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LUKE D. MURPHREE LM DESIGN PORTFOLIO

The University of Tennessee Master of Landscape Architecture


CONTENTS

STUDIO WORKS RE-MEASURING THE LANDSCAPE SOLAR GREENWAYS OAK RIDGE MASTER PLAN OAK RIDGE WETLAND PARK INTERPRETIVE CENTER CLOUD OBSERVATORY HGTV PRODUCTION GARDENS LIITTO

TECHNICAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS PHYSICAL MODELING HAND GRAPHICS

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STUDIO WORKS

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THE LANDSCAPE LM RE-MEASURING University of Tennessee | Fall 2011 FIRST PLACE MEDALISTS Established in honor of the School of Architecture’s former director, Max Robinson, the MAX_minimum Design Competition is a recurring annual design competition meant to encourage the greatest impact on the design environment with the least possible means. In an effort to fulďŹ ll a signiďŹ cant programmatic need of the College, foster interdisciplinary collaboration, and give purpose to an underused space, this competition involved the design of an assembly space in the Reading Room Courtyard of the Art and Architecture Building. Each team was composed of a mixture of four landscape architecture, architecture, and interior design students. Students were given less than 72 hours to complete the assignment. Our project focused on a garden created for beauty, leisure, and education as the College of Architecture and Design presents itself as a teaching tool for Landscape Architecture and Architecture. Professors of landscape and design are able to give lectures in front of their most powerful educational apparatus: the garden. The amphitheater allows for a transitory theater screen to project student work and timeless movies, while the stage promotes conversations of the landscape. The garden promotes a more regional landscape, and is composed of three distinct spaces: the edible garden, water garden, and shade garden.

5 STUDIO WORKS

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RE-MEASURING THE LANDSCAPE 6


GREENWAYS LM SOLAR Knoxville, TN | Fall 2011 TN ASLA HONOR AWARD Energy resources play a vital role in both causing and preventing climate change. This project, completed with teammate Patrick Osborne, examines how landscape architecture can be used as a tool to help mitigate the inevitable effects of climate change in the future. Solar Roadways, originally conceived of by Scott Brusaw and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, seeks to replace the entirety of the nation’s asphalt roadways with solar panels as a way to generate renewable energy. This project utilizes both the technology developed in Brusaw’s Solar Roadways concept and the application of greenway network principles to create an energy-harvesting solar greenway solution.

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Site Analysis

7 STUDIO WORKS

Master Plan


First Creek Greenway Perspective

SOLAR GREENWAYS 8


Underground Greenway Perspective This portion of the greenway will utilize the existing underground infrastructure of the channelized First Creek Greenway. As the interactive walkway system and natural lighting entice visitors, the corridor will serve as a First Creek historical museum and cultural center, allowing its visitors to learn more about East Knoxville and First Creek.

9 STUDIO WORKS


SOLAR GREENWAYS 10


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Prepared for the City of Oak Ridge, TN in collaboration with the Metropolitan Planning Commission of Knox County, this 50-year master plan provides a design and planning framework that can help shape Oak Ridge into a desirable destination that builds on its history while capitalizing on its role as a research and development center of the Southeast. This four week studio project was completed by teams of two, and it built on a previous study of how low-density sprawl negatively impacts the economy, environment, and society.

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RIDGE MASTER PLAN LM OAK Oak Ridge, TN | Fall 2012

LIGHT RAIL LINE BUS ROUTE GREENWAY BICYCLE LANES

Intermodal Circulation

EXISTING BUILDINGS LODGING TOURIST SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL MULTI FAMILY RESIDENTIAL OFFICE HARD SURFACE SOFT SURFACE GREENWAY

Open Space Connections

11 STUDIO WORKS

CIVIC/ INSTITUTIONAL MIXED USE- RETAIL/ RESIDENTIAL MIXED USE- RETAIL/ OFFICE MIXED USE- RETAIL/ OFFICE/ RESIDENTIAL

Building Uses


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Amphitheater History Museum The Esplanade Jackson Square Intermodal Transit Hub Wetland Park DOE Solar BrightďŹ eld Recreation Complex Business Park Neighborhood Linear Park Football Stadium Community Park Intermittent Stream Corridor

OAK RIDGE MASTER PLAN 12


RIDGE WETLAND PARK LM OAK Oak Ridge, TN | Fall 2012 OA O AK KR RII D DG E TU UR RN NP P IK I KE KE This project investigates how landscape infrastructure can be seamlessly integrated within an urban environment with the purpose of stormwater management, habitat creation, and public recreational use. Since the site lies within the existing drainage flow of its surrounding context, two types of wetlands have been designed in order to slow the water and allow for filtration, infiltration, and aquifer re-charge: urban filtration bogs and naturalized wetlands. The urban filtration bogs bring these hydrologic systems to the public eye in an artful and playful manner as they are threaded throughout the civic plaza of the proposed inter-modal transit hub. Collected stormwater cascades through the bogs and is discharged into the naturalized wetland. Excess stormwater by-passes the bog system and is released directly into the naturalized wetland.

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LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

The Esplanade Pedestrian Tunnel Crosswalk Filtration Bog Primary Stormwater Canal Transit Station Garden Club Gardens Polishing/Reecting Pool Pavilion Grass Berm Boardwalk Collection Pond Discharge Point Parking Lot Parking Garage

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OAK RIDGE WETLAND PARK 14


Oblique Aerial View Looking North

15 STUDIO WORKS


1

WATER RUN-OFF During rain events, large amounts of water accumulate from impervious surfaces like parking lots, roads, and rooftops.

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Storage Cistern

COLLECTION + STORAGE Water is collected via drainage pipes stored in underground cisterns and passed through UV filter to remove harmful bacteria

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Primary Drainage Canal

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FILTRATION BOGS Water passes through filtration bogs. Aquatic vegetation filter out the suspended particles in the water.

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AERATION Filtered water overflows into a lower poll that engages the pedestrian.

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Refl ection Pool

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DISCHARGE Water is discharged and flows in the naturalized wetland polishing pond.

UV Filtration

Underground Storage Cistern

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Refl ection Pool

Parking Lot

OAK RIDGE WETLAND PARK 16


Section Through Turnpike and Wetland Park The park’s primary axis descends through a pedestrian tunnel that connects the esplanade with the wetland park. The terraces respond to existing topography while suggesting a ceremonial descent to the naturalized wetlands. The wetlands employ a myriad of natural processes that aid in stormwater management, including filtration, infiltration, and evapotranspiration. Large swaths of native plant communities aid in habitat creation.

Green Wall

Ramp

Oak Ridge Turnpike Tunnel

17 SELECTED WORKS

Transit Hub

Stairs/Seat Walls

Terrace Bog #1

Bog #2

Terrace

Bog #3

Terrace


habitat cre eation evapotranspiration f iltratio n inďŹ ltration Discharge to wetland

Viewing platform

DOE Federal Building Boardwalk

OAK RIDGE WETLAND PARK 18


The Filtration Bogs After the collected stormwater has been treated in the UV filtration system, water is pumped into upper pools via the water supply line. The water cascades from the upper pools into the filtration bogs that slow the water and remove its sediments and harmful toxins. Water is then released in numerous waterfalls where it can be further enjoyed by pedestrians as it flows to the discharge point at the base of the plaza.

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19 STUDIO WORKS


Bog Threshold Bridge Stainless Steel

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OAK RIDGE WETLAND PARK 20


CENTER LM INTERPRETIVE Kodak, TN | Spring 2012

This five-week studio project was designed by a team of one landscape architecture and two architecture students. The purpose of this proposed interpretive center at Seven Islands Wildlife Refuge is to introduce visitors to the experiences that await them as they explore the grounds. This center was designed with site integration and regenerative systems in mind. These systems treat water, generate energy, and utilize reclaimed materials to make a self sufficient building. Consideration was also given to treating the center as a minimum intrusion upon the existing context while operating as the “gateway” to Seven Islands Wildlife Refuge. Adhering to this principle, the center preserves existing views while framing new experiences.

View from road

View from top of ramp during rain

Seven Islands Trails Plan 21 STUDIO WORKS

View from constructed wetland


Interpretive Center Plan INTERPRETIVE CENTER 22


Section through Interpretive Center + Wetland The proposed wetland is divided into two uniďŹ ed sections. One will catch and store the roof rain water to be used for the toilets inside. The other wetland area will collect the oil-contaminated stormwater from the parking lot and perform natural ďŹ ltration.

23 STUDIO WORKS


INTERPRETIVE CENTER 24


OBSERVATORY LM CLOUD Kodak, TN | Spring 2012

Geomorphology, climate, soils, and flora and fauna interconnect. This observatory project follows an investigation of how the processes of these four factors shape the observatory’s surrounding landscape of the Seven Islands Wildlife Refuge. The client’s program included provisions for the activities of a user for a 24 hour visit; one must eat, sleep, and bathe on site. The visitor will use the observatory to enhance understanding of the process of cloud/fog formation and moisture as it travels to and from earth’s surface. One is able to not only observe, but also experience and measure the change in clouds in the morning, noon, and night. The observatory condenses the unique qualities of the river and regions’s atmosphere and intensifies them in perception. By connecting people with the natural process of fog and cloud formation and the stages of the water cycle, this observatory offers a unique opportunity to experience, and feel the awe-inspiring aspects of the earth’s atmosphere. This experience can remind us of our connection to nature and instill knowledge of place and stewardship.

Top of Observatory

8:00 AM

25 STUDIO WORKS

8:55 AM

9:05 AM

Fog Viewing Area


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Site Plan of Seven Islands Wildlife Refuge

CLOUD OBSERVATORY 26


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Observe • • •

27 STUDIO WORKS

Fog formation from river Accumulation on fog nets Fog lifting

Awake To water drops from fog collection system


Night Arrival Falling cool air of the night

CLOUD OBSERVATORY 28


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Observatory Conditions Through the Day

29 STUDIO WORKS


STAINLESS STEEL NETTING SUPPORT 3/8” GLASS STAINLESS STEEL SUPPORT BRACKET

CLEAR LATEX BALLOON

1/2”-PLEXI-GLASS WATER BASIN

1/2”X8” CARRIAGE BOLT

2” BEVELED STAINLESS STEEL HANDRAIL

6” CONCRETE WALL

1” COPPER PIPE

1/2” PLEXI-GLASS

BALL VALVE ANGLED STEEL BRACKET SUPPORT

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3/8” GLASS 4x4 W4.0/4.0 WELDED WIRE MESH

STAINLESS STEEL SUPPORT COLUMN

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TOP LEVEL CONNECTIONS SINK + FAUCET

SCALE: 1” = 1”

3/8” TEMPERED GLASS 5” STAINLESS STEEL COLUMN RUBBER GASKET SEAL

1” STAINLESS STEEL LADDER INSET

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WATER BASIN CONNECTION SECTION SCALE: 1” = 1”

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TYPICAL BEAM + LADDER SECTION SCALE: 3” = 1”

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KEY PLAN SCALE: 1/4” = 1”

Construction Details

CLOUD OBSERVATORY 30


PRODUCTION GARDENS LM HGTV Knoxville, TN | Fall 2011

Completed by a team of three, this project consists of a planting design and master plan for a vacant lot that is part of Scripps Networks Interactive corporate headquarters in Knoxville, TN. The primary design objective was to create a planting plan that would provide a grand entrance while making the statement to vehicle traffic that HGTV resides in Knoxville. The secondary objective was to create a masterplan that would weave this planting design into a comprehensive design of open and enclosed spaces that would serve as HGTV’s film production gardens. These production gardens consist of four main areas: the main gathering space, the vendor exhibition area, the meadow and open lawn area, and the wetland.

ALLEE OF LACEBARK ELMS- 18 ‘INDIAN SUMMER’ BLACK EYED SUSAN RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 11 EASTERN REDBUD- 5 ‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS- 21

‘ORANGE VELVET’ DAYLILY ‘EMILY BRUNER’ HOLLY- 5 RUSSIAN SAGE ‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS- 26 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 2 ‘CLEOPATRA’ LIRIOPE

EASTERN REDBUD- 8 ‘INDIAN SUMMER’ BLACK EYED SUSAN ‘RUBY’ LOROPETALUM- 17 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1

LACEBARK ELM- 3 ‘GREEN GIANT’ ARBORVITAE- 4 EASTERN REDBUD- 3 RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 10

RUSSIAN SAGE LACEBARK ELM- 3

‘NATCHEZ’ CREPE MYRTLE- 6 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1

‘EMILY BRUNER’ HOLLY- 11 ‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS- 18

‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1 RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 11 EASTERN REDBUD- 3

Plant List Common Name

Scientific Name

Qty.

Size

Bald Cypress Commemoration Sugar Maple Eastern Redbud Emily Bruner Holly Green Giant Arborvitae Japanese Cryptomeria Lacebark Elm Natchez Crepe Myrtle

Taxodium distichum Acer sacharum Var. 'Commemoration' Cercis Canadensis Ilex x 'Emily Bruner' Thuja standishii x plicata 'Green Giant' Cryptomeria japonica Ulmus parvifolia Lagerstroemia indica 'Natchez'

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Taxus x media 'Densiformis' Rosa 'Radtko' Loropetalum chinense var. Rubrum

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RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 16 LACEBARK ELM- 1

Trees

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‘EMILY BRUNER’ HOLLY- 11 LACEBARK ELM- 3

Shrubs Densiformis Spreading Yew Red Knockout Rose Ruby Loropetalum

‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1

Groundcover, Grasses + Perennials

‘NATCHEZ’ CREPE MYRTLE- 3 ‘EMILY BRUNER’ HOLLY- 7 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1 RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 12 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1

Cleopatra Liriope Indian Summer Black Eyed Susan Karl Foerester Feather Reed Grass Orange Velvet Daylily

Liriope muscari 'Cleopatra' Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' Calamagrostis acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' Hemerocallis 'Orange Velvet'

12" O.C. 16" O.C. 155 16" O.C.

4 " pots 1 gal. 3 gal. 1 gal.

Russian Sage

Perovskia atriplicifolia

16" O.C.

1 gal.

‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS- 23

‘GREEN GIANT’ ARBORVITAE- 6 EASTERN REDBUD- 3 ‘ORANGE VELVET’ DAYLILY

RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 10 LACEBARK ELM- 1 ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 1 LACEBARK ELM- 2 RUSSIAN SAGE ‘EMILY BRUNER’ HOLLY- 5 ‘NATCHEZ’ CREPE MYRTLE- 9 ‘CLEOPATRA’ LIRIOPE ‘COMMEMORATION’ SUGAR MAPLE- 5 ‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS- 7 EASTERN REDBUD- 2 ‘ORANGE VELVET’ DAYLILY RED KNOCKOUT ROSE- 14 JAPANESE CRYPTOMERIA- 6 ‘KARL FOERESTER’ FEATHER REED GRASS-19 ‘DENSIFORMIS’ SPREADING YEW- 21 RUSSIAN SAGE ‘CLEOPATRA’ LIRIOPE

31 STUDIO WORKS

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The main gathering and production space is enclosed by a model home, outdoor kitchen, and edible gardens. This space promotes hybrid use as a potential location for large events or exploration and learning for visitors that wish to learn more about ways to enhance their own living spaces.

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The entrance concept revolves around a concrete ribbon wall that grows in presence as one draws nearer to the entrance. Plantings are designed in masses based on seasonal color, form, and textures in order to maximize visual interest.

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Entrance Concept

HGTV PRODUCTION GARDENS 32


LM LIITTO Helsinki, Finland | Summer-Fall 2011

Organized by the Helsinki City Planning Department, the South Harbor ideas competition challenged entrants to create a comprehensive ideas plan for the South Harbor that could be used as a basis for the future development of the area. The purpose of the competition was to integrate the area more tightly into the city structure while providing city residents access to the sea and the opportunity to experience and create urban culture. Completed by a team of seven students under the guidance of professors Ken McCown and Scott Wall, this proposal solves these problems by focusing on the harbor’s Liitoa (Joints) between land, sea, city, and sky. Since the existing infrastructure of the cruise ships in the South Harbor severs these joints, Liitto presents a reengagement of Helsinki’s traditional sea entry by moving the cruise ships to the south-facing facilities on Katajanokka to return the harbor’s edge to the public and link this public space back into the city. The space brings people to the harbor’s edge and allows visitors an immediate sense of entry to the city. The waterfront is the new public boundary of sea and city, land and sky as the old Esplanadi extends to Katajanokka and the Kaivopuisto area merges with the public edge of the harbor. As a result of these interventions, public active space rejoins the waterfront.

33 STUDIO WORKS


Open the Waterfront to the Public

Connect the Open Space to the City

Coordinate Transit

LIITTO 34


South Harbor Concept

35 STUDIO WORKS


LIITTO 36


TECHNICAL

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DRAWINGS LM CONSTRUCTION Knoxville, TN | Spring 2012

These construction drawings were created in AutoCAD to illustrate knowledge of how various landscape structures are built. These drawings are part of a complete construction document set required in an advanced construction course, which consists of a site plan, grading plan, staking plan, deck framing plan, and two sheets of 18 construction details.

Retaining Wall Detail

Stair Detail

Bench Detail 39 TECHNICAL


Deck Framing Plan

CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS 40


Grading Plan

41 TECHNICAL


Deck Ledger Detail

Deck Railing Detail

Wall and Firepit Detail

Fence Detail

CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS 42


MODELING LM PHYSICAL Various Site Locations | Summer 2010 - Spring 2012

Model building is an effective tool in the design process that helps visualize design concepts and site topography. These images portray a sampling of models that I have build collaboratively and individually.

43 TECHNICAL


PHYSICAL MODELING 44


GRAPHICS LM HAND Spring 2008 - Spring 2012

Drawing has always been enjoyable for me, and has been an irreplaceable tool in exploring design ideas. These quick sketches often form the basis for future renderings that occur within Photoshop and SketchUp.

10 Minutes

15 Minutes

45 TECHNICAL

10 Minutes


25 Minutes

HAND GRAPHICS 46


Barcelona Pavilion Montage Ink Transfer + Photograph


THANK YOU FOR VIEWING MY WORK

Luke D. Murphree | lukedmurphree@gmail.com The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Master of Landscaspe Architecture | 2013

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Luke D. Murphree | Design Portfolio