a Dennis & Leen table and an Oly pendant. The inlaid cabinet is from the clients’ collection.




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