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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

February 9, 2018

Volume 14, Issue 12

Dunking cellphones

Crappie in rivers, sandies on the way

Crappie are being caught in East Texas rivers, and some white bass are beginning to make the run. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Lone Star Outdoor News The crappie have moved into East Texas rivers, and based on reports from anglers, the traditional white bass run won’t be far behind. Guide Seth Vanover has been finding crappie on the Sabine River between Marshall and Carthage. “If you find the eddies, you’ll find the crappie,” he said. Vanover said some white bass, mostly males, also are being caught. Bruce Nguyen fished the Sabine on Feb. 3 and landed 25 whites on a white and chartreuse Roadrunner, slow-rolled on the bottom. On the Angelina River, there have been multiple reports of crappie limits from the upper reaches of the river, and some male white bass are being landed as well. Three factors influence the white bass run: the day length, water temperature and river flow, with river flow thought to be the most important for a good spawn,

Saltwater guides often take photos of customers, like this photo of Jimmy Burns of Waterloo Rods, and their fish, either on the boat or while wade-fishing. Many have to replace cellphones after they fall into the water, or just get wet. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Guides deal with occupational hazard By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News Capt. Ruben Garza Jr. chalks it up as an occupational hazard of being a fishing guide. The danger is more to his wallet than his hide, though.

Losing a cellphone comes with the territory, said Garza, owner of Snookdude Fishing Charters in Port Mansfield. How many has he lost? “I’ll put to you this way,” Garza said. “It happened so much that Sprint canceled my insurance. In one stretch, I lost four in a month, two in a week. It happens.”

Asked how it happens, Garza gave an example. “Twice, I had put them in my pocket and started wading,” he said. “Then I realized, ‘Damn, my phone’s in my shorts pocket.’ I’ve only lost one to the water. All the other times, it’s been in my pocket or some other dumb thing.” If you’re wondering, Garza

once tried to revive a phone by putting it in a container of rice. “It did OK, but it wasn’t the same,” he said. “It only lasted a month more. The functions weren’t all there.” Capt. Trey Pyre’s phone bought it recently during a rainstorm. “I have the iPhone 7,” said Pyre, with Caney Creek Outfitters in Sargent. “They say it’s water-re-

Please turn to page 9

Please turn to page 17

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Proposed changes to hunting regs Expanded whitetail season, mule deer antler restrictions among possible changes Lone Star Outdoor News North Zone deer hunters may get two more weeks

Wildlife Commission meeting, held Jan. 25, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department proposed a uniform statewide season “to simplify regulations while allowing time in the northern two-thirds of the state to conduct additional beneficial harvest.” TPWD officials asserted the change to season length would not result in negative

Potential changes to hunting regulations may extend the North Zone deer season by two weeks and may impose antler restrictions for mule deer in some counties. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Please turn to page 7 Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10

HUNTING

FISHING

Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12

Tapeworms in hogs? (P. 4)

Setting records (P. 8)

Officials stem frenzy.

Woman sets two fly records in Alaska.

Getting involved (P. 4)

Find mullet, find trout (P. 8)

Woman bags first buck with LSONF.

Slow retrieve key to good fish.

Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 16 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 19 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 22

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

By Craig Nyhus

added to the general season. Texas has been divided into two zones for deer hunting, and, since 2001, the opening date has been the first Saturday in November. In the North Zone, the closing date has been the first Sunday in January, while the South Zone remained open until the third Sunday. At the Texas Parks and


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February 9, 2018

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February 9, 2018

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February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HUNTING

New Texan bags first buck Woman’s first hunt with Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News A move to Texas from out of state can be daunting, especially when one is looking to hunt. For Kelsy Beauchman, though, the move was no impediment to her desire to hunt deer. The 25-year-old Colorado State University graduate moved to Texas in June, and immediately immersed herself in the Texas outdoor culture. Her family hunts, but mostly in the mountains of Colorado where she grew up. A physical condition makes it difficult for her to hike at altitude, so she had no experience hunting big game. She has been on a pheasant hunt in North Dakota, where her family owns property, and a goose hunt in Oklahoma. Once in Dallas, Kelsy met friends who were part of the Dallas Safari Club and the Women’s Sporting Club, a Dallas-based group of young women interested

Kelsy Beauchman’s first deer hunt was a success, after three days of trying. The new hunter recently moved to Texas and got involved with conservation groups, and was invited on the hunt by the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

in hunting and shooting. In October, the first outdoor-related event she attended was the Lone Star Outdoor News Wild Game Supper, where she met the people from the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. “I put in my application and it went from there,” she said. When she got the call to go on her first deer hunt, she jumped at the chance. “I was so excited, I called my

dad,” she said. Arriving at the Stonewall County ranch on a Wednesday afternoon, she quickly was out looking for deer. “We saw one young buck and a few does,” she said. The deer movement was even less on Thursday and Friday morning. “We saw two bucks in the morning before it was light enough, and nothing in the afternoon,”

she said. “Friday morning, we went to a few blinds, but nothing. The guys kept telling me, ‘We promise we have deer.’” The lack of deer sightings didn’t phase the new hunter. “I knew it was all about learning and about the experience,” Kelsy said. “I was learning so much, asking tons of questions and really enjoying it. I had accepted that I may not get a shot at a deer.” Things changed Friday evening.

“I was out with David Sweet as my guide,” Kelsy said. “The feeder went off at 4:40, and at about 5:50, he said there was a deer on the far right.” Kelsy was sitting on the right side of the blind. “I moved over in front of him, but it was awkward for me as a right-handed shooter.” She improvised. “I asked him, ‘Can I sit on your lap?’ but he was focused on the Please turn to page 7

Tapeworms in wild hogs? Report sets off social media frenzy

Scouting the key for public land hunter By Robert Sloan

Lone Star Outdoor News

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Social media was abuzz after a report of a green substance embedded in the fat of a few wild hogs in East Texas. According to posts on the Gregg County AgriLife Extension Service’s Facebook page, an agent was contacted with questions about hogs that had been processed and the fat of A possible finding of the bobcat tapeworm in an East Texas feral the meat had green specs em- hog shouldn’t cause serious concern to hunters, officials say. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News. bedded in the fat. The agent initially thought and concerns prompted the Extension Serthe caller was seeing a blue color, thinking vice to post additional information to set the hog may have ingested Warfarin, but the matter straight. the caller said it was bright, John Deere “The finding of Spirometra mansonide green. in East Texas should not be of a serious The post suggested that after photoconcern because the parasite is endemic graphs confirmed the color, the photos to the region and can be found in both were shared with veterinarians from the wild and domestic populations of cats and Extension Service and Texas A&M College other intermediate and terminal hosts,” of Veterinary Medicine, and that Dr. Tom the Service said. “As with other parasites Craig of A&M believed the green substance in East Texas, this particular one should be was the larva of Spirometra mansonoide, something in which to be aware but not commonly named bobcat tapeworm. to keep you up at night. Though the bobThe tapeworm, in its larval stage, can cat tapeworm can, in extremely rare cases, infect humans, and has been found in doresult in human health concerns does not mesticated cats in East Texas. justify fear; merely the need to be aware. The multiple comments indicating fear Parasites are common in animal and fish Please turn to page 6

We’ve all heard the tales of people of heading out to deer hunt on the public lands scattered across Texas. A lot of those experiences center on seeing few if any deer or pigs. But one man seems to have it figured out, and has made some very impressive kills on public hunting lands and drawn hunts from one end of Texas to the other. Luke Dotson is 33 years old, and has been hunting 23 years with bow and gun. “I learned a long time ago that we have thousands of acres of land available in Texas for hunting just about any animal you want to harvest,” Dotson said. “That got my interest and I started looking at what the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had to offer. Doing a little research goes a long way when you are hunting on public lands. A lot of that info is on the Internet. You just have to find it, especially the reviews from people that have made the hunts. Word of mouth information is very good.” Last November, Dotson was drawn to gun hunt on the Matador Wildlife Management Area that covers over 28,000 acres, and is located 125 miles north of Abilene. He had applied for that hunt for

Luke Dotson has hunted public lands for years, and, after scouting, took this buck at the Matador Wildlife Management Area. Photo from Luke Dotson.

eight years. Before the hunt he did some research. “The first thing I did was call the WMA and ask them if I could get there early and do some scouting,” said Dotson, who lives in Lampasas with his wife and Please turn to page 21


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Quail samples sought for eyeworm testing

February 9, 2018

Page 5

FARM AND RANCH REAL ESTATE SINCE 1946 LIVERMORE RANCH | FT. DAVIS, TEXAS

Livermore Ranch is one of the last great places in Texas—a ranch that is intrinsically valuable, with unique geographic features and wildlife resources. In the heart of the Davis Mountains, encompassing Brooks Mountain and alpine topography, hunters enjoy quality populations of mule deer, elk, aoudad, mountain lions, turkeys, and javelinas. The ranch features exceptional improvements for both friends and family, including a six-bedroom five-and-one-half-bath adobe brick-styled home. $17,500,000

MOON RIVER RANCH | CHILTON, TEXAS

Moon River Ranch lies 16 miles south of Waco and along the banks of the grandest river in Texas—the rolling hills, fertile farmlands, and tree-shaded valleys of the middle Brazos River basin. Moon River is both grand and quaint, rustic and refined. The property currently hosts executive retreats, corporate events, weddings, private parties, and family reunions. The venue can accommodate an overnight group of approximately 90 people and many more during the day. Almost 500 acres of pastures and pecan groves along the miles of Brazos River frontage offer the most desirable traits of any Central Texas ranch. $5,600,000

POKEY CAMP RANCH | GROESBECK, TEXAS

Researchers are seeking more quail specimens to examine for eyeworms, considered to be a possible cause of quail declines in West Texas. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Researchers are asking for help from quail hunters across West Texas during the last few weeks of the quail season. The Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch is soliciting quail heads/specimens to screen them for eyeworms and cecal worms. The researchers believe the eyeworm has reached epidemic status over this past season, at least across much of the Rolling Plains. By screening quail across the state, they hope to learn just how widespread the problem is. Go to quailresearch.org to see the protocol and data sheet for handling/free shipping specimens. The ranch hopes to receive up to 2,000 specimens. Individual results will be made available to the donors by June. —RPQRR

Pokey Camp Ranch consists of 1,581± acres of rolling, wooded ranchland between Thornton and Old Union, west of Lake Limestone. Duck hunt in the morning, feed your cows a few cubes at lunch, then go to the deer stand in the evening. Great roads, miles of trails and ROW’s, fenced and cross fenced. Modest functional cabin, abundant lakes and ponds, duck, deer and hog hunting. With over 120 feet of elevation change, this ranch offers diverse beauty and serene habitat, diverse soils, and endless groves to explore. It can truly be considered a hunter’s paradise to get lost in. $2,805,000

CONTACT TYLER JACOBS

Office: (979) 690-9933 Mobile: (936) 537-1749 tjacobs@hallandhall.com

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February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Denton County man poached giant whitetail A Denton County man pleaded no contest to illegally taking the trophy deer, which scored 278 points under the Boone & Crockett scoring system, last October near Pilot Point. Travis D. Johnson of Aubrey, was sentenced in Denton County Criminal Court on Monday, Jan. 22, to two years of probation and 40 hours community service, plus court costs. He also faces in excess of $53,000 in civil restitution fines and is prohibited from purchasing a hunting license for the duration of his deferred adjudication period. Almost immediately after news of the huge buck broke on Oct. 8, 2017, Texas game wardens became aware of rumors alleging Johnson may have harvested the buck after legal hunting hours the night before. Based on a photo being circulated online that showed Johnson posing with the fielddressed deer during daylight hours, along with comments that he had taken it with a bow the previous evening, wardens had concerns about the care and disposition of the venison considering the warm temperatures. Denton County Game Warden Stormy McCuistion met with Johnson at his residence the afternoon of Oct. 8 to inspect the carcass, and was informed it had been discarded at a different location due to concerns about the meat possibly being infected. Johnson claimed to have wounded the buck on Sept. 30, but was unable to retrieve it. When he saw the deer on images captured by his game trail camera a few days later, it exhibited entry and exit wounds. After that, Johnson explained, he began pursuing the animal in earnest in

This record-setting buck was taken last fall in Denton County. Unfortunately, game wardens discovered it was poached, and the culprit faces fines exceeding $53,000 and a license suspension. Photo from TPWD.

hopes of putting an end to its suffering, going so far as to spend the night in his hunting stand to avoid spooking deer. He said he got his opportunity at about 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 and dispatched the buck with his bow. After inspecting the deer carcass, game wardens went to the area where Johnson claimed to have killed the big deer to confirm the details of his story. During a conversation with the landowner adjacent to the property where Johnson hunted, game wardens became suspicious about the timeline. The landowner recalled texting Johnson at about an hour past dark on Oct. 7 asking if he was okay since he noticed he had not returned to his vehicle. Johnson replied that he was safe, but made no mention of having successfully taken the big buck an hour earlier. —TPWD

Hog concerns Continued from page 4

species commonly consumed for table food.” The Service continued that the key to removing any level of concern is implementing proper observation and food handling and preparation techniques. If an abnormality is observed and there is doubt as to the safety of the meat, they recommend it be discarded.

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February 9, 2018

Page 7

Changes proposed to hunting rules Continued from page 1

population impacts. Officials said most deer hunters were in favor of the proposed change. Quail hunters, though, may be impacted. Many quail leases begin when the general season for whitetailed deer ends. “I anticipate we’ll get some feedback on that,” said TPWD Quail Program Leader Robert Perez. “That may be an issue for some folks.” Mule deer antler restrictions Counties in the southeastern Panhandle have problems with their mule deer herd, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department believes antler restrictions may be required to bring the herd back to health. The change was among several proposals at the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission meeting in January.

“The mule deer herd in the area is in rough shape,” said Shawn Gray, TPWD’s mule deer program director. Grays said the area has only a few bucks older than 3 years and a skewed doe-to-buck ratio of about 6 to 1. In this area, the bag limit for buck deer is one. Department data indicate an undesirably excessive harvest of bucks. TPWD proposed antler restrictions for Briscoe, Childress, Cottle, Floyd, Hall and Motley counties, beginning in 2018. The legal mule deer buck would need to have an outside spread of 20 inches or more. “The average distance between the tips of a mule deer’s ears is 21 inches,” Gray said. Since too many younger bucks have been harvested, the change arguably would help boost deer

maturity and increase the overall age class of bucks. The proposed antler-restriction rule would not apply on properties enrolled in the Managed Lands Deer Program. TPWD also proposed opening a nine-day general mule deer season in Lynn County (no archery season). Most of Lynn County consists of large-scale farming and grazing operations, but the department’s survey data indicate mule deer populations sufficient to sustain hunting pressure in areas where suitable mule deer habitat exists. Air guns and air bows for big game TPWD proposed the legalization of air guns and air bows for taking alligators, big game and nonmigratory birds. In response to a petition for rule-

making and field demonstrations, the department determined that air guns of .30 caliber or larger and air bows are capable of reliably killing alligators, big game species (deer, pronghorn, desert bighorn sheep, javelina), and turkey and therefore should be lawful means of take for those species. Both the air rifles and air bows would have to be powered by an external charge source. The air bows would not be legal for use during archery-only seasons. Eastern turkey to close in two counties Eastern turkey season would close in San Augustine and Upshur counties under the current proposals. Additionally, the eastern turkey season would be shortened by seven days while maintaining the current May 14 closing date. The

proposed amendment is based on department harvest and population data and is intended to protect hens from accidental or illegal harvest during incubation and to provide additional time for mating success. Possession limit changes The proposed amendments expand the possession limit of squirrel, pheasant and chachalaca to three times the daily bag limit. Public comment The proposed changes will be opened for public comment. The Commission is expected to decide on the proposals at its March 22 meeting. Changes approved would take effect Sept. 1. Comments may be submitted at http://www.tpwd.texas.gov/business/feedback/public_comment/.

First buck Continued from page 4

The Best

Ever Made Te xas Hunte r

P ROT EI N FEED ERS

Kelsy Beauchman was excited to shoot her first deer with Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

deer and didn’t hear me. I’m real small, so I just went ahead and sat on his lap and shot the buck. It was such an incredible feeling — I was shaking.” After checking on the buck, her guide left to get the truck and Kelsy had time alone with her deer, and made another call to her dad. “He asked if shooting the deer bothered me,” she said. “I said it wasn’t a remorseful type of feeling, it was more a feeling of respect for the animal that would provide for me the rest of the year.” Back at the camp, David Sams jokingly asked if she wanted to gut the deer. “I said sure,” Kelsy said. “After I received some instructions and finished, he said, ‘Tell your dad we’re proud of you.’” That evening, Sweet cooked one of the backstraps. “It was field-to-table in just a few hours,” Kelsy said. “That was really cool.” Since Kelsy’s move to Dallas, she’s planning to do more events with the Women’s Sporting Club and getting more involved in the outdoors. And she started her new job at the Scottish Rite Hospital for Children on Feb. 5. “It’s been incredible since I moved here; things are just falling into place,” she said. The deer hunt, though, tops the list. “It was such an awesome experience,” she said. “It got me hooked — I’m so excited for next season.” “Next, I really want to try to get a turkey.”

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February 9, 2018

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FISHING

Fishing for records Texas woman sets two fly-fishing marks in Alaska By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Julia Bell landed this 3-pound, 4-ounce pink salmon on a 4-pound test tippet while fly-fishing in Alaska, an IGFA record. Photo from Julia Bell.

Julia Bell recently hit a plateau that she had been aiming at for years — setting an IGFA fly-fishing record. On a

trip to Alaska she managed to set two records. Getting there wasn’t an easy task, since she was trying to set class tippet records with 2- and 4-pound test line. Now 51, Bell got into the world of fly-fishing when she was 29 and had just beat breast cancer. While recovering from that ordeal, her dad gave her his dad’s bam-

boo fly rod. Since that time, she and her husband, Cody Bell III, who live in the Dallas area, have traveled around the world catching all sorts of fish, big and small, with nothing but flies. Some of their fly-fishing destinations have included Russia, Africa, Belize and Cuba. And along the way they have fly-fished everything

from tarpon and bonefish to bass and rainbow trout. “I don’t just like to fish, I like to experiment with fishing,” Bell says. “I also thoroughly love a challenge, so I did some IGFA record research prior to our trip to Unalakleet, in the northwestern bush of Alaska. I left the Unalakleet with four potential records, three of which were Please turn to page 13

Cold-water trout bite By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News February for the coastal angler is similar to the rut for the Texas deer hunter. The month triggers as mass move of wade-fishermen to the coast with one thing on their minds — catching trout. Many are small, but there is the opportunity to catch a bona fide wall hanger one any given cast. As of the first week of February, water temperatures on the upper Texas coast were in the lower 50s, at Matagorda Bay they were 58 and on Baffin Bay they were 59. “A good rule of thumb is to wait until about 10 a.m. to head out on the water,” said Galveston Bay guide Jim West. “As the sun warms things up, trout will begin to feed. And they will be in the hunt for mullet.” West says that one of the best cold-water wades you can make on East Galveston Bay is along the north shoreline. That’s where you have drive up access via the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge. “During all of February, I’ll be fishing slow-sinking mullet imitation lures,” West said. “One of the best is a Corky Fat Boy. But I’ll also be using the Mirrolure sinking twitch baits. Right now the 52M series is one of my favorite lures. My best colors have been pink/silver, red/ white/silver and green/silver/white. The main thing is to fish this lure a couple of feet off bottom with a very slow retrieve.” West said the coves along West Galveston Bay are very good winter fishing areas. He likes to wade

about chest deep in a mix of mud and shell. “Regardless of where you fish always look for mullet,” advised West. “That’s where winter trout will be feeding.” The middle Texas coast is where guide Dwayne Lowrey has been sticking some good trout. He fishes the south shoreline of San Antonio Bay quite a bit. “We were catching some very good trout on Pringle Lake, but the freeze basically shut that fishing down,” he said. “Now I’m fishing the shoreline south of Pringle. I’m mostly using Corkys and Assassins. I really like fishing the Assassins because I can cover more water.” Lowrey prefers the 5-inch Turbo Shad Assassins on either a 1/8- or 1/4-ounce jig head. “The 1/8-ounce is best early,” he said. “In the afternoon, I’ll switch over to a 1/4-ounce head for little faster fall. I’m not working them real fast. I’m getting the most bites while fishing them a foot or two off bottom. My top two color combinations are plum/chartreuse and red/ shad.” Lowrey also uses custom-painted Corkys. In the Fat Boy line, his best color patterns include the Pearl Harbor and Toxic Tide. Another of his favorites is the Soft Dine XL gringo. February fishing can be good wading for big speckled trout. Anglers slow their presentation and often have success later in the day. Photo by Robert Sloan, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Snapper fishing program to test state management By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

States may be able to manage red snapper populations after a temporary plan was approved by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Texas may be allowed to manage red snapper recreational fishing in federal waters after all. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management voted to approve Exempted Fishing Permits for each of the five Gulf states, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. The determination would allow the states to manage recreational fishing for red snapper. The EFPs, which cover the 2018 and 2019 fishing years, will allow recreationally caught red snapper to be

landed within certain time periods determined by the respective states. Red snapper landings would be monitored by the states, and the respective state seasons would close when a state’s quota is caught (or projected to be caught). These studies are intended to demonstrate the effectiveness of state management of recreationally caught red snapper. The Coastal Conservation Association in Texas and the American Sportfishing Association support the change. “We’re in favor of the EFPs,” said CCA Texas Advocacy Director Shane Bon-

not. “It’s a path toward state management. Our state has proven it can manage our own fisheries — why not let Texas manage red snapper?” CCA Texas touted its iSnapper reporting App as an example of how anglers can report red snapper catches. “We are thankful for the Gulf Council’s vote to allow the states to test red snapper management,” said Mike Leonard, ASA’s conservation director. “Each of the Gulf states are to be commended for putting forward well-thought-out proposals that will demonstrate their ability to effectively manage recreational red snapper

fishing.” Development and approval of the Gulf states’ EFPs was facilitated by language from Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) in the FY2017 Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations bill that directed National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)Fisheries to develop the fishery management pilot program allowing states to manage Gulf red snapper. With the Gulf Council’s approval, (NOAA) is required to publish the plans and allow for a 30-day comment period. NOAA must then ratify each plan before implementation begins.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

River crappie, sandies

February 9, 2018

Page 9

MADE IN USA

Continued from page 1

leaving anglers hoping for rain to bring up low river levels in much of the state. When water temperatures reach the upper 50s to low 60s, the fishing success increases. Anglers on the Colorado River above Lake Buchanan usually find the run begins in March, and North Texas rivers find a similar pattern. On East Texas rivers, though, the run starts earlier. Jane Gallenbach, a Sabine River guide, reported she started landing males at the end of January. On the Neches River above Lake Palestine, a few fish are showing up, but cold weather had dropped water temperatures, leaving the bulk of the run likely a few weeks away. A few limits have been reported on the Trinity River above Lake Livingston. The first sign of the white bass run usually comes from the Nueces River near George West.

New reservoir moving forward Lone Star Outdoor News With engagement and partnership from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a reservoir located in Fannin County to provide a drinking water source for North Texas is moving closer to reality. The Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir project, as proposed by the North Texas Municipal Water District, will create a water supply reservoir to provide drinking water to cities north and east of Dallas. “EPA worked extensively with partner agencies to make the vision for the Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir a reality,” said Regional Administrator Anne Idsal. EPA worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other stakeholders over several years to address issues with the proposed project, which will impact more than 6,000 acres of wetlands and more than 120 miles of streams. Through this engagement, the North Texas Municipal Water District increased mitigation measures to offset environmental impacts of the project. This mitigation plan outlines efforts to restore and enhance wetlands and streams at sites close to the project area. Total mitigation efforts will provide compensation with 9,131 wetlands acres and 74.3 miles of streams. Not all county residents are excited about the new reservoir. Russell Graves grew up along Bois d’Arc Creek, and created a 31-minute film called Bois d’Arc Goodbye. The film shows both the creek and the people who live and work around it. The film may be viewed at vimeo.com/13195858.

Proposed Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir Lake surface area: 16,641 acres Storage capacity: 367,609 acre-feet Yield: Up to 108 million gallons per day

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Page 10

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained upriver; 5257 degrees; 5.76’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live and cut bait. AMISTAD: Water murky; 6064 degrees; 23.22’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits, jerkbaits and soft plastics in 9-15 feet. Striped bass are good on slabs, spoons and jigs. White bass are good on slabs, spoons and jigs. Catfish are good on shrimp, chicken livers, nightcrawlers and cheese bait. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 51-59 degrees; 2.55’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow to fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 44-48 degrees; 0.23’ high. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, spinner baits and football jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 54-58 degrees; 0.78’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs and lipless crankbaits. Sunfish are fair on cut nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. BASTROP: Water stained; 5862 degrees. Black bass are good on blue/white soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows and frozen shrimp. BELTON: Water stained; 57-61 degrees; 3.29’ low. Black bass are fair on perch-colored lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. BENBROOK: Water stained; 42-46 degrees; 1.94’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 45-48 degrees; 0.07’ low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BONHAM: Water stained; 42-45 degrees; 1.11’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, suspending jerkbaits and Carolina-rigged worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair along creek channel with cut shad. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are good on spinner baits and dark soft plastic worms in the reeds. Striped bass are good on liver and shad. Redfish are fair on perch, shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are good on perch and shad. BRIDGEPORT: Water clear, 4246 degrees: 4.70’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 56-60 degrees; 3.52’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse/black crankbaits and watermelon soft plastic worms over brush piles. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on jigs. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on stink

bait and shrimp. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 57-61 degrees; 4.55’ low. Black bass are good on Texasrigged watermelon worms and blue-backed crankbaits along points in 10-25 feet. Striped bass are good drifting live shad. White bass are fair jigging small lipless crankbaits and blade baits along main lake points. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CADDO: Water stained; 45-48 degrees; 0.69’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms and crankbaits around reed beds. Striped bass are good on lipless crankbaits near the dam. Redfish are slow. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp and nightcrawlers. Blue catfish are fair on liver and nightcrawlers. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 59-63 degrees; 3.71’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon red creature baits and tubes on jigheads in 10-20 feet along bluffs. Striped bass are fair jigging minnow lures. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 43-46 degrees; 2.05’ low. Black bass are fair on suspending jerkbaits, shaky-head worms and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 59-63 degrees; 24.76’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastic worms in heavy grass in 12-20 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on punch bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 5559 degrees; 2.63’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 88 degrees at the hot water discharge, 60 degrees in main lake; 1.19’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows in 10-18 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with liver. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch. CONROE: Water stained; 56-60 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastics, crankbaits and lipless crankbaits in 15-25 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. COOPER: Water stained; 5459 degrees; 1.71’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, spinner baits and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are slow. Hybrid striper and white bass are fair on slabs.

CORPUS CHRISTI LAKE: Water off-color; 58-63 degrees; 0.88’ low. Black bass are fair to good on lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and shaky heads. White bass are fair on tail spinners. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are good on live shad. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 42-45 degrees; 1.98 low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, suspending jerkbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FAIRFIELD: Water fairly clear. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, shallow crankbaits and black and blue jigs. No report on other species. FALCON: Water murky; 59-63 degrees; 17.60’ low. Black bass are fair on large worms with light weights in 14-20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp and stink bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics and spinner baits. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver and shrimp. FORK: Water stained; 44-47 degrees; 1.18’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, suspending jerkbaits and black and blue flipping jigs near timber along channel swings. White and yellow bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows along bridges. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water off-color; 52-58 degrees; 2.2’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 57-61 degrees; 0.42’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails, and on lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp, stink bait and liver. GRANGER: Water stained; 5862 degrees; 0.54’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon/ white soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Blue catfish are fair on prepared stink bait. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 41-44 degrees; 0.78’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass and hybrid bass are good on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 38-45 degrees; 32.32 low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 53-57 degrees; 0.10’ high. Black bass are good on black or blue worms near the pump station. Crappie are fair

on live minnows and green tube jigs at drop-offs and around structure in 25 feet. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 54-59 degrees; 3.24’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs. No reports on crappie. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 42-46 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, suspending jerkbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 44-48 degrees: 1.01’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, lipless crankbaits and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 4347 degrees: 2.75’ low. Black bass are slow on spinner baits, shaky-head worms and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LBJ: Water stained; 57-61 degrees; 0.69’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon jigs and green/pumpkin tubes along docks and seawalls. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on silver minnow imitations. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on minnows and worms. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 41-44 degrees; 1.69’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 58-62 degrees; 0.43’ high. Black bass are fair to good on soft plastics and spinner baits early. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on juglines baited with shad. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 84-88 degrees; 2.65’ low. Black bass are good on swim jigs, square-billed crankbaits and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 44-49 degrees; 2.77’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, black and blue jigs and Texas-rigged worms. Crappie are good on jigs. Catfish are slow. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 55-59 degrees; 2.00’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 5159 degrees; 38.13’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 51-57 degrees; 10.93’ low.

Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live and cut bait. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 42-45 degrees; 0.08’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged stick worms, shaky heads and finesse jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 51-58 degrees; 1.59’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow to fair on live minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. PROCTOR: Water murky; 5761 degrees; 3.01’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shad and shrimp. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 41-45 degrees; 1.15’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 41-44 degrees; 1.47’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 41-45 degrees; 2.92’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 57-61 degrees; 2.66’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and blue/white tube jigs. Bream are fair on worms. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 58-62 degrees; 0.21’ high. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed soft plastics and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and yellow tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on bloodbait. SPENCE: 51.34’ low. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. STAMFORD: Water stained to muddy; 52-60 degrees; 0.78’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs. Crappie are slow. White bass are fair on live bait. Blue catfish are good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 57-61 degrees; 4.07’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are slow. SWEETWATER: Water offcolor; 50-58 degrees; 24.49’ low. The lake is currently experiencing a fish kill due to golden alga.

n Saltwater reports Page 11 TAWAKONI: Water stained; 43-46 degrees; 0.79’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, flipping jigs and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. TEXANA: Water stained; 5963 degrees; 2.92’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 40-44 degrees; 0.66’ low. Black bass are good on suspending jerkbaits, weightless stick worms and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 56-60 degrees; 3.99’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles. Bream are fair on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers, shrimp and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 56–60 degrees; 11.98’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits, black worms, and smoke grubs. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and chrome spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait. Yellow catfish are slow. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are good on perch-colored lipless crankbaits and soft plastics. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp and frozen shad. WEATHERFORD: Water lightly stained; 41-44 degrees; 2.44’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 44-56 degrees; 21.76’ low. Black bass are fair on soft plastics. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on cheese bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 5761 degrees; 4.60’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and liver. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained; 43-47 degrees; 3.34’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 9, 2018

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT Sponsored by

NORTH SABINE: Trout and redfish are fair while drifting mud and shell. Waders have taken better trout on the Louisiana shoreline on slow-sinking plugs. SOUTH SABINE: Redfish are fair on the edge of the channel on mullet. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on slow-sinking plugs. Black drum, sheepshead and redfish are good at Rollover Pass on fresh shrimp. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair for drifters working clam shell on Bass Assassins, Gamblers and Down South Lures. Redfish are fair at the spillway on crabs and mullet. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good on the north shoreline on Corkies and MirrOlures. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good in the mud and shell on MirrOlures and Corkies in the afternoon. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Redfish are fair in Moses Lake on shrimp and crabs. Sand trout and mangrove snapper are fair on fresh shrimp from the piers. FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs. Redfish are fair to good at San Luis pass on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp and plastics over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair to good on the

edge of the Intracoastal and the reefs on the north shoreline on shrimp. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Redfish are fair to good on the south shoreline in the guts and bayous. Trout are fair in the guts on the incoming tide on scented plastics.

PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair on Corkies, soft plastics and MirrOlures over soft mud. Trout and redfish are fair at the mouths of the back lakes on live shrimp and soft plastics. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair on the edge of the ICW on glow DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish are fair to good in the holes and channels on mullet and shrimp.

PORT ARANSAS: Sheepshead are fair to good on shrimp around the rocks at the jetty. Redfish are fair to good on the ledges of the channel on mullet. Sand trout are good on shrimp in the channel. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish and black drum are fair to good in the channels on crabs and table shrimp. Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on live shrimp, scented plastics and DOA Shrimp. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good in mud and grass on Corkies and MirrOlures. Trout are fair to good in the guts along the shoreline on Corkies, plum Bass Assassins and Down South Lures. Redfish are fair around spoils on live bait. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are fair to good on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics under a popping cork around grass holes. Trout are fair to good on mud along the edge of the ICW on Corkies and MirrOlures. SOUTH PADRE: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish, black drum and mangrove snapper are fair to good in the channel and at the jetty on shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on soft plastics and scented plastics under popping corks. Redfish are good in the holes and guts on scented plastics. —TPWD


Page 12

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER ONE BUCK TOO MANY Game wardens responded to a call about a possible case on a subject exceeding his annual bag limit on buck white-tailed deer. For the season in Brazos County, hunters are allowed only one buck with an inside antler spread of 13 inches or greater. The wardens went to the subject’s residence and during the interview discovered he had harvested an 8-point buck earlier in the week, and a big 10-point buck that evening. Citation was issued for exceeding the bag limit on white-tailed deer and multiple tagging warnings were given. Civil restitution is pending. PRISON PROPERTY A PRIME LOCATION FOR POACHERS On prison grounds belonging to the Luther Unit of the Texas Department of Corrections, game wardens acted on reports of night hunting by trespassers and initiated a stakeout. They observed a vehicle shining a spotlight out of the passenger’s window. The wardens watched the vehicle for about 15 minutes and then initiated a stop. Five individuals were in the vehicle, along with two loaded rifles and two spotlights. The guns and the spotlights were seized and the driver and passenger were placed under arrest for hunting without landowner consent. The other three passengers were released without incident. The cases are pending. HUNTING WEEKENDS TO BE SPENT AT THE JAIL A district court judge in Grayson County ordered a man convicted of

NOW, THIS IS A BAD DAY A game warden received a call regarding a vehicle being towed down a county road with a mule deer buck in the bed of the pickup. Since the mule deer season in this region had been over for weeks, the warden headed to the last known location seen by the reporting party. After arriving in the area, he located a truck behind a residence that appeared to have sustained significant front-end damage. While investigating the buck, the driver of the vehicle walked into the backyard, and was surprised to see

poaching a big white-tailed buck to spend every weekend of hunting season in jail for the next five years. In addition to five years of probation, and over $18,000 in civil restitution penalty, John Walker Drinnon must report to the Grayson County Jail each weekend of deer season starting Dec. 30 for the full term of his deferred judgment period. The 34-year-old is also prohibited from purchasing a hunting license while on probation. Drinnon admitted to killing a 19-point buck with a gross Boone & Crockett score of 202 inches with a rifle (in an archery-only county) while trespassing on private property; a state jail felony. BIG TALKER IMPLICATES HIMSELF Trinity County game wardens responded to a tip about possible deer hunting violations in the Davey Crockett National Forest. While scouting, a hunter heard two shots

a game warden standing at the back of his vehicle. It was determined the man had been involved in an accident with the deer earlier while driving on a nearby highway. The warden asked the man if he reported the accident and the driver informed him that he did not due to his license being suspended. The warden addressed the license issue, then cited the man for possession of an illegally taken resource.

close to his area, and located the carcass of a buck that didn’t meet the 13-inch minimum antler spread requirements. The deer had been shot twice, once in the back and again in the neck. The hunter also found a spent .308 cartridge casing nearby. The wardens were able to locate a brushed blind and multiple fresh boot tracks nearby along the Neches River bank, as well as boat skid marks. The wardens knew several hunters using boats to hunt this area, and decided to conduct a routine check of the camps. A man at one of the camps told the wardens he had seen an 8-point buck earlier in the day that was illegal and shortly thereafter heard two shots close by. He also told them he shoots a .308 with Remington Core-Lokt ammo. One investigator was curious what Core-Lokt ammo looked like, so the man brought out a box and it matched the spent cartridge recovered near the dead

deer. After a brief interview, the warden advised the man of the evidence they had found, including the .308 brass, boot track pictures, and boat marks on the river, not to mention the fact he was in the area that morning. The subject then admitted to shooting the illegal buck. Multiple cases are pending for illegal buck less than 13-inch inside spread, untagged deer, waste of game/failure to keep in edible condition and multiple warnings.

IN AND OUT OF THE WOODS Trinity County game wardens found a van parked at the end of a county road. The wardens noticed a man coming down a trail toward the van, who then disappear after spotting them. The wardens ran down the trail, but before they could reach the man, he emerged back onto the trail. The wardens made contact and asked the man why he ran into the woods out of sight. The hunter said he was walking around a washout. While one warden checked the man’s guns and hunting license, the other warden started walking down the trail where the hunter had emerged. At that point, the hunter admitted to shooting a doe and hiding the meat in a backpack he ditched near the trail after seeing the wardens. The hunter produced an active military hunting license, although he was not currently nor had he ever served in the military. The hunter had also used a tag on another deer he had taken earlier in the season. Multiple cases were filed with civil restitution.

RIFLE NOT FOR DUCK HUNTING While patrolling Limestone County, a game warden heard several shots coming from a nearby tract of land. The warden located an individual who was using his .30-30 rifle to shoot at ducks as they flew past. The subject did not possess a hunting license. He was given a lesson on bullet trajectory and firearm safety, in addition to citations.

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H – Calf: Educational Introduction & Kickoff

Pen Design and Handling Techniques to Minimize Herd Stress

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Chemical Application to Benefit Grazing and Wildlife

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Identifying Predators on your Urban or Rural Land (With Live Animals)

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Background and Implementation of Prescribed Burns

Brush Management and Considerations for Follow-up

Implements on the Ranch

Grazing Rotation for Maximum Cattle and Wildlife Benefit

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Managing for a Healthy Deer Herd

Wild Game Preparation: White-tailed Deer

THURSDAY, FEB. 29 •

Learning Your Herps: Common Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas (With Live Animals)

Managing Oil & Gas Production with Wildlife in Mind

Estate Planning

Profiting on your Land from Wildlife

2017 Legislative Update

Ranch Financing Update and 2017 Texas Rural Lands Markets Report

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LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 9, 2018

Page 13

Setting records Continued from page 8

vacant and breaking a previously set pink salmon record. Unfortunately, I could only submit three of the four applications, because the picture showing the weight of one of the fish was too blurry to interpret.” Bell’s records were in the light class tippet — 2- and 4-pound test. “I thought the Coho salmon on 2-pound test would be the most difficult to set,” she said. “We fished out of the Unalakleet River Lodge and were about two miles upstream from the lodge fishing the confluence of a creek with the river. Our target fish were pink salmon, but a silver salmon wanted that pink and white Clouser more. Darting between a cluster of hens, the silver ate the Clouser, and then proceeded to jump like a tarpon. When he neared the boat, he just stopped swimming for a couple of seconds, which gave the guide the right opportunity to net him, and the paperwork began.” That fish weighed 3 pounds, 8 ounces. “The pink salmon was caught under ut-

terly different conditions,” Bell said. “We were fishing from shore on an incredibly cold, windy and rainy day. We had targeted pink salmon all week, and getting the fish to bite was not a problem; playing them on the light tippet was. I caught some hens that weighed in the 2 1/2-pound range, but we wanted the males due to their dorsal hump and weight.” Bell ended up hooking and landing a record-setting 3-pound, 4-ounce pink salmon on 4-pound test tippet with a pink bead salmon fly. So where does she like to fish here in Texas? “Lake Amistad is great because it’s clear and fly-fishing friendly,” Bell said. “We can catch largemouth, smallmouth and white bass, along with lots of perch. Another favorite is Springfield Lake that covers about 5 acres. I can fish from my float tube there and catch rainbow trout during the winter and bass, along with huge perch during the warm water months.”

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Man dies in boating incident One man was killed after two fishing boats collided Jan. 23 on Lake Austin, near the Loop 360 (Pennybacker) bridge. The man was identified as 40-year-old Mark Anthony Cerrillo. His body was found three days after the crash. A 50-year-old man also involved in the crash was rushed to the hospital where doctors amputated his arm and leg. A third person had minor injuries and was treated at the scene. —Staff report

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Page 14

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HEROES

Gage McNelis took advantage of a safari purchased at the 2017 DSC convention with Schoenfeld Safaris and took this kudu with a .253 from 150 yards, his first big game animal.

Caroline Burkett, 17, of Floresville, saw this old deer one evening and it returned the next morning and finally came out of the tree line.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

In Goliad County, Abby Stegeman, 13, of Katy, shot this 10-point buck during the youth-only season, hunting with her father, Chris. It was her first whitetail.

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Morgan Williams 11, of Lavernia, harvested her first whitetail buck while hunting on the family ranch in Atascosa County. She used a .243 to make the 100yard shot.

Alex Acevedo, of Edinburg, landed this redfish while fishing in Port Mansfield with Capt. J.R. Rodriguez.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 9, 2018

Page 15

Central Texas lakes get new fish habitat With the help of local volunteers and financial support from the Brazos River Authority, several projects to improve fish habitat and provide better fishing opportunities were completed at Aquilla Lake, Lake Georgetown and Granger Lake. The projects included sinking a variety of artificial structures made of recycled plastics and transplanting native aquatic plants to supplement or replace diminishing natural habitat at these popular fishing destinations. “All of the reservoirs in Texas are aging, and as a result their habitat is degrading over time,” said Brian Van Zee, TPWD Inland Fisheries regional rirector. “These habitat projects not only serve to provide habitat for fish but they also help improve fishing opportunities in these reservoirs.” On Aquilla Lake, near Waco, fisheries biologists transplanted 240 native water willow plants and established three new plant colonies at the lake. Biologists also established four artificial reefs by sinking 160 Fishiding Stakeout structures in locations selected to provide easy access for anglers. Heavy sedimentation in the lake negatively impacts habitat availability, and the new structures are expected to help improve catch rates and provide habitat for many species in the lake. At Lake Georgetown, fisheries biologists and volunteers from the Sun City Hunting and Fishing Club restored 30 existing brushpile habitat sites by constructing and sinking 120 long-lasting Mossback artificial structures consisting of 60 Trophy Tree units and 60 Root Wad units. The GPS-marked habitat

sites aim to improve cover and catch rates of largemouth bass, the most sought-after sport fish species in the lake. “Brushpiles offer excellent habitat for largemouth bass in Lake Georgetown, but their longevity is limited to a few years before they decompose and lose their effectiveness,” said Marcos De Jesus, TPWD Inland Fisheries district supervisor for San MarcosAustin. “By supplementing these sites with a network of artificial structures, we can provide more long-term habitat suitable for largemouth bass and ultimately provide a better fishing experience for anglers.” At Granger Lake, fisheries biologists, a local fishing guide and volunteers from the local Boy Scouts of America troop sunk 168 Fishiding Stakeout structures at 10 sites ideally suited for crappie. A prospective Eagle Scout led the troop to construct and assemble the units ahead of time as part of a required team project. “Granger Lake has become a staple destination for crappie fishing in central Texas, but for much of the year they tend to school in open water,” De Jesus said. “Crappie are drawn to vertical cover so this network of habitat structures and attractors should greatly improve the catch success for anglers in the reservoir.” These projects were completed with funding from the BRA as part of a multi-year, $75,000 effort to improve all 11 BRA System reservoirs in the basin through 2020.

®

600# STAND & FILL BROADCAST FEEDER WITH CORN SHIELD

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—TPWD

Central Region opener for Bass Champs

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Gary Weimer, of Leander, and Jeremiah Wafford, of Cedar Park, won the Bass Champs Central Region opening tournament on Lake Travis with 27.56 pounds, winning $20,000. “We had about 15 spots targeted,” Weimer said. The team targeted boat docks near deep water with jigs, and their first cast netted an 8.41-pounder. Two casts later, they caught 7-pounder. They wrapped up a limit in their third spot. Tony Ferdinando, of Spicewood, and Shane Logan, of Buda, finished second with 26.02 pounds. They used jigs, jigging spoons and Carolina rigs, targeting deep ledges. Ferdinando landed the big fish of the event at 8.52 pounds. The team won $4,500 plus $500 for the big bass. Finishing third was Lee Beuershausen, of Marble Falls, and Randy Grounds, of Horseshoe Bay, using Carolina-rigged lizards. The team won $3,500 and another $3,500 for the Skeeter bonus. —Bass Champs

ADVERTISEMENT

Texas Fly-Fishing: Bass Bugs & Brews! Plano will host the Second Annual Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival on March 10-11 at the Plano Event Center. Last year, this new event drew nearly 1,000 attendees right out of the shoot. “The concept is simple,” said festival director Beau Beasley. “Fly-fishing is really fun, but many folks are just too intimidated to give it a try. At our festival they can try fly-fishing at their own speed — and take in some cool Texas microbreweries at the same time.” Beasley should know: he just wrapped the 18th annual Virginia Fly Fishing & Wine Festival in January, which drew a record crowd of more than 2,000 anglers. Major brands like Patagonia, TFO, RIO, Hardy, Sage and Orvis will be at the Texas event, as will lodges from as far away as Montana, Alaska, Canada, Patagonia and Russia. Anglers can test drive Hobie and NuCanoe watercraft in the kayak demo pond, with experts from Mariner Sails standing by to answer any questions. The event kicks off with a “Bass Bugs & Brews” movie night on Feb. 9 at Tupps Brewery in McKinney. Events include: Fly-casting classes (beginner and advanced) Speakers and seminars Exhibitors and artists Beer tastings Indoor kayak demo For more info, go to txflyfishingfestival.org.

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Win a chance to catch bull trout like this at this year’s festival. Photo from Kevin Stubbs.

TFO Pro-Staffer Wanda Taylor will be at this year’s TFF&B Festival. Photo from Wanda Taylor.

For prices and information call 1-800-221-6398 or visit us online at www.mummesinc.com

830.426.3313 830.334.3323 830.931.2215 Hondo, TX

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120 Hwy 173N

Pearsall, TX

1845 Business I-35N

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Mon-Fri: 8-5:30 Sat: 8-5:00 Closed Sunday

We ship anywhere in the continental United States. Call for Quantity Discounts on select feeders. Feeder Capacity Determined by corn weight.


Page 16

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

New

First

Full

Last

Feb 15

Feb 23

Mar 1

Mar 9

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu

12:24 6:36 1:07 7:18 1:49 8:01 2:32 8:44 3:15 9:27 4:00 10:12 4:46 10:57

12:47 6:59 1:30 7:42 2:13 8:25 2:56 9:08 3:39 9:51 4:24 10:36 5:09 11:21

07:15 07:14 07:13 07:13 07:12 07:11 07:10

2:30a 3:22a 4:13a 5:00a 5:46a 6:28a 7:08a

1:14p 1:57p 2:43p 3:32p 4:25p 5:19p 6:15p

16 Fri

5:33 11:17

5:56

07:09 06:12 7:45a

7:12p

17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

6:21 12:10 7:11 1:00 8:02 1:51 8:54 2:43 9:48 3:35 10:42 4:29 11:37 5:23

6:44 12:33 7:34 1:23 8:25 2:14 9:18 3:06 10:13 4:00 11:08 4:55 ----- 5:51

12:18 6:30 1:01 7:13 1:43 7:55 2:26 8:38 3:09 9:21 3:54 10:06 4:40 10:52 5:27 11:12 6:16 12:04 7:05 12:54 7:56 1:45 8:49 2:37 9:42 3:30 10:36 4:23 11:31 5:17

12:42 6:53 1:24 7:36 2:07 8:19 2:50 9:02 3:33 9:46 4:18 10:30 5:03 11:15 5:50 ----6:38 12:27 7:28 1:17 8:19 2:08 9:12 3:00 10:07 3:54 11:02 4:49 11:59 5:45

07:05 07:04 07:04 07:03 07:02 07:01 07:00 06:59 06:58 06:58 06:57 06:56 06:55 06:54 06:53

06:04 06:05 06:06 06:07 06:07 06:08 06:09 06:10 06:11 06:11 06:12 06:13 06:14 06:15 06:15

2:19a 1:13p 3:11a 1:57p 4:00a 2:43p 4:48a 3:33p 5:34a 4:24p 6:17a 5:18p 6:57a 6:13p 7:35a 7:08p 8:12a 8:04p 8:47a 9:00p 9:22a 9:57p 9:58a 10:56p 10:36a 11:57p 11:18a NoMoon 12:05p 12:59a

-----

07:08 07:07 07:06 07:05 07:04 07:02 07:01

06:06 06:07 06:08 06:08 06:09 06:10 06:11 06:13 06:14 06:15 06:16 06:17 06:17 06:18

8:20a 8:09p 8:54a 9:06p 9:27a 10:05p 10:02a 11:05p 10:39a NoMoon 11:20a 12:07a 12:05p 1:10a

San Antonio 2018 Feb

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

12:31 6:42 1:13 7:25 1:56 8:08 2:38 8:50 3:22 9:34 4:07 10:18 4:52 11:04 5:40 11:24 6:28 12:17 7:18 1:06 8:09 1:57 9:01 2:49 9:54 3:42 10:49 4:36 11:44 5:30

12:54 1:37 2:20 3:02 3:46 4:30 5:16 6:03 6:51 7:41 8:32 9:25 10:19 11:15 -----

7:06 7:49 8:31 9:14 9:58 10:42 11:28 ----12:39 1:29 2:20 3:13 4:07 5:02 5:58

07:17 07:16 07:15 07:15 07:14 07:13 07:12 07:11 07:10 07:10 07:09 07:08 07:07 07:06 07:05

06:17 06:18 06:19 06:20 06:20 06:21 06:22 06:23 06:24 06:24 06:25 06:26 06:27 06:27 06:28

2:31a 1:27p 3:23a 2:10p 4:12a 2:57p 5:00a 3:46p 5:46a 4:38p 6:29a 5:32p 7:09a 6:27p 7:48a 7:22p 8:24a 8:17p 9:00a 9:13p 9:35a 10:10p 10:11a 11:09p 10:50a NoMoon 11:31a 12:09a 12:18p 1:11a

Amarillo

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

12:44 6:56 1:27 7:39 2:09 8:21 2:52 9:04 3:35 9:47 4:20 10:32 5:06 11:18 5:53 11:38 6:42 12:30 7:31 1:20 8:22 2:11 9:15 3:03 10:08 3:56 11:02 4:49 11:57 5:43

1:08 1:50 2:33 3:16 3:59 4:44 5:29 6:16 7:04 7:54 8:45 9:38 10:33 11:28 -----

7:19 8:02 8:45 9:28 10:11 10:56 11:41 12:05 12:53 1:43 2:34 3:26 4:20 5:15 6:11

07:39 07:38 07:37 07:36 07:35 07:34 07:33 07:32 07:31 07:30 07:29 07:27 07:26 07:25 07:24

06:22 06:23 06:24 06:25 06:26 06:27 06:28 06:29 06:30 06:31 06:32 06:33 06:34 06:35 06:36

2:56a 1:30p 3:49a 2:12p 4:39a 2:58p 5:27a 3:48p 6:12a 4:41p 6:53a 5:36p 7:32a 6:33p 8:08a 7:30p 8:42a 8:28p 9:15a 9:27p 9:48a 10:27p 10:21a 11:28p 10:57a NoMoon 11:37a 12:31a 12:21p 1:36a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 5:11 AM 5:58 AM 6:40 AM 12:07 AM 12:43 AM 1:17 AM 1:53 AM 2:32 AM 3:15 AM 4:05 AM 5:04 AM 12:19 AM 1:12 AM 2:09 AM 3:10 AM

Rollover Pass Height -0.29L -0.38L -0.43L 0.99H 1.03H 1.08H 1.10H 1.11H 1.11H 1.08H 1.05H 0.25L 0.09L -0.08L -0.24L

Time 1:46 PM 2:32 PM 3:06 PM 7:20 AM 7:57 AM 8:34 AM 9:09 AM 9:45 AM 10:20 AM 10:57 AM 11:36 AM 6:16 AM 7:43 AM 9:26 AM 11:07 AM

Height 1.10H 1.16H 1.18H -0.47L -0.49L -0.49L -0.45L -0.37L -0.25L -0.09L 0.11L 1.02H 1.02H 1.07H 1.17H

Time 7:47 PM 8:26 PM 8:33 PM 3:33 PM 3:56 PM 4:18 PM 4:40 PM 5:03 PM 5:26 PM 5:48 PM 6:09 PM 12:18 PM 1:07 PM 2:09 PM 3:28 PM

Height 0.85L 0.88L 0.90L 1.18H 1.17H 1.17H 1.16H 1.16H 1.14H 1.11H 1.07H 0.34L 0.58L 0.80L 0.96L

Time 10:48 PM 11:29 PM

Height 0.91H 0.94H

8:29 PM 8:38 PM 9:00 PM 9:30 PM 10:07 PM 10:47 PM 11:31 PM

0.90L 0.86L 0.80L 0.73L 0.64L 0.53L 0.40L

6:27 6:45 7:08 7:48

PM PM PM PM

1.05H 1.06H 1.08H 1.12H

Time

Height

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 5:23 AM 6:09 AM 6:49 AM 7:27 AM 12:06 AM 1:02 AM 1:52 AM 2:40 AM 3:28 AM 4:17 AM 5:11 AM 12:16 AM 1:05 AM 2:01 AM 3:00 AM

Height -0.38L -0.46L -0.53L -0.56L 0.87H 0.91H 0.94H 0.95H 0.94H 0.92H 0.88H 0.19L 0.01L -0.17L -0.36L

Time 1:59 PM 2:52 PM 3:30 PM 4:00 PM 8:05 AM 8:45 AM 9:22 AM 9:56 AM 10:27 AM 10:58 AM 11:29 AM 6:26 AM 8:11 AM 9:49 AM 11:39 AM

Height 1.05H 1.12H 1.16H 1.17H -0.57L -0.55L -0.51L -0.44L -0.32L -0.17L 0.03L 0.85H 0.87H 0.95H 1.09H

Height -0.31L -0.38L -0.44L -0.48L -0.49L -0.48L 0.81H 0.82H 0.83H 0.84H 0.85H 0.23L 0.05L -0.13L -0.31L

Time 1:34 PM 2:19 PM 2:59 PM 3:35 PM 4:06 PM 4:31 PM 8:53 AM 9:30 AM 10:10 AM 10:49 AM 11:31 AM 6:14 AM 7:54 AM 9:45 AM 11:33 AM

Height 1.15H 1.22H 1.26H 1.27H 1.26H 1.23H -0.43L -0.35L -0.23L -0.07L 0.12L 0.86H 0.91H 1.04H 1.21H

Height 0.03L -0.01L -0.03L -0.04L -0.03L -0.03L -0.01L 0.67H 0.63H 0.53L 0.44L 0.34L 0.24L 0.15L 0.06L

Time 7:13 PM 7:58 PM 8:44 PM 9:27 PM 10:06 PM 10:43 PM

Height 0.73H 0.76H 0.77H 0.76H 0.74H 0.71H

12:06 PM 12:33 PM 3:55 AM 5:35 AM 8:14 AM 6:39 PM 6:23 PM 6:37 PM

0.02L 0.07L 0.58H 0.52H 0.49H 0.55H 0.64H 0.72H

Time 9:36 PM 10:18 PM 11:08 PM

Height 0.21H 0.23H 0.23H

1:53 PM 2:32 PM 3:03 PM 3:27 PM 3:46 PM 7:44 AM 9:15 AM 1:30 PM 9:39 PM 8:43 PM 8:47 PM

-0.40L -0.37L -0.33L -0.29L -0.23L 0.12H 0.08H 0.09H 0.22H 0.30H 0.37H

Time

9:43 PM 4:25 PM 4:47 PM 5:06 PM 5:23 PM 5:39 PM 5:54 PM 6:13 PM 12:06 PM 12:51 PM 1:57 PM

Height

0.84L 1.16H 1.13H 1.10H 1.06H 1.02H 0.98H 0.95H 0.27L 0.52L 0.77L

10:05 10:24 10:40 10:54 11:11 11:38

PM PM PM PM PM PM

6:35 PM 7:01 PM 7:30 PM

0.81L 0.76L 0.69L 0.60L 0.48L 0.35L 0.92H 0.91H 0.92H

Time 4:47 AM 5:42 AM 6:29 AM 7:08 AM 7:43 AM 8:17 AM 1:13 AM 2:06 AM 3:02 AM 4:03 AM 5:05 AM 12:08 AM 12:44 AM 1:33 AM 2:30 AM

Time

11:07 PM 4:51 PM 5:06 PM 5:20 PM 5:35 PM 5:52 PM 12:18 PM 1:37 PM 4:03 PM

Height

0.76L 1.19H 1.13H 1.07H 1.01H 0.94H 0.36L 0.60L 0.80L

Time

11:15 11:22 11:29 11:43

PM PM PM PM

Height

0.72L 0.65L 0.54L 0.40L

6:11 PM 6:30 PM 6:40 PM

0.88H 0.84H 0.83H

Time

Height

Port O’Connor Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 7:27 AM 8:24 AM 9:20 AM 10:08 AM 10:47 AM 11:17 AM 11:42 AM 1:12 AM 2:38 AM 12:30 AM 1:09 AM 1:55 AM 2:54 AM 4:07 AM 5:24 AM

Time 10:20 AM 11:18 AM 12:14 PM 1:06 PM 12:09 AM 1:22 AM 2:30 AM 4:19 AM 6:16 AM 4:18 AM 5:04 AM 5:49 AM 6:37 AM 7:33 AM 8:40 AM

Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 5:37 AM 6:21 AM 7:01 AM 7:38 AM 8:15 AM 8:51 AM 1:23 AM 2:20 AM 3:15 AM 4:12 AM 12:18 AM 12:59 AM 1:43 AM 2:31 AM 3:23 AM

Time 7:34 PM 8:19 PM 9:00 PM 9:37 PM 10:07 PM 3:32 AM 4:25 AM 5:20 AM 6:18 AM 7:22 AM 8:32 AM 9:53 AM 11:34 AM 10:36 PM 7:08 PM

Height 0.80H 0.83H 0.84H 0.84H 0.83H 0.79H 0.79H 0.78H 0.74H 0.70H 0.65H 0.60H 0.58H 0.74H 0.81H

Height -0.34L -0.37L -0.39L -0.41L -0.42L -0.41L 0.60H 0.61H 0.61H 0.58H 0.28L 0.14L 0.00L -0.14L -0.27L

Time 3:48 PM 4:27 PM 4:55 PM 5:08 PM 5:15 PM 5:28 PM 9:29 AM 10:08 AM 10:48 AM 11:31 AM 5:16 AM 6:37 AM 9:04 AM 11:42 AM 1:25 PM

Height 0.72H 0.75H 0.75H 0.74H 0.72H 0.70H -0.40L -0.34L -0.25L -0.12L 0.55H 0.52H 0.54H 0.65H 0.78H

Height 0.10L 0.09L 0.09L 0.10L 0.10L 0.09L 0.09L 1.15H 1.11H 1.05H 0.98H 0.57L 0.39L 0.21L 0.06L

Time 4:04 PM 4:55 PM 5:48 PM 6:45 PM 10:50 PM 11:45 PM

Height 1.21H 1.25H 1.25H 1.23H 1.17H 1.17H

9:15 AM 10:02 AM 10:52 AM 11:43 AM 4:47 AM 11:55 AM 2:10 PM 3:08 PM

0.12L 0.18L 0.29L 0.45L 0.90H 0.85H 1.05H 1.22H

Time

12:39 PM 1:11 PM 1:42 PM 2:13 PM 2:44 PM 3:13 PM 3:37 PM 3:48 PM

Time

10:54 PM 5:44 PM 5:59 PM 6:12 PM 6:21 PM 12:18 PM 1:11 PM 2:29 PM 4:55 PM

Height

-0.49L -0.46L -0.40L -0.29L -0.13L 0.06L 0.27L 0.47L

Height

0.57L 0.68H 0.66H 0.62H 0.59H 0.05L 0.24L 0.43L 0.58L

Time

10:17 PM 9:57 PM 9:48 PM 9:45 PM 9:46 PM 9:51 PM 10:02 PM 10:17 PM

Time

Height

0.81H 0.78H 0.74H 0.70H 0.66H 0.65H 0.65H 0.69H

Height

11:00 PM 11:14 PM 11:41 PM

0.53L 0.47L 0.39L

6:32 6:45 7:02 7:21

PM PM PM PM

0.57H 0.57H 0.58H 0.61H

Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 4:36 AM 5:12 AM 5:47 AM 6:24 AM 7:04 AM 7:46 AM 8:30 AM 12:41 AM 1:39 AM 2:38 AM 3:40 AM 12:19 AM 1:05 AM 1:51 AM 2:40 AM

Time

7:15 PM 6:50 PM 6:59 PM 12:37 PM 1:57 PM

Height

Time

Height

0.93H 0.92H 0.90H 0.64L 0.85L

10:28 PM 11:29 PM

0.88L 0.74L

5:49 PM 5:58 PM

0.90H 0.94H

Time

Height

Port Aransas Time

Height

9:47 PM 1:02 PM 1:33 PM 1:59 PM

0.56H 0.15L 0.25L 0.37L

9:25 PM 8:31 PM 7:15 PM

0.50H 0.46H 0.48H

Time

Height

Time

Height

Nueces Bay Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

San Luis Pass

Height -0.36L -0.41L -0.44L -0.47L -0.48L 0.76L 0.75L 0.71L 0.64L 0.54L 0.41L 0.26L 0.11L -0.04L -0.17L

East Matagorda

Freeport Harbor Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 9:23 AM 10:09 AM 10:52 AM 11:31 AM 12:06 PM 1:31 AM 2:02 AM 2:32 AM 2:57 AM 3:17 AM 3:39 AM 4:15 AM 5:05 AM 6:09 AM 7:18 AM

Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 3:57 PM 5:47 AM 6:26 AM 7:02 AM 7:37 AM 8:15 AM 12:38 AM 1:32 AM 2:23 AM 3:16 AM 4:13 AM 5:24 AM 12:33 AM 1:19 AM 2:17 AM

Height 1.03H 0.06L 0.03L 0.02L 0.02L 0.03L 0.95H 0.94H 0.93H 0.90H 0.86H 0.81H 0.36L 0.23L 0.12L

Time

Height

Time

Height

4:38 PM 5:20 PM 6:09 PM 11:43 PM

1.01H 0.97H 0.96H

8:31 PM

0.95L

10:45 PM

0.95H

8:56 AM 9:41 AM 10:27 AM 11:12 AM 11:51 AM 12:09 PM 7:01 AM 3:00 PM 3:13 PM

0.06L 0.11L 0.19L 0.29L 0.42L 0.57L 0.78H 0.89H 1.01H

4:49 PM 4:24 PM 4:33 PM 4:55 PM 5:17 PM 5:34 PM 12:01 PM

0.87H 0.85H 0.83H 0.82H 0.80H 0.80H 0.72L

7:13 PM 8:19 PM 10:53 PM 11:25 PM 11:56 PM

0.84L 0.79L 0.72L 0.61L 0.49L

5:26 PM

0.82H

Time 3:21 PM 4:06 PM 4:47 PM 5:24 PM 5:53 PM 6:05 PM 6:01 PM 5:54 PM 10:13 AM 10:57 AM 11:44 AM 5:56 AM 8:03 AM 10:54 AM 1:34 PM

Height 0.98H 1.03H 1.04H 1.02H 0.99H 0.94H 0.90H 0.86H -0.10L 0.03L 0.19L 0.73H 0.76H 0.86H 1.02H

Time

Height

South Padre Island Height -0.42L -0.43L -0.43L -0.42L 0.22H 0.21H 0.20H 0.17H 0.15H 0.07L -0.01L -0.10L -0.20L -0.28L -0.33L

11:44 PM 4:03 PM 4:20 PM 4:29 PM

0.10H -0.15L -0.05L 0.06L

11:30 PM 9:54 PM 9:42 PM

0.08H 0.10H 0.15H

Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23

Time 4:29 AM 5:20 AM 6:07 AM 6:51 AM 7:33 AM 8:12 AM 8:52 AM 9:32 AM 2:00 AM 3:14 AM 4:28 AM 12:10 AM 12:49 AM 1:34 AM 2:26 AM

Height -0.24L -0.28L -0.30L -0.31L -0.31L -0.29L -0.26L -0.20L 0.78H 0.76H 0.73H 0.31L 0.14L -0.04L -0.19L

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11:07 PM 11:36 PM

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Texas Coast Tides

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Date Feb 9 Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Cellphones, saltwater don’t mix

February 9, 2018

IMPROVING THE GAME.

Continued from page 1

sistant. Let me tell you, it is not. I had it in my jacket pocket. I didn’t even get out of my boat. It was raining and I guess my jacket, which is also supposed to be waterresistant, got wet enough for some of the moisture to seep through it. It got behind the iPhone’s screen and shorted it out.” An Apple representative referred LSON to its support page when asked how customers should deal with a wet phone. It recommends drying an iPhone by tapping it against your hand and leaving it in a dry area with airflow. Fans can help. Apple does not recommend using a hair dryer or objects such as a cotton swab. Although Apple touts the iPhone 7, such as Pyre owns, as water-resistant, its warranty does not cover liquid damage. “Waterproof means you can submerge something and it will work,” Pyre said. “Water-resistant apparently means you can spit on it and it will go haywire.” At this point, though, waterproof phones are like jetpacks: a work in progress. A fall issue of Forbes featured the headline: “Please Don’t Get Your Waterproof Phone Wet.” Its article recommended treating the feature as one that might save your phone “if you drop it in the sink, toilet or get caught in heavy rain.” Garza didn’t need the warning. “I once bought a waterproof sports model from Sprint,” he said. “I put it on the console of my boat. Got out of the water and it was ringing and I picked it up with my wet hand. From there, it eventually got to where it wouldn’t charge.” Pyre went the waterproof case route with an earlier iPhone. He had no problem with how the case shielded his phone from water – but he wasn’t a fan of how it served

as a buffer between him and his customers. “Nobody could hear me talking when I used it,” Pyre said. “I had to take the phone out of the case to talk, which defeats the purpose.” Austin Canoe & Kayak, which has five stores in Texas, sells products to protect cell phones from the elements. But their best advice to customers is to keep your phone out of harm’s way. “What we recommend is bringing a dry bag or dry box to put your phone in when you’re on the water,” said Zach, who heads customer relations. “When you want to use it, take it out.” Both Pyre and Garza have insurance to pay most of the replacement cost if their phones get damaged. Even so, the cost to the customer can be hundreds of dollars. But paying, say, $200 isn’t bad when your phone sells for more than $1,000. Sprint eventually reinstated Garza’s insurance, and he’s gone two years without an incident. “I’ve been a little lucky,” he said. “Maybe a little more careful. I’ve got kids in college, not as much disposable income.” After getting his iPhone repaired, Pyre said he’s going “back to the basics.” “I have an Olympus camera that you can put underwater and take pictures,” he said. “I’m going back to that and leave the phone in the dry box from now on.” Online tech authority, Mashable, reports iPhones 7,8, and X are all water- and dustresistant (not waterproof, though). This water resistance rating, according to MacRumors, means the iPhone X can handle immersion in 3.3 feet of water for up to 30 minutes.

Page 17

Presenting the new

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HICO STORE: 254-796-2155 • ALVARADO STORE: 855-299-BUCK(2825)


Page 18

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Tracy to lead Yamaha sales

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Yamaha Marine Group announces a newly formed Marine Power Sales and Marketing team, led by General Manager Mark Tracy.

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The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council is currently accepting applications for the position of executive director.

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ACROSS Catfish bait that puts out a strong odor 1. Catfish A good crappiebait lakethat puts out a strong odor Used3. Christmas trees put A good crappie lakeinto the water A camo manufacturer 6. Used Christmas trees put into the water An ammo brand camo manufacturer How 9. theAlure is shown to the fish A favorite forbrand deep water 13. Ancolor ammo A type of bow sight 14. How thefox lure shown to the fish Most common in is Texas A state its own fishing rig water 16. with A favorite color for deep The19. front of the boat A type of bow sight A good river for white bass fishing 20. Most common in Texas Fastest growing groupfox of hunters The22. plastic baitwith with its arms legsrig A state ownand fishing The underwater island 25.the Thefish front boat Keeps in of thethe boat alive 27. the A good river for white bass fishing Makes Curado The28. porkFastest trailer growing on a jig group of hunters A mackerel species 30.retrieve The plastic baithewith andfall legs Dog's on bird did arms not see Parasite in West Texas island quail 31. The underwater 32. Keeps the fish in the boat alive 33. Makes the Curado 34. The pork trailer on a jig 35. A mackerel species 36. Dog’s retrieve on bird he did not see fall 37. Parasite in West Texas quail

New CEO at West Marine Doug Robinson joined West Marine, Inc. as its new chief executive officer.

Development opening

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The Conservation Federation of Missouri is seeking a director of development.

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1. A favorite duck plant favorite duck plant 2.1. A Adeep-water white bass lure A deep-water bass lure 4.2. The fish branchwhite of zoology 5.4. Predicted moreofweeks The fish six branch zoologyof winter 6.5. Where the bass spawn Predicted six more weeks of winter 7.6. A Where destructive, invasive weed the bass spawn 8. A good rainbow trout bait, ____ eggs destructive, invasive weed 10.7. A Asafari destination A good rainbow trout bait, ____ eggs 11.8. The collared peccary 12. Bait for thedestination baitfish 10. A safari 13. The 11. TheCanada collaredgoose peccary 15. Largest fox in Texas 12. Bait for the baitfish 17. A good blue catfish lake 13. Canada goose 18. A The snapper species 21. Wild turkey 15. Largest foxsounds in Texas 23. The tournament official on the boat 17. A good blue catfish lake 24. A member of the Big Five 18. A snapper species 25. Rocky Mountain or Desert 21. Wild turkey sounds 26. Minnesota state fish 23. The tournament official the boat 29. Manufacturer of dog, deeronfood 24. 25. 26. 29.

A member of the Big Five Rocky Mountain or desert Minnesota state fish Manufacturer of dog, deer food

new vice president of conservation. Melinchuk was previously the director of conservation programs at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

RD job at RMEF The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is seeking a regional director for Missouri and Kansas.

ED job at fishery council

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LSONews.com

Sales rep group sought Meopta USA is seeking experienced independent sales representatives and/or groups throughout the United States.

Costa selects agency Costa Sunglasses selected Gunpowder, Inc. as its new communications agency of record.

Melinchuk moves to NWTF

Stohr to lead Washington department Joe Stohr was named the acting director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

New head at USA Archery Rod Menzer was named the new chief executive officer of USA Archery.

Ruger names top retailer Randy’s Hunting Center of Michigan was named the 2017 Ruger Retailer of the Year.

MDF names marketing director Jared Wire joined the Mule Deer Foundation as the new director of marketing, membership services and media relations.

The National Wild Turkey Federation hired Ross Melinchuk as its

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Catfish enchiladas Vegetable stock 1 lb. catfish fillets 1 cup chopped onions 1/2 cup water 1 can mild enchilada sauce 1 can hot enchilada sauce 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese 3/4 cup sliced black olives 3 hard cooked eggs, chopped 4 oz. can chopped green chilis, drained 8 flour tortillas 1 cup shredded Monterrey Jack cheese Poach fish fillets in stock until fish flakes, 9 to 12 minutes depending on size of fillets. Cool fish slightly, flake meat and set aside. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Heat skillet, cook onions and water over medium

heat; drain onions and set aside. Combine mild and hot enchilada sauces in skillet and heat. In mixing bowl, combine fish, onions, 1/2 cup olives, 2/3 of both cheeses, 2 chopped eggs and the chilies. To assemble enchiladas, dip a tortilla in the heated sauce and place in a 9x13 baking dish. Spoon 1/2 cup of the fish mixture down the center of the tortilla and roll. Pour remaining sauce over rolled enchiladas. Cover dish with foil and bake for 30 to 35 minutes until sauce bubbles around edges. Remove foil and top with remaining cheeses, olives and egg. Re-cover and bake for 5 to 10 minutes or until cheese is melted. —Ohio DNR

Quail pie 2 cups deboned quail 6 tbsps. butter 6 tbsps. plain flour 1 3/4 cups broth from cooked quail 2/3 cup cream 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper Pastry for two-crust pie Stew 4-5 quail to make 2 cups when deboned. Roll out 2/3 pastry and place in baking

pan. Melt butter, add flour and seasoning, let bubble. Add liquid and cook slowly until thickened. Add quail, pour into pastry-lined pan. Top with remaining pastry rolled to fit the top. Pinch edges together and bake at 400 degrees, about 35 minutes or until pastry is browned. —North Carolina Widlife Resources Commission


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 9, 2018

Page 19

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

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AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does.Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159 QUAIL HUNTING

Bird Dog Training Facility 700 yard RANGE PoetryShootingClub.com (214) 728-2755 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 (214) 361-2276

470 Low Fence Acres 1.5 Hours North of DFW Boone & Crockett Deer Turn Key: Cabin, Food Plots, Feeders, Tower Stands. (940) 464-0121

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 AMERICAN LAB PUPPIES Excellent pedigrees from field trial, hunt test, hunting lines. Owners has trained dogs for 10 years, can train if requested. 3 yellow males, 2 yellow females, 1 black male. All come with certification, shots. Call Jeff. (214) 384-5641

CLASSIFIEDS

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2 ISSUE MINIMUM ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@ GMAIL.COM

RANCH FOR SALE

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

Network of Indoor & Outdoor Ranges TEXASARCHERY.INFO FISHERMEN/DUCK HUNTERS Flour Bluff/Corpus Christi Rental Two BR, Two Bath, Sleeps Six, Fully Furnished. One Mile from Boat Ramp, Parking on Site for Boat & Trailer View online: The Blue Heron Corpus Christi. All Bookings thru Airbnb TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS Actively purchasing authentic Texas artifacts. One piece to entire collections. Call (210) 557-9478 REPORTER/ JOURNALIST JOB Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter at its Dallas office. Journalism degree preferred. (214) 361-2276

FISHING DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com.Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Call About Our Winter Discounts! (956) 551-1965


Page 20

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL MICHIGAN

Pheasants Forever award Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division Chief Russ Mason was presented with Pheasants Forever’s Partner of the Year award. In his presentation introducing Mason as this year’s award recipient, Pheasants Forever Regional Coordinator Bill Vander Zouwen praised Mason’s commitment to the restoration of Michigan’s pheasant habitat. Mason was commended for making pheasant management a high priority, even though the numbers of pheasants and pheasant hunters have declined in recent decades. —Michigan DNR

WYOMING

Weatherby moving

KOHL KENNEDY, 14, OF FAIR OAKS RANCH, ARROWED THIS 11-POINT BUCK ON THE FAMILY LEASE IN MEDINA COUNTY. HE MADE THE 15-YARD SHOT ON HIS 14TH BIRTHDAY, USING A DIAMOND ARCHERY EDGE PRO BOW WITH A 100-GRAIN RAGE BROADHEAD.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

Weatherby is pulling out of California and moving to Wyoming. The firearms manufacturer is relocating its manufacturing operations and corporate headquarters to Sheridan, Wyoming.
The move is expected to create 70 to 90 jobs and more than $5 million annually in payroll in the next five years.

 —Weatherby, Inc.

ARKANSAS

Shooting sports complex for Jonesboro The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has secured a $2 million grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to be used in the construction of a new shooting sports complex for northeast Arkansas. The construction of the shooting sports complex is a partnership with the City of Jonesboro. The total cost of the complex has been estimated at $10 million. The city will be responsible for the remainder of the cost. —AGFC

NEVADA

Thormählen honored

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Wheeler’s Feed & Outfitters 32450 IH-10 West Boerne, TX 78006 (830) 249-2656 wheelersfeed.com

Peter Thormählen was named the International Professional Hunter of the Year by Safari Club International. In 2000, Thormählen started hunting professionally in South Africa, and has built one of the most successful operations on the African continent, operating in South Africa, Namibia and, formerly in Bostwana. Thormählen was the first professional hunter to guide the first black rhino hunts in many years in 2005, the first legal black rhino trophy hunt since the 1970s. —SCI

NEW YORK

Walleye fishing sets record Walleye fishing on Lake Erie experienced the highest recorded success in nearly 30 years during the 2017 season. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation conducted an angler survey on Lake Erie to estimate fishing quality and fish harvest annually since 1988. Survey results for 2017 revealed record-high walleye catch rates that are nearly three times greater than the 30-year average. DEC estimates that anglers harvested more than 70,000 walleyes in 2017, a level not achieved since 1989. The exceptional fishing was due in large part to contributions of strong walleye reproductive success in 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2015. —NYDEC

OKLAHOMA

Elk hunt scams Caddo County Sheriff’s deputies are looking for a person in connection with a case of fraud involving elk hunts in Oklahoma. Dozens of people fell victim to the scam.

The sheriff said more than 20 people have booked hunts costing thousands of dollars, and when they showed up, they were left waiting and waiting and no guide shows up. “They’ve called saying they’ve booked a hunt for lots of money, and when they show up to go to the expedition, there’s nobody there,” said Nathan Erdman, assistant chief of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The sheriff said they have a suspect, but if you have been scammed by this person, officials want you to come forward. —ODWC

LOUISIANA

Asian carp food products The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is supporting Silverfin Group in its effort to process Asian carp into a value-added product for human consumption. The product, fish cakes called Silverfin, will be distributed nationally, primarily by SYSCO food distributors. Asian carp have moved into Louisiana waterways, including Lake Pontchartrain, Vermillion Bay, Lake Verret and many of Louisiana’s rivers, canals and bayous. —LDWF

ALABAMA

Director of Grand Slam Club/Ovis dies Dennis Campbell, the 27-year executive director of the Grand Slam Club/Ovis, died Feb. 3 after a four-year battle with cancer. When appointed director of the Grand Slam Club of North American Sheep Hunters, there were fewer than 400 members. Under his leadership the organization grew to more than 4,000 members. Campbell began Ovis, In., a similar organization for international mountain game hunters in 1997, and later donated the organization to the Grand Slam Club. During his terms, GSCO donated nearly $9 million for big game conservation projects worldwide. —GSCO

INTERNATIONAL

Hong Kong to end ivory trade Hong Kong voted to end its ivory trade. The bill also included an increase for maximum penalties to 10 years in jail. Supporters see the ban as closing a large loophole since most of the world banned ivory trade in 1990 with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES. Although only antique ivory from before the 1970s was supposed to remain for sale in Hong Kong, large shipments of ivory of various ages have been intercepted on their way there as recently as July. Opponents of the ban fear that the bill is punishing those craftspeople and others who have been working legally in the ivory business for decades. —Staff report

Wetland education in Latin America A group of 14 natural resource professionals from Mexico and 12 other Latin American countries recently graduated from Ducks Unlimited de México’s RESERVA training course. The intensive, two-month continuing education experience is designed to provide advanced training in the ecology and management of wetlands and other natural resources to practicing professionals from across Central and South America. Graduates came from Guatemala, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Paraguay, Dominican Republic, Panama, Ecuador, Venezuela, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile and Mexico. —DU


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

PRODUCTS

February 9, 2018

Page 21

Public land hunter

>>

Continued from page 4

M18 RIFLE: German gunmaker Mauser describes its newest gun as “Volkswaffe: the people’s rifle.” Thanks to its ultra-rugged synthetic stock, the rifle will withstand daily use in the harshest of hunting environments. A three-position safety allows hunters to safely carry a round in the chamber; the steel receiver provides core strength and reliability to protect the action; and a cold-hammer-forged barrel gives further peace of mind that the rifle will perform consistently, round after round. For optimum grip, the stock features two areas of soft-inlay. The five-round magazine enables fast, fuss-free follow-up shots, and an adjustable trigger allows hunters to set their preferred pull weight. Priced from about $700, the M18 is currently available in .243 Win., .308 Win., .270 Win., .30-06, 7mm Rem. Mag., and .300 Win. Mag., with the 6.5 Creedmoor coming soon.

SCENT SLAMMER PORTABLE OZONE AIR CLEANER: Hunting Made Easy (HME) delivers outdoorsmen odor-killing ozone technology at an affordable price. This portable air cleaner produces ozone in a proper, yet safe, amount to kill and remove odor-causing particles including bacteria, sweat, human odor, oils, volatile organic compounds and smoke. It will not damage clothing. A hunter or angler can drop this compact lightweight device into his or her backpack for odor removal in an area up to 106-cubic feet. The rechargeable cleaner costs about $30.

>> SILENTHUNTER SCENT IQ MASK JACKET: Rocky’s hunting jacket utilizes a technology that destroys scent at the microbial level. In addition, bodymapped insulation keeps a hunter’s core warm and insulated while keeping his or her arms cool and flexible. There also is a built-in mask stored in the hood, which stows safely away until a hunter needs it. Available in Realtree Xtra camouflage and in sizes medium to 2X large, the jacket costs about $130.

>>

>> CHATTERBAIT ELITE: This bass bait by Z-Man Fishing Products features the company’s patented, bladed swim jig design with such features as a 5/0 Gamakatsu hook, new jig skirt with a low-profile hub, more detailed head paint schemes, and a beefed-up stainless ChatterBlade with a super strong quick clip line tie. Add a molded-in trailer keeper that prevents soft plastics from sliding and a strengthened head-to-blade connection, and the result is an upgraded lure that is irresistible to fish. The lures are available in 1/2- and 3/8-ounce models and in 10 colors.

SURECAN GAS CAN: This innovative gasoline can has a flexible spout that rotates down more than 180 degrees so that outdoorsmen can fill ATVs or small machinery with minimal spillage. The can has a tethered child-proof cap. Available in a 2.2-gallon (about $40) or a five-gallon (about $55) size, the gas can comes in a Mossy Oak edition.

>>

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276

two kids. “I was coming in on the second hunt. They said I could scout after the last hunter left from the first hunt. That was a big plus, and gave me the chance to scout areas that could hold mule deer, whitetails and pigs.” The scouting paid off during the hunt. “The first evening I hunted I saw lots of pigs,” Dotson said. “The next morning I was still hunting in my selected pasture. I saw nine bucks. Some were good but I passed. I ended up still-hunting in an area with big draws. That’s where I shot an 8-pointer scoring 144. He weighed 160 pounds after being field dressed. It took me three hours to haul it out on a game cart — that Hunting on public land in Colorado, Luke Dotson bagged this cow elk. Photo from Luke Dotson. was tough.” The one thing about hunting on public lands is that you are on your own. Some allow ground blinds and feeders. But that’s not something Dotson likes to mess with. He works as a transmission lineman and is not one to walk away from putting in a little extra effort on a hunt. “I’ve hunted on public lands in Central, West and East Texas and killed a lot of deer and pigs,” he said. “If you’re persistent and do your research and scouting you’ll have some good hunts. For pigs, I like to hunt on the Granger WMA that’s not far from my house. For deer, I’ve done pretty well on the Amistad National Recreation Area.” Hunting in all different terrains and types of land presents a challenge for Dotson. “Most have areas for camping,” he said. “It’s a lot of fun to wake up at your camp site, gather your gear and head out into your private section of land to hunt.” Dotson said he hasn’t had any negative experiences, with the occasional exception of another hunter walking into his area. “Don’t be afraid to put your feet on the ground,” he said. “Apply for lots of hunts — they are cheap and numerous.”


Page 22

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK FEBRUARY 9

National Wild Turkey Federation Smith County Banquet Tyler Rose Garden (903) 920-5115 nwtf.org

FEBRUARY 9-10

Texas Deer Association Antler Fest Embassy Suites Conference Center San Marcos Texasdeerassociation.com

FEBRUARY 10

National Wild Turkey Federation Houston Banquet Houston Distributing Company (832) 492-1400 nwtf.org

FEBRUARY 17

Mule Deer Foundation Parker County Banquet (817) 475-9702 muledeer.org Ducks Unlimited Red River Valley Dinner Gainesville Civic Center (940) 736-3885 ducks.org/Texas

FEBRUARY 22

Coastal Conservation Association Corpus Christi Banquet American Bank Center (361) 882-5199 ccatexas.org

FEBRUARY 10-11

Ducks Unlimited NE Tarrant County Banquet Colleyville Community Center (817) 560-5611 ducks.org/Texas

FEBRUARY 13

National Wild Turkey Federation Brazos Longbeards Banquet The Swinging Door, Richmond (512) 966-9539 nwtf.org

Lone Star Predator Calling Classic Hoffpauir Expo Grounds, Lampasas (512) 748-2810 info@hoffpauirexpo.com Ducks Unlimited Allen Fat Tuesday Party TwoRows Classic Grill (915) 255-9565 ducks.org/Texas

FEBRUARY 15

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Plano Marriott at Legacy (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

FEBRUARY 16-18

Trout Unlimited, Guadalupe River Chapter Troutfest Texas Lazy L&L Campgrounds, New Braunfels grtu.org

FEBRUARY 24

Ducks Unlimited Kerrville Banquet Hill Country Shooting Sports Center (830) 377-2838 ducks.org/Texas

FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 2

Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo Rodeohouston.com

FEBRUARY 28

Lubbock Sportsman’s Club Hunters’ Banquet and Auction Lubbock Memorial Civic Center (806) 789-2441 Lubbocksportsman.com

Delta Waterfowl Collin County Banquet Nohas Event Venue, Plano (618) 691-9364 deltawaterfowl.org

MARCH 4

MARCH 1-4

Stewards of the Wild San Antonio Chapter Sausage Showdown Beethoven Maennerchor tpwf.org/sotw

Exotic Wildlife Association 51st Annual Membership Meeting YO Hotel and Conference Center, Kerrville (830) 367-7761 myewa.com

MARCH 8

MARCH 2

Park Cities Quail Dinner and Auction Frontiers of Flight Museum parkcitiesquail.org

Coastal Conservation Association Brazos Valley Banquet Brazos Center, Bryan (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

MARCH 9

National Wild Turkey Federation Marble Falls Banquet Lakeside Pavilion (830) 693-7520 nwtf.org

National Wild Turkey Federation Cross Timbers Banquet Decatur Civic Center (940) 393-8908 nwtf.org

MARCH 10

Tarrant Regional Water District Flyfest trwdflyfest.com

Ducks Unlimited Conroe Banquet Montgomery County Fairgrounds (836) 537-1561 ducks.org/Texas

MARCH 10-11

Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival Plano Event Center txflyfishingfestival.org

MARCH 3

Delta Waterfowl Marshall Banquet Marshall Visual Arts Center (903) 407-2586 deltawaterfowl.org

Ladies Sporting Weekend Joshua Creek Ranch, Boerne (830) 537-5090 joshuacreek.com

Texas Dove Hunters Association Shooting for Scholarships National Shooting Complex, San Antonio (210) 764-1189

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 22

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1. Catfish bait that puts out a strong odor [STINK] 3. A good crappie lake [AQUILLA] 6. Used Christmas trees put into the water [BRUSHPILES] 9. A camo manufacturer [REALTREE] 13. An ammo brand [HORNADY] 14. How the lure is shown to the fish [PRESENTATION] 16. A favorite color for deep water [BLACK] 19. A type of bow sight [PEEP] 20. Most common fox in Texas [GRAY] 22. A state with its own fishing rig [ALABAMA] 25. The front of the boat [BOW] 27. A good river for white bass fishing [ANGELINA] 28. Fastest growing group of hunters [WOMEN] 30. The plastic bait with arms and legs [CREATURE] 31. The underwater island [HUMP] 32. Keeps the fish in the boat alive [LIVEWELL] 33. Makes the Curado [SHIMANO] 34. The pork trailer on a jig [PIG] 35. A mackerel species [KING]

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L

L

20

Y 31

29

P

E L

H U M P

I V E W E L L

E

34

P

R

S

I G

Y

N

E Y E W O R M S

A

37

21

G R A Y

Down

1. A favorite duck plant [SMARTWEED] 2. A deep-water white bass lure [SLAB] 4. The fish branch of zoology [ICHTHYOLOGY] 5. Predicted six more weeks of winter [GROUNDHOG] 6. Where the bass spawn [BEDS] 7. A destructive, invasive weed [SALVINIA] 8. A good rainbow trout bait, ____ eggs [SALMON]

10. A safari destination [MOZAMBIQUE] 11. The collared peccary [JAVELINA] 12. Bait for the baitfish [PLANKTON] 13. The Canada goose [HONKER] 15. Largest fox in Texas [RED] 17. A good blue catfish lake [TAWAKONI] 18. A snapper species [LANE] 21. Wild turkey sounds [YELPS] 23. The tournament official on the boat [MARSHAL] 24. A member of the Big Five [LEOPARD] 25. Rocky Mountain or Desert [BIGHORN] 26. Minnesota state fish [WALLEYE] 29. Manufacturer of dog, deer food [PURINA]

Puzzle solution from Page 18


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 9, 2018

Page 23


Page 24

February 9, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

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February 09, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

February 09, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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