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LUKE ANGERS

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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

EDUCATION

PUBLISHED WORK & EXHIBITIONS

McGill University (Fall 2014 - Winter 2018) Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (Winter 2017)

Centre Nautique McGill, published on the McGill SoA

HONOURS McCaig Family Scholarship in Engineering (2015/16) Favretto Scholarship in Architecture (2016/17) Gluskin-Sheff Travel Scholarship (2016/17) Deans Honour List, Faculty of Engineering (2015/16/17)

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Student Work Website and in the 2015-2016 McGill SoA Student Work Book

Pavilion for the Mile End, published on the McGill SoA

Student Work Website and in the 2015-2016 McGill SoA Student Work Book

Museum for the Mile End, displayed in the McGill SoA accreditation exhibition “From Arch 303 to Arch 683” First Nations Garden Pavilion Analytique, on the McGill SoA Student Work Website

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BONAVENTURE HOTEL

CONTENTS CONTACT

Bonaventure Hotel / MSOA 1

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luke.angers@mail.mcgill.ca

Fictive Transcripts / KADK 1

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(514)-572-2352

Amager Urban Housing / KADK 2

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3615 Rue Lorne-Crescent, Apt. 2 Montreal, Quebec, H2X 2A8

Centre Nautique McGill / MSOA 2

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Selected Drawings / MSOA 3

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Museum for the Mile End / MSOA 4

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MSOA 1


BONAVENTURE HOTEL

BONAVENTURE HOTEL / MONTREAL McGill University SoA, 2017 / Design and Construction 3 Professor Howard Davies / Collaboration with Odile Lamy

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DESIGN STATEMENT 12/12/17 Starting out, we were interested in the notion of originality in terms of architectural ideas and how we could sublimate archetypes into a project that was buildable in the context of a technical studio. The prescribed program of a hotel on our site at the edge of Montreal’s recently deconstructed Bonaventure Expressway prompted notions of disintegrating modernist infrastructures (as well as dreams) and their relevance to the current architectural context. An especially fertile point of departure were the subconscious ideas associated with the notion of the cannonical hotel, an irrational forcing of the homely outside of the home and the uncanny environments their architectures create.

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The project explores the multiplicities of influence modern architecture can have on a community; most important was the subconscious interface between the psychological realm of the built environment and human experience operating on level of archetypical perceptions. The assigned technical scheme of a dual-program was manifested as the horrific trope of a clone or doppelganger which came to embody the program’s formal expression through a double tower; an engaged twin straining for separation into two distinct volumes that are ultimately constrained to the singular block. The division of the site and reduplication of the building form purposefully identifies issues of uniqueness, identity, and deviance, which, in turn, inform the architectural experiences of the interior.

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The split programming also references the manifestation of modernist desires in the Downtown Athletic Club and Waldorf Astoria Hotel outlined in Koolhaas’s Delirious New York. Its productive and rational critique of the indulgence and congestion of the high-rise typology is embodied in our project but given an innapropriate twist with the introduction of a vertical hydroponic farm. As such, the programming merges notions of industrial production, rationalism and the uncanny experience of the hotel. The project’s grid, which typically internalizes the modern ambition of subjugating if not obliterating nature, is also twisted and broken; the archetypal glass megastructure of modernist fantasies is inappropriately deformed, opening itself to inhabitation by the exterior environment it relegated to obselesence and denying the superiority of mental construction over environmental reality.

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BONAVENTURE HOTEL

Above / Interior Renderings Centre / Design Progression Sketch Opposite / Massing Diagram ; Design and Plan Progression Skethes

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Above, Opposite / Construction Plans, 1:300

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BONAVENTURE HOTEL

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130mm CAVITY (SEALED AIRSPACE) RS1 ~ 1

STAINLESS STEEL WEBNET

1+1mm LOW IRON LAMINATED GLASS (LOW-E DUAL PANE) RSI ~ 5

STEEL MEMBRANEVAPOR BARRIERBATTING INSULATION-

-30mm CONCRETE TOPPING -RADIANT HEATING -CONCRETE SLAB

ALUMINUM SKIRTING

4TH FLOOR 24 700

ALUMINUM FLOOR STRIPS

FEED DUCT

GALVANIZED STEEL PLANTING BASKET

VERTICAL CLAMP

SUPPORT ROD TOP RAIL

STEEL MULLION

30mm IRRIGATION LINES VERTICAL POST

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MEP FUNCTIONING

-HANGING POLE -VISIBLE FRAME KEEL -MAIN KEEL

-RADIANT HEATING PANEL -GYP. BD

WOOD PANNELING

TRIPLE CELL TRACKING SHADE (LOW-E COATING) RSI ~ 5 INSULATING FABRIC RSI ~ 2

EFFECTIVE R-VALE LOW-E GLASS - 5 130mm SEALED AIRSPACE - 1 LOW-E GLASS - 5 TRIPLE CELL SHADE - 5 + FABRIC - 2 18

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PARAPET 67 000

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15TH FLOOR 63 500

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14TH FLOOR 60 000

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PARKING-3 FLOOR 2 700

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Above / NS Construction Section, 1:300 Opposite / Construction Detail, 1:10

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13TH FLOOR 56 500

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12TH FLOOR 53 000

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10TH FLOOR 46 000

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4TH FLOOR 25 000

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3RD FLOOR 21 500

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2ND FLOOR 18 000

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GROUND FLOOR 11 700

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BOUL. ROBERT-BOURASSA FACADE SCALE - 1:300

Above / Construction Elevation, 1:300 Opposite, Next / Physical Model, 1:200 Next / Construction Plans, 1:500

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BONAVENTURE HOTEL

MECH. RM. ROOF 69 500


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KADK 1


FICTIVE TRANSCRIPTS

FICTIVE TRANSCRIPTS / COPENHAGEN Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, 2017 / The Fictive City Professor Carolina Dayer / Collaboration with Erin Poppy

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ON THE CITY AND THE CHURCH “Films act as cultural, social and poetic entities that carry within their plots a lot more than the stories they mean to tell. Places, habits and history are framed through fictive narratives that mirror structures of reality.” This excerpt from the project brief describes the initial investigations which led realization of the work displayed here. It also describes the process of my cultural acclimation to the city of Copenhagen, which I explored both physically (by bicycle) and fictionally (through film). Stemming from an analysis of Thomas Vinterberg’s Submarino, my partner and I conducted a chiasmic study of the aesthetics of the city through the aesthetics of film and vice versa. This process is represented in the first image (previous page), an aerial photo of Bipesbjerg and the surrounding neighborhood of Købehavn NV where much of Submarino was shot. Areas of the image are cut away in a cartographic exercise to reveal film stills relating to the surrounding area and early maps of the region before it was developed. The project culminated in a film exploring a central location (Grundtvigs Kirke) of both Submarino and the city (right) and an architectural transcript of its experiential qualities (next page). The film has no characters or explicit narrative; it acts as a probe into the architecture and materiality which constitute the spatial and emotional dimensions of the church and Copenhagen more broadly. If the film is a probe, then the transcript is a embodiment of the data retrieved. It combines traditional architectural representation in working drawings through collage and manipulates their scales to desired effect. Three distorted drawings merge into a cohesive image forming the shape of a crucifix, which is later sketched over with graphite to reveal lighting and evoke the softness of the building’s interior. Constituted of a plan, unfolded section, and detail, reading of the drawing mimics the significant cortical experiences of the church; beginning with an oversized view of the threshold, through the rhythmic section, and culminating in the centre of the cross at the locus of spiritual internalization.

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FICTIVE TRANSCRIPTS See full film Title / Filmic Mapping, Købehavn NV Above, Below / Film Stills in Sequence Next / Architectural Transcript, Grundtvigs Kirke

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KADK 2


AMAGER URBAN HOUSING

AMAGER URBAN HOUSING / COPENHAGEN Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, 2017 / Studio Finder Sted Professors Peter Alexander Bullough, Robert Gassner, and Camilla Hornemann

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APPROACH AND PROGRAM

The fact that this project is based on the elusive qualities essential to Lynch entails the requirement for aesthetic and programmatic precedent to not only be taken from the site but from the greater context of the architectural uncanny experienced within it. Therefore, the project does not restrict itself to the aesthetic of the existing buildings of Amager but takes influence from the uglier realities of industrial nieghborhoods more broadly, like those of Lynch’s early life in Philadelphia or Inland Empire’s shooting location of Lódz in Poland, as they all share the same psychological topography of human experience. The resulting building is one that reflects the realities of the site and context without being grounded; an uncanny representation that reminds us of Amager, but simultaneously produces spaces of otherness in our fundamental psychological experience in the same manner that Daniel Libeskind is reminded of the transitory nature of the buildings in Lódz. “So familiar and yet so strange. Uncanny and magnificent, yet full of sadness. That’s how Lódz felt to me. The city appeared to be made of cardboard, a decaying set for a movie that wrapped long ago.” Using Mark Pimlott’s notion continuous interior as intellectual precedent, new construction will insert itself directly into existing infrastructure, linking established residences with new units and refurbished spaces in an interconnected polychrome conglomeration. The continuous interior forges a direct link to the otherspace that permeates the literature of the architectural uncanny; the combination of existing typologies is intended to create a gestalt-esque tertiary (other) space or space of equivalence in which habitation can be accommodated along with a public program containing workshops and exterior gathering places. The corridor along the central axis of the built addition which connects existing apartments with new units is illuminated through a series of openings from the functional spaces of apartment interiors. This examination of architectural boundaries also makes its way into the internal organization of units through a system of curtains and sliding walls that intentionally question standards of personal space and behavioral reactions to privacy. Finally, this project celebrates its staircases as a Lynchian chambers by separating them from the internal building volume and allowing processes of the architectural uncanny to be put into practice, namely adjusted scale and combinatory typologies. The staircase serves to literalize the pursuit of the uncanny that drives this project; they are to be constructed from brick recycled from surrounding industrial buildings into conical volumes containing modified industrial spiral staircases. This shrunken smokestack typology plays with the perception of scale and is reminiscent of the industrial past which can still be observed in the decaying brick and peeling paint of the derelict buildings on the site.

Title / Physical Model on Site Model, 1:100 Opposite / Damaged Physical Model, 1:100

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AMAGER URBAN HOUSING

The general concept for this project is to subvert the typical limitations of the modern housing development in a distinctly Lynchian manner; an approach inspired by an analysis of the films of David Lynch carried out at the Danish Film Institute. The spaces Lynch creates in film constitute the architectural underpinnings of the work, but the building is not attempting to recreate them in any capacity. However, Lynch’s influence was incorporated more generally into the programmatic functions, organization, representation and materiality of the architecture, creating spaces that are at once familiar to the site and existing urban fabric of Amager (area of sotheast of Copenhagen) but maintain an air of elusiveness.


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AMAGER URBAN HOUSING

Above / NS Section Watercolour, Collage Opposite / EW Section Collage, 1:50

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AMAGER URBAN HOUSING

Above / Final NS Section, 1:100 Opposite / Exterior Renderings

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Above / Final Plans, 1:150 ; 1:750 Opposite / Damaged Physical Model, 1:100 Next / Physical Model on Site Model, 1:100


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AMAGER URBAN HOUSING / COPENHAGEN

AMAGER URBAN HOUSING

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MSOA 2


CENTRE NAUTIQUE MCGILL

CENTRE NAUTIQUE MCGILL / STE.-ANNE-DE-BELLEVUE McGill University SoA, 2016 / Architectural Graphics and Elements of Design Professor David Covo / Collaboration with Thibaud Gagnon-Guimaud Published on McGill SoA Student Work Website and in the 2015-2016 McGill SoA Student Work Book

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CONNECTING STUDENTS WITH LAC SAINT-LOUIS This project was born out of past development plans being enancted in McGill University’s MacDonald campus and is intended to challenge the conventional community centre. Despite the site’s location on the western extremity of the Island of Montreal close to Ste. Anne de Bellevue, the university believed a boathouse providing access to the water along with equipment could increase student interest in the second campus and foster outdoor activity. As such, a proposal for an underutilized stretch of waterfront property on Lac Saint-Louis was produced with the intention of adding to the recreational capacity of the existing campus infrastructure. The project’s program is separated between its two primary floors, with rowing facilities (including boat storage, locker rooms, a classroom, and cafeteria) on the ground level giving access onto the waterfront, and a reception space (with a kitchen, dining space, and large terasse wirh views over the water) on the gallery floor. Accessibility is addressed through an elevated lobby and a series of ramps letting onto both floors while encompassing meeting spaces to create an active entrance threshold. The building, in turn, promotes the outdoors by drawing the visitor within and through to the waterfront site regardless of the path they take. Its form was strategically generated to suit these purposes and serves to celebrate outdoor space over indoor. Construction is intended to be as sustainable as possible, employing wood framing and natural ventilation as conditons to drive the design . Special focus was given to the circulation of fresh air throughout the upper floor; the terrace was carved out of the southwest edge of the building as to capture the breeze coming off the water and to draw stale air from the lower floor out of the building through suction. Strategic placement of skylights and windows further reduces the need for consumption of electrical power as much of the interior space is lit naturally throughout the day. This pihilosophy retains the administartion’s vision for a responsible and mutally beneficial intervention that will connect students with Montreal’s natural beauty and serve as significant cog in McGill’s Macdonald Campus.

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CENTRE NAUTIQUE MCGILL

Title / Physical Model I, 1:200 Above / Design Progression Watercolours and Sketches Opposite / Physical Model II, 1:200

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1. Main Entrance 2. Lobby 3. Ramp to Gallery 4. Ramp to Main Floor

5. Janitor’s Closet 6. Central Corridor 7. Men’s Lockers 8. Women’s Lockers

9. Cafeteria 10. Boat Maintenance 11. Boat Storage 12. Classroom

GALLERY

MAIN FLOOR

CENTRE NAUTIQUE MCGILL

16. Men’s Restroom 13. Ramp to Gallery 17. Foyer 14. Fire Stairs 15. Women’s Restroom 18. Kitchen

19. Central Reception 20. Outdoor Terrace

Above / Final Plans, 1:400 ; Final Elevations, 1:300 Opposite, Next / Physical Model I, 1:200

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CENTRE NAUTIQUE MCGILL

Above / Final NS and EW Sections, 1:150 Next / Final Site Plan, 1:500

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TITLE / QUEBEC CITY Urban Sketch for Architectural Sketching

SPREAD 1 / MONTREAL Carceri Expansion Exercie for Architectural Graphics and Elements of Design

SPREAD 2 / MONTREAL Invisible Cities - Zenobia Storyboard for Architectural History 1

SPREAD 3 / STOCKHOLM AND QUEBEC CITY Urban Sketching for Finder Sted Studio and Architectural Sketching Displayed in the McGill SoA accreditation exhibition “From Arch 303 to Arch 683”

SPREAD 4 / MONTREAL First Nations Garden Pavilion Analytique for Communication, Behavior and Architecture Published on McGill SoA Student Work Website

MSOA 3


SELECTED DRAWINGS

SELECTED DRAWINGS / VARIOUS LOCATIONS McGill University SoA, 2015-17; Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, 2017 / Various Courses Professors Ricardo Castro, David Covo and Anne Romme Multiple works published and exhibited

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SELECTED DRAWINGS

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SELECTED DRAWINGS

Previous / Carceri Expansion Exercise Above / Invisible Cities - Zenobia, Storyboards Opposite / Invisible Cities - Zenobia, Plan

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SELECTED DRAWINGS

Above / Urban Sketches, Quebec City Opposite / Urban Sketches, Stockholm Next / First Nations Garden Pavilion Analytique

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SELECTED DRAWINGS

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MSOA 4


MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END / MONTREAL McGill University SoA, 2016 / Design and Construction 1 Professor Vedanta Balbahadur Displayed in the McGill SoA accreditation exhibition “From Arch 303 to Arch 683”

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ART, SPACE, AND THE ALLEY In the context of the dense urban neighborhood of Montreal’s Mile End, buildings reinforce the street and mold the space of the yards and alleys to their backs with irregular, projecting shapes. The site for this museum proposal is opportune because it is one of the few areas in the surrounding context that does not reinforce the street. Unfortunately, the space is designated as a parking lot and little public activity is allowed to take place. In the redesign of the site there was a conscious choice to leave the street side of the site empty, activating it as a space for the public, and allowing the alleyway to serve as the spine for the new building. In this way, the museum reverses the focus of vernacular Mile End architecture by reinforcing the alley. The museum is also a theoretical exploration of a great incongruence in museum design; the requirement for receding, practical spaces against the creation of a place of importance which distinguishes itself from other institutions through its architecture. The earliest concept sketches of the building envisioned it as a network of projecting spaces tied around a centralized circulation core situated at the back of the site. As the design began to materialize as a three-dimensional model, it became clear that there would have to be some kind of reconciliation between the form in the original sketches and the requirement for a functioning museum program. Many of the airborne projections were dragged down to rest upon a base volume along the building spine, but one remains, stretching away from the constraints of the site, context and practical architecture. The main volume was simplified into two geometries constituting the gallery and public space respectively, both spanning from one end of the site to rest on top of its constituent at the other end in an ‘X’ shape. The geometry of the gallery space is considered as opaque, heavy architecture, providing the separation and insulation required for complete immersion. The geometry of the functional public space is considered as a translucent, lighter architecture, providing the natural light and openness required for productive work environments and a view of the city to orient visitors. The remaining projection is then considered as a dual space in itself, with both a gallery and public space, where insulated gallery ‘pockets’ and open public areas with views to the exterior exist in unison. As the building footprint only occupies about half of the site, a lot of focus was given to the landscaping and entryway. Depressions are carved into the terrain from either street corner as a way of extending the alley into the vistor experience and dramatizing the entrance threshold; as people reach the reception space on the basement floor the 3-storey circulation atrium is revealed only after a descent. The and the ry

museum is ultimately a celebration of space, art, their collaboration in the human expereince, with culminating projection serving as the transitoarchitectural element which binds them together.

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Title / Rendered EW Section, 1:200 Centre / Design Progression Sketches Opposite / Site Plan Progression Sketches


MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

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Above / Planning Sketches ; Design Sketch ; Third Floor Plan, 1:350 Opposite / Planning Sketches ; Final Floor Plans, 1:500

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MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

Above / Interior Rendering ; Design Watercolour and Sketches

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MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

Above / Sunpath from Laurier and St. Urbain on Physical Model, 1:200 Opposite / Aerial Sunpath on Physical Model, 1:200

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MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

Above / Landscaping and Interiors from Physical Model, 1:200 Next / Detail from Physical Model, 1:200

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MUSEUM FOR THE MILE END

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BONAVENTURE HOTEL

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Luke Angers / McGill Architecture Portfolio  

Selected Work, 2015-17

Luke Angers / McGill Architecture Portfolio  

Selected Work, 2015-17

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