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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

September 14, 2018

Volume 15, Issue 2

Falcon putting out lunkers

Hunters prepare for incoming white-winged dove while hunting with the Valdina Ranch over the opening weekend. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Dove season underway

Several double-digit bass have been caught and released at Falcon Lake. Photo from John Adami.

Lone Star Outdoor News

Rains hinder second weekend

Big bass have been coming out of Falcon Lake, and not all from deep water. According to photos shared with Falcon State Park, recent landings have included Marie Garza’s bass of 12, 7 and 5 pounds, Arturo Infante with a 7.3- and 5.5-pounder and Andrez Lopez with a 7.5 and 5.5. Guide John Adami with Broken Braid Guide Service said the south end of the lake has been fishing the best. “The rockpiles on the south

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Opening weekend proved to be great in some areas while somewhat disappointing in others.

In the Graford, Throckmorton and Woodson areas, a few hunters shot limits, but many hunters and outfitters reported bird numbers were down for the opener. Bob Smith hunted with the Dallas Woods and Waters Club group east of Throckmorton, and the hunt was better than expected.

“We had a good hunt, we limited out in about an hour,” he said. “Some of our guys did OK, but others at the other end of the field didn’t do as well. Most of the birds were young, local birds.” The next day, Smith found himself at the wrong end of the field. “I was in the same area but only

shot a few,” he said. “Guys at the far end were doing much better.” Heavy rains in the area kept the hunters home during the second weekend of the season, but the rains were more than welcome, with most of the West Texas areas receiving 1-3 inches, with some pockets receiving more. Most Please turn to page 32

Tarpon action hot out of Galveston

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Please turn to page 13

Shallow-water anchors Factor in wading deaths By Mark England

By Nate Skinner

Lone Star Outdoor News

Tarpon have always been a highly cherished trophy for Texas saltwater anglers, and the nearshore waters of the Gulf of Mexico that surround the Galveston Jetties and beachfront are known for producing colossal catches of silver kings. Capt. Mike Williams targets the species out of the Galveston area. According to Williams, the prime time for chasing silver kings is occurring now. “The best tarpon action of the year is taking place as we speak, and it will persist as late as mid-October,” Williams said. Williams said the annual southern migra- Michael Ochoa, of LaPorte, caught this silver king while fishing tion of tarpon is something Texas anglers can on his 16th birthday with Capt. Michael LaRue. Photo from Please turn to page 33

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 22 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 24 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 31 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 34

The death of a Victoria man last month marked the third time in little more than a year that an angler drowned trying to swim after a drifting boat on the Texas coast. In each case, the misuse of a mechanical or hydraulic anchor is believed to have been a contributing factor, according to Texas law enforcement officials. The body of Thomas Followwill, 22, was found August 18 near Grass Island after he swam after a boat. A companion, who made it to shore, told rescuers that their fishing boat drifted away. “This young man was healthy and

Michael LaRue.

Please turn to page 20

HUNTING

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Finally, a limit

FISHING

(P. 4)

Crappie moving up

Youngsters reach feat during opening weekend.

Good catches reported.

Big spenders

Reduce the limit?

(P. 6)

Sportsmen and women contribute $93.5 billion.

Upper coast trout survey.

(P. 8) (P. 8)


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September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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September 14, 2018

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September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HUNTING

First limits Three youngsters achieve feat over the opener By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Most everyone remembers the time they shot their first limit of dove. For three dads and their sons, it happened over the opening weekend this season. Cody Kohleffel, 11, hunted with his dad, Chris, and other family members near Marion in Guadalupe County. “The last few years, Cody has done a lot of deer and pig hunting with a rifle, but the shotgun thing is more difficult,” Chris said. “We worked his way to shooting a 20-gauge and shot some skeet before the season.” When opening day came, Chris borrowed a 20-gauge from his mother, Dana, and Cody was in the field. “I stood with him in the morning, and we talked about safety, shooting lanes and where he could and couldn’t shoot,” Chris said. “We stood behind a round bale and he got his first bird on his fourth shot. That morning, he got three birds and he did really well; he passed on several shots that were in the direction of other hunters.” When they returned to the field in the afternoon, more birds were flying. “I had given him more room to shoot in the afternoon,” Chris said. “One time, two birds came over, Cody shot one and I shot the other. That was pretty cool.” As the afternoon continued, Cody got closer to his limit until he finally shot his 15th bird. “We couldn’t find it, we looked all over,” Chris said. “Finally, my brother Nick came over with his dog, Piet, and he picked it up right away. Cody was really excited.”

As was his father. “I don’t know who had more fun, him or me,” Chris said. Phil Lamb hunted near Forney in Kaufman County, in an area where the hunting has been hit-or-miss over the years. His 9-year-old son, Cooper, who turned 10 since the opener, was on the hunt. “He got his shotgun just before his 8th birthday,” Phil said. “We would practice occasionally. He shoots a 20-gauge with light recoil loads — it’s a pump but I have the plug set to where it only holds two shells.” The mourning dove action was fast and furious this opening weekend. “Cooper shot his limit on opening day, and for the whole Labor Day weekend, he shot 38,” Phil said. “It was strange, the bird action stayed strong through the whole weekend.” Lamb’s wife, Catherine, also shot her first limit on Sept. 2. “She decided to shoot more this year because she knows her three boys and husband will be doing it for years and she doesn’t want to miss out,” Lamb said. “She had shot three dove total last season. She shot her limit using my 28-gauge over and under for extra credit.” Phil noticed the role reversal. “Now I wait to shoot until after Cooper and Catherine pull the trigger,” he said. “And now I’m the bird dog.” Nolan Deveny is 11, and has been tagging along with his dad, David, on hunts for years. This year, it was his turn to join in the family dove hunt on a ranch in Winkler County. “There were so many birds,” Deveny said. “It seems like rain or shine, the mourning dove are always there. You can put a Mojo up by a windmill and pretty much pick your shot.” Please turn to page 20

Cooper Lamb shot his first dove limit near Forney during the season’s opening weekend. He used a 20-gauge pump shotgun with a plug that allowed only two shells at a time. Photo by Phil Lamb.

Quail outlook generally poor Areas with timely rains have birds Lone Star Outdoor News Each September, the Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch unveils its quail forecast for the upcoming season, including reports from landowners and managers across the state. Dr. Dale Rollins, who collects all of the reports, gave a quick report for the area near Roby where the research ranch is located. “When you have no winter wheat crop and all of the dryland cotton is ‘disaster declared,’ that makes for an ominous forecast,” he wrote. Since the Sept. 2 report, rains did come to the ranch, helping with the habitat. Late hatches are unlikely in the Rolling Plains, Rollins reported, as the quail crop relies on a June hatch. However, bobwhites have hatched as late as early October in the area, and blue quail have hatched as late as Nov. 1 in the Trans-Pecos. Rains during the year varied by 50 percent or more across a particular county, Rollins reported. “Most areas had little to no rain

last fall, which I believe is especially problematic for quail reproduction,” he said. The outlook in South Texas is better, as many areas received heavy rains in late June. Rolling Plains Helicopter pilot Kyle Lange flew areas north and west of San Angelo, and gave poor reports for Brewster, Crockett, Irion, Jeff Davis, Jones, Presidio, Reagan, Schleicher, Scurry, Shackelford, Stonewall, Sutton and Tom Green counties. In Clay County, Jay Stine said the area looks better, giving the quail outlook a score of 7 out of 10. In midAugust, he reported seeing pairs with young chicks less than 2 weeks old. George Allen reported Helicopter pilot Kyle Lange helped provide information some late-season rains in for quail populations in West Texas. Photo from Kyle Archer County, which left Lange. some of the best cover in Reports varied from 2 to 5 in years. However, he hasn’t observed Shackelford County, although Marc many coveys of birds, and the ones Bartoskewitz said they are hearing he has seen have been small, 4 to 12 lots of whistling and seeing broods birds. of half- to 3/4-grown birds. Please turn to page 17

License buyers make donations Eligible charities benefit By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News When making their purchase, license buyers are asked if they would like to make a donation of $1, $5, $10 or $20 to help support the “Feeding Texas’ Hunters for the Hungry” program or the Texas Veterans Commission’s veterans assistance fund. A significant number of them do. Outdoor enthusiasts in Texas purchase more than 2.4 million hunting and fishing licenses annually, and in fiscal year 2018, $144,328 was remitted to the Texas Veterans Commission fund and $106,472 to the Hunters for the Hungry program through dona-

tions at the time of license sales. One North Texas retailer, however, was uncomfortable asking license purchasers to donate. “Our screen says in large, red letters that we must ask,” the retailer said. “But I don’t really want to.” The process of the selection of eligible charities actually was established by the Texas Legislature in 2015. Senate Bill 1978, introduced by Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr. (D-Brownsville) authorized the designation of a nonprofit organization to receive voluntary donations made by persons when purchasing a hunting license. The authority for the contribution to the veterans fund comes from Texas Parks and Wildlife Code,

Please turn to page 6


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September 14, 2018

Page 5

Air guns, air bows finally approved for big game hunting

Air guns and arrow guns will be allowed for hunting big game in Texas this season, with ballistic specifications of .30 caliber and 150 grain bullets. Photo from Pyramid Air.

Lone Star Outdoor News After a delay to consider effective ballistic specifications, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission authorized the use of air guns and air bows when hunting big game at its August meeting. The regulations create a new category of legal means for hunting in Texas defined as pre-charged pneumatic devices. Pre-charged pneumatic air guns and arrow guns are those weapons for which an unignited compressed gas propellant is supplied or introduced from a detached source. Minimum ballistic specifications of pre-charged pneumatics approved by the commission for hunting alligators, big game and Rio Grande turkeys are: .30 caliber bullets weighing at least 150 grains powered by an unignited compressed gas propellant charge capable of attaining a muzzle velocity of at least 800 feet per second or any bullet weight and muzzle velocity combination that produces at least 215 foot pounds of energy. For furbearers, pre-charged pneumatics must be at least .30 caliber. For squirrels, chachalaca, quail and pheasant an air rifle does not need to be a pre-charged pneumatic, but it must be able to propel a minimum .177 caliber projectile at least 600 fps. The new rules will take effect Sept. 29.

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September 14, 2018

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Hunters, anglers spend $93.5 billion In a series of reports released by the American Sportfishing Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation and the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, expenditures made for hunting, target shooting and sportfishing gear and services in 2016 supported 1.6 million jobs and provided $72 billion in salaries and wages. These monies also generated nearly $20 billion in local, state and federal taxes, much of which benefits vital conservation and educational programs that improve our outdoor areas for all who enjoy them and make hunting and shooting safer activities. “If hunting, fishing and target shooting were a corporation, it would rank number 25 on the Fortune 500,” said Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which conducted the study. Highlights of the reports include: • Each year, 35.8 million people 16 years and older fish. • More than 28 million people over 16 years old took to our nation’s public and private lands and waters and gun ranges to hunt and target shoot in 2016. • The number of people who participate in sportfishing, hunting and target shooting represents 16.5 percent of the total U.S. population.

When factoring in multiplier effects, spending by sportsmen created economic activity in excess of $220 billion. Hunting, fishing and shooting adds $119 billion of overall value to the U.S. gross domestic product and generates $17.6 billion in federal taxes and $12.2 billion in state and local taxes. —CSF

License donations Continued from page 4

Sec. 12.007, also enacted in 2015, allowing a person to make a voluntary contribution of $1, $5, $10 or $20. TPWD is not allowed to keep any of the money collected, except it may deduct money “equal to the amount of reasonable expenses for developing and administering this section,” according to Sec. 12.007 (d). The nonprofit organizations are required to submit annual reports to the legislature and to TPWD.

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Page 7

IMPROVING THE GAME.

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Lone Star Outdoor News

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The Houston Safari Club Foundation awarded a total of 27 scholarships across Texas, totaling $150,000. To date, the program, called the Dan L. Duncan Scholarship Program, has awarded 525 scholarships totaling $2.1 million. Winning recipients demonstrated a desire to protect and promote hunting and the principles of conservation. Applicants for these scholarships are undergraduate and graduate students majoring in Wildlife Management and/or Range Management. Seven Borderlands Research Institute students received scholarships totaling $39,000, being Taylor Daily, Maribel Glass, Matt Hewitt, Jacob Lampman, Carolina Medina, Howell Pugh and Kaitlyn Williams. “These scholarships are among the most prestigious and highest paying wildlife scholarships in the country,” said Dr. Louis Harveson, the Dan Allen Hughes Jr., BRI Endowed Director and professor of Wildlife Management at Sul Ross State University.

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September 14, 2018

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FISHING

Crappie anglers enjoying the fall-like bite By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

Due to thermoclines and cooling water temperatures, crappie have been found at middepths between 9 and 13 feet. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Lake Houston, 15 miles northeast of downtown Houston, serves as a water supply for the city. But anglers are touting the 11,854-acre lake’s crappie fishing. At the Sept. 8 Lake Houston Crappie Tournament, the top prize for the best seven fish weighed 8.64 pounds, with the big fish weighing 1.41 pounds. The water temperature was 85 degrees, and fish were caught in sev-

eral areas, on several different colors, with most coming from 10- to 14foot depths, reported the Bayou City Crappie Club. At Sam Rayburn Reservoir, the deep brush pile fishing has slowed. According to Greg Fenn at Camoriver Guide Service, the thermocline is the reason. “I increased the sensitivity on the sonar and the thermocline line was around 14.4 feet. I switched to brush piles in 9-13 feet and limited out,” he said. “The crappie were biting min-

nows in 8 feet and the bite was very light — I would feel a small peck and wait until the line started to move sideways, then lift up easy.” Fenn maintains brush piles in deep, middepth and slopes on the edges of the river and creeks. Serj5150 reported a similar pattern at Lewisville Lake on the Texas Fishing Forum. “I started to fish some shallow timber at around 7 feet of water and have been catching bigger crappie,” he reported. “I do have to bounce Please turn to page 23

Upper Coast guides support reduced trout limit By Nate Skinner

For Lone Star Outdoor News In June, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department conducted a mail-out survey that included 2,300 anglers residing in 14 counties surrounding Galveston Bay and Sabine Lake. The purpose of the survey was to collectively analyze individuals’ opinions on the current state of the speckled trout fishery along the upper coast. According to Dakus Geeslin, the program leader of the policy and education team for the TPWD Coastal Fisheries division, 358 of the individuals that were surveyed within the 14 county region held an all-water fishing guide license. Results from the Spotted Seatrout Survey indicate that there is support from both recreational anglers and professional fishing guides for a reduction in the bag limit for the species. “Over half of the respondents to the survey supported decreasing the individual bag limit for spotted seatrout from 10 to 5 fish per day,” Geeslin said. “Twenty three percent of respondents were opposed to this possible

regulation change, and another 23.2 percent were neutral.” Geeslin explained an even larger majority of fishing guides supported lowering the speckled trout bag limit from 10 to 5. “About 77 percent of the fishing guides surveyed indicated that they were in favor of dropping the bag limit for spotted seatrout,” he said. Galveston Bay Ecosystem Leader Glen Sutton claims that data from 2017 gill net surveys for spotted seatrout showed a significant downward trend in catch rates. “Gill net catch rates were only this low in 2010, 2006, and prior to 1995,” he said. “It’s a trend worth monitoring, and it’s difficult to say whether this signals a population decline or a movement. Generally to answer this question you need to look at several years of data.” Sabine Lake Ecosystem Leader Carey Gelpi notes that 2016 and 2017 gill net survey data on Sabine Lake also indicated a decline in catch rates for spotted seatrout. “The working theory as to why there has been a decline in catch rates is that the fresh

The speckled trout bite along the upper coast has many guides in favor of a reduction in the bag limit from 10 to 5 fish per day. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Please turn to page 25

Teen lands first big tarpon By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News A 16-year-old teen from Los Fresnos has been hoping to catch a tarpon since he started fishing several years ago. On an August Friday, his dream to hook and land such a fish came true.

“I have hooked more than two dozen tarpon,” Gilbert Olivarez Jr. said. “However, I finally caught one which I was able to bring in.” The tarpon caught about three fourths of the way out on the South Padre Island jetty was estimated to weigh more than 100 pounds and was 6 feet long.

Olivarez said it took him about 20 minutes to reel in the fish and brought it onto the rocks of the jetty where two of his friends, Trey Cantu and Javier Soza, helped him hold the fish for pictures. The teen said he caught another tarpon which was even bigger, but it got unhooked as he was reeling it in Please turn to page 33

Gilbert Olivarez, left, shows his first tarpon before releasing the fish. Photo from Gilbert Olivarez.


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September 14, 2018

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September 14, 2018

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained up the river; 77 degrees main lake, 79 up the creeks; 8.51’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. AMISTAD: Water murky; 91-95 degrees; 37.61’ low. Black bass are fair on soft plastics and jigs in 20-28 feet. Striped bass are good on slabs and top-waters. White bass are good on top-waters and slabs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and punch bait in 40-80 feet. Yellow catfish are fair to good on trotlines and juglines baited with live perch in 20-30 feet. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 78-83 degrees; 3.88’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water clear; 82-85 degrees; 1.45’ low. Black bass are fair on hollow-body frogs, weightless stick worms and white buzzbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 78-86 degrees; 0.79’ low. Black bass are fair to good on shallow-running crankbaits, stick worms and Texas rigs. Sunfish are fair to good on cut nightcrawlers and corn. Catfish are fair to good nightcrawlers. BASTROP: Water stained; 89-93 degrees. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and liver. BELTON: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 5.47’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits and crankbaits around structure. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on hot dogs, Spam and summer sausage. BENBROOK: Water lightly stained; 81-85 degrees; 8.03’ low. Black bass are fair on medium crankbaits, shaky-head worms and top-water walking baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 82-86 degrees; 1.38’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged creature baits, hollow-body frogs and magnum shaky heads. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 81-84 degrees; 2.14’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits, topwaters and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are fair on brush piles on minnows. Catfish are fair on rod and reel. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and soft plastic worms in reeds. Striped bass are good on liver and perch off points near the pier. Redfish are excellent on perch, shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are very good on liver, shrimp and cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water clear; 8285 degrees: 7.06’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, shaky-head worms and shad square-billed crankbaits. Crappie are slow. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 87-91 degrees; 7.53’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms in 8-15 feet, and on jigs and buzzbaits in 4-10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white or shad Li’l Fishies in 10-18 feet.

Channel catfish are slow. Blue catfish are good on cheese bait in 5-10 feet Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with perch and goldfish in 3-10 feet. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 8.43’ low. Black bass are good on white buzzbaits, watermelon top-waters, and weightless Texas-rigged purple flake stick worms. Striped bass are fair on top-waters and lipless crankbaits at first light, and drifting live bait. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on live bait and dip bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on juglines and trotlines baited with goldfish and perch. CADDO: Water stained; 83-86 degrees; 0.21’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, hollow-body frogs and bladed jigs in green/pumpkin. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are fair on perchcolored crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on spoons and striper jigs. Redfish are fair on live perch and tilapia along the shoreline, and on live bait along the crappie wall. Channel catfish are slow. Blue catfish are good on liver and cut bait. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 89-93 degrees; 7.25’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon/red flukes, Texas-rigged watermelon stick worms and white crankbaits off points in 2-8 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are good on white tube jigs and live minnows over brush piles in 10 feet upriver. Yellow and blue catfish are good on juglines and trotlines upriver. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 82-85 degrees, 2.10’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and top-waters. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 28.66’ low. Black bass are very good on watermelon crankbaits and large soft plastic lizards and worms. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait in 5-10 feet. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 4.87’ low. Black bass are very good on lipless crankbaits, spinner baits and chartreuse soft plastics. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad near the park and the store. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs at night. Channel catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch and chicken livers. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 105 degrees at the hot water discharge, 90-94 degrees in main lake; 3.94’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastics and lipless crankbaits around vegetation in 8-10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines and drop lines baited with live perch and goldfish in 10-14 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 8892 degrees; 1.95’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse Carolina-rigged soft plastics and crankbaits. Striped bass are good on silver/gold striper jigs. Crappie

are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are good on liver and bait shrimp. CORPUS CHRISTI LAKE: Water off-color; 81-87 degrees; 4.88’ low. Black bass are fair to good Texas rigs, weightless flukes and jigs. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live shad. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 81-84 degrees; 2.72’ low. Black bass are fair on medium-diving crankbaits, shaky-head worms, and top-water poppers. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. FAIRFIELD: Water lightly stained. Black bass are fair on Texas rigged craws, shaky-head worms and top-waters in bone. No report on other species. FALCON: Water murky; 90-94 degrees; 35’ low. Black bass are good on large soft plastics and slow-rolling spinner baits in 5-10 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp, cut bait and stink bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and Carolinarigged green/ pumpkin soft plastics over humps. Channel and blue catfish are slow. FORK: Water lightly stained; 82-85 degrees; 2.33’ low. Black bass are slow. White and yellow bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs on brush piles. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water off-color; 77-83 degrees; 4.9’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, drop-shot rigged worms and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows around deeper structure. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on electric blue soft plastic worms and watermelon crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are fair on minnows, cut bait and frozen shrimp. GRANBURY: Water stained; 89-93 degrees; 2.00’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon Carolina-rigged soft plastics, crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows, slabs and spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and green tube jigs. Catfish are fair on chicken livers and frozen shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 1.49’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms and crankbaits around timber. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows in 4-15 feet. Blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with shad. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 81-84 degrees; 3.50’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, top-water walking baits and shallow crankbaits. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 75-82 degrees; 35.81’ low. Black bass are fair on jigs, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water clear to stained; 87-91 degrees; 1.83’ low. Black bass are good on

top-waters and shad flukes near grass beds. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows over brush piles. Bream are good on live worms in 12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on juglines baited with shad and perch. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 79-84 degrees; 5.94’ low. Black bass are fair to good on medium-running crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water stained; 82-86 degrees; 2.11’ low. Black bass are fair on top-water poppers, Texas-rigged craws and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water stained; 82-86 degrees: 1.15’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, bladed jigs and hollow-body frogs. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water lightly stained; 83-86 degrees: 4.25’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. LBJ: Water stained; 90-94 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters and weightless watermelon/red stick worms. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles in 15 feet. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with goldfish and perch. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 81-84 degrees; 3.25’ low’. Black bass are fair on medium-diving crankbaits, topwater poppers and magnum shaky heads. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 0.40’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Striped bass are good on slabs, spoons and troll tubes. White bass are good on troll tubes, spoons and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows in 20 feet. Blue catfish are fair on shad. MACKENZIE: Water stained; 85-91 degrees; 77.5’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow-running crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live baitfish. MARTIN CREEK: Water stained; 89-96 degrees; 3.33’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, bladed jigs and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 83-86 degrees; 4.03’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. NASWORTHY: 75-83 degrees; 1.49’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and weightless soft plastics. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on live bait and nightcrawlers. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 87-91 degrees; 1.58’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on spoons and jigs. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel catfish are good on stink bait in 5-15 feet. Blue and yellow catfish are slow.

O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 77-83 degrees; 44.48’ low. Black bass are fair to good on square-billed crankbaits, Texas rigs and finesse jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are good on cut and live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 77-84 degrees; 13.29’ low. Black bass are fair to good on shaky heads, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 82-85 degrees; 2.14’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, spinner baits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and top-waters. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water fairly clear; 77-83 degrees; 4.09’ low. Black bass are fair to good on split-shot rigged flukes, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs around structure in 15-20 feet. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. PROCTOR: Water murky; 88-92 degrees; 7.25’ low. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and soft plastic worms early. Striped bass are fair on live shad. White bass are good on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines and juglines baited with goldfish. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 82-86 degrees; 3.92’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, shaky-head worms and black and blue football jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. RAY ROBERTS: Water clear to lightly stained: 81-85 degrees; 1.61’ low. Black bass are fair on Carolina-rigged creature baits, top-water walking baits and deepdiving crankbaits. White bass are good on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 82-84 degrees; 1.99’ low. Black bass are good on shaky-head worms, top-waters and Texas-rigged creature baits. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 89-93 degrees; 3.54’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and silver spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse jigs over brush piles. Bream are fair on crickets and nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on trotlines baited with shrimp and cut bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 88-92 degrees; 2.67’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastics and spinner baits. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers, minnows and shad. STAMFORD: Water stained to muddy; 78-84 degrees; 3.83’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and live minnows around structure. White bass are fair on slabs. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait.

n Saltwater reports Page 11 STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 89-93 degrees; 8.12’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on chicken livers and shrimp. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 8386 degrees; 2.38’ low. Black bass are fair on buzzbaits, hollow-body frogs and Texas-rigged creature baits. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. TEXANA: Water stained; 78-84 degrees; 2.04’ low. Black bass are fair to good on stick worms, shad crankbaits and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 81-84 degrees; 0.69’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Striped bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 87-91 degrees; 3.99’ low. Black bass are good on redbug and watermelon red soft plastic worms and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on silver spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and blue/green tube jigs over baited holes in 20 feet. Bream are good on nightcrawlers and crickets in 2-8 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait, stink bait, liver and hearts. TRAVIS: Water stained; 90-94 degrees; 27.09’ low. Black bass are good on bone top-waters, red shad worms, and smoke grubs. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on grubs, top-waters and chrome jigging spoons. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and fresh cut perch. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on jigs. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and nightcrawlers. WEATHERFORD: Water lightly stained; 83-85 degrees; 3.86’ low. Black bass are fair on shakyhead worms, weightless flukes and buzzbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. WHITNEY: Water stained; 87-91 degrees; 6.64’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows, spoons and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and yellow tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp, stink bait and live bait. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained to muddy; 83-87 degrees; 5.05’ high. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, black buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. —TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 14, 2018

Smaller gear teeth, and more of them, mean more contact points creating a highly efficient drive train and a smoother feel.

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT Sponsored by NORTH SABINE: Redfish are good in the marsh with high tides. Tides are well above normal. Drifters have worked slicks for trout and redfish on plastics and top-waters. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Bull redfish are good at the jetty. BOLIVAR: Trout are good on the south shoreline on top-waters and soft plastics. Trout, bull redfish, black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and birds. Redfish are good on live bait around the reefs. Redfish are good on the north shoreline on gold spoons and small top-waters. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout and redfish are good on soft plastics while working slicks and mud boils. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Trout are good for drifters on plum plastics. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout and redfish are good in the back lakes on live bait. Bull redfish are good in the surf and at San Luis Pass on crabs and mullet. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good

at the jetties on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Sand trout and Gulf trout are good in the channel on shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in Moses Lake on crabs and shrimp. FREEPORT: Bull redfish are good on live bait and crabs on the Surfside Beach. Black drum and redfish are good on the reefs. Bull redfish are good at the jetties. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp, scented plastics and DOA Shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Trout and redfish are fair to good on the shorelines for waders tossing small top-waters and plastics. Redfish are good in Lake Austin and on the north shoreline. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good on live shrimp and top-waters in Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and Shell Island. PORT O’CONNOR: Bull redfish are good in the surf and at the jetty on natural baits. Trout and redfish are good for waders and drifters working the back lakes with live shrimp and DOA Shrimp. ROCKPORT: Redfish are good on mullet on the Estes Flats and around Mud Island. Trout and redfish are good in the back of Allyn’s Bight and schooling.

fish.shimano.com PORT ARANSAS: Trout are fair around Super Flats and Mud Island on top-waters. Redfish are fair at East Flats and Shamrock Cove on top-waters and D.O.A. plastics under rattling corks. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are good on the shallow flats on gold spoons and small top-waters. Sand trout and croaker are good in the channels on fresh shrimp. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and plum plastics around rocks and grass. Redfish are good in the Land Cut on live bait. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are fair to good around East Cut. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on top-waters and soft plastics under a popping cork. SOUTH PADRE: Trout, redfish and snook are fair to good on the flats on DOA Lures and live bait. Tarpon and bull redfish are fair to good around the jetty. PORT ISABEL: Redfish are good at Gas Well Flats and in South Bay on scented plastics. Trout and redfish are fair to good while drifting sand and grass flats on live shrimp and scented plastics under popping corks. —TPWD Chronarch_10_5x15_5.indd 1

FISHING TACKLE UNLIMTED Houston,TX / 281-481-6838 Katy, TX / 713-827-7762 Sugarland, TX / 281-201-2141 TACKLE BOX Victoria, TX / 361-575-8700 PORT A OUTFITTERS Port Aransas, TX / 361-749-3474 ROCKPORT TACKLE TOWN Rockport, TX / 361-729-1841 MARBURGER’S SPORTING GOODS Seabrook, TX / 281-474-3229 ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE OUTFITTERS Corpus Christi, TX / 361-992-2960 JENSEN FISHING TACKLE Austin, TX / 512-836-1788 JOES TACKLE SHOP McAllen, TX / 956-630-0181 JOHNNY’S TRUE VALUE HARDWARE Harlingen, TX / 800-642-7392 MCBRIDE’S Austin, TX / 512-472-3532 JOHNNY’S SPORT SHOP Eagle Lake, TX / 979-234-3516 HOOK SPIT League City, TX / 832-632-1205 SOUTHWESTERN PARTS & SERVICE Dallas, TX / 214-630-8161 ANGLERS PRO TACKLE North Richland Hills, TX 817-503-2333 FUN-N-SUN Hurst, TX / 817-280-0303 BRANNANS BASS SHOP Powderly , TX 903-732-3422 PORT O’CONNER ROD AND GUN Port O’conner, TX / 361-746-8049 TACKLE ADDICT Livingston, TX / 936-646-7640 TACKLE ADDICT Brookeland, TX / 409-698-9368 CARTERS FISHIN’ WORLD Dallas, TX / 214-358-4941 ABLES SPORTING GOODS Huntsville, TX / 936-295-5786 AUSTIN CANOE KAYAK Austin, TX / 512-719-4386 San Marcos, TX / 512-396-2386 Houston, TX / 713-660-7000 Spring, TX / 281-203-0430 San Antonio, TX / 210-593-7063 COUNTY HOME AND OUTDOORS Nederland, TX / 409-722-7100 HOOK, LINE, & SINKER Harlingen, TX / 956-970-1349 JECO MARINE Port O’Connor, TX / 361-983-2000 KEITH’S TOLEDO BEND TACKLE Milam, TX / 409-625-0181 TALL TIMBER OUTDOORS Nacogdoches, TX / 936-305-5400

2/10/17 2:37 PM


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September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER RESCUE BOAT FLIPS A single vehicle with two occupants was swept off a low-water crossing near Fort McKavett and into the San Saba River. After one occupant was recovered, the Texas Game Warden Swift Water Rescue Team, along with four members of the Junction Fire Department, were working to save the second motorist. However, the first responders’ boat flipped during the recovery effort. A Texas Department of Public Safety helicopter assisted in recovering the rescue team members, along with the second occupant. All individuals were safely recovered. EVIDENCE NEARLY EATEN A Jasper County game warden was notified by Martin Dies Jr. State Park staff that a group of campers may have taken an alligator illegally. At the campsite, the warden heard conflicting stories from two male subjects, but eventually received a confession from one that he had killed a small alligator. The alligator meat was seasoned, wrapped in foil and about to be placed on the grill when the warden arrived. The gator hide, head and meat were seized. Several citations are pending, along with civil restitution. NEEDS A BIGGER COOLER A state trooper observed an alligator tail sticking out of an ice chest during a recent traffic stop, and contacted a Jasper County game warden. The trooper noted there were no tags or documentation on the tail. The warden made contact

BAYOU FISHERMAN ILLEGAL MORE WAYS THAN ONE Harris County game wardens observed three men pulling a small boat from a bayou near Clear Lake. The boat was unregistered and had a large illegal gill net onboard. The suspects initially denied having any form of identification. When one of the men kept walking toward the driver side door of his vehicle, and continued to ignore commands, one of the wardens detained the subject fearing a weapon might be in the vehicle. The warden searched the

with the subject and seized the alligator tail. Several citations are pending along with civil restitution. THESE MULLET SURE HAD BIG MOUTHS Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, an Orange County game warden made contact with a fisherman throwing a cast net for bait. When asked if he was having any luck, the fisherman said that he had caught some mullet. During an inspection of the man’s bait bucket, the warden found largemouth bass that had been taken illegally with the net along with the mullet. The bass were still alive and released. MAN THROWN FROM PERSONAL WATERCRAFT FOUND Aransas County game wardens received a call concerning two individuals on a personal watercraft in Copano Bay who had gotten separated after the driver was thrown from the vessel with the kill switch lanyard still attached to his arm.

vehicle and discovered a .40 caliber semi-automatic with two fully loaded magazines, as well as a large machete. The firearm was made safe, and the wardens attempted to locate valid identification for the suspects to no avail. A local Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent was contacted, and it was determined that one of the men was undocumented. The suspect was cited and the firearm was seized.

Without the kill switch, the passenger was unable to restart the vessel and floated away from the operator. Friends of the two individuals located the craft and passenger but could not locate the operator. After searching the area and hearing faint a yell from the bay, the wardens and sheriff’s deputies were still unable locate the operator. The U.S. Coast Guard was notified and a helicopter requested to aid in the search after dark. The helicopter located the operator and guided the game warden boat to the victim’s location where he was transported to his vacation residence. SHOCKING FISH ON THE BORDER On the Rio Grande River, Webb and La Salle County game wardens spotted two boats fleeing towards Mexico. Although the first vessel made it back to the Mexico side of the river, the wardens were able to stop the second vessel and its three occupants. After making contact with the individuals, the wardens

spotted a wooden hand-crank fish shocker used to stun fish. The wardens seized the fish shocker and released several large catfish back into the river. KAYAKER STUCK, RESCUED Jasper County game wardens received information recently about a missing elderly man who had been kayaking on Sam Rayburn Reservoir. A family member who had spoken with the man earlier in the day indicated he seemed disoriented. Three wardens responded to the call with help from the Jasper County Sheriff’s Office, which was able to ping the individual’s cell phone location. The cell phone information placed the elderly man in a creek on the Jasper/Sabine County line. Eventually, phone contact was made and the individual informed responders he was stuck in a grass mat and was experiencing muscle cramps. One of the wardens located the individual from land while the other wardens ap-

proached by water. The man was in good condition, other than experiencing slight dehydration, and was reunited with family members at the scene. BOATFUL OF WEED In early August, Texas game wardens were conducting water safety enforcement patrol on Falcon Lake when they got a text from a Falcon State Park police officer about a report of a suspicious boat entering Texas waters from the Mexico side of the lake. Wardens contacted the fisherman who made the report and determined the approximate location of the suspicious vessel. While searching the area, wardens observed a panga-style boat operating at a high rate of speed heading toward the Texas shoreline. During the ensuing pursuit, wardens chased the panga into a backwater cove more than 3 miles from the U.S./Mexico boundary line. After closing the distance, the wardens were able to prevent the escape of the suspect vessel. They found the vessel abandoned and beached on the Texas shoreline. Forty-eight bundles of marijuana were hidden under camouflage tarps and filled the vessel from bow to stern. The total cargo weighed approximately 1,100 pounds and was turned over to U.S. Border Patrol agents.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263

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Jay Link to receive Conklin award The Conklin Foundation has named Jay Link as its 2019 Conklin Foundation Award winner. The award will be presented at the 2019 Dallas Safari Club convention. The foundation recognizes the world’s greatest active hunter who pursues game in the most difficult terrain and conditions, while abiding by the highest standards of ethics and fair chase and is a strong participant in wildlife conservation. Link has been nominated for over 400 trophies in the record books from nearly every corner of the world and received the SCI World Hunting and Conservation Award. In 2017 he was awarded the Pantheon Award presented by both the Grand Slam Club/Ovis and Safari Club International. Link is the owner of Link’s Wild Safaris and is the past president/CEO of Jack Link’s Beef Jerky, International, now the largest meat snack business in the world.

September Teal Only Season Statewide Sept. 15-30 Bag Limit: 6 birds Daily Bag Aggregate: May include blue-winged, green-winged or cinnamon teal Possession Limit: Three times daily bag limit

—Conklin Foundation *See TPWD for more information

Bass at Falcon Continued from page 1

Photo from John Adami

end have been the best, and brush piles in about 15 feet of water,” he said. “The best lures have been crankbaits and jigs, and Carolina rigs and Texas rigs dragged over the rocks have been good.” One of Adami’s clients recently landed his personal best, a 9.5-pounder, and Adami landed a 10.02-pounder. “I had my customers throw crankbaits and plastics over a spot for 10 minutes with no bites, and then I picked up my crankbait and caught her on the third cast,” he said. The lake has risen more than a foot with recent rains. “We’ve received a lot of rain the past few days,” Adami said on Sept. 10. “The water is definitely on the rise.” Angler Mark Saenz also reported a 7- and 8-pounder caught and released near the dam Reports to Falcon Lake Tackle indicated the best fishing was in the afternoon, and the after-dinner bite has been good. And don’t forget the trees, said owner James Bendele. “The trees are still putting out fish, from the top to the bottom,” he said. “And don’t be afraid to cast on the bank.”


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On the level: Jupiter’s 43 SF an exceptional ride By Dan Armitage

For Lone Star Outdoor News When a boat’s ride stands out during a day of multi-boat testing, it’s worth some follow-up. Several times each season, I get the chance to test for review several boats over the course of a long day or two. The opportunity to literally hop from one boat to another and run each in similar conditions allows you to learn firsthand the advantages of certain types of hull designs, as well as comparing layouts, accessories and other assets — and shortcomings. Jupiter’s new 43 SF leveled off so quickly, was so smooth and rock-solid underfoot as the boat was put through its paces, that I was prompted to look into the design of the hull, which had to be a bit different. Carl Herndon, the founder of Blackfin Yachts and past president of Bertram Yachts, and his design team at Jupiter utilized a hull pad design they call “Posi-Stern,” which proved itself famously on earlier offshore fishing models such as the popular Jupiter 31. The pad’s proportional size and shape creates a variable dynamic stern lift that results in higher speeds, better handling and fuel economy and a riding altitude with little loss of visibility from the helm. The visibility was apparent while testing the new 43 SF, fitted with a quad of Yamaha’s new-for-2018 XTO Offshore outboards. Rigged as such, with four 425 hp V8s doing the pushing, the boat attained speeds exceeding 60 mph at 6,000 rpm, with a 0-30 mph average of just under 9 seconds — and with noticeably little bow rise. At the other end of the speed spectrum, thanks to the XTOs that are designed for multi-outboard setups and built specifically for boats the size of the Jupiter, the 43 footer’s low-speed maneuverability is exceptional. Thanks to Yamaha’s new Helm Master

PMS 470 c/u PMS 350 c/u

SetPoint control features, the craft can “crab walk” sideways to approach a dock or move closer to a fishing hotspot — and remain there for the duration without having to deploy and anchor; while trolling, the two outside motors can power down and the center two outboards operate automatically to offer the slowest possible selected speed. As for the boat, as a limited production builder, Jupiter is able to offer a resin-infused, solid fiberglass hull bottom and uni-grid stringer system that comes with a transferable limited lifetime warranty for structural integrity. Matched with premium mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems and outstanding fit and finish, the Jupiter 43 is a showcase of a blue-water boat. Notable features aboard the SF include 360-degree coaming pads, recessed Lenco trim tabs, a recessed transom seat with integrated 90 gallon insulated and illuminated livewell aft. On the bow is a thru-stem roller with remote-controlled anchor windlass, a freshwater washdown hose and a 680 quart in-floor storage locker. Between the two are insulated, illuminated 420-quart fish boxes to port and starboard and a dozen flush mounted rod holders atop gunwales that offer dive doors and ladders on each side. Overhead is a fiberglass T-Top built into an aft support frame with electronics box, six rod holders, GEM outrigger bases and 22-foot carbon poles and Lumitec Mirage Spectrum Lighting. Below deck can be found sleeping accommodations for two, a 24-inch LED TV, galley with microwave, sink and a stand-up head — all cooled by a 10,000 BTU AC system powered by the standard Kohler 9 kw diesel generator. The Jupiter 43 SF is an excellent choice for serious Lone Star State blue water anglers who value the option of venturing far into the Gulf to hook up — despite sea conditions that may keep lesser boats at bay.

The Jupiter 43 SF sports an ultrasmooth ride when fitted with four XTO Offshore outboards, along with plenty of rod and fish storage. Photos from Yamaha.


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September 14, 2018

Page 15


Page 16

September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Brian Genovese, of Lake Highlands, and Nathan Daun, of Sachse, caught these redfish in Venice, Louisiana using popping corks with jig heads.

Anneliese Martinez, a junior at Boerne Champion High School, caught this shark on her 17th birthday over Labor Day weekend in Corpus Christi Bay while fishing with her father, Gilbert.

Ty Self, of Rankin, shot this cape buffalo in the Rungwa Valley of Tanzania while hunting with Bullet Safari. He used a Dakota Arms .375 H&H Magnum to make the 60-yard shot on July 4.

Earnest Houston, of Castroville, took this nyala using a TC Encore pistol in .270. He was hunting with Restless Africa Safaris in South Africa.

After a 30-minute battle, Cameron, Kim, Emma and Darren Luensmann, of New Berlin, brought in and released this 74-inch tarpon at the mouth of the Port O’Connor jetties.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

OCT. 20-21

ABILENE CONVENTION CENTER

OCT. 27-28

FREDERICKSBURG FAIR GROUNDS

NOV. 17-18

KERRVILLE EVENT CENTER

DEC. 8-9

AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER Mark your calendars for our Christmas Show:

DECEMBER 22 & 23 KERRVILLE EVENT CENTER


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September 14, 2018

Page 17

Predictions for upcoming quail season Continued from page 4

In Stonewall County, Stan Kimbell said the outlook was 3 to 4 in the southwestern part of the county, but Rick Snipes gave an outlook of 2. “We got some rains and cooler weather recently, but I fear it is too little, too late,” Snipes reported. Roy Wilson leases quail country in several counties, and scored northeast Fisher County at 2-3, and Dickens and Garza counties at 5. “I’m an optimist,” he said. In nornthern Coke County, Hollis Farris said the numbers of birds are still strong, predicting the season at 6-7, and in Runnels County, Steve Mayer said the area has received 16 inches of rain this year, but he isn’t seeing many birds. He grades the area as a cautiously optimistic 6. Wade Clifton offered a sad forecast for Concho County. “This year I have seen one quail chick,” he said. Panhandle Chip Ruthven oversees several Wildlife Management Areas, and grades the Matador WMA (Cottle County) a 2, the Gene Howe WMA (Hemphill County) a 5-6 and the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Cochran, Yoakum, Terry counties) a 3-4. Chadd Malone is the TPWD biologist in Pampa serving several counties (Carson, Donley, Gray, Hemphill, Lipscomb, Ochiltree, Roberts and Wheeler). “My overall prediction is a 4,” he said. Jeff Bonner, TPWD’s technical guidance biologist the Panhandle, said the late rains have been spotty. “I’ve seen a few clutches here recently,” he said. Bonner scored the northeastern Panhandle at 5-6, and gave lower scores to the southwest around Lubbock, unless “you were under the right cloud.” Permian Basin Predictions for Ector and Crane counties are good, with large clutches being seen. Jim Blain scored the season a 7-8, “but it might be better.” In Upton County, Jesse Wood provided a 6-7 score. South Texas In Dimmit County, Alston Beinhorn is seeing small coveys of bobwhites, and forecasts the season at 4. Andrea Bruno in Jim Hogg County predicts a 5. Forecasts for other counties, including Brooks, Kleberg and Kenedy are higher, as the counties experienced more rainfall, and predictions are for a slightly above average season. The southern coastal prairie regions is predicted to be below average due to heavy rains and last year’s Hurricane Harvey. Trans-Pecos (blue quail) In Culberson County, George Strickausen said the year is similar to 2011-2012, and gives a score of 3. Gaby Tamez, the TPWD biologist for Pecos County, reported a lot of adults coveyed up but few chicks seen. “But this happened last year too and we saw more hatches in the fall, so here’s to hoping for the best,” she said.

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Page 18

September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

How the tagged reds were caught

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Sam Lack landed a tagged redfish at the age of 12. He’ll receive a scholarship instead of a truck. The summer-long tournament ended on Labor Day. Photo from CCA STAR.

Variety of lures, bait, locations

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Larry Holman, of Highlands, fished the upper Trinity Bay on the opening morning of the CCA STAR tournament with the goal of winning the truck and boat. He waited in the dark until the official start time on the first day of the summer-long event. He had only a shrimp tail left on his hook when the tagged red bit. Other winners used both live bait and artificial lures. Sam Lack, 12, of Bellaire, landed his fish while fishing from a boat slip on Port O’Connor. He was fishing with his father, sister and cousins, and was having fun catching hardheads with cut mullet when he hooked something bigger — his tagged redfish. Because of his age, he’ll receive a scholarship instead of a truck, but he does get to keep the boat. Mitchell Parham, of Houston, was fish-

ing in East Matagorda Bay with his wife, using a Down South lure. When the redfish rolled near the boat, he told his wife, “Baby, this thing’s tagged.” Aaron Graham, of San Antonio, was fishing with live croaker out of Rockport when he landed a redfish with moss stuck to its back. When he wiped the slime off of the fish, he discovered the tag. Michael Varnado, of Houston, used a dead shrimp to land his tagged red. He was enjoying his second day of fishing after receiving a heart transplant in February. Daniel Mullenix, 17, of Lake Jackson, threw a Super Spook Jr. in Nighthawk Bay just outside of Corpus Christi. When his line went tight, he thought he had hooked another undersized red and started horsing it in, but when his mother saw the tag, his mindset quickly changed. Lisa Murillo, of Edinburg, was drift-fishing with her husband in the Brownsville Ship Channel, using cut ballyhoo for bait. She thought she had hooked another hardhead when the tagged redfish hit.

FINAL LEADERBOARD STARKIDS scholarship division: Flounder Cannon Martin, 9, of Beaumont Sheepshead Tanner Basci, 8, of San Antonio Gafftop Makenzie Hebert, 8, of Nederland

6 pounds, 3 ounces 8 pounds, 3 ounces 6 pounds, 8 ounces

STARTEENS scholarship division: Speckled trout: Upper coast Noah Fong, 12, of Houston Middle coast Cayla Albers, 12, of Gillett Lower coast Audrie Lozano, 17, of La Feria

7 pounds, 2 ounces 8 pounds, 4 ounces 8 pounds, 10 ounces

Flounder Sheepshead Gafftop

Chase Blackwell, 16, of Cuero 6 pounds, 1 ounce Emily Gray, 15, of Baytown 10 pounds, 3 ounces Madison Newman, 16, of Angleton 6 pounds, 12 ounces

GENERAL LEADERBOARD: Speckled trout: Upper coast Robert Lewis of Angleton 9 pounds Middle coast Chris Grapentine of Corpus Christi 8 pounds, 14 ounces Lower coast Frank Cavazos of Harlingen 11 pounds

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Kingfish Dorado Ling Flounder Sheepshead Gafftop

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66 39 77 7 10 6

pounds, pounds, pounds, pounds, pounds, pounds,

15 14 15 11 13 15

ounces ounces ounces ounces ounces ounces

REDFISH DIVISION: Truck/Boat package: Larry Holman of Highlands Sam Lack of Bellaire Michael Varnado of Houston Daniel Mullenix of Lake Jackson Lisa Murillo of Edinburg Boat package: Mitchell Parham of Houston Aaron Graham of San Antonio —STAR tournament


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$35 1 YEAR 24 ISSUES

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LIFETIME READER 1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. There are four ways to enter the sweepstakes. 1) You may subscribe via our secure website, LSONews.com. 2) You may subscribe by calling (214) 361-2276. 3) You may mail the subscription card below to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355. 4) If you do not wish to subscribe, send a postcard to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 for an entry in our sweepstakes, handwrite your name, address, telephone number and email. Mechanically reproduced or copied postcards are not eligible. Lone Star Outdoor News is not responsible for late or misdirected mail. All entries must be received by midnight October 31, 2018 to be eligible for final drawing. Purchasing a subscription does not in itself increase your odds of winning. Odds are strictly determined by number of entries received, whether via Internet, telephone or mail. 2. SELECTION OF WINNERS: Every entry for every qualified contestant will be entered into random drawing for our Subscription Sweepstakes. Odds of winning depend on number of entries received. Selection of winners will be conducted under the supervision of a third party. Only one winner per household. 3. ELIGIBILITY: You must be 18 years or older. Void in Canada, Florida and Puerto Rico. Employees (and their immediate families and household members) of Lone Star Outdoor News are not eligible. Void where restricted or prohibited by law. 4. PRIZE: 1(one) Grand Prize for the Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes is a one-night, two-day hunting trip for one hunter and one nonhunter at H3P Ranch, including hunting and other recreational activities, lodging and meals. 5. PRIZE CONDITIONS/RESTRICTIONS: Prize winners will be notified by email and will be required to sign an eligibility and liability release prior to redeeming prize. Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. Prize must be redeemed during the 2018-2019 hunting season. 6. ADDITIONAL TERMS: By participating, entrants agree: a) to Official Rules and to the decisions of Lone Star Outdoor News on all matters relating to the sweepstakes which decisions shall be final in all respects; b) to release, indemnify and hold harmless, Lone Star Outdoor News and any related companies, distributors, vendors, their affiliates and subsidiaries and their respective officers, directors and employees from all liability, claims or damages arising out of their participation in the contest and the acceptance, use or misuse of any prizes; and c) to use your likeness (name) without further compensation except where prohibited. 7. WINNERS LIST: For the name of the prize winners visit our website (on or about November 30, 2018) LSONews.com or mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355. Copyright Š 2018 by Lone Star Outdoor News. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this sweepstakes in any form without the express written consent of the Publisher is expressly prohibited.


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September 14, 2018

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Boats and wade-fishing

Kids and dove

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 4

athletic,” said Calhoun County Sheriff Bobbie Vickery. “But Michael Phelps would be lucky to keep up with a drifting boat that has so much surface area for the wind to push. You should never chase after a boat. You’re not likely to catch it. We’ve had too many drownings where people tried to and failed.” Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Game Warden Jake McMahen told LSON that the boat started drifting despite the deployment of a Power-Pole, a shallow-water anchor that can be activated remotely. “Either the wind pushed it or a wave came up and the boat drifted off,” he said. “They’re not a permanent anchor. It doesn’t take much to knock one loose. They’re good if you’re on a boat and want to stop for a moment. If you use one, you should never leave a boat and expect it to be there when you get back.” Vickery said a Power-Pole is a great tool, provided you stay on the boat. “The length of the Power-Pole doesn’t change,” Vickery said. “If a tide raises the boat or the wind picks up, it can bounce free and the boat becomes unanchored.” Two other drownings related to misuse of shallow-water anchors occurred early last year. In May 2017, the body of a 54-year-old Rockport man was found in Copano Bay. He had gone fishing alone, according to his wife. Authorities suspect a mechanical anchor played a role in the man’s death because his boat

was found drifting with the Power-Pole down. Two months earlier, in Espiritu Santo Bay, strong winds and waves caused a boat’s anchor to become detached, according to a U.S. Coast Guard report. The boat drifted away and two anglers swam after it. The surviving angler reported swimming for more than an hour as he pursued the boat. At one point, the man told authorities, he looked back and noticed his friend was missing. Capt. Jason Bussey of TPWD law enforcement said anglers fishing in shallow water sometimes don’t exercise appropriate caution. “People along the coast are usually comfortable in the water,” Bussey said. “When people have been out all day wade-fishing, they often don’t realize how tired they are. The water in a bay may not be that deep, but all it has to be is over your head.” McMahen said anglers must always “respect” the water. “Most people will tire out after they swim 150 or 200 yards,” he said. “Without a flotation device, you will go down.” Cody Jones called the trio of drownings a “coastal phenomenon.” “You don’t see it happening on inland lakes,” said Jones, TPWD’s Boating Law administrator. “It’s primarily focused on wade fishermen. They typically find a shallow bay, anchor and then go wade-fishing several hundred yards away from the boat. Their expectation is that the boat will

be there when they get back. The reality is that’s not always the case.” Texas guides take precautions when wading, should their anchor lose hold. “Keep the boat close behind you,” said Port Mansfield Capt. Ruben Garza. “You may get too far away for the remote control to work. And either keep the motor pointed straight so the boat will follow you if it comes lose, or sometimes I turn it so that if it drifts away, it will go toward shallower water.” Law enforcement officials who talked to LSON urged boaters to use traditional anchors when they want to climb out and wade-fish. “A traditional anchor, if it’s not set properly, can break free, too,” Jones said. “But we don’t see as many cases of it being the cause of boats drifting.” While shallow-water anchors are convenient and let anglers stop a boat quickly, a traditional anchor has a better chance of accommodating changing conditions. “If you’re going to wade-fish, you can’t beat a rope and anchor,” Vickery said. “Usually, it doesn’t matter what the boat does, the anchor is going to stay on the bottom — unlike a pole that doesn’t change depths. In the rare cases it does come loose, an anchor is going to drag the bottom. So, when you get someone to help you recover the boat, it’s going to be relatively close by.”

Nolan was shooting his Citori .410 he got for Christmas two years ago. “For an 11-yearold to shoot his first limit is a pretty big deal,” his father said. “He was real excited and telling everyone — everyone remembers their first limit.” Cody Kohleffel and Nolan Deveny, both 11, shot their first limits of dove in the season’s first weekend. Photos from Chris Kohleffel and David Deveny.


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Veterans Bill Neff, Felipe Cuz and Dennis Hoot landed speckled trout while fishing with Capt. Jim Musquiz in Port Mansfield. Photo by Tony Vindell, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News Saying they are honored to help those who have served their country, a group of fishing guides from the Port Mansfield/ Raymondville area took a group of veterans fishing at their own expense. The seasoned guides — Noe Soza, Jim Musquiz, Jeremy Porter and Augustin Perez — took the groups on four-hour trips. Two keeper redfish and more than two dozen speckled trout were caught and, later on, cooked at the Pelican Cove — courtesy of the bar and grill owner, Jan Jones. The four guides said they were contacted by the American Legion Post 390 Commander, George Solis, about taking the veterans and they all graciously agreed to pitch in. “It was great. We all had a good time,” Porter said. “We do this for the veterans,

first responders and even for Boy Scouts.” Porter said the people on his boat caught fish and enjoyed being outdoors, despite the hot weather. On another boat, Musquiz and a trio of veterans fished up and down the bay not too from the port. Perez and Soza’s anglers caught 19 speckled trout. The group met at the Pelican Cove where the fish were cleaned, filleted and cooked three different ways, plus all the trimmings. Jones said she was glad to provide the meals. “I feel good about it,” she said. “I like to help out as much as I can.” Jones said the restaurant also hosts other events during the year with some of the proceeds going back into the community.

BIG CHINGON

7’ x 7’ with 8 TOWER

LITTLE CHINGON 5’ x 5’ with 5’ TOWER


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September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

First

Full

Last

New

Sept 16

Sept 24

Oct 2

Oct 8

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

14 Fri 15 Sat 16 Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 Wed 20 Thu 21 Fri 22 Sat 23 Sun 24 Mon 25 Tue 26 Wed 27 Thu 28 Fri

14 Fri 15 Sat 16 Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 Wed 20 Thu

10:09 11:02 11:53 12:18 1:04 1:49 2:32

21 Fri

3:14 9:26

22 Sat 23 Sun 24 Mon 25 Tue 26 Wed 27 Thu 28 Fri

3:55 4:37 5:19 6:03 6:50 7:39 8:32

10:03 3:51 10:56 4:44 11:47 5:35 12:12 6:24 12:58 7:10 1:43 7:55 2:26 8:38 3:08 9:20 3:50 10:01 4:31 10:42 5:13 11:24 5:57 ----6:44 12:33 7:33 1:22 8:26 2:14

10:27 11:20 ----12:36 1:22 2:07 2:50 3:31 4:12 4:53 5:35 6:19 7:06 7:57 8:51

4:15 5:08 5:59 6:48 7:35 8:19 9:02 9:43 10:24 11:05 11:47 12:08 12:55 1:45 2:38

07:04 07:05 07:05 07:06 07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:08 07:09 07:09 07:10 07:10 07:11 07:11

07:28 07:27 07:26 07:24 07:23 07:22 07:21 07:19 07:18 07:17 07:16 07:15 07:13 07:12 07:11

12:00p 11:08p 12:57p 11:50p 1:52p NoMoon 2:44p 12:35a 3:32p 1:22a 4:18p 2:11a 5:00p 3:03a 5:40p 3:56a 6:17p 4:50a 6:52p 5:44a 7:25p 6:39a 7:59p 7:34a 8:33p 8:30a 9:09p 9:27a 9:48p 10:26a

3:57 4:50 5:41 6:29 7:16 8:01 8:44 10:07 10:48 11:30 ----12:38 1:27 2:20

10:33 11:26 ----12:42 1:28 2:13 2:56

4:21 5:14 6:05 6:54 7:40 8:25 9:07

07:09 07:09 07:10 07:11 07:11 07:12 07:13

3:37

9:49

07:13 07:26 5:50p

4:18 4:59 5:41 6:25 7:12 8:02 8:56

10:30 11:10 11:52 12:14 1:01 1:51 2:44

07:14 07:14 07:15 07:16 07:16 07:17 07:18

07:35 07:34 07:32 07:31 07:30 07:28 07:27 07:24 07:23 07:21 07:20 07:19 07:17 07:16

12:11p 11:09p 1:09p 11:50p 2:04p NoMoon 2:56p 12:34a 3:45p 1:21a 4:30p 2:11a 5:12p 3:03a 3:57a

6:26p 4:52a 7:00p 5:47a 7:32p 6:43a 8:05p 7:40a 8:37p 8:37a 9:12p 9:35a 9:50p 10:36a

San Antonio 2018 Sept.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

14 Fri 15 Sat 16 Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 Wed 20 Thu 21 Fri 22 Sat 23 Sun 24 Mon 25 Tue 26 Wed 27 Thu 28 Fri

10:29 4:17 11:22 5:10 ----- 6:01 12:38 6:50 1:24 7:36 2:09 8:21 2:52 9:04 3:34 9:46 4:16 10:27 4:57 11:08 5:39 11:50 6:23 12:10 7:10 12:59 7:59 1:48 8:52 2:40

10:53 11:46 12:13 1:02 1:48 2:33 3:16 3:57 4:38 5:19 6:01 6:45 7:32 8:23 9:17

4:41 5:34 6:25 7:14 8:01 8:45 9:28 10:09 10:50 11:31 ----12:34 1:21 2:11 3:04

07:28 07:29 07:30 07:30 07:31 07:32 07:32 07:33 07:34 07:35 07:35 07:36 07:37 07:37 07:38

07:56 07:54 07:53 07:52 07:50 07:49 07:47 07:46 07:44 07:43 07:41 07:40 07:39 07:37 07:36

12:36p 11:26p 1:35p NoMoon 2:31p 12:06a 3:23p 12:50a 4:11p 1:36a 4:56p 2:26a 5:37p 3:19a 6:15p 4:13a 6:50p 5:09a 7:23p 6:06a 7:54p 7:03a 8:25p 8:00a 8:57p 8:59a 9:30p 9:59a 10:07p 11:00a

Amarillo

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

14 Fri 15 Sat 16 Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 Wed 20 Thu 21 Fri 22 Sat 23 Sun 24 Mon 25 Tue 26 Wed 27 Thu 28 Fri

10:15 4:03 11:08 4:56 ----- 5:47 12:24 6:36 1:11 7:23 1:55 8:07 2:39 8:51 3:21 9:32 4:02 10:13 4:44 10:55 5:26 11:37 6:10 ----6:56 12:45 7:46 1:34 8:39 2:26

10:40 11:33 12:00 12:48 1:35 2:19 3:02 3:44 4:25 5:06 5:48 6:32 7:19 8:09 9:03

4:28 5:21 6:12 7:01 7:47 8:32 9:14 9:56 10:36 11:17 11:59 12:21 1:08 1:57 2:51

07:17 07:17 07:18 07:18 07:19 07:19 07:20 07:20 07:21 07:21 07:22 07:22 07:23 07:23 07:24

07:41 07:39 07:38 07:37 07:36 07:34 07:33 07:32 07:31 07:29 07:28 07:27 07:26 07:25 07:23

12:13p 11:22p 1:10p NoMoon 2:04p 12:04a 2:56p 12:49a 3:44p 1:36a 4:30p 2:25a 5:12p 3:17a 5:52p 4:10a 6:29p 5:04a 7:04p 5:58a 7:38p 6:52a 8:12p 7:47a 8:46p 8:43a 9:22p 9:40a 10:01p 10:38a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 1:30 AM 2:42 AM 3:49 PM 12:55 AM 1:57 AM 2:38 AM 3:06 AM 3:28 AM 3:46 AM 4:03 AM 4:20 AM 4:36 AM 4:51 AM 5:04 AM 5:15 AM

Rollover Pass Height 1.23L 1.44L 0.35L 1.82H 1.86H 1.87H 1.86H 1.83H 1.81H 1.80H 1.79H 1.77H 1.75H 1.72H 1.71H

Time 6:51 AM 7:01 AM

Height 1.61H 1.55H

Time 1:53 PM 2:49 PM

Height 0.35L 0.34L

Time 9:45 PM 11:26 PM

Height 1.74H 1.77H

4:50 PM 5:49 PM 9:46 AM 9:32 AM 9:16 AM 9:16 AM 9:33 AM 9:58 AM 10:29 AM 11:03 AM 11:40 AM 12:22 PM

0.37L 0.38L 1.43L 1.42L 1.36L 1.26L 1.13L 0.98L 0.83L 0.67L 0.53L 0.40L

11:51 AM 12:54 PM 1:45 PM 2:29 PM 3:12 PM 3:54 PM 4:38 PM 5:26 PM 6:20 PM 7:21 PM

1.46H 1.51H 1.58H 1.64H 1.69H 1.73H 1.77H 1.81H 1.83H 1.84H

6:43 PM 7:31 PM 8:13 PM 8:52 PM 9:28 PM 10:04 PM 10:39 PM 11:16 PM 11:55 PM

0.39L 0.40L 0.43L 0.48L 0.56L 0.67L 0.80L 0.97L 1.15L

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 2:17 AM 3:52 AM 3:48 PM 12:43 AM 1:51 AM 2:39 AM 3:18 AM 3:49 AM 4:15 AM 4:34 AM 4:48 AM 4:58 AM 5:07 AM 5:18 AM 12:09 AM

Height 1.25L 1.43L 0.30L 1.85H 1.89H 1.89H 1.88H 1.84H 1.81H 1.77H 1.75H 1.73H 1.72H 1.71H 1.27L

Time 6:51 AM 7:02 AM

Height 1.54H 1.52H

Time 1:57 PM 2:52 PM

Height 0.34L 0.31L

Time 9:59 PM 11:17 PM

Height 1.79H 1.82H

4:46 PM 5:49 PM 6:47 PM 7:34 PM 9:31 AM 9:55 AM 10:19 AM 10:39 AM 10:59 AM 11:22 AM 11:49 AM 5:33 AM

0.32L 0.34L 0.37L 0.41L 1.43L 1.35L 1.24L 1.11L 0.95L 0.79L 0.62L 1.70H

12:55 PM 2:09 PM 3:08 PM 4:04 PM 4:55 PM 5:44 PM 6:40 PM 12:23 PM

1.51H 1.55H 1.60H 1.66H 1.71H 1.75H 1.79H 0.47L

8:16 PM 8:57 PM 9:39 PM 10:21 PM 10:59 PM 11:35 PM

0.47L 0.55L 0.65L 0.77L 0.92L 1.08L

7:55 PM

1.84H

Height 1.35L 0.46L 0.46L 1.99H 2.02H 2.03H 2.01H 1.97H 1.92H 1.85H 1.78H 1.73H 1.67H 1.63H 1.35L

Time 6:09 AM 11:11 PM

Height 1.47H 1.94H

Time 1:25 PM

Height 0.50L

Time 9:48 PM

Height 1.88H

Time 2:55 AM 2:19 PM 3:21 PM 12:27 AM 1:28 AM 2:12 AM 2:46 AM 3:15 AM 3:39 AM 3:57 AM 4:10 AM 4:22 AM 4:37 AM 4:53 AM 12:45 AM

4:22 PM 5:24 PM 6:28 PM 7:23 PM 9:49 AM 9:55 AM 10:01 AM 10:07 AM 10:20 AM 10:42 AM 11:12 AM 5:10 AM

0.46L 0.48L 0.49L 0.51L 1.41L 1.37L 1.29L 1.18L 1.05L 0.90L 0.75L 1.60H

12:36 PM 1:45 PM 2:38 PM 3:30 PM 4:25 PM 5:21 PM 6:19 PM 11:47 AM

1.47H 1.54H 1.60H 1.67H 1.74H 1.81H 1.88H 0.59L

8:05 PM 8:42 PM 9:19 PM 10:00 PM 10:49 PM 11:45 PM

0.55L 0.62L 0.73L 0.86L 1.01L 1.18L

7:25 PM

1.94H

Height 0.59H 0.67H 0.73H 0.76H 0.76H 0.75H 0.72H 0.67H 0.62H 0.57H 0.52H 0.27L 0.35L 0.43L 0.53L

Time 3:06 AM 4:44 PM 5:57 PM 7:07 PM 8:11 PM 9:10 PM 10:01 PM 10:43 PM 11:16 PM 11:44 PM 12:47 PM 6:53 AM 5:39 AM 5:06 AM 4:49 AM

Height 0.58L 0.02L 0.00L 0.00L 0.01L 0.04L 0.07L 0.10L 0.15L 0.21L 0.42L 0.48H 0.48H 0.51H 0.57H

Time 5:24 AM

Height 0.59H

Time 3:38 PM

Height 0.05L

4:22 PM 12:47 PM 1:04 PM 1:31 PM 2:06 PM

0.46H 0.34L 0.24L 0.15L 0.06L

6:28 PM 8:54 PM 10:24 PM

0.47H 0.51H 0.57H

Height 0.67H 0.67H 0.69H 0.71H 0.74H 0.24L 0.23L 0.23L 0.26L 0.29L 0.34L 0.40L 0.47L 0.55L 0.36L

Time 7:33 AM 8:33 PM 9:49 PM 11:03 PM

Height 0.57L 0.34L 0.30L 0.27L

Time 9:38 AM

Height 0.59H

Time 7:19 PM

Height 0.40L

2:41 PM 3:39 PM 4:23 PM 5:06 PM 5:55 PM 6:57 PM 10:45 AM 8:49 AM 8:13 AM

0.77H 0.79H 0.80H 0.79H 0.77H 0.75H 0.54H 0.53H 0.58H

Port O’Connor Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 12:18 AM 4:18 AM 4:51 AM 5:32 AM 6:16 AM 7:00 AM 7:38 AM 8:05 AM 8:17 AM 8:11 AM 7:48 AM 12:12 AM 12:43 AM 1:16 AM 1:47 AM

Time 12:44 AM 2:57 AM 7:37 AM 11:34 AM 1:18 PM 12:08 AM 1:05 AM 1:55 AM 2:37 AM 3:12 AM 3:41 AM 4:08 AM 4:38 AM 5:24 AM 4:41 PM

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 3:19 AM 3:09 PM 12:54 AM 2:18 AM 3:18 AM 4:01 AM 4:23 AM 4:32 AM 4:41 AM 4:52 AM 5:01 AM 5:07 AM 5:14 AM 12:14 AM 1:25 AM

Time 6:52 AM 6:31 PM 7:38 PM 8:49 PM 9:53 PM 10:47 PM 11:32 PM

Height 1.20L 0.28L 0.31L 0.34L 0.36L 0.38L 0.40L

Time 9:01 AM

Height 1.23H

Time 5:34 PM

Height 0.30L

7:56 7:56 7:58 8:04 8:12 8:21 8:29

AM AM AM AM AM AM AM

1.44H 1.41H 1.38H 1.35H 1.32H 1.30H 1.31H

1:55 2:13 2:30 2:44 2:57 3:15 3:43

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

1.07L 0.99L 0.90L 0.79L 0.66L 0.53L 0.41L

4:59 PM 6:07 PM 7:10 PM 8:12 PM 9:16 PM 10:25 PM 11:47 PM

1.17H 1.21H 1.25H 1.30H 1.35H 1.39H 1.42H

Height 1.08L 0.38L 1.43H 1.47H 1.48H 1.46H 1.43H 1.39H 1.36H 1.34H 1.32H 1.30H 1.29H 0.95L 1.10L

Time 6:38 AM

Height 1.19H

Time 2:16 PM

Height 0.42L

Time 11:00 PM

Height 1.37H

4:04 PM 5:05 PM 6:08 PM 7:06 PM 7:55 PM 10:19 AM 10:20 AM 10:21 AM 10:28 AM 10:49 AM 11:19 AM 5:25 AM 5:38 AM

0.39L 0.41L 0.44L 0.47L 0.49L 1.20L 1.17L 1.11L 1.02L 0.90L 0.78L 1.28H 1.28H

12:33 PM 1:41 PM 2:45 PM 3:44 PM 4:43 PM 5:43 PM 11:56 AM 12:38 PM

1.22H 1.25H 1.28H 1.31H 1.33H 1.35H 0.66L 0.54L

8:37 PM 9:16 PM 9:55 PM 10:35 PM 11:20 PM

0.51L 0.54L 0.60L 0.69L 0.80L

6:51 PM 8:31 PM

1.37H 1.40H

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 1:51 AM 12:42 AM 2:12 AM 3:11 AM 4:04 AM 4:53 AM 5:40 AM 6:22 AM 6:54 AM 6:43 AM 04:37 AM 4:21 AM 3:47 AM 4:03 AM 12:19 AM

Height 0.93L 1.09H 1.19H 1.25H 1.26H 1.23H 1.18H 1.11H 1.01H 0.90H 0.86H 0.89H 0.93H 0.96H 0.82L

Time 5:13 AM 2:04 PM 2:51 PM 3:39 PM 4:31 PM 5:32 PM 6:36 PM 7:32 PM 8:17 PM 9:50 AM 9:36 AM 10:03 AM 10:41 AM 11:23 AM 4:23 AM

Height 1.07H 0.02L 0.04L 0.10L 0.17L 0.24L 0.29L 0.32L 0.34L 0.86L 0.73L 0.58L 0.42L 0.26L 0.98H

Time 1:18 PM

Height 0.06L

12:46 PM 1:50 PM 2:53 PM 3:55 PM 4:57 PM 12:06 PM

0.96H 0.95H 0.96H 0.96H 0.96H 0.12L

8:59 PM 9:41 PM 10:26 PM 11:16 PM

0.38L 0.43L 0.53L 0.66L

11:19 PM

1.00H

Height 0.74L 0.08L 0.08L 1.02H 1.02H 0.99H 0.93H 0.86H 0.83H 0.82H 0.82H 0.82H 0.82H 0.57L 0.69L

Time 5:36 AM 11:36 PM

Height 0.83H 0.98H

Time 1:46 PM

Height 0.11L

Time 10:16 PM

Height 0.98H

4:25 PM 5:32 PM 6:29 PM 7:17 PM 8:44 AM 8:42 AM 8:59 AM 9:22 AM 9:55 AM 10:37 AM 4:24 AM 4:38 AM

0.10L 0.13L 0.14L 0.16L 0.82L 0.76L 0.69L 0.61L 0.52L 0.42L 0.82H 0.83H

11:52 AM 12:51 PM 1:49 PM 2:45 PM 3:39 PM 4:33 PM 11:20 AM 12:02 PM

0.87H 0.87H 0.88H 0.89H 0.89H 0.89H 0.31L 0.20L

7:59 PM 8:40 PM 9:22 PM 10:09 PM 11:02 PM

0.19L 0.22L 0.28L 0.36L 0.46L

5:29 PM 6:37 PM

0.89H 0.88H

Height 1.28L 0.37L 1.66H 1.69H 1.70H 1.69H 1.64H 1.58H 1.52H 1.47H 1.43H 1.41H 1.40H 1.39H 1.29L

Time 5:10 AM

Height 1.32H

Time 1:23 PM

Height 0.42L

Time 10:41 PM

Height 1.60H

3:04 PM 4:02 PM 5:04 PM 6:06 PM 7:01 PM 7:48 PM 10:06 AM 9:39 AM 9:44 AM 10:07 AM 10:38 AM 11:14 AM 4:32 AM

0.38L 0.41L 0.45L 0.50L 0.55L 0.60L 1.35L 1.27L 1.15L 1.01L 0.87L 0.72L 1.40H

12:27 PM 1:55 PM 3:06 PM 4:11 PM 5:16 PM 6:30 PM 11:54 AM

1.36H 1.38H 1.40H 1.44H 1.49H 1.54H 0.59L

8:31 PM 9:11 PM 9:54 PM 10:42 PM 11:40 PM

0.67L 0.76L 0.87L 1.00L 1.14L

8:17 PM

1.60H

Time

Height

Port Aransas

Nueces Bay Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

San Luis Pass

Height 1.36H 1.43H 1.52H 1.56H 1.56H 1.54H 1.50H 1.47H 0.43L 0.48L 0.56L 0.67L 0.81L 0.98L 1.16L

East Matagorda

Freeport Harbor Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 12:53 AM 4:03 AM 5:30 AM 6:24 AM 7:05 AM 7:36 AM 7:55 AM 7:59 AM 12:12 AM 12:48 AM 1:24 AM 2:00 AM 2:37 AM 3:17 AM 3:58 AM

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 2:10 AM 2:33 PM 3:24 PM 3:21 AM 4:12 AM 4:53 AM 5:30 AM 6:00 AM 3:37 AM 3:30 AM 3:21 AM 3:40 AM 4:03 AM 12:00 AM 12:56 AM

South Padre Island

12:54 PM 1:57 PM 3:07 PM

0.53L 0.47L 0.42L

8:09 PM 9:30 PM 11:37 PM

0.73H 0.71H 0.70H

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Time 2:34 AM 2:12 PM 12:17 AM 1:40 AM 2:47 AM 3:36 AM 4:12 AM 4:30 AM 4:31 AM 4:23 AM 4:18 AM 4:20 AM 4:26 AM 4:32 AM 12:51 AM

Texas Coast Tides

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28

Date Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 24 Sept 25 Sept 26 Sept 27 Sept 28


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 14, 2018

Page 23

Catching crappie Continued from page 8

around from tree to tree to get a good number in the boat.” At Lake Granbury, James Davis with Davis Guide Service had excellent crappie fishing in early September, and the fishing improved with the cooler temperatures and rising water. With two customers, one who hadn’t fished for crappie since he was a youngster, the group fished with jigs and also with slip corks to fill the cooler. At Lake Palestine, guide Mark Standridge with Three Nails Guide took two groups over the Labor Day weekend, with the first group bringing in 46 quality fish and the second group getting chased off of the water due to storms after two hours of fishing, but still bringing in 27. “The fishing is getting better and better with the cooler temperatures,” he said.

Hall takes FLW Costa event Texans claimed the top two spots at the Costa FLW Series North Division’s final event at Ontario, Canada’s 1000 Islands. Kyle Hall, of Rio Vista, brought five bass weighing 18 pounds, 10 ounces, to the scale on the final day to claim the victory and a check for $45,700. His three-day total weighed 68 pounds, 11 ounces. Hall landed smallmouth bass from both the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario, targeting main-river current breaks and points with boulders, using a drop-shot rig with a 3-inch minnow. Carl Jocumsen, of Frisco, finished second with 65 pounds, 9 ounces, winning $17,500. —FLW Fishing

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Page 24

September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

PRODUCTS

>> FIRMINATOR G-3: Like the original Firminator, this downsized G-3 model by Ranew’s Outdoor Equipment incorporates all the necessary food plot implements into one unit and it can be used on terrain not easily accessible by heavy implements. Though light enough to be easily pulled by a 500cc or greater ATV, the G-3’s 800 pounds proves ample weight for the 16-inch ground turning discs to break up and dig into hard ground. Its seed box feeds into a precision delivery system and, after seeding, land managers can finish with the agricultural grade 34-inch- wide cast iron cultipacker. “After some adjustments and trimming out the unit, I only had to make one pass in our sandy soil, pulling it with the Can Am,” said LSON’s David J. Sams. “It was frustrating to adjust it for the soil type, but once that was done, it worked great. It was nice to see the seed sprouted when I returned the next week.” The implement costs about $6,000.

PRO 365 GUIDE GLOVES: These gloves by Fish Monkey allow anglers to custom cut and expose only the fingers they need for the various tasks fishing demands. Made from a quick-dry breathable fabric, the gloves have a nonslip grip synthetic leather palm. The gloves, which are available in two colors and five sizes, cost about $30.

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CATALYST SOFTSHELL PANTS: First Lite’s technical hunting pants use a two-layer construction that creates pants that are both warm and breathable while also being lightweight and completely silent. An interior fleece lining optimizes a hunter’s body temperature while the pants’ durable exterior resists moisture. Zippered mesh pockets hold tags, GPS, knives and other accessories without noise or hassle. These versatile pants, which are ideal for a wide range of environments and hunting applications, are available in Dry Earth, Fusion camo (shown) and Cipher camo. They cost $230.

>> GONAME JIG: Williamson has introduced a bigger Gomame jig to help increase anglers’ odds of landing the most coveted and biggest fish in the sea. The S-shape of this lure’s body delivers a pronounced wounded baitfish action to attract a variety of sportfish, including tuna, jacks, Spanish mackerel and kings. The new larger sizes are a 4.25-inch jig that weighs 2.75 ounces and a 4.75-inch model that weighs 3.5 ounces. The jigs feature VMC Perma Steel hooks and premium foiled finishes to add flash and attraction. They are available in seven colors and range from $8.99 to $9.99, depending on size.

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VENTURE 65 COOLER: OtterBox’s large capacity cooler will extend a hunter’s week in the woods by several days. The 65-gallon cooler has a mounting system for accessories that configure to the demands of the outdoorsman, to include a side table, cup holders, dryboxes, etc. The cooler comes with a bottle opener and dry storage tray. “The cooler seems to weigh less than its competitors and the latches are easier to use,” said David J. Sams. “I did find the drain plug produced condensation, but being able to attach a garden hose to it to drain was a cool feature.” It costs about $350.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 14, 2018

Page 25

Trout limit survey Continued from page 8

water inflows that the estuary has received in recent years has temporarily displaced spotted seatrout populations,” Gelpi said. “They may have moved to areas with higher salinities, such as the deeper portions of the Sabine Lake estuary.” Data from 2018 upper coast gill net surveys has not been completely finalized as TPWD coastal fisheries biologists are waiting on results that will be obtained from fall survey efforts. Veteran Galveston Bay fishing guide Capt. Steve Hillman, spends 180-230 days on the water each year. He experiences the ever-changing trends within the Galveston Bay Complex first hand. “Consistently staying on fish has changed a lot over the years, and it’s definitely becoming more difficult to find good numbers of speckled trout day in and day out,” he said. “In fact, over the past few months, redfish have saved the day for my clients when the trout bite just wasn’t happening.” Hillman does still have decent trips in which his customers land Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News 15-40 speckled trout, but his tactics for producing these catches have changed significantly. “I can’t catch fish in all the places that I used to find them at anymore,” he said. “Nowadays, I typically have to rotate through a handful of spots and hope they continue to produce.” Hillman feels the struggle to consistently catch speckled trout is a result of unintentional mismanagement of the fishery as a result of Mother Nature. “In 2008, the Galveston Bay system lost significant amounts of live oyster reefs as a result of them being silted over from Hurricane Ike,” he elaborated. “Then, over the past decade, droughts and floods have stacked up our speckled trout populations, allowing them to be hammered on by massive amounts of anglers.” Hillman believes a reduction in the speckled trout bag limit from 10 to 5 fish would help the fishery.

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Page 26

September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 34

LSONews.com

INDUSTRY Powell honored Linda Powell, director of media relations for O.F. Mossberg & Sons, Inc., was inducted into the Legends of the Outdoors Hall of Fame on Aug. 25 for her conservation efforts.

Malibu Boats acquired Pursuit Boats, expanding into the saltwater fishing market.

Crabtree joins ASA Clay Crabtree, formerly a legislative analyst, joined the American Sportfishing Association as policy director.

CEO at 5.11 Tactical Francisco Morales, co-founder of 5.11 Tactical, was named the company’s chief executive officer.

New VP at Duckett Fishing DOWN 1. Used by some deer hunters to get to blind quietly 2. Shorebird that keys anglers to baitfish 3. A mechanical fishing reel 5. Blue, green or cinnamon 7. Taking game illegally 8. A hook manufacturer 9. The wild dog in Australia 12. A salmon species 14. It sends a message for help into the air 16. A trout species 17. River that flows through Waco 18. A freshwater lake with redfish 20. A Panhandle county 23. A Hill Country river 25. The wobbling, diving lure 27. Goddess of the hunt 31. Uses compressed air to propel the projectile 32. Some dove hunters use this size shot 33. Command to stop a pointing dog 34. Deer eat this on the cob or off 36. It drops the acorns

Nikon Sport Optics products, including firearm optics, binoculars, spotting scopes and rangefinders, are now available at EuroOptic.

Council names director

Pursuit Boats acquired

ACROSS 1. A bass lure 4. White-tailed bucks are losing their _____ 6. Treat all firearms as if ____ 10. Pests during the teal hunt 11. A favorite choke size for dove hunters 13. The blood-sucking bait 15. A coastal county 17. The sharp projection on a hook 19. A decoy held open by wind 21. Two-legged gun rest 22. Rocks along the lake bank 24. Bow that bends back against the natural bend 26. Put on deer after shooting 28. Device constructed to provide water for wildlife 29. Nighttime animal 30. Putting the shot ahead of the bird 33. Hooking the plastic bait in the middle 34. Place where hunting stories are told 35. It lights up the dark 37. A quail predator 38. Highest peak in Texas 39. First rule of shooting

EuroOptic selling Nikon products

Larry Rencken was named vice president of operations for Duckett Fishing.

ED sought in Pennsylvania

Dr. John Froeschke, a Texas A&M-Corpus Christi graduate, was named the deputy director of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.

DBC director to retire Debbie Erwin, the Director of Operations of Deer Breeders Corp, will retire March 1, 2019, after serving the group since February, 2011.

Sportsman’s Box joins Delta Waterfowl as corporate partner Sportsman’s Box, a subscription service that provides monthly delivery of gear and supplies that cater to the hunting, fishing and outdoors lifestyle, has become a corporate partner of Delta Waterfowl.

Ravin Crossbows sold

The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is conducting a nationwide search for a new executive director.

Rep group for Parker Parker Compound Bows, Inc. retained Outdoor Marketing Group to represent the company in several southern and eastern states.

Velocity Outdoor, Inc., the parent company for the Crosman and Benjamin Airguns and CenterPoint Archery, acquired Ravin Crossbows.

Anderson named CEO of A Band of Anglers A Band of Anglers, the umbrella corporation overseeing several fishing tackle brands including Ocean Born, Engage and Hyperlastics, named Brian Anderson its chief executive officer.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Dove sticks 1 bottle lemon-lime soda Carribean jerk marinade Skewers Sweet peppers Mushrooms Cherry tomatoes 12 pieces of bacon cut in half 24 dove breasts

marinate dove for 12 hours. Soak skewers in water. Take breast piece, wrap in bacon, and add to skewer, alternating with mushroom, pepper and cheery tomato. Grill to medium rare. —Cabela’s

Soak dove breasts in lemon lime soda for 8-12 hours, then

Fancy fried bass 1 1/2 lbs. bass fillets 1/4 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. pepper 1/2 cup flour Butter or margarine 1 cup or more sliced fresh mushrooms 1/4 cup green onions 2 tbsps. dry white wine 1 tbsp. lemon juice Sprinkle fillets with salt and pepper, then dredge lightly in flour. Melt about 2 tbsps. but-

ter or margarine over medium heat. Fry the fillets until golden brown on each side and remove to a plate, keeping them warm. Add more butter or margarine to the skillet and add mushrooms and green onions. Cook them for about 3 minutes then stir in the wine and lemon juice. Pour this mixture over the fish and serve. —Ohio DNR


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September 14, 2018

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2019 YOU ARE INVITED to the Greatest Hunters' Convention on the Planet

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9/11/18 11:04 AM


Page 28

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LSONews.com

NATIONAL SOUTH DAKOTA

OKLAHOMA

Pheasant numbers recover

Shelton on board of OWCF

According to the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, this year’s pheasant brood survey shows a 47 percent increase over last year. The 2018 statewide pheasants-per-mile index is 2.47, up from the 2017 index of 1.68. South Dakota’s traditional statewide pheasant hunting season opens on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, and runs through Jan. 6, 2019.

Country music star Blake Shelton has joined the board of directors of the new Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Foundation. His board membership was approved Tuesday during the regular September meeting of the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission. “When I was 10, my dad took me out in the woods deer hunting with him, and it changed my life forever,” Shelton said. “Healthy fish and wildlife, and the opportunities to get outdoors, make Oklahoma a special place to live.” Shelton, who grew up hunting and fishing in Oklahoma, has been a longtime supporter of the Wildlife Department. When asked if he would become an honorary director, Shelton instead said he wanted to be fully involved as an active and voting member of the foundation’s board. —OWCF

—SDGFP

COLORADO

SCTP national champions At the 2018 Scholastic Clay Target Program International National Championships held in Colorado Springs, more than 120 athletes competed in International Skeet as well as International Trap during the 6-day event. Taking top senior division squad honors in International Skeet was Union Grove Broncos, Wisconsin, scoring 275. Sauk County Youth Shooting Team, Wisconsin was second at 230, and Tampa Bay Clay, Florida finished third with 218. In International Trap, Tampa Bay Clays won the title with a squad score of 329, followed by Minute Man Sharpshooters, Massachusetts, with 314. —USA Shooting

IOWA

0-YARD SHOT , OF ABILENE, MADE A 25 CADE HENDRICKSON, 14 ILE HUNTING IN WH D TOOK THIS IMPALA WITH HIS .270 RIFLE AN SOUTH AFRICA. THE EASTERN CAPE OF

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

Pheasant numbers highest in decade Iowa’s pheasant hunters can expect to find more birds this fall, state wildlife experts predict. That forecast is based on the recently completed statewide population survey of pheasants, quail, partridge, cottontail rabbits and jackrabbits. The survey counted a state average of 21 birds per 30 mile route which translates to a statewide harvest estimate of 250,000 to 300,000 roosters this fall. Iowa’s pheasant season runs from Oct. 27 to Jan. 10, 2019. —IDNR

MINNESOTA

Conservation officer dies in farm accident See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Caroline Colt. Company 4409 Crawford Drive Abilene, TX 79602 (325) 704-5426 carolinecoltcompany.com

Kyle Quittschreiber, a conservation officer with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, died Aug. 24 in a farm accident when the tractor he was driving rolled, pinning him underneath. Quittschreiber was stationed at the Detroit Lakes DNR office. —Staff report

FLORIDA

Snook, reds catch-andrelease only The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission temporarily made snook and redfish catch-and-release only from the northernmost point of Anna Maria Island in Manatee County to Gordon Pass in Collier County. This was done through an executive order in response to the red tide bloom in southwest Florida. —FWC

UTAH

Cougar permits increased During an Aug. 30 meeting in Salt Lake City, members of the Utah Wildlife Board approved a slight increase in the number of cougars hunters can take during the state’s upcoming season. During the 2017-2018 season, hunters were allowed to take 581 cougars. During the upcoming season, hunters can take 642. Last year, 456 cougars were taken from the 581 permits issued. —UDNR

IDAHO

Restoration efforts on Big Wood River As part of the Big Wood Home River Initiative and with a goal to help restore the Big Wood River to its former glory as a wild trout fish factory, once the Idaho Transportation Department fixes a perched culvert across Highway 20, about 89 miles of spawning and rearing habitat for wild trout will be made accessible to the Big Wood. Additional plans on the river are to repair an irrigation diversion that was damaged in flooding in a way that allows for irrigation while recreating floodplain habitat, and lessening the need to bulldoze “push-up” dams in the middle of the river for irrigation purposes, and the Bridge to Bridge project that would help to create floodplain and in-stream habitat while simultaneously protecting a hospital and a major bridge from flooding. —Trout Unlimited

CALIFORNIA

SITKA, KUIU founder dies Jason Hairston, the founder of Sitka Gear and KUIU, died Sept. 4 at his Dixon, California home of an apparent suicide. He was 47. Hairston played college football player at UC Davis. In 1995, he signed on to play with the San Francisco 49ers in the NFL, and then transferred to the Denver Broncos before retiring in 1996. In 2005, Hairston founded the hunting gear company SITKA. He later sold the company to Gore-Tex in 2009. A year later, he founded the KUIU brand. Hairston most recently hunted and took a Dall’s ram on a hunt with Donald Trump Jr. Hairston had announced in 2017 that he was having symptoms of CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) as a result of his football career. —Staff report

INTERNATIONAL PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA

Free licenses for first-time hunters In an effort to boost hunter recruitment, Prince Edward Island is waiving the provincial fees to take a required hunter’s safety course. In addition, licenses for first-time hunters will be free. “We have listened to the feedback from groups such as yours about the barriers people face to becoming a hunter,” Brown told the members of the PEI Chapter of Delta Waterfowl. —Delta Waterfowl


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September 14, 2018

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offering DOVE * DUCKS * SPRING TURKEY

Available for small groups to corporate outings Primary property located 5 miles north of Winters, Texas Additional acreage located outside Clyde, Potosi and Baird, Texas From DFW/Arlington: 3 hrs, San Antonio/Austin: 3 hrs, Houston: 5 hrs All properties have one or all of the following: Black oil sunflowers, milo, millet, winter wheat and/or wild sunflowers For dove hunts, max 50 guests per weekend - call for pricing Hunting Friday afternoon, Saturday morning & afternoon, Sunday morning Meal packages available - call for more information For more info & reservations contact Ryan Gardner rg@24outfitters.com 903-787-2889 www.24outfitters.com

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䄀渀渀甀愀氀 倀爀椀挀攀 ⴀ 倀爀椀瘀愀琀攀 䔀砀挀氀甀猀椀瘀椀琀礀 䌀䄀䴀䐀䔀一Ⰰ 吀堀 伀渀氀礀 ㄀⸀㔀 栀漀甀爀猀 昀爀漀洀 搀漀眀渀琀漀眀渀 䠀漀甀猀琀漀渀

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㈀   䘀漀爀 洀漀爀攀 椀渀昀漀爀洀愀琀椀漀渀Ⰰ 瘀椀猀琀 甀猀 漀渀氀椀渀攀㨀

眀眀眀⸀眀椀氀搀栀愀爀攀戀礀爀愀礀漀渀椀攀爀⸀挀漀洀


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CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING PROFESSIONAL TAXIDERMY AND TROPHY ROOM SERVICES “We specialize in African game taxidermy” Trophy install, restoration, cleaning, insect prevention, transport, storage. www.safarilifetaxidermy.com (210) 438 2417 WHITETAIL DEER STOCKER BUCKS AND DOES Purchase Whitetail deer for release on your high fenced ranch. Bucks from 190” to 300”. The 3 Amigos Ranch is a TAHC Certified Herd and TC-1 Status. No testing! Call for availability! Anthony Campagna: (214) 212-9292 or Frank Marino: (214) 212-7035 DOVE AND DUCK LEASE Grayson County Between Whitesboris and Southmayd Highway 56 Looking for 6-8 guns (214) 577-3111 ARGENTINA DOVE HUNTING Cordoba, Argentina 4 days – 3 nights 6 half day hunts - $1320 Tim – (972) 769-8866 HUNTING LEASE TRACTOR/MOWER 1946 Ford 9N tractor with 4 foot mower runs great. Carb just overhauled. $1995 3 speed trans, PTO, 12volt conversion, three point hitch, fuel type: gas Call Steve (214) 460-1241

ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263 TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189 ARGENTINA DUCK HUNTING dagaradventures.com 8 hunts – $3990 Damian – 011 54 9 2923 69 2907 Tim – (972) 769-8866 HUNTERS DELIGHT 117 acres for sale 85 miles from Ft. Worth, Clay County Deer, turkey, hogs, etc $3,950 per acre Jd Rose Real Estate (817) 332-3887 (817) 994-1486 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219 DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 SEASON LEASES  & GUIDED HUNTS in Jim Hogg County. Quality Bucks. $2800-4000/Gun. Info at saenzmm@yahoo.com or (361) 215-6738

AXIS HIDES Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996 MILLER DOUBLE A RANCH Two hours north of DFW in historic Saint Jo, TX. Hunt trophy whitetail and exotics. Lodging and meals included during three-day hunts. www.millerdoublearanch.com Contact Kelly at (817) 771-9146 SOUTH TEXAS MANAGEMENT BUCK HUNTS, 130 to 150 class $2,000 to $2,500 two day hunts $250 no kill fee per day , guide and meals included Lodging not included but available near by. Call John (512) 517-0299 RANCH FOR SALE 470 Low Fence Acres 1.5 Hours North of DFW Boone & Crockett Deer Turn Key: Cabin, Food Plots, Feeders, Tower Stands. (940) 464-0121 STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210 DUVAL COUNTY, CONCEPCION, TX 85 Acres, Lodging, RV Power available HuntersHilton.com for more info (361) 244-0544 OR (361) 443-9330

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MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS Actively purchasing authentic Texas artifacts. One piece to entire collections. Call (210) 557-9478

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1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. There are four ways to enter the sweepstakes. 1) You may subscribe via our secure website, LSONews.com. 2) You may subscribe by calling (214) 361-2276. 3) You may mail the subscription card below to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355. 4) If you do not wish to subscribe, send a postcard to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 for an entry in our sweepstakes, handwrite your name, address, telephone number and email. Mechanically reproduced or copied postcards are not eligible. Lone Star Outdoor News is not responsible for late or misdirected mail. All entries must be received by midnight October 31, 2018 to be eligible for final drawing. Purchasing a subscription does not in itself increase your odds of winning. Odds are strictly determined by number of entries received, whether via Internet, telephone or mail. 2. SELECTION OF WINNERS: Every entry for every qualified contestant will be entered into random drawing for our Subscription Sweepstakes. Odds of winning depend on number of entries received. Selection of winners will be conducted under the supervision of a third party. Only one winner per household. 3. ELIGIBILITY: You must be 18 years or older. Void in Canada, Florida and Puerto Rico. Employees (and their immediate families and household members) of Lone Star Outdoor News are not eligible. Void where restricted or prohibited by law. 4. PRIZE: 1(one) Grand Prize for the Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes is a one-night, two-day hunting trip for one hunter and one nonhunter at H3P Ranch, including hunting and other recreational activities, lodging and meals. 5. PRIZE CONDITIONS/RESTRICTIONS: Prize winners will be notified by email and will be required to sign an eligibility and liability release prior to redeeming prize. Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. Prize must be redeemed during the 2018-2019 hunting season. 6. ADDITIONAL TERMS: By participating, entrants agree: a) to Official Rules and to the decisions of Lone Star Outdoor News on all matters relating to the sweepstakes which decisions shall be final in all respects; b) to release, indemnify and hold harmless, Lone Star Outdoor News and any related companies, distributors, vendors, their affiliates and subsidiaries and their respective officers, directors and employees from all liability, claims or damages arising out of their participation in the contest and the acceptance, use or misuse of any prizes; and c) to use your likeness (name) without further compensation except where prohibited. 7. WINNERS LIST: For the name of the prize winners visit our website (on or about November 30, 2018) LSONews.com or mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to Lone Star Outdoor News Subscriber Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355. Copyright © 2018 by Lone Star Outdoor News. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this sweepstakes in any form without the express written consent of the Publisher is expressly prohibited.


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Opening weekend Continued from page 1

hunters didn’t complain, as they were just happy to see the rain in the parched part of Texas. South Texas hunters fared well, according to reports. Steve Strick traveled from his Forney hometown to Pearsall to hunt whitewings at the Wilson Whitetail Ranch. “We did well, I didn’t shoot that well, but after awhile it got better and we got our limit,” he said. “I wasn’t leading them far enough at first.” Other hunters did well near Strick’s hometown, where dove numbers have been spotty over the past several seasons. Excellent reports also came from hunters over irrigated sunflowers in the Hondo and Uvalde areas and from the Rio Grande Valley, and in areas near Wichita Falls. The dry conditions greeted opening day hunters in Comanche County, but a spotty 2-inch rain a few weeks before the opener brought good hunting for a group in the northern portion of the county. “The fields haven’t been good on opening weekend for several years,” said hunter Steve Broadhurst. “This year, it was like the old days. We could have used more people, though, the birds came from every direction and left in every direction — there was no pattern to them.”

Interior provides $36 million to boost wetlands The Texas Beaches to Bays and the San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge will receive the benefit of additional funds provided through grants announced by the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission. The Commission, chaired by U.S. Sec. of the Interior Ryan Zinke, approved $23.8 million in grants for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to conserve or restore almost 135,000 acres of wetland and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 17 states throughout the United States. The grants, made through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act, will be matched by over $60 million in partner funds. “These projects provide tens of thousands of acres of hunting, fishing and recreational access, while strengthening important migration corridors and local economies,” said Deputy Sec. David Bernhardt. Texas Beaches to Bays will receive $1 million to permanently protect 5,369 acres of coastal prairie, coastal marsh, and other wetlands and uplands in the Texas midcoast. The project will benefit mottled duck, mallard, redhead and other species. The commission also approved more than $13.1 million from the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund to conserve 5,802 acres for six national wildlife refuges. These funds were raised largely through the sale of Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps, commonly known as Duck Stamps. The San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge will receive $1,255.500. —Dept. of Interior

LED light may influence radio reception LED lights may cause poor VHF radio and Automatic Identification system reception, according to a Marine Safety Alert by the U.S. Coast Guard on Aug. 15. In some cases, the interference may cause problems if mariners need to call for help, the Coast Guard said. The Coast Guard advised to test for the presence of LED interference by turning off LED lights, tuning the VHF radio to a quiet channel, adjusting the radio’s squelch control until it outputs audio noise, readjusting the squelch control until the audio noise is quiet and, finally, turning on the LED lights. If the radio outputs audio noise, the LED lights are causing interference. —Coast Guard

For: Lone Star Outdoor News

#1820-18L Lone Star Outdoor News.indd 1

Due: 8/29/18

Issue: Sept. 2018

8/27/18 2:55 PM


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Galveston tarpon Continued from page 1

Lyn Houston from Pirate’s Beach on Galveston Island and his friend tag-teamed and released this tarpon. Photo from Capt. Michael LaRue.

count on each year during the early fall, as the fish pass through the Gulf waters near Galveston on their way to their wintering grounds off the Yucatan. He calls this travel route that the beasts take Tarpon Alley. “Tarpon Alley is a migration corridor for Tarpon that runs just offshore throughout the entire perimeter of the Gulf of Mexico,” he said. “It’s like a freeway in the Gulf for the silver kings, and its existence is the reason we are able to catch monster tarpon out of Galveston every year. These fish have to come through our nearshore waters on their way to their winter haunts.” Williams claims the best way to catch tarpon is by using a live, natural bait. “That’s not to say that these fish won’t hit an artificial lure, I just believe that natural baits are the most effective option,” he said. Live mullet, ribbon fish, croaker and sand trout are all good choices, and these baits will catch fish even when conditions are not ideal. “I prefer to fish for tarpon when the Gulf is flat and green with good visibility throughout the water column, but that just doesn’t happen as much as we’d like it to,” he said. “Using live baits makes it possible to entice strikes from nearby tarpon, even when the water is choppy and off-colored.” Another Galveston area tarpon guide is

Capt. Michael LaRue. He was guiding his son, Shane LaRue, when he landed the current state record tarpon on August 20, 2017. The giant silver king measured 90 inches in length, had a 47-inch girth, and weighed in at 229 pounds. LaRue said that the biggest limiting factor so far during this year’s tarpon season has been the weather. “We just haven’t had a whole lot of calm days to really fish for tarpon the way we like to,” he said. “We’ve been dealing with strong winds and storms quite a bit, and we’ve still been catching plenty of fish.” LaRue believes the nearshore waters off of Galveston are loaded with tarpon. “We’ve been catching a lot of tarpon under less than ideal conditions by conducting blind drifts without ever sighting a fish on the surface,” he said. “To me, this means there are a ton of silver kings roaming throughout our waters.” LaRue’s favorite method for catching tarpon is to cast coon pops at fish that are schooled up and rolling along the water’s surface. “A coon pop is just basically a homemade jig attached to a circle hook,” he explained. “Over the years, we found that the hook-up ratio with a circle hook is much better than when a J-hook or treble hook is used.”

Youngster’s big tarpon Continued from page 8

toward the rocks. “But this is the first time I can actually say I finally caught one,” he said of the tarpon he landed. “I feel that one of my missions was completed.” Olivarez used a St. Croix Avid road and a Van Staal VR 200 reel, a 50-pound braid line and a plastic lure. His father, Gilbert Sr., said he is proud of his son. “He was strictly fishing for tarpon this time,” he said of his son. “A little while ago, he went fishing for tarpon and caught a 55-inch kingfish.” Gilbert Sr. said junior is a fanatic angler who does not give up. “He really loves fishing,” he said. “One time when he was a 3 or 4 years old, I read ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ to him and I believe that had something to do with it.” Gilbert Sr. said his son’s nickname is Manolin, or one of the characters in Ernest Hemingway’s book about a fisherman and the greatest catch of his life.

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DATEBOOK SEPTEMBER 15

Dallas Safari Club S.A.F.E.T.Y. Event Greystone Castle, Thurbur (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

SEPTEMBER 20

National Wild Turkey Federation Corpus Christi Gun Raffle The Sharpshooter (361) 980-1190 nwtf.org Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting DoubleTree Galleria (972) 980-9800 biggame.org Coastal Conservation Association Heart of the Hills Banquet Don Strange Ranch (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Ducks Unlimited Canton Dinner The Silver Spur Resort (903) 262-6154 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 22

Right to Bear Auctions Gun Auction Chico (940) 644-0053 r2bauctions.com

SEPTEMBER 27

Ducks Unlimited Midland Dinner Midland Country Club (432) 664-9559 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 28-29

Christian Outdoor Ministry Goldwaithe Dove Hunt dsouder3@gmail.com

SEPTEMBER 29

Los Cazadores Deer Contest Grand Reopening and Awards Day (830) 334-5959 loscazadores.com Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Fly Fishing Saturday Orvis Woodlands projecthealingwaters.com

OCTOBER 2

Ducks Unlimited Johnson County Dinner Cleburne Conference Center (817) 556-8074 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 3

Lone Star Outdoor News Wild Game Supper Benefiting Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation Beretta Gallery, Dallas (214) 361-2276 lsonews.com

OCTOBER 4

Ducks Unlimited Matagorda County Banquet Bay City Civic Center (979) 240-6637 ducks.org/Texas

Ducks Unlimited San Antonio Banquet Alzafar Shrine Auditorium (210) 722-7787 ducks.org/Texas

Ducks Unlimited Grapevine Dinner Grapevine Concourse Event Center (817) 601-7357 ducks.org/Texas

Park Cities Quail Coalition State of the Quail Kickoff Dinner Tailwaters Fly Fishing, Dallas (214) 63207460 parkcitiesquail.org

OCTOBER 6

Coastal Conservation Association Babes on Baffin Fishing Tournament Marker 37 Marina, Corpus Christi (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

OCTOBER 10

Ducks Unlimited Llano Dinner John L Kuykendall Event Center (512) 755-9770 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 11

Ducks Unlimited Calhoun County Banquet Bauer Community Center (361) 237-6803 ducks.org/Texas

Ducks Unlimited Denton Dinner Buffalo Valley Event Center (940) 367-0679 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 13

Dallas Safari Club DSC 100 Volunteer Party DSC Office (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

OCTOBER 17

Puzzle solution from Page 26

Delta Waterfowl RGV Waterfowlers Dinner Oats Ranch, Edinburg (956) 341-7543 Ducks Unlimited Fort Worth Dinner Panther Island Pavilion (817) 223-8386 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 18

Ducks Unlimited Dallas Dinner Sixty Five Hundred (214) 673-9636 ducks.org/Texas Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Royal Oaks Country Club (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

OCTOBER 20-21

Berkley Big Bass Tournament Lake Fork Marina (817) 439-3274 basschamps.com Texas Gun & Knife Show Abilene Convention Center (830) 285-0575 texasgunandknifeshows.com

OCTOBER 26

Rob Harper Memorial Fund Texas Shootout Elm Fork Gun Range, Dallas friendsofrob.org


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 14, 2018

YOU CARRY, JUST IN CASE SHOULDN’T IT BE AN HK ... JUST IN CASE? Preparation is about attention to detail – like forging the short, 3-inch barrel of the HK VP9SK from the same steel we require in the HK416 carbine used by the world’s most elite fighting units. To those who dismiss this as unneeded “over-engineering,” our response is simple: So what?

VP9SK (9 mm) with extended 10 round magazine

VP9SK (9 mm) with flat floorplate 10 round magazine

Visit Your Local Texas HK Premium Dealer to Learn More! A Place to Shoot San Antonio, 210-628-1888 Abilene Indoor Gun Range Abilene, 325-698-4224 Able Ammo Huntsville, 936-295-5786 AJC Sports Clute, 979-265-4867 Alpha Armory Houston, 888-932-7660 Alpine Industries Ft Worth, 817-478-6613 Athena Gun Club Houston, 713-461-5900 Caroline Colt Company LLC Abilene, 325-232-7501 Carter's Shooting Center Spring, 281-443-8393 DFW Shooting Sports Bedford, 817-285-0664

CDNN Investments Abilene, 800-588-9500 Champion Firearms College Station, 979-693-9948 CMC Government Supply Dallas, 214-773-0129 Collectors Firearms Houston, 713-781-5812 Crazy Gun Dealer Alvarado, 817-790-0235 Danny's, Inc. McAllen, 956-687-4692 Defender Outdoors, LLC Aubrey, 817-935-8377 DFW Gun Club Dallas, 214-630-4866 DSG Arms Fort Worth, 800-382-7571 Dury's Gun Shop San Antonio, 210-533-5431

Field & Stream Sporting Goods San Angelo, 325-944-7094 Forza Armory, LLC Edinburg, 956-533-5371 Fun Guns Waco, 254-755-0080 Glick Twins Pharr, 956-787-429 Guns Warehouse LLC Cedar Park, 512-986-7330 Hoffpauir's Ranch & Supply Lampasas, 512-556-5444 Hunter's Equipment & Supply Midland, 432-686-2500 Jackson Armory Dallas, 214-363-2767 Jess Briley Manufacturing Houston, 713-932-6995 John Doe Investigations, LLC Lewisville, 214-773-0129

Kirkpatrick Gun & Ammo Laredo, 956-723-6338 Lonestar Guns Gallery & Gear Weatherford, 817-599-9275 Longview Class III Arms Longview, 903-918-0140 McBride's Guns Austin, 512-472-3532 Hoss Arms, LLC New Braunfels, 830-609-8891 Mister Guns LLC Plano, 214-901-7429 Modern Pawn & Guns Corpus Christi, 361-993-9390 Nagel's Gun Shop, Inc. San Antonio, 210-342-5420 Nytex Firearms Coppell, 888-895-0266 Omaha Outdoors Missouri City, 713-703-4648

www.hk-usa.com • 706-568-1906 Ranger Firearms of Texas Inc. San Antonio, 210-822-4867 Ray's Hardware & Sporting Goods Dallas, 214-747-7916 RifleGear.com Plano, 949-292-7678 S & K Arms Company, LLC Midland, 432-704-5127 Saddle River Range Conroe, 936-271-2620 SAWS Sunnyvale, 972-226-3200 Sharp Shooters Knife & Gun Inc Lubbock, 806-791-1231 Sheridan Outfitters Corpus Christi, 361-980-1190 Southwestern Firearms, Inc. Midlothian, 972-617-7056 Sportsman's Finest Austin, 512-263-1888

Bayou Arms, Inc. Spring, 281-288-7000 Spring Guns & Ammo II Spring, 832-299-1950 Superior Pawn & Gun Tyler, 903-592-4006 Tejas Shooting Sports Odessa, 432-332-7358 Teskey's Circle T Saddlery Weatherford, 817-599-3400 Webyshops.com Arlington, 800-851-9329 Wheeler Feed & Outfitters Boerne, 830-249-2656 Xtreme Guns & Ammo Richmond, 832-363-3783 VISIT WWW.HK-USA.COM for more inforamtion on HK’s full product line.

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September 14, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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9/4/18 12:06 PM

September 14, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

September 14, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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