Page 1

HUNTING TEXAS INSIDE Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

August 9, 2019

HUNTING

texas ANNUAL 201 9

The art of

capturing your favorite

hunting moment

Advertising Section

Volume 15, Issue 24

Cole gets Dove outlook strong across state 50 years By Nate Skinner

For Lone Star Outdoor News

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News The former owner of Monarch Hunting ProdChuck Cole ucts will spend up to the next 50 years behind bars. In 2018, Joseph Charles “Chuck” Cole, 55, of Maypearl, had been placed on deferred adjudication for misapplication of fiduciary property over $200,000, a first-degree felony. Parker County District Judge Craig Towson assessed Cole’s restitution at more than $1.5 million, and ordered Cole to pay $13,164 per month toward restitution. Cole, also a homebuilder, was on probation for stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from a Parker County woman. At a hearing on July 29, prosecutors showed that Cole had paid only $1,291 in restitution and told his probation officer he didn’t have any money coming in. However, Cole had actually received and diverted more than $1 million, buying a beach house in Florida and multiple vehicles including a BMW and a Porsche. One of the new owners of Monarch Hunting Products, Corey Lehr, testified under subpoena and told the court that Cole represented the company had profits of about $125,000 annually. However, Cole’s tax returns indicated that he represented to the Internal Revenue Service that he was losing money every year, with a loss of over $400,000 in

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Please turn to page 19

Spring and early summer rains allowed for seed-bearing crops and plants to flourish in many different regions of the state, providing plenty of much-needed food for nesting

dove. These rains also replenished water sources across the landscape and the upcoming dove season is shaping up to be positive. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Webless Migratory Game Bird Program Leader Owen Fitzsimmons,

dove numbers across Texas are looking phenomenal. “We have received ample amounts of rain over seven of the last 10 months,” Fitzsimmons said. “With the exception of January, February and March, much of the state was twice as wet as it normally is in Please turn to page 6

Conditions were prime for dove production this year. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Calm winds during the first two weeks of August allowed anglers to hit the surf in the Gulf of Mexico and catch good trout on lures and croaker. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Running the surf for trout

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The first week of August was as sweet as it gets for anglers running the surf and looking for easy limits of trout. And it set the

stage for some excellent fishing for the next couple of months. “This is without a doubt the best time to be fishing the surf,” said Dennis Brandon, who has been a fanatic about this type of angling since 1990.

The winds calmed down to almost nothing, the surf was green to the beach and fishermen didn’t hesitate to take advantage of the conditions. On Aug. 3, Brandon headed out of the Port O’Connor jet-

ties, turned north and headed to a spot that he’s been fishing for years. “The thing about trout fishing in the surf is that once you find a spot that’s holding fish, it’s usually going to be good for many Please turn to page 15

Beating the heat Fly-anglers find shade on Texas rivers, streams By Nate Skinner

Meghan Moore, of Dallas, caught this bass while fly-fishing along the Nueces River. Photo from Seth Winkelmann.

Many of the rivers and creeks within the central portion of our state and the Hill Country have stabilized from flooding spring rains. Fly-fishermen are targeting them to beat the heat and

Please turn to page 19

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10

HUNTING

FISHING

Saltwater Fishing Report . . . Page 11

Bowhunter ed (P. 4)

What’s a Flybrary? (P. 8)

Required in many states.

Fly-fishermen share flies, ideas.

Anthrax is back (P. 4)

Big catches at TIFT (P. 8)

Affecting Edwards Plateau deer.

Man realizes championship dream.

Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 13 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 16 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 17

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

For Lone Star Outdoor News

the summertime crowds, not to mention they are taking advantage of the consistent action for bass and other species that the shaded, smaller bodies of water provide. As a fly-fishing instructor and retail specialist for Tailwaters Fly Fishing Company in Dallas, Sean Polk has become a guru at targeting streams west of the DFW area. Polk has been spending most of his time on the water this


Page 2

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Owners reap the dividends. More than $1 Billion returned since 2004. When you borrow from Capital Farm Credit, you

become something special — one of our owners. That means when our borrower-owned cooperative has surplus earnings, you get your share through our patronage dividend program. Based on our strong financial performance, our board of directors declared a record $184.3 million in patronage on our 2018 earnings. This return effectively lowers

your cost of borrowing, so partner with a lender

Together we’re better. Partnership that really pays.

that really pays.

2019 Patronage Declaration: $87.5 Million in Cash $96.8 Million in Allocated Equities

$184.3 MILLION TOTAL

capitalfarmcredit.com | 877.944.5500 NMLS493828

7282 2019_CFC_Patronage-Lone Star Outdoor News-10.5x15.5.indd 1

4/16/19 3:45 PM


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 9, 2019

Page 3


Page 4

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HUNTING

Taking the bowhunter education course

While bowhunter education is not required to hunt in Texas, it is in many states and at national wildlife refuges. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News A bowhunter education course isn’t required in Texas, except in certain circumstances. Hunting on the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge is currently an exception, and the class is required. Many Texas hunters have taken the course, though, since it’s required in several popular hunting states, including Alaska, Connecticut, Idaho, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Vermont.

Lone Star Outdoor News’ Mike Hughs was drawn to hunt on the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge in November. A longtime bowhunter, he had taken hunter’s education as a youngster, but not bowhunter ed. For a coveted hunt on the Hagerman, where several big bucks are taken each year, it was worth it. “Most of the people taking the course were taking it to hunt in other states,” Hughs said. Hughs started with an online course that took about three hours, although a classroom option also is available.

“It was similar to the hunter’s ed course,” he said. “You could start and stop whenever you want.” To complete the certification, a field course was required, which he completed at Cinnamon Creek Archery in Roanoke. “A lot of it was a recap of what we learned in the online course,” Hughs said. “It was kind of long — about half of the course was indoors, but outside we did distance measuring, blood-tracking and ladder and treestand safety. Then we had to pass another test.” Finding a course wasn’t easy, as most places only do three or four of them each year.

Anthrax back in West Texas Lone Star Outdoor News Jim Shepherd manages a large hunting lease near Rocksprings, and is concerned. Anthrax has made a comeback in the area of the state known for periodic outbreaks. According to the Texas Animal Health Commission, the first anthrax case of the year was confirmed in one captive antelope on a premises in Uvalde County on June 19. Since that time, anthrax was confirmed in goats on a different Uvalde County premises on June 24, one Sutton County horse was confirmed to have anthrax on July 3, and cattle were confirmed to have anthrax on a separate Sutton County premises on July 4. Many ranchers in the area known as the “anthrax triangle,” an area generally from Uvalde to Del Rio to Ozona on the western side of Texas’ Edwards Plateau, vaccinate their livestock for the fatal exposure to the anthrax bacteria. White-tailed deer aren’t so lucky. “It is common to see an increase in anthrax cases after periods of wet, cool weather, followed by hot, dry conditions,” said Dr. Andy Schwartz, TAHC executive director. “During these conditions, animals ingest the anthrax bacteria when they consume contaminated grass and hay, or inhale the spores. Outbreaks usually end when cooler weather arrives.” Hunters have been reporting sightings of dead deer.

“Just left my lease south of Sonora,” reported Dwight on 2coolfishing.com. “I got a confirmed case of anthrax on a text message. When I got there I counted at least 15 deer dead in the area. I wasn’t even looking, I could smell them.” The TAHC weekly reports indicate reports of the disease in livestock. To date, 14 premises in five counties, Crockett, Kinney, Sutton, Val Verde and Uvalde, have had animals confirmed with anthrax. Animals included antelope, goats, horses, deer and cattle. Anthrax, thought to have been brought in when Spanish explorers brought animals to the new world, results in periodic outbreaks, especially in the favorable soil conditions in the anthrax triangle. The anthrax spores like soil that’s rich in calcium and low in acid, which is found in southwest Texas. Affected animals have trouble breathing, bleed out of various orifices and then die within 48 hours or so. Anthrax spores can live in the soil for years, but usually remain buried too deep to be exposed to animals. But that changes with a particular weather pattern. “On the Texas landscape we tend to see outbreaks associated with relatively wet springs,” Dr. Jason Blackburn of the University of Florida, who has studied anthrax around the world, told the Texas Standard. “So springs with a lot of rains and grasses greening up relatively early in the year.” Please turn to page 6

“Our class had 26 people and they said that was the largest group they could remember,” Hughs said. “I definitely learned some things, though, especially about the shot placement for the larger animals.” Simply completing the course isn’t always all that is required, though, as some locations, including the Hagerman, require a bowhunter proficiency test. Hughs completed that at another location. “We had to shoot a minimum of 14 targets and score 80 percent or better,” he said. “I wish that had been a part of bowhunter

education.” Doug Lambert, the course instructor, agreed proficiency is important, but may be too difficult for some in the classes. “We had a mother and son at the class,” he said. “The day before was the first time they had ever held a bow. It would be too much to ask for them to perform a difficult shooting test to pass the course.” In November, Hughs will get to spend three days in a stand at the Hagerman. “I know there’s no guarantee,” he said. “But I could get the chance at a really nice buck.”

Texan wins national taxidermy contest By Lili Sams

Lone Star Outdoor News Mark Hernandez won first place in the openmouth whitetail deer category in the 48th-annual national taxidermy competition held July 25-27 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. “I’ve been doing this for going on 13 years now,” the Sabinal resident said. Hernandez has worked as a taxidermist for Mesquite Creek Taxidermy in Pearsall for the last seven years. “I’ve always been interested in taxidermy,” he said. From messing around with animal skins as a kid Mark Hernandez won a national award for his mount of a white-tailed deer in the open-mouth to an apprenticeship with a category. Photo from Mark Hernandez. taxidermist in high school, Hernandez learned the skills and turned his passion into a career. Hernandez used a whitetail he harvested with his stepson, Carson, for the award-winning mount. On a chilly, rainy morning a few years ago, Carson, 9 at the time, Please turn to page 7


LSONews.com

New manager at Greystone Castle Patrick Wall was named the new general manager of Greystone Castle in Mingus. A native of Hurst, Wall graduated from The Citadel in 1989 and spent 30 years in the Marine Corps as a logistics officer, building camps and supporting operations all over the world. An avid outdoorsman, Wall sought outdoor activity wherever he was stationed, whether shooting, hunting, hiking, surfing or scuba diving. He enjoys both wingshooting and big game hunting. —Greystone Castle

Shooting sports month

Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News National Shooting Sports Month, the annual month-long initiative created to encourage participation in the shooting sports, takes place throughout the month of August. Plus, it’s at the perfect time to prepare for the upcoming hunting season. Shooting ranges and firearms retailers across the country are planning events and promotions to celebrate. There are more than 180 events or promotions in Texas. “The vibrant shooting sports culture is made possible, in large part, by our steadfast protection of one of our bedrock and mostcherished liberties, the right to keep and bear arms,” President Donald Trump said in his Presidential Message on National Shooting Sports Month. National Shooting Sports Foundation research shows 50 million Americans participate in target shooting and that millions more are interested in trying target shooting. Ed Arrighi from America Shooting Centers in Houston said they have a variety of events and promotions planned for National Shooting Sports Month. For example, every Monday at the rifle and pistol pro shop, patrons will receive a free splatter shot target for stopping in. President Trump continued in his presidential message: “I was proud, earlier this year, to sign into law H.R. 1222, the Please turn to page 6

LoneOStar Outdoor News

New DSC chapter in Georgia Dallas Safari Club announced its newest chapter — DSC Georgia. Based in Atlanta, the chapter’s initial membership ranges from well-known outfitters to Weatherby Award recipients, and is led by Emanuel “Kappie” Kapp, chapter president. Carson Keys, chapter development and management coordinator, said, “Consistent and measured growth of the chapter system is our priority. I’m convinced that DSC Georgia will be an exceptional chapter for DSC and will lead the way for conservation in the Southeast.” The DSC Chapter network, which began in 2015 now has 12 chapters nationwide. —DSC

August 9, 2019

Page 5


Page 6

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

West Texas deer

Dove season approaching

Continued from page 4

Continued from page 1

The heavy vegetation growth pushes the anthrax spores closer to the surface. When hot, dry conditions follow, the vegetation wilts and the animals graze closer to the ground. When another rain comes, the anthrax spores are brought to ground level. The periodic outbreaks end when cool weather arrives and the bacteria become dormant. Losses may occur in one pasture, while animals nearby remain healthy. Another Sonora-area hunter reported dead deer on his lease, as did a hunter west of Ozona. “Talked to the ranch hand yesterday,” JohnG posted. “They have found nine dead deer and one dead cow since last week.” On Shepherd’s lease, the news is still good. “Nothing yet, but we’re watching,” he said.

Shooting celebrations Continued from page 5

All aspects of shooting are celebrated during National Shooting Sports Month, with more than 180 events planned in Texas in August. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act. This important legislation will support state wildlife management agencies as they construct or expand shooting ranges, providing more opportunities for citizens to safely and properly learn marksmanship skills. And, in June, my administration announced a plan to open an additional 1.4 million acres in national wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries to new or expanded hunting, fishing, and recreational opportunities. These actions will help ensure a perpetual investment in wildlife and habitat conservation, foster responsible stewardship, and increase interest in shooting sports for current and future generations.” A full list of participating retailers and ranges is available at shootingsportsmonth.com.

Hunters hope good reproduction results in excellent hunting come opening day on Sept. 1. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

comparison with the long-term precipitation average. The result of this moisture was a surplus of food and water for dove during their crucial nesting period.” Fitzsimmons indicated the energy demand for nesting dove is high. With abundant food sources available, the birds have been able to produce multiple clutches. “We’ve seen this from time to time over the years,” he said. “Dove will respond to excellent range conditions and undergo a boom in population. When there’s sufficient amounts of food and water available, the birds experience increased reproductive success. With the landscape as lush and green as it has been over the past several weeks, it looks as if this could be the case this year.” Fitzsimmons expects bird numbers to remain steady throughout the duration of dove season, so the hunting could be pretty consistent well beyond opening weekend. “Range conditions to the north in South Dakota, Oklahoma and Kansas were extremely favorable for the birds nesting in those areas as well,” he said. “This should provide us with some great influxes of birds once fall cool fronts start rolling in.” North Zone outfitter Jonathon Wise of Rivers West Ranch in Eliasville said their crops of sun-

flowers, milo and Egyptian wheat are heading out and are already receiving a lot of attention from dove. “All of our tanks are full of water as well, and barring any unforeseen, drastic changes in weather patterns, we should kick the season off with a bang,” Wise said. In Hondo, Ashley Mechaley with Paloma Pachanga said sunflower fields in the Central Zone are also heading out. “Our milo crops are also looking really good and we have several ponds with plenty of water in them,” Mechaley said. “We are looking forward to a fun and productive start to the 2019 dove season.” In the South Zone, guide Clayton Roth of Dilley Dove is already seeing hoards of dove over their milo fields. “We also have a lot of birds swarming some fields with native sunflowers and croton,” Roth said. There are several dove festivals taking place across the state to kick off this year’s season. The Winters Dove Fest is scheduled on Sept. 7, as is the Coleman County Dove Festival and The Lonesome Dove Fest which take place on Sept. 13 and 14, and the Dilley Dove Fest and Hunter Appreciation Fish Fry occurs on Sept. 14 at Dilley Feed and Grain.

New - Fiberglass Blinds

300# GALVANIZED BROADCAST FEEDER

Wrap-around Shelf

®

600# STAND & FILL BROADCAST FEEDER WITH CORN SHIELD

Texas Twister Seating

®

Molded Poly Blinds

RealBark® HUNTING SYSTEMS

Follow the Mumme’s Facebook page for info on the latest items and special sales!

For prices and information call 1-800-221-6398 or visit us online at www.mummesinc.com

830.426.3313 830.334.3323 830.931.2215 Hondo, TX

www.mummesinc.com

120 Hwy 173N

Pearsall, TX

1845 Business I-35N

Rio Medina, TX 10195 FM 2676

Mon-Fri: 8-5:30 Sat: 8-5:00 Closed Sunday

1-800-256-4465 www.realbark.com Dealer Inquiries Welcome

We ship anywhere in the continental United States. Call for Quantity Discounts on select feeders. Feeder Capacity Determined by corn weight. Lonestar_W5.125xH7.75_final.indd 1

3/17/2017 11:26:03 AM


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

The Hunting Report shuts down Lone Star Outdoor News The Hunting Report, a staple for international big game hunters for more than 37 years, shut down earlier this year. Unfortunately, according to John Jackson of Conservation Force, the owners didn’t tell anyone. “All I know is the December 2018 issue was its last,” said Barbara Crown, who was the newsletter’s editor for 20 years before leaving at the new owners’ request in mid-2018. “That issue went out sometime in January.” Subscribers didn’t receive a notice, they just stopped receiving the monthly newsletter that reported on issues important to international travelers and hunters. Jackson said The Hunting Report included his organization’s monthly bulletin for 22 years, and promised it would continue after two changes in ownership. In 2016, The Hunting Report was acquired by San Mateo, California-based Universal Operations Risk Management, which also owns Ripcord, a rescue travel insurance program.

Top mount Continued from page 4

was huddled under Hernandez’s jacket. The deer they had their eyes on was spooked by a four-wheeler going down the road and ran off. Hernandez encouraged Carson not to be discouraged. “I told him you need to stick it out, you can’t quit when it gets tough,” he said. Right before dark, the deer reappeared and presented Hernandez a shot. Hernandez challenged himself to mount the deer open-mouth. “I tried to recreate a moment in time,” he said. His vision, the moment after a deer pulls off a piece of fruit from a prickly Mark Hernandez mounted the whitetail buck he took while hunting with his stepson, Carson. Photo from Mark pear cactus, paid off. Hernandez. James Newport, owner of Mesquite Creek Taxidermy, credits Hernandez with having an eye for detail as well as a focus on correct anatomical positioning. During the Texas Taxidermy Association Annual Convention and Competition, Hernandez won the Breakthrough Magazine Award for best of show and the best of masters division. He also had the state champion whitetail entry.

SANTA ANNA HUNTING AREA

THE BEST FLYING BIRDS IN TEXAS

August 9, 2019

Page 7


Page 8

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

FISHING Flybrary Project gaining momentum

Longtime TIFT angler realizes dream of winning

Fly-anglers share flies, photos and ideas at the Flybrary Project boards at many fly shops. Photo from Scott Jones.

Fly-fishing community shares flies, ideas By Nate Skinner

For Lone Star Outdoor News Sportsmen and women have a way of connecting with one another through shared interests and passions. The fly-fishing community is no different. This band of brothers and sisters is so enthralled with the art of fooling and landing fish with hand-tied flies and light tackle that they are constantly yearning for opportunities to fellowship with others who share their obsession. A grassroots movement, coined the Flybrary Project, is taking fly shops, sporting goods stores, and other locations where fly-anglers gather by storm. The idea behind the trend is simple. Locations for fly-fishermen to trade flies, knowledge, tips, tricks and intel are being established in public areas. The foundation of the Flybrary Project started as a “take a fly, leave a fly” concept among a group of fly-anglers in Florida. They began sticking pieces of foam in common areas so that anglers could leave flies behind for others to try, and then take a fly for themselves. The movement has now gained a fairly large national following on social media with its Instagram page called “The Flybrary Project,” and little foam pads are beginning to pop up on signs, benches and anything else with a solid surface all over the state and country. Beside sharing flies, the deeper intent of the Flybrary Project is to bring the fly-fishing community closer together on a more personal level, and it seems to be working. The fishing manager for the Orvis store in Plano, Steven Palmer, said the foam Flybrary Project patch placed on the wall in the fly-tying section of their location has become a hub for regular interaction between customers. “The foam piece is the center of our bragging board where we have photos of our customers showing off fish that they have caught on the fly around the world,” Palmer Please turn to page 11

TIFT dock crew member carries a sailfish to the weigh-in on the second day of the 80th Texas International Fishing Tournament in Port Isabel. Photo from Eryn Reddell Wingert.

By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News A Port Isabel man who has been participating in the Texas International Fishing Tournament since he was a child has finally seen his dream come true. “I have been fishing TIFT since I can remember,” John Barrera said. “I have placed numerous times but this year I took the number one spot.” He was referring to TIFT’s big kahuna in the bay waters divi-

sion, or the Bay Grand Champion spot. In anglers’ parlance, it’s known as the Texas Grand Slam, a combination of speckled trout, redfish and flounder. Barrera said he caught all three fish species on Friday and Saturday, resulting in a total combined weight of 28.4 pounds. He said he has been fishing TIFT since he was 4 years old while his father, Victor, has fished the tournament for more

than 50 years. “I have fished for a long time,” the younger Barrera, a guide for the last four years, said. “But winning the grand champion spot is a dream come true for me.” Besides Barrera, there were scores of winners in each category. TIFT, which just completed its 80th year, is one of Texas’ largest and oldest fishing tournaments, with up to 1,000 anglers competing in the bay and offshore divisions.

Deep sea anglers brought in a number of wahoo, dorado, amberjack, tuna and several sailfish. Anglers also have the option to release their catches of large fish, according to Matt Klostermann, president of the TIFT board of directors. Proceeds from the tournament are used to award scholarships to area college students. Last year, 21 scholarships of $2,000 each were awarded.

Her first fish By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

Lindsey Baumgartner learned all about the ups and downs of deep sea fishing this summer off the Texas Coast. The downside of the 18-yearold’s first fishing trip ever was seasickness. With 3-foot waves rocking Captain Murphy’s charter boat, she found herself too queasy to fish. But the upside was soon realized when Baumgartner hooked her only catch of the trip — a hefty 24-inch red snapper — in federal waters off of South Padre Island in late July. The recent Rockwall High School grad was surprised and thrilled to catch what turned out to be one of the best fish on the boat that day. “I didn’t realize the fish were going to be big. I thought they were going to be really small. I definitely thought fishing was going to be a lot easier than it was,” she said. Baumgartner, who took the

fishing trip with her boyfriend, Berto Sanchez, figured she only got in about 20 minutes fishing during the all-day trip. Feeling a little better after an extra dose of Dramamine, Baumgartner dropped her line into the Gulf waters after Sanchez helped her bait it with squid. “I was standing there, and I started getting pulled toward the edge of the boat. I thought I had something. I was reeling frantically. I’d never reeled anything in my life,” she said. Sanchez helped her hold the rod as she reeled. The line hissed and her rod flexed into a C-shape. “They thought it got caught on another line, it was so big,” she said. She stopped reeling until a crewman cleared the other angler’s line. That’s when she knew she had a fish and the adrenaline kicked in. “It felt heavy like lifting a 15-pound weight,” Sanchez said, adding the fish put up Please turn to page 19

Lindsey Baumgartner landed a red snapper and surf-fished on her first fishing trip to South Padre. Photo by Bobby Sanchez, for Lone Star Outdoor News.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 9, 2019

Page 9

Flounder take center stage at Port M tourney By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News The 45th annual Port Mansfield Fishing Tournament is in the books, and this year one fish species caught the attention of anglers, marine biologists and spectators. It was not the nearly 40-inch long wahoo, the 30.25-inch dolphinfish or the 22.5-inch blackfin tuna. The tournament star was the flounder. There were 77 flounder caught out of nearly 400 fish brought in for the weigh-in. “Flounder,” Tim Bonner, a weighmaster who works at the University of Texas-San Marcos, repeatedly said during the two days as he kept receiving fish to be weighed. On the first day of the weighin, about 24 percent of all the fish brought in were flounder, or 52 out of a total of 220. Tony Reisinger, a marine extension agent in Cameron County, said he has never seen such a number of flounder since he began working the tournament years ago. “There were hardly any flounder brought in some years,” he said. “That is not the case this year. This is pretty darn good.” Derrick Bolcik and his son, Rance, said they caught six flounder, while Luis Zamora caught three and Michael Brymer caught seven on the first day of the tournament. Any southern flounder an angler catches and keeps has to be 14 inches in length and the daily bag limit is five per day. The return of the flounder has been noticed even by wade-fishing enthusiasts. One recent day before the tournament was held, anglers had shown up with a few good catches of flounder at Port Mansfield’s Honey Hickman Public Fishing Dock. The dock is a popular place for anglers to clean fish. Bill Craigson, the tournament director and a local fishing guide, said it has been a while since flounder have been caught at this rate. As to the reason why this fish has come back, no one seemed to be able to pinpoint a single factor. Some people said the dredging projects going on can be attributed, while others said it could be because of the changes in water temperatures or other environmental factors. Laura Picariello, a marine fisheries specialist with Texas Sea Grant who worked as a deck crew during the tournament, said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has been working to increase the flounder population since 2006. “I couldn’t say that is the reason,” she said, “but the southern flounder is making a comeback.”

Promoting the growth of Archery infrastructure in Texas 501(c)3

GET MORE NEWS!

SIGN UP FOR OUR FREE E-NEWSLETTER

ONLINE LSONews.com CALL 214-361-2276 or EMAIL News@LoneStarOutdoorNews.com

Made in USA

New ble in Availa stic colors 6 reali

Derrick Bolcik and his son, Rance, show some of the fish they landed during the Port Mansfield Fishing Tournament. Photo by Tony Vindell, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

The 12” Sna-Koil pro-style snake is so close to the real thing it’s scary. A true snake shape, the Sna-Koil’s lifelike profile slithers through weed lines and over matted vegetation producing heart thumping strikes. Fished weighted, Tex-posed, Carolina or Drop Shot. Its unique coiling action triggers strikes from stubborn fish when others can’t.

w w w . d o a l u r e s . c o m 181297_DOA_5.9_Lone Star Outdoor Ad_Sna-Koil_5.1x3.45.indd 1

5/10/18 9:38 AM


Page 10

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake and 84 degrees, stained up the river and 86 degrees; 2.17’ low. Black bass are good on small stick worms and 10-inch worms. Crappie are fair at night on minnows. Catfish are fair on minnows and jug lines with cut bait. AMISTAD: Water stained; 8892 degrees; 29.88’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, crankbaits, spinner baits and swimbaits. White bass are fair on small crankbaits and minnows. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on cheese bait, shrimp and nightcrawlers in 3-15 feet. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines, drop lines and throw lines on live perch. ARROWHEAD: Water stained; 78-85 degrees; 0.83’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water clear; 85-89 degrees; 0.10’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, hollow-body frogs and weightless stick worms. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 83-88 degrees; 0.74’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, Texas rigs and jigs. Sunfish are fair to good on cut nightcrawlers and dough bait. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and prepared bait. BASTROP: Water stained; 8185 degrees. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 80-84 degrees; 0.35’ high. Black bass are good on purple/black soft plastic craws on the bottom. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad early. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on summer sausage, stink bait and frozen shad. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines and throw lines baited with live perch. BENBROOK: Water stained; 86-89 degrees; 1.97’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, Carolina-rigged worms and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. BOB SANDLIN: Water stained; 85-90 degrees; 0.14’ low. Black bass are good on flukes, shakyhead worms and black buzzbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 85-89 degrees; 0.61’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BRAUNIG: Water stained. Black bass are good on crankbaits and dark soft plastic worms near the jetty and dam. Striped bass are fair on liver and shad off points near the pier. Redfish are very good on perch, shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are very good on liver, shrimp and cheese bait near the dam. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained; 85-88 degrees: 0.55’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, white spinner baits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines.

BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 79-83 degrees; 0.66’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon and redbug crankbaits and spinnerbaits over grass flats. Hybrid striper are good on shad. White bass are very good on Li’l Fishies and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and green tube jigs. Channel and yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 79-83 degrees; 0.28’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse top-waters, Texas-rigged pumpkinseed worms and watermelon flukes along secondary points. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits, top-waters and shad-colored crankbaits near the dam. Crappie are fair on minnows and green tube jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on live bait and shrimp. Yellow and blue catfish are good on jug lines and trotlines baited with goldfish and perch. CADDO: Water muddy; 85-91 degrees; 1.25’ high. Black bass are good on Texasrigged craws, weightless stick worms and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. CALAVERAS: Water stained. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on chicken livers and shad. Redfish are fair on live perch and tilapia near the crappie wall. Channel catfish are fair on cheese bait and shad. Blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 80-84 degrees; 0.54’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits, soft plastic worms and crankbaits along banks in 6-14 feet early. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows over brush piles in 8-12 feet. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are very good on jug lines and trotlines baited with live bait. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 85-90 degrees, 0.54’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 84-88 degrees; 15.04’ low. Black bass are good on black/blue crankbaits, spinner baits and top-waters. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on cut bait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are good on jug lines baited with live bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 79-83 degrees; 0.80’ low. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed lipless crankbaits and soft plastics. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. CONROE: Water stained; 8387 degrees; 0.58’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass

are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs over brush piles. Catfish are good on chicken livers and shrimp. CORPUS CHRISTI LAKE: Water off-color; 79-86 degrees; 0.18’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigs, Carolina rigs and medium-diving crankbaits. White bass are fair to good on live shad and slabs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live or dead shad. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 85-89 degrees; 0.99’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, shaky-head worms and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. FALCON: Water stained; 88-92 degrees; 33.49’ low. Black bass are very good on watermelon and chartreuse jigs and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on cut bait, shrimp and shad. FAYETTE: Water stained. Black bass are good on perchcolored lipless crankbaits and small crankbaits early. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and blood bait. FORK: Water lightly stained; 85-90 degrees; 0.48’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texasrigged craws, green/pumpkin football jigs and Carolina-rigged flukes. White and yellow bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 80-84 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse/ black soft plastic worms and lizards. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on stink bait, chicken livers and frozen shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 82-86 degrees; 0.47’ high. Black bass are fair on black soft plastic worms and spinner baits. White bass are good on slabs and spoons on humps and ridges near the dam. Crappie are very good on jigs in 6-15 feet. Blue catfish are good on fresh shad. GRAPEVINE: Water stained; 85-88 degrees; 1.70’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 78–85 degrees; 35.88’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, Texas rigs and squarebilled crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 86-90 degrees; 0.09’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters and shallow-diving crankbaits near sandy flats.

Crappie are fair on minnows off lighted docks at night. Bream are good on live worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on shad and perch. HUBBARD CREEK: Water stained; 78-87 degrees; 0.28’ low. Black bass are fair to good on finesse jigs and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs around deeper structure. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, live and cut shad. JOE POOL: Water stained; 86-90 degrees; 0.70’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, Texas-rigged worms and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 85-90 degrees: 0.90’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, medium crankbaits and top-waters. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LBJ: Water stained; 81-85 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse jigs, watermelon top-waters, and green/pumpkin stick worms. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles in 12 feet. Channel catfish are fair on minnows and shrimp. Yellow and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. LEWISVILLE: Water stained; 85-88 degrees; 0.10’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, Texas-rigged creature baits and top-waters. White bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water murky; 8488 degrees; 0.09’ high. Black bass are good on tequila sunrise crankbaits and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on slabs and white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are very good on minnows in 12-22 feet. Blue catfish are fair on shad. MACKENZIE: Water stained; 76-84 degrees; 79.05’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, finesse jigs and shallowrunning crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 85-90 degrees; 2.76’ low. Black bass are fair on hollowbody frogs, buzzbaits and Texas-rigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. NASWORTHY: Water stained; 74-83 degrees; 0.93’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, shaky heads and weightless stick worms. Crappie are fair on jigs and live minnows. Catfish are fair on large minnows and nightcrawlers. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 83-87 degrees; 0.47’ low. Black bass are good on lipless crankbaits from the fishing dock at the marina. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles in 9-15 feet early. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines baited with perch. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 77-85 degrees; 7.70’ low. Black bass are fair to good on

crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on cut and live shad. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 76-85 degrees; 0.34’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters early and late, midday switching to Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, live and cut shad. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 85-88 degrees; 0.11’ low. Black bass are good on shaky-head worms, Texas-rigged craws and weightless flukes. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water fairly clear; 78-88 degrees; 0.00’. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, Carolina rigs and crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows and jigs around deeper structure. White bass are fair to good on tail spinners and live shad. Striped bass are fair to good on live shad and Sassy Shad. Catfish are good on live or dead shad and nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 79-83 degrees; 0.27’ low. Black bass are fair on dark crankbaits and pumpkinseed soft plastic worms. Striped bass are very good on live shad. White bass are good on minnows and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live bait. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 86-89 degrees; 0.79’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are slow. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained: 85-89 degrees; 0.10’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 86-89 degrees; 0.41’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 85-89 degrees; 0.30’ low. Black bass are fair on slabs, spinner baits and watermelon soft plastic worms and lizards. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Catfish are very good on trotlines baited with live bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 81-85 degrees; 7.39’ high. Black bass are good on junebug spinner baits and crankbaits. White bass are good on hellbenders and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on blood bait and nightcrawlers. SPENCE: Water off-color; 7785 degrees; 33.67’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, shaky heads and chrome lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are good on cut bait and

n Saltwater reports Page 11 nightcrawlers. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 79-83 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse and green/pumpkin soft plastics and crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and liver. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 86-90 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. TEXANA: Water stained; 79-86 degrees; 1.24’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and square-billed crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. TEXOMA: Water stained to muddy; 85-88 degrees; 1.61’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, shaky-head worms and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. TOLEDO BEND: Water murky; 84-88 degrees; 3.76’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on crankbaits and silver striper jigs. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Bream are fair on crickets and nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. TRAVIS: Water murky; 81-85 degrees; 1.78’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms, white grubs, and chartreuse top-waters. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on cut bait and stink bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water stained. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and shrimp. WHITNEY: Water murky; 80-84 degrees; 2.16’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on minnows and jigs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on shrimp, stink bait and nightcrawlers. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained to muddy; 86-91 degrees; 13.54 high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, hollow-body frogs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs Catfish are fair on trotlines.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 9, 2019

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT EAST GALVESTON BAY: Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Trout are good for drifters on plum Bass Assassins, Norton Sand Shad, Down South Lures and live shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Bull redfish are good in the surf and at San Luis Pass on crabs and mullet. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetties on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Sand trout and Gulf trout are good in the channel on shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in Moses Lake on crabs and shrimp. FREEPORT: Bull redfish are good on live bait and crabs on the Surfside beach. Black drum and redfish are good on the reefs. Bull redfish are good at all the jetties on crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Trout and redfish are fair to good on the shorelines for waders tossing small top-waters and live shrimp under a popping cork. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on

NORTH SABINE: Redfish are good in the marsh on soft plastics and frogs. Trout are good while working slicks on plastics and top-waters.

SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Bull redfish are good at the jetty. BOLIVAR: Trout are good in the surf on croaker and top-waters. Trout, bull redfish, black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on soft plastics and live shrimp under a popping cork. Redfish are good on live bait around the reefs.

Sharing flies Continued from page 8

PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair at East Flats and Shamrock Cove on top-waters and plastics under rattling corks. Offshore is good for amberjack, kingfish, tuna and dolphin. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are good on the shallow flats on gold spoons and small topwaters. Sand trout and croaker are good in

1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com SUPER COUPON

44" x 22" DOUBLE BANK EXTRA DEEP CABINETS

Customer Rating

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT

$449 HOLDS $ 49999 20% MORE

$ COMPARE TO

SNAP-ON

*45423376 * 45423376 SUPER COUPON

CAMO TOUCHSCREEN PERFORMANCE WORK GLOVES Customer Rating $ 99 NOW

SAVE 62%

MECHANIX

34

8750 WATT MAX. STARTING GAS POWERED GENERATOR • 9 hour run time NOW

ITEM 68525/63088/56168/56170/63087 CALIFORNIA ONLY

ITEM 64414, 64415 shown

*45435363 * 45435363

*45436862 * 45436862

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SUPER COUPON

HOT DOG

ITEM 69269 97080 shown

95275 shown

$

COMPARE TO

PORTER-CABLE

98

62

MODEL: PCFP02003

SAVE 59%

BLUE HAWK $ 99

SAVE 70%

19

MODEL: 77280

ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown

*45461034 * 45461034

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

349

COMPARE TO

STACK-ON

564

57

MODEL: SS-16-MB-E

SAVE 83%

DEWALT $ 14

68

8

NOW

99

$12

COMPARE TO

GAME WINNER $ 99

24

MODEL: FSGWHE1030

Contents not included.

*45479158 * 45479158

ITEM 5889/62281/61637 shown

MODEL: DW1369

SUPERWINCH $ 99

189

SAVE $140 $

MODEL: 1125220

NOW

99 9 4 $ 69 99

ITEM 68146/61258/61297/63476/61840 shown

*45447866 * 45447866

*45453782 * 45453782

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

FOLDABLE EAR MUFFS

Customer Rating

NOW

$3 99

NOW

SAVE $ 91

9 $599

COMPARE TO

K TOOL $ 42

$

151

MODEL: KTI63094

6

$ 99

79

99

COMPARE TO

ITEM 64545/64552/64832/64980 68053/62160/62516/60569 shown

ITEM 70040

SAVE 80%

MORRIS PRODUCTS $ 86

20

MODEL: 447075

*45471504 * 45471504

*45473550 * 45473550

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 48%

$

15

99

ITEM 63750/56810/63181 shown

• Safe + Secure + Stable • Super Strong - Holds 300 lbs. • Weighs 34 lbs.

NOW

$1 1 $

99

1599

Customer Rating COMPARE TO

ITEM 92486/39757/60496/62398/61897/38970 shown

$

SERVING SPORTSMEN SINCE 1969

NOW

17999 $154

99

ITEM 64715/64478/63287 shown

12

W

13999 $1N0O999

COMPARE TO

LITTLE GIANT $ 99

298

MODEL: XE M17

SAVE $189

Customer Rating

ITEM 67646/62514/63418/63419/63417 shown

*45507490 * 45507490

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SNATCH BLOCK

99

SAVE 72% COMPARE TO

$1 9

HAMPTON BAY

99

99

COMPARE TO

$

32

97

Customer Rating

MODEL: 84130

ITEM 62533/63941/64625/68353 shown

*45510337 * 45510337

*45514485 * 45514485

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 12/9/19.

WARN $ 99

42

MODEL: WAR88898

MODEL 1800

$

2799

SAVE 53%

ITEM 62435/61673 shown

*45521175 * 45521175 LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SUPER COUPON

ULTRA-LIGHT, CRUSH PROOF WEATHER-RESISTANT Customer Rating LOCKABLE CASE • 8-1/8" L 5-5/8" W 3-3/4" H

NOW

NOW

$8

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

• 16 ft. of warm white LEDs

Customer Rating

1997 SAVE 39%

$

*45489397 * 45489397

SOLAR ROPE LIGHT

40 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS 14" BRUSHLESS CHAIN SAW

$

MILWAUKEE MODEL: 33700

SUPER COUPON

$

18

99

COMPARE TO

*45484483 * 45484483

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

SAVE $ 25

$

Customer Rating

99 $299

ITEM 64008/64011 shown

COMPARE TO

$1 0 99

17 FT. TYPE IA .50 CAL METAL 30" x 18" HARDWOOD DOLLY • 1000 lb. capacity MULTI-TASK LADDER AMMO CAN • Versatile - 24 configurations

NOW

SAVE $ 264

NOW

14.3 lbs. • 11-1/8" L 4-1/2" H

SUPER COUPON

• CA DOJ compliant

Customer Rating

99

$ 99

*45459737 * 45459737

99

Customer Rating

MODEL: EB6500X1AT

$5

COMPARE TO

10 GUN ELECTRONIC SECURITY SAFE

$

2,669

NOW

SUPER COUPON

$

COMPARE TO

HONDA $

Customer Rating

Customer Rating • Weighs 34 lbs.

5999

Customer Rating

SAVE 2,119

SUPER COUPON

29 PIECE 2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH TITANIUM WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL DRILL BIT SET • Weighs

99

$

*45407211 * 45407211

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Central Machinery, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/9/19.

SUPER COUPON

72" x 80" RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON MOVING LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM BLANKET FLOOR JACK

9 $399 $

*45415812 * 45415812 Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/9/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE AIR COMPRESSORS YOUR CHOICE

• Air delivery: PANCAKE 0.6 CFM ITEM 61615/60637 @ 90 PSI

13

64999

Not available in AZ, OH, Wheel kit and battery sold separately. OK, and VA. ITEM 63086/68530/56169/56171/63085 shown

MODEL:MPT-78-009

ITEM 63878/63991 PERFORMANCE $ 52 64005/69567/60566 MODEL: W2364 63601/67227 shown TOOL

Customer Rating

$

27

COMPARE TO

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

SUPER COUPON

$549

$12 $

2,735

MODEL: KRA4813FPBO

99

COMPARE TO

$

SAVE 2,285

Item 64446, 64443, 64133, 64954, 64955, 64956

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

15

20% OFF

WITH ANY PURCHASE

• Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3- AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

99

Flybrary Project starter kits are available at castawaycustoms.com. Photo by Chuck Baldwin.

SUPER COUPON

FREE

SUPER BRIGHT LED /SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

YOUR CHOIRCE OF COLO

214-350-2551 2931 Irving Blvd. Ste. 105 Dallas, Texas 75247

—TPWD

SUPER COUPON OVER 5,000 5 STAR REVIEWS Customer Rating

• 14,000 cu. in. of storage • 2600 lb. capacity • Weighs 291 lbs.

said. “Every week we have customers come in the store and leave a fly on the wall after taking one in a pattern that intrigues them.” Palmer has noticed the foam Flybrary Project patches in numerous public areas across Texas, from the coast to inland lakes. “There’s some serious groundswell building from this movement, and it’s really neat to see it bringing fly-anglers from a variety of different backgrounds together to trade tips, stories and techniques,” he said. Chuck Baldwin of Swan Point Landing Fly Shop in Rockport said the store has had a Flybrary Project kit up and running for several months. “Our customers gather around our sunglasses case where the foam patch is stationed on a regular basis,” Baldwin said. “Different flies are constantly being added and removed from the piece of foam each week.” At the Orvis store in San Antonio, Sam Arguella said their kit is attracting more and more traffic each and every day. “Customers are not only using the foam patch to trade flies, they are also gathering around it to discuss fly-tying tips and share different angling experiences,” Arguella said. “It’s great to see our fly-fishing community coming together and forming a strong bond.”

the channels on fresh shrimp. Trout are good on top-waters in Oso Bay and in the surf. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and plum plastics around rocks and grass. Redfish are good in the Land Cut on live bait. Trout are good at Rocky Slough on top-waters and plastics. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on top-waters and soft plastics under a popping cork. Trout are good on the ledges of the channel on soft plastics. SOUTH PADRE: Trout, redfish and snook are fair to good on the Mexiquita Flats on D.O.A. Lures and live bait. Tarpon, trout and snook are good on shrimp and shad at the jetties. PORT ISABEL: Redfish are good at Gas Well Flats on scented plastics under a popping cork. Trout and redfish are fair to good while drifting sand and grass flats on live shrimp under a cork.

sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good on live shrimp and top-waters in Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and Shell Island. ROCKPORT: Redfish are good on mullet on the Estes Flats and around Mud Island. Trout and redfish are good on the St. Joe shoreline on scented plastics and top-waters.

$

14

NOW

$999

99

SAVE 74% COMPARE TO

PELICAN

$

3995

MODEL: 1150

ITEM 64550 Case contents and 63518 shown locks not included.

*45521822 * 45521822 LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 12/9/19*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

www.theflagggroupinc.com hft_lonestarnews_0819_M-REG166847.indd 1

7/22/19 12:33 PM


Page 12

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER GATOR IN TUB BRINGS DOUBLE TROUBLE A man posted a video of a small alligator in his bathtub. Game wardens noticed the video and recognized the man as a suspect in a January road-hunting incident in which a large fallow may have been shot from the road. A warden made contact with the individual, who admitted to possessing the alligator and agreed to a meeting where he would hand it over. The suspect also admitted to shooting the fallow deer from the road, and told where he had stashed the antlers. The antlers were recovered, and citations were issued for the offenses. TRACKING DOWN TRESPASSERS A hunting lease member reported to a Tyler County game warden that he had caught multiple subjects on his lease trespassing. The man said he believed the individuals had given him false identification. A game warden responded and began coldtrailing ATV tracks off the property. The tracks went across multiple properties and turned into a wooded property off a county road. The warden walked in and located the subjects working on an ATV. After getting backup from the Sheriff’s Department, the warden made contact with the subjects. The subjects were initially arrested for criminal trespass, but during an inventory, one of the subjects confessed that she had methamphetamines in a backpack on the ATV she was riding. The warden found additional narcotics on the other ATV. Numerous charges followed, and three of

STOLEN FAWNS IN PRIUS A caller who was driving near Belton said he observed two live white-tailed deer fawns in the back seat of a Toyota Prius. A Limestone County game warden obtained the vehicle information and contacted the driver. The driver was instructed to meet the warden at the Limestone County Sheriff’s Office to turn over the two fawns. At the office, the warden seized the two fawns and noticed one had a hole in its ear due to a missing ear tag. The

the four subjects were arrested. DON’T PAT ME DOWN An individual was observed walking away from the shoreline with fishing rods and bait bucket in hand in Polk County. The individual was not in possession of any required identifying information. The subject became fidgety and nervous upon asking for identification. Game wardens put the man in temporary detention for officer safety. Upon pat down of weapons, the subject said the wardens shouldn’t pat him down because there were needles in his pocket filled with dirty meth. The contents of his pockets included meth, a synthetic marijuana, a glass pipe and multiple syringes. The man also had two felony warrants for burglary. The subject was arrested. IT PAYS TO ASK Polk County game wardens were

driver admitted he works at a deer breeder facility in Dimmit County and he took both fawns without permission from the ranch manager. The driver was booked into the Limestone County Jail. A Dimmit County game warden contacted the ranch manager and received authorization to file additional charges on the subject for taking both deer without landowner consent.

checking deer camps that had been broken into and observed a vehicle parked along a creek bed that had been seen the previous night. When checking the vehicle, the wardens noticed a spotlight and .22 rifle inside the truck. In the back, a small pool of dried blood was located on the tailgate. Wardens went to talk to the occupants of the vehicle. A warden asked the owner if he remembered the game warden truck trailing him the night before. The subject said yes, and asked why the warden was following him. The warden replied, “Well sir, I was following you longer than you think, and what do you think I saw?” The subject sighed and said, “We shot a deer.” The subject claimed his buddy shot a whitetail doe at night while he held the spotlight. The two also admitted to other poaching incidents and escorted the wardens to the location where they dumped the carcass and where they stored the

Big blue marlin caught during Lone Star Shootout By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The weather was perfect for running 100plus miles out to catch blue marlin, tuna, dorado and wahoo during the Lone Star Shootout, held July 25-27 out of Port O’Connor. The bite was on with plenty of fish making it to the scoreboard. But the star of this tourney was a The crew of the Bimini Babe shows the 514.5-pound winning marlin in the 514.5-pound blue marLone Star Shootout. Photo by Capt. Robert Jones. lin caught well over 100 miles out in over 3,000 feet of water. over to lures.” Some of the best catches of the tournaTo get away from the big sharks, up to ment included the second-place blue marlin around 250 pounds, they relocated about 4 weighing just over 412 pounds, two yellowmiles from the rig and pulled a spread of five fin tuna that weighed 115.5 pounds each, a of lures over the Gunnison hump at about 8 58-pound wahoo and a 32-pound dorado. knots. The marlin was caught on a 14-inch The Bimini Babe, a 74-foot Viking out of Australian lure called a Top Gun. Rockport, hooked up with the winning mar“The heaviest marlin we have ever caught lin on the first day of the tourney at 3:15 weighed 624 pounds,” Jones said. “That was p.m., and after a 45-minute battle by angler back in 1997 while fishing the Poco Bueno. Lee Weidner, she was in the cockpit on ice. So far this summer we’ve fished three or “She didn’t do any jumping,” said Capt. four tournaments east out of Mississippi Robert Jones, who was at the helm. “She and Alabama, and about five along the Texcame up on the surface one time then went as coast.” down.” After boating the big marlin that had the The team was fishing roughly 160 miles potential to be the heaviest of the tourney, out around the Gunnison Rig in about Jones said they made the run back to Port 3,500 feet of water. The drill was to catch O’Connor, weighed the catch, then turned blackfin tuna at night under the lights of around and headed back out. the drilling platform, put them in the tuna Anglers said the reason the fishing in this tubes to keep them alive and use them for tournament was so good for tuna, wahoo fishing at daybreak. They also had blue runand dorado, was that many of the boats ners in the livewell. were fishing along rips and weed lines with “Things looked pretty good as we got the a combination of live and artificial baits. baits out,” said Jones, 45, who has been fishMany of the anglers said they haven’t seen ing offshore for 30 years. “Then the sharks weed lines like they are seeing now in about moved in and we were using up the blackfin three years. tuna too fast. That’s when we had to switch

meat at their grandmother’s house. The shooter later said his daddy and granddaddy were questioned back in the day but never caught in the act, claiming that the apple doesn’t fall to far from the tree. SOUNDING FAMILIAR A complaint was received of a subject keeping undersized flounder and crabs near Port Arthur. A Jefferson County game warden noticed the information sounded similar to past local complaints about a subject hiding his undersized catch in a nearby garbage can until he was ready to leave for the day. Wardens responded to the call and discovered four undersized flounder and several undersized crabs hidden in a nearby garbage can. The fish and crabs were seized, and charges and restitution are pending. PACKED FOR A LONG STAY An abandoned pickup was reported

in the sand hills of Cochran County. The caller said the vehicle had not moved for several weeks and he observed rifle cases, ammo and military backpacks in the vehicle. A Lubbock District game warden and the Cochran County Sheriff’s Office arrived to investigate the vehicle. Multiple rifle cases, boxes of ammunition, military backpacks and camping supplies were seen inside and outside of the vehicle. The vehicle’s registration came back to an individual who led deputies and DPS on a vehicle pursuit in 2017. The pursuit began when the individual pointed a gun at a deputy and ended by DPS shooting and injuring the individual. The Sheriff’s Office obtained a search warrant to seize any firearms and ammunition located on the property to hold until the family members could be notified or until the final disposition of the previous case. The search of the pickup yielded eight long guns, four handguns, multiple swords/knives, military uniforms, camouflage wrap, Kevlar helmet, backpacks, camping gear and a large amount of ammunition. Not far from the pickup a pit was found with multiple buckets, coolers, cases and other containers containing tools, equipment, clothing and large sealed bags of rice.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 9, 2019

Page 13

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ARGENTINA DOVE HUNTING Cordoba, Argentina 4 days – 3 nights 6 half day hunts - $1320 Tim – (972) 769-8866

ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

BOW HUNTING Day hunts and season lease South Texas, Duval Co. Freer Area (361) 701-4711

ARGENTINA DUCK HUNTING dagaradventures.com 8 hunts – $3990 Damian – 011 54 9 2923 69 2907 Tim – (972) 769-8866

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

HUNTING ON THE RIO GRANDE White Wing & Dove Texasdovehunt.com (956) 542-2223

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582

DOVE HUNTS South zone, near Corpus Christi Sunflowers, Milos, Goat weed and water holes Starts Labor Day Weekend (361) 701-4711

AXIS HIDES Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

TROPHY WHITETAIL Buck Hunts Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

$1

RANCH CONTRACTOR

TEXAS PHOTO HUNTERS Outdoor Photography Still/Videography aw@texasphotohunters.com (318) 366-4368

SOUTH TEXAS DEER HUNTS txdiamondcranch.com (713) 725-5033

For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below.

Fields near San Antonio & La Pryor Day Package & Corporate Hunts Lodging, Clays & Catering Available Sunflowers, Wheat, Milo, Corn & Sesame www.texasdovehunts.org (830) 914-2313

TROPHY AXIS HUNTS Low fence & high fence both near Fredericksburg / Luckenbach Tx, Contact Heath (512) 663-5246

TDHA - JOIN TODAY Texas Dove Hunters Association TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

CLASSIC SOUTH TEXAS DOVE HUNTS

Game & Livestock Fences, Hog-Proof Fences, Land Clearing, Roads & Trails, Ponds & Lakes Athens, TX TejasRanchFence.com (903) 292-0525

Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $35 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $3, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2019 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

Craig Nyhus

Managing Editor

Lili Sams

Design Editor

C2-Studios, Inc.

Associate Editor

Mark England

Products Editor

Mary Helen Aguirre

Operations Manager

Mike Hughs

Accounting

Ginger Hoolan

Website

Bruce Solieu

National Advertising Mike Nelson

CENTRAL TEXAS TROPHY DEER HUNTS Available 2019-2020 season High-Fenced Ranch Stands, Feeders, Lodging, and Guides First-time offer Contact Darren: (512) 564-1013

CLASSIFIEDS

VEHICLES TRUCK TIRES Michelin LT 275/65R18 E rated, Level 8 black aluminum 18 inch wheels Set of 4 with black lugs and caps $500 Call (214) 361-2276

ADD A PHOTO/LOGO $25 ALL BOLD LETTERS $15 2 ISSUE MINIMUM

Founder & CEO

David J. Sams

Advertising: Call (214) 361-2276 or email editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com to request a media kit.

For home delivery subscriptions www.LSONews.com • (214) 361-2276

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@ GMAIL.COM

August 17-18 Abilene Convention Center Sept. 7-8 - Kerrville Exhibit Center

August 14-16 | Abilene, TX

Oct. 19-20 - Abilene Convention Center

What options are there for restoring quail populations?

Oct. 26-27 - Fredericksburg Fair Grounds

How does rain factor into the quail equation?

Nov. 16-17 - Kerrville Exhibit Center Saturday 9 AM - 5 PM | Sunday 10 AM - 4 PM

Can small acreage landowners help quail?

Want Answers?

Register today at texas-wildlife.org/resources/events


Page 14

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Elizabeth Hart, of San Antonio, caught this snook while fishing with Capt. Eric Glass in South Padre.

Austin Owens, of Boerne, took this pronghorn north of Van Horn last season.

Jeffrey Grant Passmore Jr. caught his first fish in the flats near Port Aransas while fishing with his dad, Capt. Steve Simenek.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

David “The Bull� Bellamy caught this 9.2-pound bass south of Athens on a 10-inch power worm.

Emmanuel Villarruel, of San Marcos, caught this 27-inch redfish in the Upper Laguna Madre.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LONE STAR OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Solution on Page 18

August 9, 2019

INDUSTRY Agency for CanCooker

MWS expands

CanCooker selected RubLine Marketing as its marketing agency of record.

MWS Associates, Inc. expanded its sales territory coverage into Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma, and Dave Roberts joined as the newest regional manager.

Murray Road to represent Savage Savage retained Murray Road as its public relations agency of record.

French joins GSM GSM Outdoors hired Kim French to the GSM Outdoors sales team as regional sales manager.

Marketing director at Clenzoil

DOWN 2. ___ is National Shooting Month 3. Swinging the lure to the target 4. The brown lab 5. River that flows through San Angelo 9. A type of fishing sinker (two words) 10. Up and down fishing 11. A measurement in antler scoring 12. The water dog 15. The early-arriving teal (two words) 16. Natural material used in making fishing rods 17. A way wild turkeys clean their feathers 18. Shoulder hide on a deer 19. The grass carp 22. A good striper lake 25. An African game species 26. A shorebird species 27. The extra hook added to a lure 29. An offshore target 32. The distance between the waterline and the boat’s bottom

Lew’s acquires European tackle company Fox International, Europe’s largest privately owned fishing tackle company, agreed to be acquired by Lew’s Holdings.

Agency for Oceanmax Oceanmax selected Rushton Gregory as its marketing agency.

Alan Molony has become the director of marketing at Clenzoil.

Scoutten honored

Positions at Shimano Europe

John Scoutten, son of Shooting USA host Jim Scoutten, was selected to receive the 2019 Legacy Award by the Legends of the Outdoors Hall of Fame.

Shimano Europe is seeking sales and marketing managers in France/ Switzerland and Portugal/Spain. ACROSS 1. Insects imitated by fly-tiers 6. The smaller shad 7. Leaves, twigs as food for deer 8. A shotshell brand 13. Member of the jack family 14. Slang for a saltwater catfish 15. Steady ____ is important in shooting 17. The wild dog in Australia 18. An ATV manufacturer 20. The drumming grouse 21. The male bighorn 23. Maker of dog, deer food 24. A Texas mountain range 26. Amarillo’s county 28. Abilene’s county 30. When a pointing dog freezes upon seeing another dog’s point 31. A sheath preventing slaps from the bowstring 33. A salmon species 34. An outboard manufacturer 35. A trout species 36. A type of hunting blind

Page 15

Puzzle by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News

Trout on the beach Continued from page 1

years,” he said. “Most of the time it’s just a little washout that’s formed a hole where bait can congregate and attract trout. Throw in a little current with green water to the beach and it is game on.” The beachfront surf from the Port O’Connor jetties and north towards the Matagorda jetties is prime water to be fishing. “I have a 24-foot J&H center console that’s prefect for running the surf,” Brandon said. “Most of the time I’ll run anywhere from 10 to 15 miles along the beach looking for birds working, or hitting some spots that are pretty reliable. About half the time I’ll fish north along Matagorda Island toward the mouth of the Colorado River. If that’s not looking too good, I’ll head south and fish the water down around the Matagorda Island lighthouse and on down toward the Darlington. This is a strip of sand and surf that has a few boat wrecks. Those wrecks are well known for holding solid

numbers of trout.” Live croaker rule in the surf. “About 99 percent of the time I’ll be fishing live croaker in the first and second guts along the beach,” Brandon said. “Live shrimp also will work. But croaker are very tough to beat. I fish them on 8 1/2-foot rods with baitcasting reels loaded with braided line for making an extra long cast. That’s important when the surf is a little rough and I have to anchor a little bit farther out. If the green water in the first gut is holding baitfish, that’s where you need to be fishing croaker. I like to rig up with a 1/4-ounce barrel weight, a rattle and monofilament leader tied to a 5/0 croaker hook. The leader is about 2 feet long.” The only way Brandon likes to fish the surf is high and dry from his boat. Matagorda-based guide Tommy Alexander said the surf fishing during the first week of August was outstanding.

“August, September and October are very good months to fish the surf from Matagorda and on over to Sargent Beach, he said. “When I hit the surf, I’m looking for some sort of activity from bait on the surface to birds. I don’t ever pass up pelicans dive-bombing into mullet and shad. If I see that happening it’s almost guaranteed trout.” Alexander makes it a point to fish areas that have held trout before. Once he gets to one of those spots, he’ll idle along looking for baitfish. Some of his better spots are small guts, or areas that hold patches of clam shells. “Sometimes I’ll use live shrimp,” he said. “But about 99 percent of the time I’ll be using lures. Right at daylight, I like to fish a bone-colored Super Spook or a dark-colored paddle tail. Once the sun comes up, I’ll switch over to something like a blue/ chrome Super Spook Jr. The darkcolored Down South and Norton

Surf-fisherman Dennis Brandon is having success catching speckled trout. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Bull Minnow plastics are good. Another lure that’s good is a Hot Rod. That’s a slow-sinking twitch bait with a rattle. It’s a killer on trout.”

For easy access to some quality surf fishing without a boat, popular hotspots are Surfside Beach, the Galveston beachfront and the Bolivar Peninsula.


Page 16

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Aug 15

Aug 23

Aug 30

Sept 5

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2019 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2019 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu

1:17 2:03 2:49 3:35 4:21 5:08 5:54

7:30 8:16 9:02 9:48 10:34 11:20 -----

1:42 2:29 3:15 4:01 4:46 5:32 6:17

7:55 8:42 9:28 10:13 10:58 11:44 12:06

06:45 06:46 06:47 06:47 06:48 06:49 06:49

3:57p 4:55p 5:49p 6:39p 7:24p 8:04p 8:41p

1:45a 2:28a 3:15a 4:05a 4:58a 5:53a 6:48

16 Fri

6:41 12:30

7:03

12:52

06:50 08:11 9:14p

7:44a

17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

7:27 8:13 8:59 9:45 10:32 11:19 -----

7:48 8:34 9:20 10:06 10:53 11:41 12:07

1:38 2:23 3:09 3:56 4:42 5:30 6:19

1:11 7:24 1:57 8:10 2:43 8:56 3:29 9:42 4:15 10:28 5:02 11:14 5:48 ----6:35 12:24 7:21 1:11 8:07 1:57 8:53 2:43 9:39 3:29 10:26 4:15 11:13 5:02 ----- 5:49

1:37 2:23 3:09 3:55 4:40 5:26 6:11 6:57 7:42 8:28 9:14 10:00 10:47 11:36 12:01

7:49 8:36 9:22 10:07 10:53 11:38 12:00 12:46 1:32 2:18 3:04 3:50 4:37 5:24 6:13

06:44 06:45 06:45 06:46 06:46 06:47 06:48 06:48 06:49 06:49 06:50 06:51 06:51 06:52 06:52

08:08 08:07 08:06 08:05 08:04 08:03 08:02 08:01 08:00 07:59 07:58 07:57 07:56 07:55 07:54

3:45p 1:45a 4:42p 2:29a 5:36p 3:16a 6:26p 4:06a 7:11p 4:59a 7:53p 5:53a 8:30p 6:48a 9:05p 7:42a 9:36p 8:35a 10:07p 9:27a 10:36p 10:19a 11:07p 11:11a 11:39p 12:05p NoMoon 1:00p 12:15a 1:57p

1:16 2:03 2:49 3:35 4:21 5:07 5:55

06:51 06:51 06:52 06:53 06:53 06:54 06:55

08:18 08:17 08:16 08:15 08:14 08:13 08:12 08:10 08:09 08:08 08:07 08:06 08:04 08:03

9:44p 8:38a 10:13p 9:32a 10:42p 10:25a 11:11p 11:19a 11:42p 12:13p NoMoon 1:10p 12:16a 2:08p

San Antonio 2019 Aug

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

1:24 7:36 2:10 8:23 2:56 9:09 3:42 9:54 4:28 10:40 5:14 11:26 6:01 ----6:47 12:36 7:34 1:23 8:20 2:10 9:06 2:56 9:52 3:42 10:38 4:28 11:25 5:14 ----- 6:02

1:49 2:36 3:22 4:07 4:53 5:38 6:24 7:09 7:55 8:40 9:26 10:13 11:00 11:48 12:14

8:02 8:49 9:34 10:20 11:05 11:50 12:12 12:58 1:44 2:30 3:16 4:02 4:49 5:37 6:26

06:57 06:58 06:58 06:59 07:00 07:00 07:01 07:01 07:02 07:02 07:03 07:04 07:04 07:05 07:05

08:19 08:19 08:18 08:17 08:16 08:15 08:14 08:13 08:12 08:11 08:10 08:09 08:08 08:07 08:06

3:57p 1:58a 4:54p 2:42a 5:48p 3:30a 6:38p 4:20a 7:23p 5:13a 8:05p 6:07a 8:42p 7:01a 9:17p 7:55a 9:49p 8:48a 10:19p 9:41a 10:49p 10:32a 11:20p 11:24a 11:52p 12:17p NoMoon 1:12p 12:28a 2:09p

Amarillo

2019 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

1:37 7:50 2:23 8:36 3:09 9:22 3:55 10:08 4:41 10:54 5:28 11:40 6:14 12:02 7:01 12:50 7:47 1:37 8:33 2:23 9:19 3:09 10:05 3:55 10:52 4:41 11:39 5:28 12:03 6:15

2:03 2:49 3:35 4:21 5:06 5:52 6:37 7:23 8:08 8:54 9:40 10:26 11:13 ----12:27

8:15 9:02 9:48 10:33 11:19 ----12:26 1:12 1:58 2:44 3:30 4:16 5:03 5:50 6:39

07:01 07:02 07:03 07:04 07:04 07:05 07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:09 07:10 07:10 07:11 07:12

08:42 08:41 08:40 08:39 08:38 08:37 08:36 08:35 08:34 08:32 08:31 08:30 08:29 08:28 08:26

4:24p 2:01a 5:22p 2:43a 6:16p 3:29a 7:06p 4:20a 7:50p 5:13a 8:30p 6:08a 9:05p 7:05a 9:37p 8:01a 10:07p 8:57a 10:34p 9:52a 11:02p 10:46a 11:30p 11:41a NoMoon 12:36p NoMoon 1:34p 12:33a 2:34p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 1:36 AM 2:42 AM 3:34 AM 4:16 AM 4:50 AM 5:17 AM 5:41 AM 6:02 AM 6:23 AM 6:44 AM 12:06 AM 12:43 AM 1:23 AM 2:11 AM 3:19 AM

Rollover Pass Height 1.63H 1.73H 1.77H 1.77H 1.73H 1.68H 1.63H 1.59H 1.56H 1.52H 0.49L 0.69L 0.90L 1.11L 1.30L

Time 7:09 AM 8:57 AM 9:53 AM 10:22 AM 10:31 AM 10:32 AM 10:43 AM 11:07 AM 11:40 AM 12:20 PM 7:03 AM 7:20 AM 7:29 AM 7:29 AM 7:26 AM

Height 1.31L 1.34L 1.35L 1.35L 1.34L 1.31L 1.24L 1.15L 1.05L 0.93L 1.49H 1.45H 1.41H 1.40H 1.42H

Time 10:37 AM 11:26 AM 12:17 PM 1:05 PM 1:47 PM 2:27 PM 3:06 PM 3:48 PM 4:36 PM 5:31 PM 1:03 PM 1:49 PM 2:38 PM 3:28 PM 4:20 PM

Height 1.39H 1.38H 1.39H 1.40H 1.42H 1.43H 1.43H 1.41H 1.37H 1.33H 0.81L 0.67L 0.53L 0.38L 0.22L

Time 6:10 PM 7:00 PM 7:46 PM 8:29 PM 9:09 PM 9:46 PM 10:22 PM 10:57 PM 11:31 PM

Height -0.18L -0.23L -0.24L -0.21L -0.16L -0.08L 0.02L 0.15L 0.30L

6:36 PM 7:58 PM 9:38 PM 11:24 PM

1.29H 1.27H 1.31H 1.42H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 2:11 AM 3:17 AM 4:05 AM 4:44 AM 5:14 AM 5:37 AM 5:56 AM 6:15 AM 6:35 AM 6:56 AM 7:16 AM 7:34 AM 12:27 AM 1:05 AM 1:56 AM

Height 2.01H 2.15H 2.20H 2.18H 2.11H 2.03H 1.96H 1.92H 1.89H 1.86H 1.83H 1.80H 1.12L 1.42L 1.70L

Time 7:35 AM 6:55 PM 7:39 PM 8:19 PM 10:27 AM 10:18 AM 10:10 AM 10:27 AM 11:03 AM 11:48 AM 12:35 PM 1:23 PM 7:46 AM 7:42 AM 6:55 AM

Height 1.71L -0.40L -0.40L -0.35L 1.83L 1.79L 1.71L 1.60L 1.46L 1.31L 1.14L 0.95L 1.77H 1.76H 1.82H

Time 9:51 AM

Height 1.73H

Time 6:07 PM

Height -0.33L

12:51 PM 1:43 PM 2:32 PM 3:22 PM 4:17 PM 5:21 PM 6:42 PM 8:18 PM 2:10 PM 2:58 PM 3:48 PM

1.86H 1.86H 1.84H 1.79H 1.70H 1.59H 1.50H 1.48H 0.75L 0.54L 0.32L

8:55 PM 9:27 PM 9:56 PM 10:25 PM 10:53 PM 11:23 PM 11:54 PM

-0.26L -0.15L -0.02L 0.14L 0.34L 0.57L 0.83L

10:06 PM 11:55 PM

1.56H 1.75H

Height 1.79H 1.90H 1.95H 1.94H 1.89H 1.82H 1.76H 1.69H 1.63H 1.56H 1.50H 0.81L 1.02L 1.22L

Time 5:42 PM 6:37 PM 7:28 PM 8:13 PM 8:53 PM 9:28 PM 10:02 PM 1:06 PM 12:36 PM 12:50 PM 1:19 PM 6:57 AM 7:15 AM 7:30 AM

Height -0.05L -0.10L -0.11L -0.08L -0.02L 0.06L 0.15L 1.26L 1.18L 1.06L 0.94L 1.44H 1.39H 1.36H

Time

Height

Time 1:19 AM 2:35 AM 3:38 AM 4:22 AM 4:54 AM 5:19 AM 5:43 AM 6:06 AM 6:25 AM 6:37 AM 6:44 AM 12:46 AM 1:52 AM 3:14 AM

3:19 PM 4:16 PM 5:13 PM 6:15 PM 1:51 PM 2:24 PM 3:00 PM

1.30H 1.28H 1.26H 1.23H 0.79L 0.65L 0.50L

Height 0.75H 0.81H 0.83H 0.83H 0.81H 0.77H -0.07L -0.00L 0.07L 0.16L 0.24L 0.32L 0.39L 0.59H 0.65H

Time 8:12 PM 9:11 PM 10:11 PM 11:07 PM 11:55 PM

Height -0.06L -0.10L -0.12L -0.12L -0.11L

Time

Height

11:02 AM 11:00 AM 10:42 AM 10:12 AM 9:37 AM 8:57 AM 8:13 AM 5:27 PM 6:20 PM

0.71H 0.65H 0.60H 0.56H 0.54H 0.53H 0.55H 0.15L 0.07L

3:43 PM 4:09 PM 4:43 PM

0.39L 0.31L 0.23L

Time

Height

Time

Height

10:37 PM 11:13 PM 11:55 PM

0.28L 0.43L 0.61L

7:35 PM 10:55 PM 3:41 PM

1.23H 1.33H 0.35L

Port O’Connor Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 7:43 AM 8:08 AM 8:51 AM 9:34 AM 10:13 AM 10:45 AM 12:34 AM 1:05 AM 1:26 AM 1:38 AM 1:43 AM 1:40 AM 1:14 AM 7:39 AM 7:17 AM

Time 1:41 PM 12:12 AM 1:03 AM 1:57 AM 2:52 AM 3:45 AM 4:33 AM 5:14 AM 5:48 AM 6:15 AM 6:35 AM 6:39 AM 6:06 AM 3:24 AM 12:20 PM

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 2:48 AM 4:12 AM 5:11 AM 5:59 AM 6:37 AM 6:59 AM 7:01 AM 7:07 AM 7:18 AM 7:30 AM 12:19 AM 12:58 AM 1:44 AM 2:46 AM 1:32 AM

Time 9:41 PM 10:43 PM 11:41 PM

Height -0.04L -0.08L -0.08L

9:57 AM 10:26 AM 10:36 AM 10:26 AM 10:13 AM 10:08 AM 10:15 AM 10:29 AM 10:46 AM 4:26 AM 7:48 PM

1.44H 1.36H 1.28H 1.22H 1.19H 1.18H 1.18H 1.17H 1.16H 0.96L 0.20L

Height 1.20H 1.30H 1.34H 1.33H 1.28H 1.22H 1.16H 1.12H 1.09H 1.08H 0.44L 0.58L 0.75L 0.92L 1.09H

Time 6:31 PM 7:22 PM 8:10 PM 8:55 PM 9:35 PM 10:11 PM 10:43 PM 1:14 PM 1:28 PM 1:43 PM 7:41 AM 7:51 AM 8:01 AM 8:12 AM 6:05 AM

Height -0.11L -0.15L -0.14L -0.10L -0.04L 0.04L 0.12L 0.99L 0.93L 0.85L 1.07H 1.05H 1.05H 1.05H 1.06L

Height 0.41H 0.44H 0.45H 0.44H 0.43H 0.41H -0.00L 0.03L 0.07L 0.11L 0.15L 0.19L 0.23L 0.27L 0.36H

Time 8:13 PM 9:05 PM 9:59 PM 10:53 PM 11:43 PM

Height 0.01L -0.02L -0.03L -0.03L -0.02L

3:53 4:32 5:09 8:18 8:27 8:33 8:22 7:39 6:32

0.41H 0.39H 0.36H 0.30H 0.31H 0.31H 0.32H 0.33H 0.09L

Height 1.00H 1.09H 1.13H 1.11H 1.07H 1.02H 0.96H 0.91H 0.88H 0.81H 0.33L 0.44L 0.57L 0.70L 0.86H

Time 6:05 PM 6:58 PM 7:45 PM 8:27 PM 9:07 PM 9:45 PM 10:23 PM 11:01 PM 11:40 PM 12:26 PM 6:17 AM 6:41 AM 7:04 AM 7:10 AM 3:51 PM

Height -0.06L -0.11L -0.12L -0.10L -0.04L 0.03L 0.10L 0.17L 0.24L 0.72L 0.81H 0.81H 0.81H 0.82H 0.15L

Height 1.34H 1.47H 1.53H 1.55H 1.54H 1.51H 1.47H 1.42H 1.36H 1.29H 1.23H 0.66L 0.84L 1.02L 0.19L

Time 5:22 PM 6:20 PM 7:14 PM 8:04 PM 8:50 PM 9:31 PM 10:07 PM 11:20 AM 11:32 AM 11:53 AM 12:20 PM 6:43 AM 6:31 AM 6:12 AM

Height -0.41L -0.48L -0.48L -0.43L -0.33L -0.19L -0.03L 1.29L 1.21L 1.09L 0.94L 1.17H 1.14H 1.15H

Time

4:26 PM 4:47 PM 5:05 PM 5:20 PM 5:38 PM 6:07 PM 11:01 AM

Time

3:24 4:19 5:17 2:07 2:38 3:15 3:55 8:20

Height

0.96L 0.88L 0.78L 0.67L 0.54L 0.42L 1.15H

Height

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM AM

1.02H 0.98H 0.93H 0.74L 0.62L 0.49L 0.36L 1.08H

Time

Height

Time

Height

6:54 PM 7:56 PM 9:00 PM 10:10 PM 11:29 PM

1.02H 0.98H 0.96H 0.95H 0.97H

6:50 PM

0.30L

Time

Height

11:13 PM 11:44 PM

0.21L 0.31L

6:26 PM 8:13 PM 11:44 PM

0.89H 0.86H 0.95H

4:40 PM

0.23L

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 5:50 AM 6:40 AM 7:41 AM 8:49 AM 9:58 AM 3:04 PM 12:25 AM 1:00 AM 1:26 AM 1:44 AM 1:55 AM 1:57 AM 1:49 AM 1:20 AM 6:41 AM

PM PM PM AM AM AM AM AM PM

1:09 2:02 2:53 3:55 5:16

PM PM PM PM PM

0.27L 0.23L 0.20L 0.17L 0.13L

Time

Height

Time

5:52 PM 6:55 PM 8:53 PM 10:54 PM

Height

0.33H 0.30H 0.28H 0.28H

Port Aransas Time

7:19 PM 10:45 PM

Height

0.40H 0.40H

Nueces Bay Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

San Luis Pass

Height 1.39H 1.49H 1.52H 1.50H -0.05L 0.00L 0.08L 0.17L 0.27L 0.37L 0.48L 0.62L 0.78L 1.01H 1.16H

East Matagorda

Freeport Harbor Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22

Time 6:44 AM 7:41 AM 8:31 AM 9:17 AM 12:34 AM 1:20 AM 1:58 AM 2:26 AM 2:45 AM 2:58 AM 3:14 AM 3:37 AM 4:04 AM 1:11 AM 11:01 AM

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 3:54 AM 4:42 AM 5:29 AM 6:20 AM 7:18 AM 8:24 AM 9:28 AM 2:28 PM 3:24 PM 6:00 AM 12:17 AM 12:51 AM 1:15 AM 1:26 AM 5:45 AM

4:20 PM 12:58 PM 1:33 PM 2:11 PM 2:56 PM

0.84H 0.62L 0.50L 0.38L 0.26L

Time

5:23 PM 6:45 PM 10:45 PM

Height

0.79H 0.74H 0.75H

South Padre Island Height 0.69H 0.14L 0.08L 0.03L -0.00L -0.02L -0.02L 0.01L 0.07L 0.15L 0.24L 0.33L 0.40L 0.49H 0.65H

Time 2:12 PM 2:54 PM 3:42 PM 4:33 PM 5:25 PM 6:13 PM 6:56 PM 7:35 PM 8:13 PM 4:40 PM 2:55 PM 2:37 PM 5:59 AM 10:21 PM

Height 0.75H 0.80H 0.83H 0.86H 0.86H 0.84H 0.80H 0.74H 0.66H 0.60H 0.57H 0.56H 0.47L 0.25L

8:22 PM 8:55 PM 12:10 PM

0.50L 0.41L 0.59H

Time

Height

10:32 PM

0.51H

9:33 PM

0.33L

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Time 2:16 AM 3:22 AM 4:12 AM 4:56 AM 5:35 AM 6:09 AM 6:36 AM 6:54 AM 7:02 AM 7:00 AM 6:53 AM 12:08 AM 12:44 AM 1:33 AM 3:14 PM

Time

1:51 PM 2:59 PM 4:07 PM 5:25 PM 12:53 PM 1:32 PM 2:19 PM

Height

1.32H 1.28H 1.22H 1.16H 0.77L 0.58L 0.39L

Time

Height

10:39 PM 11:09 PM 11:37 PM

0.14L 0.32L 0.49L

6:58 PM 8:58 PM 11:25 PM

1.12H 1.14H 1.24H

Texas Coast Tides

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23

Date Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11 Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 9, 2019

Page 17

NATIONAL SOUTH CAROLINA

Ban on urine attractants South Carolina became the ninth state to ban the use of natural deer urine as an attractant. The new regulation from the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources will ban the use of lures or attractants that contain any excretion collected from a deer (including urine, feces, gland oil, etc.) Synthetic products or any substance collected by a hunter from a legally harvested deer within South Carolina is still allowed. —SCDNR

VIRGINIA

Ike wins Eastern Open Mike Iaconelli relied on low water to win the Bassmaster Eastern Open on the James River. Iaconelli stayed closer to the main river take-off site to take advantage of the morning tide schedule on the final day. That decision led to a five-bass limit that weighed 13 pounds, 12 ounces and pushed him to victory with a three-day weight of 44 pounds. Iaconelli earned $39,000 for his first B.A.S.S. victory since 2014. On the final day, he caught his fish on a Rapala DT-6 in a color called Old School. —B.A.S.S.

GEORGIA

Strickland named Deer Manager of the Year Dr. Bronson Strickland received the 2019 Al Brothers Professional Deer Manager of the Year Award from the Quality Deer Management Association. Strickland is a professor of wildlife management and the Extension Wildlife Specialist at Mississippi State University whose work focuses on questions of interest

to deer hunters and wildlife managers. Strickland received a bachelor’s degree in forest resources from the University of Georgia in 1995. He pursued a master’s degree from Texas A&M University-Kingsville where his research involved estimating white-tailed deer carrying capacity in southern Texas. QDMA’s Deer Manager of the Year awards are named in honor of Al Brothers of Texas, wildlife biologist and author of the book “Producing Quality Whitetails,” who is considered the father of Quality Deer Management. —QDMA

ARKANSAS

No limits on Lake Monticello The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission removed all daily sportfish limits and length limits on Lake Monticello for all species of fish in an emergency proclamation as a result of the recent decision by the City of Monticello to drain the lake for repairs to its dam. —AGFC

MARYLAND

Record mahi-mahi Jeff Wright of Cambridge has broken a 34-year-old Maryland state fishing record in the Atlantic Division for a common dolphinfish, or mahi-mahi. Wright caught the 72.8-pound fish off the coast of Ocean City. Wright was aboard a boat practicing with friends for the upcoming White Marlin Open when he caught the fish. Wright’s catch beat the existing record of 67.8 pounds set in July 1985. —MDNR

WEST VIRGINIA

Partnership for youth angling The International Game Fish Association and the Boy Scouts of America announced a new partnership focused on youth angling education during the BSA’s World Scout Jamboree. A memorandum of understanding outlines the organizations’ shared objective of introducing youth to the joys of fishing and educating them on how to be ethical anglers and stewards of the environment. Specifically, the MOU describes how the IGFA will work with the BSA on developing and executing their angling-focused programs by sharing youth education curricula and materials as needed. Additionally, all scouts who complete their BSA Fishing and Fly-Fishing Merit Badges will be included in the IGFA’s initiative to teach 100,000 kids to fish and will receive a custom certificate from the IGFA. —IGFA

ARIZONA

Commission honored by WAFWA At the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies’ annual conference in Manhattan, Kansas, the Arizona Game and Fish Commission was recognized as the Commission of the Year. The award recognized the commission’s work to conserve fish and wildlife resources. —AZGFC

INTERNATIONAL TANZANIA

Selous Game Reserve to be divided President John Magufuli directed the dividing of the Selous Game Reserve into two sections to establish a new national park to be named after founding president Julius Kambarage Nyerere. Magufuli said the new park will help generate additional tourism revenue. Additionally, a large dam and power project are planned on the site. The Selous is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. Hunting block applications are down and several blocks are vacant after years of bans on elephant and lion imports into the U.S. —Staff report

PERU

Golds at Pan American Games At the 2019 Pan American Games in Lima, Sarah Beard, of Danville, Indiana, won gold in Three-Position Rifle, finishing .7 points ahead of Cuba’s Eglys De La Cruz. Beard was joined on the medal stand by 2016 Air Rifle Olympic gold medalist Ginny Thrasher, of Springfield, Virginia, who won the bronze. Two Olympic quotas were earned by gold medalist Brian Burrows, of California, and silver medalist Derek Haldeman, of Ohio, in Men’s Trap. Their ultimate triumph brought to an end a streak that had seen no U.S. competitor at the Olympic Games in the Men’s Trap event since 2008. —USA Shooting

PRODUCTS

>>

OPTIKA HD BINOCULARS: Meopta USA Sport Optics’ newest binoculars are available in 8x42 and 10x42 models. These lightweight, rugged, magnesium-alloy binoculars are encased in a shockproof, rubber-armored exterior for durability. The advanced HD lenses, combined with phase-correction and dielectric coatings, deliver brightness, color fidelity, edge-to-edge sharpness and increased contrast, allowing hunters to see better in low light. Other features include anti-abrasion and hydrophobic lens coatings that repel rain, dust and grease. The MSRP will be $339.95 for the 8x42 model and $349.95 for the 10x42 model.

>>

KVD SPLASH TOPWATER LURE: This hard bait by Strike King is the perfect balance of spitting, chugging and surface-walking action for inducing top-water strikes. The lure has an ultra-realistic paint scheme, 3-D eyes and a feathered rear treble hook. It was designed with the input of Kevin VanDam, a repeat Bassmaster Classic champion. It comes in six color combinations and costs about $10.

2020 RANGER XP 1000 TEXAS EDITION: This Polaris utility side-byside vehicle offers increased performance and durability. Its features include load-adaptive rear shocks designed to automatically adjust to support added weight. This adjustment allows the vehicle to maintain 13 inches of ground clearance to deliver a smooth ride, no matter the load. Additionally, hunters can confidently handle the rugged Texas terrain with the added feature of arched A-arms to maximize ground clearance. The 900W charging system offers maximum electrical output. A 4,500-pound winch comes standard and its 2,500-pound towing capacity offers the ability to haul heavy loads. It has a base price of $18,899.

>>

>>

SX2550 BAY BOAT: Skeeter has introduced a 24-foot, 6-inch inshore/offshore boat, the largest of the company’s SX bay boat line. Powered by a Yamaha F300 four-stroke outboard, the boat is packed with features designed to create more room, better fishability and a powerful ride. The boat comes standard with a tall two-toned console with a side-entry door, changing room, and enough space to accommodate a toilet. Rear jump seats and a removable backrest fold down to extend the rear casting deck. If lifted forward, these seats create extra storage compartments. Other features include built-in LED lighting, an in-floor fish box with macerator pump, and fresh and raw water wash-down systems.

Ultimate Bird Hunting Vest: Dove Gear’s vest is the first product the new Texas company offers. The breathable vest which features six-way adjustability, two security pockets with spring closure, rear compartment for hulls and in addition to the shell pouches, a lined washable game bag adds extra storage. Plus, it comes with a holder for a 32-ounce bottle of water. The vest retails for $89.95.

>>


Page 18

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK AUGUST 9-11

National Wild Turkey Federation Montgomery County Banquet Lone Star Convention Center, Conroe (713) 823-2958 nwtf.org

AUGUST 21

AUGUST 10

Park Cities Quail Coalition Snake Avoidance Clinic Rice Ranch, Bartonville (214) 534-4122

Coastal Conservation Association Lower Laguna Madre Banquet Port Isabel Event & Cultural Center (956) 491-8148 ccatexas.org

AUGUST 22

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation North Texas Big Game Banquet Embassy Suites Bass Pro Shop, Grapevine (214) 693-8523 rmef.org

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Royal Oaks Country Club (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

Texas Trophy Hunters Association Fort Worth Extravaganza Fort Worth Convention Center huntersextravaganza.com

AUGUST 16-17

Ducks Unlimited Wise County Dinner Decatur Civic Center (940) 255-5034 ducks.org

Texas Deer Association Annual Convention JW Marriott Hill Country (512) 499-0466 texasdeerassociation.com

Coastal Conservation Association Aransas Bay Banquet Camp Aranzazu, Rockport (432) 230-9069 ccatexas.org

AUGUST 14-16

Texas Wildlife Association Statewide Quail Symposium MCM Elegante Abilene texas-wildlife.org

AUGUST 15

Stewards of the Wild Dallas Chapter Back to the Field Celebration Beretta Gallery tpwf.org/sotw

AUGUST 23

Deer Breeder Corporation Annual Convention Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort (866) 972-5001 dbcdeer.com Joshua Creek Ranch Kendall County Women’s Shelter Clay Shoot (830) 537- 5090 joshuacreek.com

San Antonio Quail Coalition Chapter Banquet Freeman Coliseum Expo Hall quailcoalition.org DSC Conservation Society Fall Kickoff Social Filson Store, Plano dscconservationsociety.org Ducks Unlimited Frisco Dinner Embassy Suites Conference Center (940) 222-9616 ducks.org

Coastal Conservation Association Trinity Bay Banquet Nuevo Leon Event Center, Baytown (281) 728-6278 ccatexas.org

AUGUST 24

Right to Bear Arms Gun Auction (940) 644-0053 r2baauctions.com

AUGUST 16-18

Texas Trophy Hunters Association San Antonio Extravaganza Freeman Coliseum Expo Hall huntersextravaganza.com

AUGUST 17

Joshua Creek Ranch Sid Edwards Memorial King of the Hills Shoot (830) 537- 5090 joshuacreek.com

Coastal Conservation Association Hill Country Banquet New Braunfels Civic Center (830) 660-8025 ccatexas.org

Delta Waterfowl Lamar County Banquet Love Civic Center, Paris (903) 517-5889 deltawaterfowl.org

Delta Waterfowl Houston Banquet Chateau Crystale (817) 471-7646 deltawaterfowl.org

National Wild Turkey Federation Blackland Prairie Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, West (254) 855-2902 nwtf.org

Puzzle solution from Page 15

RECRUITING HUNTERS AND ANGLERS FOR A LIFETIME

McClelland Gun Shop gunsmithing | restoration | REPAIR

in business since ‘72. we’ve seen it all. bring it on. www.Mcclellandgun.com DALLAS, TX | 214. 321.0231

ADMISSION IS FREE

JOIN US OCTOBER 2 DOORS OPEN AT 6

SPONSORED BY OUR FRIENDS:

UBATHI GLOBAL SAFARIS


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Page 19

First fish is a snapper

Fishing rivers Continued from page 1

summer fly-fishing the Paluxy and Brazos rivers. “These rivers are some of my favorite bodies of water to fish during the summertime,” Polk said. “They provide plenty of shade along their waters, and the fish that inhabit them will often times feed aggressively all day long.” Not only does the shade along the banks of these rivers shield anglers from the scorching sun, it also keeps the water temperature cool enough for the fish to be willing to strike top-water flies at just about any hour of the day. “Perhaps the best part about river fishing during this time of year is that it can be a pretty relaxing activity,” Polk said. “Unlike lake fishing, it is not necessary to hit the water at daylight in order to experience action along the surface. Most of my river outings take place between the hours of 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. or from 4 p.m. to dark, and the top-water bite usually remains consistent. That’s because these waters are staying cool throughout the day and the majority of them are fairly shallow. They present fly-anglers with the perfect opportunity for casting poppers and other surface flies.” On the Paluxy River, Polk generally tangles with largemouth bass, spotted bass, panfish, carp and gar. He said these same species are prevalent on the Brazos River, along with smallmouth bass, stripers and white bass. “Stripers tend to stack up in deeper holes along the Brazos that can be as deep as 6-20 feet,” Polk informed. “When fishing these deeper stretches of the river, I prefer to use flies that imitate baitfish, like a clouser, rigged on a sinking line.” The stretches of the Brazos River Polk that targets the most lie below Possum Kingdom Lake, Lake Whitney and Lake Granbury. “The rate of water flowing along the Brazos is key to achieving success,” he said.

August 9, 2019

“The sweet spot is 100-200 cubic feet per second, and the river’s flow is currently holding steady in that range right now.” Polk uses an app called River Data to obtain information from USGS water monitoring sites to get the latest updates on how fast the rivers he plans to target are flowing. Firefighter Seth Winkelmann also enjoys fishing the rivers near the DFW area, but his passion is fishing smaller rivers and streams located in the Hill Country. “I like to get off the grid and take in the more intimate setting on areas of the Blanco, San Marcos, and Guadalupe rivers,” Winkelmann said. “You can cast flies completely across the width of these rivers in many places, plus the water is usually clean and the views are as picturesque as they come.” Winkelmann’s favorite way to fish these waters is out of a float tube, floating alongside his girlfriend and groups of buddies. He uses a 2-5 weight fiberglass fly rod to cast small poppers and other surface fly presentations. “A good way to increase your success on Hill Country rivers is to use a popperdropper rig,” he said. “This setup involves using a nymph or wooly bugger about 2 feet behind or under a small popper. Sometimes the fish will strike the popper, and sometimes they will hit the fly trailing under the surface. This rig will often double your amount of hookups in a given time period.” The Hill Country rivers generally hold smaller Guadalupe and largemouth bass in the half-pound to pound-and-a-half range. “Catching a 3-pound bass is not uncommon, and it makes for a sporting fight on light fly gear,” Winkelmann said. “In recent years we have been catching more and more larger bass as flooding rains have allowed fish from stock tanks in the area to enter these waters.”

Continued from page 8

a good fight. “The guy next to me said, ‘Dude you might actually have a shark.’” “My arm got tired really quickly,” Baumgartner said, adding it took around 5 minutes of battling the fish to get it to the surface. After pulling it onto the boat, onlookers admired the huge red snapper and congratulated her. Thrilled with her success, Baumgartner decided to try surf fishing off South Padre Island the next day. Her beginner’s luck didn’t hold unfortunately, but it didn’t dampen her enthusiasm for a newfound passion. “I never really thought I would be a fishing person. It was really fun!” she said.

This red snapper was Lindsey Baumgartner’s first catch on a recent trip to South Padre Island. Photo by Bobby Sanchez, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Cole sentenced Continued from page 1

the last three years. “We’re ready to put this behind us and move on,” Lehr told Lone Star Outdoor News, noting he and his wife, Dixie, planned to operate Monarch Hunting Products with integrity. Although Cole was ordered to give all of his financial account numbers and information to his probation officer, he gave only a fraction of that information and used multiple accounts to conceal assets. Records admitted during the hearing also showed that, instead of paying restitution, Cole gave tens of thousands of dollars to his daughters, paid for their

college, spent thousands on vacations, and took out over $40,000 in cash. Cole is also on deferred adjudication in Tarrant County for misapplication of fiduciary property of $100,000 to $200,000. In that offense, he embezzled money intended to build a home in Fort Worth. Two other victims from 2002 and 2008 testified that Cole embezzled from them related to construction projects, with amounts totaling over a million dollars. Judge Towson revoked Cole’s probation and sentenced him to 50 years in prison.


Page 20

August 9, 2019

LoneOStar Outdoor News

DALL AS SAFARI CLUB with SPORTS AFIELD presents

JANUARY 9-12, 2020

DSC CONVENTION & SPORTING EXPO I Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

For more info call Toll Free 1-800-9GO-HUNT (800-946-4868) Email: info@biggame.org

www.biggame.org

LSONews.com

Profile for Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News 080919  

Lone Star Outdoor News 080919  

Advertisement