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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

February 23, 2018

Volume 14, Issue 13

Customizing a popular trout lure

Lost lease

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Dick Davis harvested this buck on his Fannin County lease. The planned Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir caused him to lose the lease, effective Feb. 28. Photo from Dick Davis.

Future reservoir impacts hunters By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News A new reservoir is celebrated by some, but not so much by others. For Dick Davis of Dallas, the planned Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir in Fannin County means the loss of his hunting lease, and on Feb. 19, he was in the process of moving blinds and feeders off the ranch. “I bought some property, just 10 acres, about eight years ago,” Davis said. “It’s in the middle of the Caddo National Grasslands. When I’m there, I feel like I own 12,000 acres.” Davis had been hunting on a lease out west, near Throckmorton, but then found a 1,500-acre ranch bordering the grasslands to lease. “I wanted to hunt closer to the property, otherwise I would have been out west thinking of projects to do here,” he said.

Capt. Jim West is one of several coastal guides who uses a custom-painted Corky, and landed these fish in East Galveston Bay, where the limit is 10 speckled trout. Below, in Costa Rica, the lures are painted in several custom colors. Top photo by Robert Sloan. Bottom photo by L&S Bait Company.

Fishermen have been tweaking lures since the first one was ever made, and for trout fishermen along the Texas coast that’s definitely the way to go with one of the best lures ever made for catching trophy trout — Paul Brown’s Original Corky. Thousands of these softbodied suspending lures have been sold, and they may have caught more trophy trout than any other lure ever made. Jim Wallace used a Corky to catch the state record rod and reel trout that weighed 13.11 pounds. You would think that tweaking such a big-time producer of wall-class speckled trout would be taboo. Not so. Back in 2008, Lowell Odom, a Rockport and Galveston guide, figured out that he could take a Corky and give it a paint job, add a little flash and better treble hooks and catch more trout. He was right. And before you know it, some of the best guides in the business were fishing Odom’s customized Corkys. Some of those guides include Jay Watkins,

Jim West, Charlie Paradoski, Cliff Webb, Dwayne Lowrey and James Plaag. “It started out with Jay Watkins,” said Odom. “He wanted Corkys in certain colors that he knew would catch more trout. At first I was using a Sharpie and some fingernail polish. But there was a problem keeping the ink on the lures. Airbrushing was the best way to paint the lures. We started out with Fat Boys, and then started doing Soft-Dine XL’s. Originally, I was doing a lot of customized Mirrolures then moved on to the Corky Fat Boys and Dines.” One of the best color combinations is clear plastic with a silver hologram, glitter body and plum back. The transparent Corkys were best in clear water. The bone/diamond has also been good. Odom started working with the clear bodies so that people could custom paint them. What he found out is that a lot of fishermen didn’t want to paint their own lures. That’s when orders for his custom lures started pouring in. So much so that three years ago he moved the Please turn to page 19

Please turn to page 6

By Robert Sloan

Texas is lucky to have an assortment of rivers that offer great angling opportunities for anything from rainbow trout to smallmouth bass. The Sabine is best known for its excellent run of big white bass. The Guadalupe is famous for its rainbow trout fishing. And the

Devils River is a one-of-a-kind ribbon of gin-clear water that’s loaded with smallmouth bass. All three of those rivers are produce fine catches of fish. There is one, though, that anglers aren’t as familiar with. It’s the Angelina River smack-dab in the middle of the Piney Woods. “It’s one of the finest rivers we have in Texas,” said guide Bill Fondren. “It’s a small river by Texas Please turn to page 14

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

For Lone Star Outdoor News

White bass fishing is excellent on the Angelina River, with crappie and largemouth bass catches mixed in. Photo by Robert Sloan.

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10

HUNTING

FISHING

Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12

Guides chasing snows (P. 4)

Students helping habitat (P. 8)

Some head to other states.

Plantings to benefit Lake Fork.

Hunter dollars (P. 5)

Black drum time (P. 9)

Report shows significant contribution to GDP.

Big fish coming in at piers.

Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 19 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 23

INSIDE

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Prime fishing on the Angelina


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February 23, 2018

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February 23, 2018

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HUNTING Results of quail research A new published

deer hunter

Lone Star Outdoor News The Quail-Tech Alliance has been evaluating the influence of broadcasting supplemental feed directly into the habitat on bobwhite survival and reproduction since 2010. Now, the research showing the benefits of this supplemental feeding program for bobwhite reproduction has been accepted for publication in the international, peer-reviewed journal, “Wildlife Biology.” The article, “Effects of food supplementation on the nesting dynamics of wild northern bobwhite,” will appear this spring. The results couldn’t be more timely. The article details the benefits of broadcasting supplemental feed into the habitat during a severe drought, as their research showed in 2011. “As we are currently experiencing a severely dry period, broadcasting grain sorghum into the habitat is something that you should consider,” Brad Dabbert of Quail-Tech Alliance said. “It is important to note that broadcasting supplemental feed is an add-on ben-

Studies since 2010 are finally being published, showing that quail nesting improves with the introduction of supplemental feed broadcast into habitat, especially during drought. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

efit, not a replacement for proper habitat management to maintain sufficient vegetative cover for bobwhites.” The research showed that during the 2011 nesting season, hens with access to feed broadcast into the habitat produced 0.86 nests per hen while hens not receiving feed produced 0.15 nests

Chance Morse takes aim out of the blind during his first deer hunt with the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. Photo by David Sweet.

Man has big plans after first hunt with Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Chance Morse of Irving had only been on a few waterfowl and varmint hunts before

getting introduced to the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. Now, he is buying a four-wheel drive truck and getting on a deer lease. “I went to the Wild Game Supper at the Beretta Gallery last October,” Morse said. “When David Sams asked who hadn’t been deer hunting, it was only girls that raised their hands. My friend, Cameron Martin,

Please turn to page 7

Please turn to page 7

Snow goose hunters still out

Some snow goose hunters are out and having good hunts during the Light Goose Conservation Order season. Some Texas guides pursue snows, while others head to Arkansas. The season run through March 18. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Geese expected to head north soon By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Fletcher Feldman had his best Light Goose Conservation Order snow goose hunt on Valentine’s Day near Bay City, while other Texas guides moved their operations to states to the north. There aren’t many guides, or

hunters, that pursue snow geese into February in the state, but Fletcher was happy his hunters got to participate in a great hunt. “I witnessed some of the best snow goose hunting action I’ve ever experienced,” the Run-NGun Guide Service guide said. His group dropped 105 snow geese in the outfitter’s best hunt of the season that began Jan. 29 after the regular goose season ended. “We’re going to chase them

as long as they stay around, but they could migrate out any day,” said outfitter Daniel Kubeka. “The days we have wind, sunlight or fog we do really well. The no wind days are tough.” Kubeka said there have been plenty of snow geese around the Bay City area. “The slower hunts haven’t been because of a lack of birds,” he said. Some Texas outfitters have followed the geese to the north and east. Cody Malone guides white-

tail hunters in the fall and bass fishermen on Lake Fork in spring and summer. In February, he runs hunts in northeastern Arkansas, and his hunters have been having banner shoots, with one group totaling 139 geese last weekend. “There are 2-3 million geese up here,” he said. “It’s just more reliable than Texas goose hunting. We get birds coming from the north when it’s cold, and birds coming up from the south when it warms up. Most of our hunts have

been in the 40-60 bird range, with some better hunts mixed in.” Malone has leased 80,000 acres in the area, and said in some areas, there are almost too many birds. “They are all staging around here and there are lots of juveniles mixed in with the adult birds,” he said. “You’ll have a group coming in, and another larger group will come and pull them away.” Malone said the fun should last a few more weeks. Please turn to page 6


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February 23, 2018

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Hunting, fishing significant contributor to GDP Hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation are now included by the federal government’s gross domestic product, and the impact shown is significant. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Inaugural report highlights economic influence of outdoor recreation industry Lone Star Outdoor News Revenue from outdoor recreation is now considered by the federal government in analyzing its gross domestic product, and the results now are known.

In its first report, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis showed that outdoor recreation accounts for 2 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP), at $373.7 billion. The hunting/shooting/trapping segment spent $15.4 billion in 2016, with hunting accounting for more than 60 percent of that amount. Boating/fishing activities were a whopping $38.2 billion. The Outdoor Recreation Satel-

lite Account report also showed the outdoor recreation economy grew 3.8 percent in 2016, compared to growth of 2.8 percent in the overall economy. “Businesses need the right data to help them hire, invest and grow,” said U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “The historical lack of detailed federal data regarding outdoor recreational activities has handicapped both the private and public sectors. The public will no doubt be surprised at the eco-

be allocated to specific outdoor activities, accounted for 35 percent of the conventional outdoor recreation gross output. “The report affirms what those of us in the outdoor community already know — outdoor recreation has a far-reaching positive impact across the U.S. and our economy,” said Thom Dammrich, Outdoor Recreation Roundtable chair and president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

nomic importance of this industry as we release prototype statistics measuring the impact of activities like boating, fishing, RVing, hunting, camping, hiking and more.” Motorized vehicles topped the list of conventional outdoor recreation spending at $59.4 billion, with recreational vehicles accounting for more than half of that amount, at $30 billion. Multi-use apparel and accessories, including backpacks and general-purpose gear that could not

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February 23, 2018

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Chasing snows Continued from page 4

Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News

“After the first week of March,” we’ll head back to Lake Fork for the fishing,” he said. Allen Morehouse used to guide goose hunters in Central Texas, but also moved his operation with Elite Outdoorsmen to Arkansas, and also hunts in Missouri as the birds continue their movement north. In Texas, the Light Goose Conservation Order season runs through March 18. During the season, intended to reduce snow goose numbers to protect habitat in their breeding grounds, electronic calling is permitted, unplugged shotguns are allowed and there is no daily bag or possession limit.

Reservoir has hunter searching for lease Continued from page 1

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What Davis didn’t know was the lease happened to be the site of the levee of the proposed reservoir. “We had no idea there would eventually be a reservoir there,” he said. Davis said the lease was unique, although the hunting would not be described as stellar. “I have been hunting all over Texas for 59 years, many of them using corn feeders,” he said. “The FanOn his last day at his Fannin County lease, Dick Davis moved his hunting equipnin County lease ment off of the property. Photo by Dick Davis. is the only place I have ever hunted where deer did not utilize corn. In 10 years, we never saw a plenty of people negatively impacted worse deer go to a feeder, never caught one on than me.” The water authority started purchasing a feeder cam. Although, our squirrels and coons were obese. The woods were full of land and mitigating long before the reseracorns and the fields have lots of native voir was approved, Davis said. “They seemed to know that eventually grasses.” Not many deer were taken on the prop- they would be able to build that reservoir,” he said. erty. The Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir “In 10 years, we took only four bucks and six does,” Davis said. “We hunted hard, project, as proposed by the North Texas most often left empty-handed, but it was Municipal Water District, will create a wagreat being on 1,500 acres with only three ter supply reservoir to provide drinking water to cities north and east of Dallas. other people — on a crowded day.” Like many deer hunters, Davis is not Three years ago, he knew his time on the stranger to the lost lease. lease was limited. “I’ve left or lost every deer lease I’ve ever “After three years of extensions, we finally got our notice to evacuate the lease by had, and I’ve been hunting for 59 years,” he said. “I love to hunt and manage wildFeb. 28,” he said. Davis is disappointed, but said he’s trying life, but like most people I can’t afford to buy much property.” not to feel sorry for himself. After moving his hunting equipment in “The guy we lease from is getting evicted after 35 years, and he grew up with his fa- the rain, for now, it’s all going to his 10ther who had the cattle rights before that,” acre tract. “I can’t seem to find another lease nearhe said. “He’s losing his way to make a living, and the reservoir is impacting dozens by,” he said. if not hundreds of landowners — there are


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First deer

Page 7

Supplemental feed for quail

Continued from page 4

made me raise mine.” Morse filled out some information, and later he got a call from Mimi Sams of the foundation with a chance to hunt. “I had something going on so I couldn’t go,” Morse said. Morse thought he had missed his chance, until the phone rang again with a last-minute opportunity in late January. “I was ready and available,” he said. On the short weekend trip to the Managed Lands Deer Program ranch in West Texas, he had heard the stories that the deer weren’t moving. But on his first time in the blind with his guide, David Sweet, a tall 8-pointer stepped out. “I have never felt adrenaline like that,” Morse said. “I was panting and sweating — Sweet had to tell me to calm down and breathe.” Unfortunately, a button buck came out right after the 8-pointer and the two bucks moved off. The next morning, more deer came out. “There were five deer, three bucks and two doe,” Morse said. “David (Sweet) asked me, ‘Do you want to take this one?’ I said yes and made the shot.” Morse was happy his guide was so calm. “David was super happy for me,” he said. “And it was his birthday. You could tell he really loved what he did.” Morse is boiling the buck’s skull, planning a do-it-yourself European mount. And he took the meat to Cinnamon Creek Wild Game Processing in Roa-

February 23, 2018

Continued from page 4

Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News

On his first deer hunt with the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation, Chance Morse harvested his first buck. Photo by David Sweet.

noke. “I had eaten their stuff at the Beretta Gallery and it was delicious,” he said. The just-turned 30-year-old spent his birthday weekend trout fishing at Broken Bow, Oklahoma, and, on Feb. 19, was using the President’s Day holiday to shop for a new truck. He’s hoping to finalize plans on a deer lease. “My buddy and his dad had a place open up on their lease near San An-

gelo,” he said. “So I’m going to look at that — hopefully it will work out.” Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is 501(c)(3) charitable organization that seeks to create hunters and fishermen for a lifetime by creating opportunities for those, of any age, who have the passion but lack the opportunity. For more information or to donate, call (214) 361-2276 or visit lsonews.com/lsonfoundation.

per hen. The nest season extended 16 days longer for the birds with access to feed. During the 2012 nesting season, hens with access to feed broadcast into the habitat produced 1.60 nests per hen while hens not receiving feed produced 0.81 nests per hen, and the nesting season length was 31 days longer. “These results directly link the management practice of broadcasting supplemental grain sorghum into the habitat to reproductive benefits measured in wild bobwhite populations,” Dabbert said. “We are proud of this accomplishment, because it fulfills our mission through the last step of the scientific method, publication, the Holy Grail for scientists,” Dabbert said. “None of this work would have been possible without the generous support of the 6666 Ranch, the Burnett Foundation, and the Park Cities Chapter of the Quail Coalition.

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FISHING

A big two days on Rayburn Lone Star Outdoor News Going into the third and final day of the Costa FLW Series Southwestern Division event on Sam Rayburn, tournament leader Kevin Lasyone of Dry Prong, Louisiana,

had accumulated a nice 10-pound, 8-ounce cushion atop the leaderboard. A severe fog delay eventually caused the final day to be canceled, giving him the win and $54,200. “This has been a long time coming,” said La-

syone, who has fished Rayburn for more than 25 years. “I hate it happened this way, mostly because I was looking forward to going out there and bearing down on my best spot. Lasyone’s honey hole produced a massive

31-pound, 6-ounce limit by 9:30 a.m. on day one, and then another 21 pounds, 11 ounces by 1:30 p.m. on day two, giving him a two-day total of 53 pounds, 1 ounce. “It’s one of the biggest community holes on the Please turn to page 14

The tournament anglers have been catching plenty of bass at Sam Rayburn Reservoir. Photo by Chad Love, FLW Fishing.

Students help develop cover at Lake Fork

Yantis High School FFA students have been assisting the Lake Fork Sportman’s Association in an effort to add cover for fingerlings at Lake Fork. Photo by Richard Walker.

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

During the drought that took hold of Texas in the early part of the decade, Lake Fork showed her age. The lack of vegetation became painfully apparent to anglers as lake levels dropped. When a fishing guide struck up a conversa-

tion about the problem with Kevin Storey, supervisor for the state’s Inland Fisheries Tyler North district, it became the genesis of a project that continues today. Storey said the agency came up with the idea of planting bareroot plants in hopes of offering cover for fingerlings. The Lake Fork Sportsman’s Association, a nonprofit group, got involved

and both organizations began planning a way to grow plants that could then be transplanted into Lake Fork — a less expensive alternative to buying larger readyto-go plants. “It’s been so obvious to us that we need more cover,” said Carolyn West, president of LFSA. Her group contacted Yantis High School and began working

with agriculture students there some six years ago. The students began growing button bushes that they eventually planted at Lake Fork that first year. The project is ongoing, with LFSA purchasing button bushes and supervising, while students nurture the bushes until they are ready for planting in the fall. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

and LFSA members supply boats for the students on planting day. The project got a boost in 2016 with a TPWD grant for a new greenhouse at the school dedicated to button bushes and aquatic plants. “The main thing is to have these ag students involved in actual learning and about conservation.” West said. Please turn to page 11

When cold, Valley angler fishes the docks By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News Sometimes it pays to take the simple approach. For Genaro Serna, a drop in the thermometer is his favorite method to one of his favorite fish — speckled trout. The 69-year-old Harlingen resident has been fishing as long as

he can remember, and owns his own boat. When it’s cold, though, he leaves the boat at home and focuses on hooking trout from the boat docks in Port Mansfield. “I like to come here as much as I can possibly can,” Serna said during a recent cold day, at least for Rio Grande Valley standards. “This beats all the work you do whenever you fish from your

boat.” With little preparation time, no fueling and loading the boat, hauling it to a boat ram, and washing it after the fishing day, he simply heads to the docks. Most of the docks in the harbor are private and off-limits, but there are still places to fish. “At the marina, there are two or three public docks for loading

and unloading people,” Serna said. “You can fish of both sides of them. To the sides, there are private property signs where you can’t go. I’ve been fishing there the last 10 years and have never had a problem.” Serna uses a DOA lure, in particular a white and gold shrimp whenever he is after trout, and moves his rod, making the shrimp Please turn to page 11

Genaro Serna and his friend landed a good stringer of speckled trout while fishing docks in Port Mansfield on a chilly February day. Photo by Tony Vindell.


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Big black drum being landed from piers

Several Texas piers hold black drum fishing contests that run through March. Reports of big drum catches are coming in. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News The big black drum are coming in at some Texas piers. At the Red Dot Pier in Corpus Christi, Byron Doucet said the fishing has picked up since Valentine’s Day. “They are catching lots of them,” he said on Feb. 19. “This afternoon, three big fish have been brought in and another broke off when they were trying to net it.” There were 15 people fishing the pier on the Monday afternoon. The water temperature was 63 degrees on a sunny, breezy, 80-degree afternoon. Doucet was off over the weekend, but a chalkboard at the pier indicated the fishing had been good for several days. “The board is full of marks,” he said. The pier is holding its Black Drum Tournament, open

through March 31. There is a one-time $5 entry fee, the fish must be caught on the pier during store hours and must be kept alive. “We have 244 entries so far,” Doucet said. At Seawolf Park in Galveston, according to its social media posts, a 33.7-pounder was landed on Feb. 18 and another big fish came in Feb. 19. Seawolf Park also hold its annual Black Drum Tournament from Feb. 15 until March 31, with free fishing passes going to the winners. The entry fee is $25, and the fish must be caught from the pier. For those fishing from a boat, the Gulf Coast Tournament Association holds the Galveston Yacht Basin Big Ugly Bash Black Drum Tournament from Feb. 1 to April 1. The fish must be 15-30 inches in length. There is a $25 entry fee, with daily weigh-ins at the Galveston Yacht Basin.

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Team has big day, big winnings on Rayburn Phil Marks, of Dallas, and Tim Reneau, of Richland Springs, weighed 37.04 pounds to win the second regular-season event of the Texas Team Trail presented by Cabela’s February 10 on Sam Rayburn Reservoir. By participating in contingency programs, the anglers’ original boat and motor package was upgraded to a boat valued at $46,895. The duo worked the lake’s upper end, near the Highway 147 bridge in two spots. Both anglers have decades of experience on Rayburn, but these particular areas were the ones Marks fished during a recent BFL win. “They’re hard bottom with isolated stumps on them,” said Marks. “They have old spider stumps; you can see them on your down scan. I don’t know that we caught any that weren’t around stumps. I known the first 8-pounder I caught, my bait deflected off the stump and it locked up.” “Over the course of the last six weeks, I’ve checked hundreds of spots just like them, but I could only count on these two places,” he said. “I don’t really know why. I’ve gotten a bite here and a bite there, but there have been schools of big ones in these two places.” The team used crankbaits in chartreuse/blue and Tennessee shad. On top of the new boat and motor, the anglers added $3,180 in Anglers Advantage cash for a total of $50,075 in winnings. Second-place finishers Brian Shook and John Iles weighed 30.07 pounds to win $9,957. Starting uplake and working their way down to the midlake area, Shook and Iles targeted deep drop-offs with brush in 20-28 feet of water. They threw deep-diving crankbaits in citrus shad, along with a jig and craw. Grover Mansfield, of Brookeland, and Dale Jones, of Vidor, weighed 29.62 pounds, including a 10.16-pounder, to take third place. Mostly targeting open hard spots within the grass, the anglers caught their fish in 3-8 feet of water on lipless crankbaits. The team won $7,045. —TXTT


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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained upriver; 52-57 degrees; 6’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live and cut bait. AMISTAD: Water murky; 6468 degrees; 23.14’ low. Black bass are fair on jigs and green/ pumpkin soft plastic worms on light Texas rigs. Striped bass are fair on slabs and grubs. White bass are fair on slabs and crankbaits. Catfish are fair on shrimp, nightcrawlers and cheese bait. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines and drop lines baited with live perch. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 51-59 degrees; 2.72’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow to fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 45-49 degrees; 0.50’ high. Black bass are good on soft plastic jerkbaits, bladed jigs and Carolina-rigged lizards. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 5257 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are fair to good on lipless crankbaits, jigs and Texas rigs. Sunfish are fair on cut nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. BASTROP: Water stained; 63-67 degrees. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and liver. BELTON: Water stained; 62-66 degrees; 3.49’ low. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows at night. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with frozen shad. BENBROOK: Water stained; 46-50 degrees; 1.39’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 47-51 degrees; 0.14’ high. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BONHAM: Water stained; 45-49 degrees; 1.24’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, medium crankbaits and Carolina-rigged worms. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs on brush piles. Catfish are fair along creek channel with cut shad. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits near the dam. Striped bass are slow. Redfish are fair on tilapia, crawfish and shad near Dead Tree Point. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver, shrimp and shad in 20-30 feet. BRIDGEPORT: Water clear, 4448 degrees: 4.45’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on white jigs. White bass are slow. Hybrid striper are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 60-64 degrees; 3.70’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed jigs, small crankbaits and watermelon/red worms over brush piles. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on jigs and watermelon/red crankbaits under lighted docks at night. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are fair on liver, minnows and shrimp.

BUCHANAN: Water stained; 63-67 degrees; 4.79’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon/red grubs, blue flake worms and drop-shot worms along ledges in 12-25 feet. Striped bass are fair drifting live shad in 20-28 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. CADDO: Water stained; 47-51 degrees; 1.35’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on chicken livers and shad along the shoreline. Redfish are fair on live perch, shad, tilapia and crawfish. Catfish are slow. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 64-68 degrees; 3.89’ low. Black bass are very good on Texas-rigged red shad worms and creature baits along bluffs in 10-15 feet. Striped bass are fair jigging spoons and trolling crankbaits on downriggers in 40-60 feet. White bass are fair but small on blade baits along main lake bluffs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 45-48 degrees; 1.74’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 63-67 degrees; 24.92’ low. Black bass are good on heavy jigs, crankbaits and large soft plastic lizards in the grass. White bass are fair on minnows upriver. Crappie are fair on minnows. Drum are fair on live worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 6165 degrees; 2.75’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits and spinner baits. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 89 degrees at the hot water discharge, 66 degrees in main lake; 1.36’ low. Black bass are fair on soft plastics and spinner baits in 8-10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CONROE: Water stained; 6165 degrees; 0.25’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits, spinner baits and jigs. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are slow. COOPER: Water stained; 55-64 degrees; 1.94’ low. Black bass are fair on swim jigs, spinner baits and Texasrigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper and white bass are fair on slabs. CORPUS CHRISTI LAKE: Water off-color; 58-63 degrees; 0.97’ low. Black bass are fair to good on jigs, lipless crankbaits and shaky heads. White bass are fair on tail spinners. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are good on live shad. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 45-48 degrees;

2.25 low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows on docks. Catfish are good on trotlines. FAIRFIELD: Water fairly clear. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, swim jigs and Texas-rigged creature baits. No report on other species. FALCON: Water murky; 64-68 degrees; 17.72’ low. Black bass are good on spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and cut bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver and shrimp. FORK: Water stained; 47-50 degrees; 1.01’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, bladed jigs and black and blue flipping jigs near timber along channel swings. White and yellow bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs along bridges. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water off-color; 52-58 degrees; 2.47’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed spinner baits and soft plastics. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are fair on frozen shrimp and stink bait. GRANBURY: Water stained; 62-66 degrees; 0.40’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics, spinner baits, crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on pet spoons. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and stink bait. GRANGER: Water stained; 63-67 degrees; 0.52’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with shad and cut bait in 10-20 feet. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 45-48 degrees; 0.76 low. Black bass are slow. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 52–59 degrees; 32.54 low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 60-64 degrees; 0.11’ high. Black bass are fair on black or blue worms with red or blue metal flake around sand bars at mid lake, and on jigs in creek channels. Crappie are fair on live minnows in 20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live worms near bream beds. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 54-59 degrees; 3.4’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs. No reports on crappie. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 45-49 degrees; 0.91’ low. Black bass are fair on

bladed jigs, spinner baits and Carolina-rigged worms. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 47-51 degrees: 1.51’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, lipless crankbaits and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LAVON: Water stained; 4548 degrees: 2.63’ low. Black bass are Texas-rigged creature baits, shaky-head worms and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 62-66 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are good on black/blue jigs and pumpkinseed tubes off docks. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows in brush piles under heated docks. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp and nightcrawlers. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 43-47 degrees; 1.71’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, spinner baits and shallow crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 63-67 degrees; 0.22’ high. Black bass are good on silver/ black spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are good on lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with shad and cut bait. MACKENZIE: 74.36’ low; 5156. Black bass are slow. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. No reports on crappie. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 84-88 degrees; 2.38’ low. Black bass are good on swim jigs, shaky-head worms and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. MEREDITH: Water fairly clear; 49-56 degrees; 47.59’ low. No reports on black bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in limited numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 47-50 degrees; 2.48’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs and Texasrigged creature baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 53-58 degrees; 1.07’ low. No reports on black bass. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on live bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 61-65 degrees; 2.13’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on black/chartreuse jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver and shrimp. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 5159 degrees; 38.36’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live bait.

OAK CREEK: Water stained; 51-57 degrees; 11.05’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live and cut bait. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 44-48 degrees; 0.41’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, finesse jigs and flipping jigs on docks. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 51-58 degrees; 1.71’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow to fair on live minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on live and cut bait. PROCTOR: Water murky; 6266 degrees; 3.06’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are slow. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 44-49 degrees; 1.23’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, medium crankbaits and Carolina-rigged worms. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 44-47 degrees; 1.55’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 43-47 degrees; 2.98’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged worms, spinner baits and football jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 62-66 degrees; 2.19’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse/black soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on live minnows and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Bream are slow. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and nightcrawlers. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 63-67 degrees; 0.11’ high. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on shad. White bass are fair on pet spoons. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp. SPENCE: 51.53’ low. Catfish are fair to good on live and cut bait. STAMFORD: Water stained to muddy; 52-60 degrees; 0.94’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs. Crappie are slow. White bass are fair on live bait. Blue catfish are good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 62-66 degrees; 4.30’ low. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed spinner baits and watermelon soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and nightcrawlers. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 45-49 degrees; 0.72’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner

n Saltwater reports Page 14 baits, flipping jigs and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXANA: Water stained; 5963 degrees; 3.23’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 43-47 degrees; 1.38’ low. Black bass are good on suspending jerkbaits, medium crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Striped bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 61-65 degrees; 3.02’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon and chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows over brush piles. Bream are good on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver, nightcrawlers and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 61-65 degrees; 12.38’ low. Black bass are fair on brown jigs and green/pumpkin worms in 28-40 feet. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are good on silver jigging spoons and white grubs. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows and fresh cut bait in 30-45 feet. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers. WEATHERFORD: Water lightly stained; 44-47 degrees; 2.57’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless stick worms, lipless crankbaits and Texas-rigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 44-56 degrees; 21.9’ low. Black bass are fair on soft plastics. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on cheese bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 6266 degrees; 4.70’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon/ red spinner baits, crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on shrimp, nightcrawlers and stink bait. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained; 46-50 degrees; 3.66’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, spinner baits and bladed jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait.

—TPWD


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Industry veterans named to Bass Fishing HOF board John Mazurkiewicz and Steve Bowman were named to the board of directors of the Bass Fishing Hall of Fame. As owner of South Bend, Indiana-based Catalyst Marketing since 1993, Mazurkiewicz provides media relations and advertising services to leading brands in the fishing tackle industries, including Shimano North America Fishing, Inc. He also plays an active role with the American Sportfishing Association, where he chairs the industry group’s communications committee. Bowman, of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been involved in the fishing as an outdoor writer, editor, photographer and book author for more than 30 years. He has been with JM Outdoors

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Project for students Continued from page 8

since 2000 as director of web content, where he heads up tournament coverage for Bassmaster.com and produces the Bassmaster television show and “Bassmaster LIVE.” Donald Howell of Birmingham, Alabama, was reelected board president. Howell played a major role in the hall finding a permanent home within Johnny Morris’ Wonders of Wildlife Museum & Aquarium in Springfield, Missouri. Daren Cole, the global brand director for Navico and former marketing manager of Skeeter Boats, will assume the secretary/treasurer position, and will chair the Board’s annual induction dinner. —BFHOF

Speckled trout off the docks Continued from page 8

swim as if it were alive. On his most recent trip, he landed his limit of five speckled trout while his friend, fishing newcomer Mario Martinez, hooked four — all within three hours. On the same day, anglers coming in from 7-hour deep-sea fishing trips for red snapper returned with disappointed looks on their faces. The weather and underwater currents offshore were blamed. Serna said he has hooked giant speckled trout, a few flounder and an occasional snook from the boat dock, and carries photographs to prove it to those who ask. But once the weather starts to warm up, he’ll return to the routine that many other anglers follow — with his boat.

Yantis High School students and LFSA volunteers load button bushes onto boats to plant at Lake Fork. Photo by Richard Walker.

Tonya Rabenaldt, agriculture teacher at Yantis, said all the students enjoy the unique project. Students check on the plants daily, care for them and go out on pontoon boats to assist on planting day. “There are not any other schools in the area that do this,” she said. “All the kids enjoy it.” Storey said hundreds of button bushes have been planted, but fluctuating water levels at Lake Fork made for little success and most of the plants drowned. “I think that’s one of the most frustrating things,” he added. Button bushes are found further inland around the lake and Storey hopes that some of those planted last fall around the shoreline will produce seeds and spread naturally.

Meanwhile, the groups are trying a new approach using aquatic plants provided by TPWD, such as water willow. Unlike the button bushes, which are planted in the fall or winter, the aquatic plants will be planted this spring. “We’re looking forward to our first go at this with the different types of plants,” said Ed Swenson, LFSA project leader for the aquatic plants. Swenson said they will be evaluating what works and what doesn’t. Water lily, water willow and bulrush are being supplied by TPWD. Swenson said about 600 total will be planted in April or May. “The whole hope is by this earlier start, they’ll be bigger and healthier,” he said.


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February 23, 2018

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GAME WARDEN BLOTTER SOCIAL MEDIA STRIKES A Facebook group notified game wardens about a Cooper’s hawk being killed. The concerned citizen sent in screen shots of a Facebook post where a suspect posed with a dead Cooper’s hawk and stated, “Killed my first hawk today. I found him in the pigeon coop eating this pigeon. I picked up the shovel and killed him! Normally we let them go but I’m tired of them killing my chickens and pigeons.” The actor then posed in several pictures holding the dead hawk. Wardens located the actor and the hawk. Citations and restitution are pending. EXPERIENCING LIFE AS A WARDEN A game warden took two local 10-year-old boys on a youth deer hunt in Scurry County. While in the blind, a young hunter asked what would happen if a poacher came here right now? The warden said he would arrest him, of course. Less than 30 minutes later, they were watching a spike buck from about 300 yards away when a pickup truck on an adjacent county road rolled up, a passenger got out and shot the deer. The driver and passenger both exited their truck and ran into the field where the boys were hunting, grabbed the deer, and began dragging it back to their vehicle. The warden watched in disbelief. The warden called the father of one of the boys and asked him to come watch the boys so he could chase down the suspects. The warden got to his patrol truck and initiated a short pursuit. Both individuals were

ILLEGAL DUMPER UNDONE BY BEER, CHICKENS Four yearling deer carcasses and a hog were dumped along a county road. A Red River County game warden collected evidence, including two beer cans and a feed tub with white feathers inside. A week later there was another dumped deer. The warden went to the nearest house and spoke with the homeowners, who admitted their son legally killed a doe and it fell off the ATV on his way to dump it on another property. During the interview, the warden observed several deer hides in the yard. The homeowners said their dogs had dragged the hides into the yard. After collecting the hides,

apprehended, placed under arrest and transported to the Scurry County Jail. UNNEIGHBORLY MAN NOT SO INNOCENT A Cherokee County game warden got a call from a landowner concerning profane messages that were left along his property line, allegedly blaming the landowner for messing up his neighbor’s hunting activities. The warden made a visit to the neighbor and learned the boyfriend of the homeowner’s niece, who had access to the property for hunting, had shot a deer or two during the season. While the homeowner attempted to contact the subject, the warden decided to look around the property. He discovered two illegal buck heads under a shed, neither of which met the county’s antler restriction, and also found a spoiled deer carcass in a nearby cooler. Eventually, the subject arrived at the residence and after some questioning by the warden, admitted to

which were consistent in size with the dumped yearling carcasses, the warden made a visit to a neighbor who denied any knowledge of the incident. The warden noticed feed tubs at their house, a pile of beer cans and white chickens consistent with the evidence he found at the dump site. He retrieved the beer cans and matched a specific lot number on the bottom of the can and an expiration date, meaning the two beer cans from the dump site were connected to this house. When confronted with this, the suspects admitted to illegally dumping the deer.

shooting the two bucks from behind the house, on the property line. The second buck was shot during the late muzzleloader-only season with a high-powered rifle. Multiple cases are pending. HORN-HONKING HARASSER Game wardens recently responded to a possible hunter harassment call near the Harris and Waller County line. Contact was made with the hunters who showed video of a subject on an adjacent property setting off his vehicle alarm every time ducks would fly in, chasing the birds away. When interviewing the suspect, the warden asked why he was honking his horn and the suspect stated, while getting agitated, because he wanted to ruin their hunt. The case is pending. IGNORANCE ISN’T BLISS In Maverick County, game wardens made contact with a ranch hand during a camp check and were informed there were five hunters

still in the field. While waiting for the hunters to return to camp, the wardens discovered several plastic bags in a cooler containing 43 duck breasts and 10 dove breasts missing the required wing or head attached for bird identification purposes. The wardens made contact with the hunters and found them in possession of five dove and two ducks, along with a mix of lead and steel shotshells in their hunting bags and shotguns. The wardens examined the dove and found their crops to be full of corn. The hunters were asked by the wardens where they had harvested the dove, and were told they had shot the birds under a deer feeder. The hunters told the wardens they had hunted their entire lives and had no idea they couldn’t hunt dove at a deer feeder, and also said they didn’t know they had to keep a wing or a head on a duck for identification purposes. Citations were issued to all five hunters. The birds were seized, and civil restitution and cases are pending.

DIGGING IN THE TRASH A Lubbock area game warden received a tip from a Facebook message concerning the dumping of geese in a community dumpster. The warden found four geese that had not been cleaned and had been dumped along with other bags of trash. In the trash was a “to-go” bag from a local restaurant with a phone number on the receipt. The warden called the phone number, which led to three interviews before he was able to identify a possible suspect that lived on the street where the dumped birds were located. The warden tracked down the suspect, who admitted to dumping the birds. Ironically, the warden had checked the suspect with those same harvested geese while in the field three days prior. OBSERVANT ANGLERS A young boy approached a game warden and state park police officer at the boat ramp in Falcon State Park and said he and his dad were fishing when they observed several bundles floating in the water. He showed the officers a photo of one of the bundles and stated they had marked the location on their GPS in the boat. The two officers drove to the location by boat and recovered 17 large bundles of marijuana floating in the water. The marijuana weighed 705 pounds and was valued at $564,208.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263


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February 23, 2018

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TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT

New head at Brazos River Authority

Sponsored by

David Collinsworth, a regional manager for the Brazos River Authority, has been named general manager and CEO for the Waco-based organization that manages water supplies in the Brazos River basin. Collinsworth will oversee more than 275 employees in multiple locations throughout the Brazos River basin, while managing the system’s water supply, water treatment projects and water quality initiatives under the direction of the 21-member board of directors. Collinsworth, a 20-year Brazos River Authority employee, graduated from Southwest Texas State University with a degree in aquatic biology and organic chemistry. The organization built, owns and operates Possum Kingdom Lake, Lake Granbury and Lake Limestone. It also contracts with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to store water in eight other lakes: Lake Whitney, Lake Belton, Proctor Lake, Lake Somerville, Stillhouse Hollow Lake, Granger Lake, Lake Georgetown and Aquilla Lake. —BRA

Heavy fish for FLW winner

NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good on the Louisiana shoreline on top-waters and Corkies. Flounder are fair on jigs tipped with shrimp around marsh drains. SOUTH SABINE: Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Trout are fair to good around Lighthouse Cove on top-waters. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on soft plastics and plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair for waders along the east shoreline on Soft-Dines and Corkies. Redfish and catfish are good in the marsh on shrimp. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good on the south shoreline on Gamblers, Bass Assassins MirrOlures and Corkies. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Black drum are fair to good in the Ship Channel on crabs. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good for waders in the mud and shell on top-waters and Corkies in the afternoon. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Black drum are fair to good on crabs in the channel. Redfish are fair to good in Moses Lake on Crabs and mullet. Trout are fair to good on the reefs on shrimp. FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs. Black drum are good at

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lake,” he said. “I saw guys fishing it in practice, and I just knew someone else had found those fish. But when I got there the first day, it was wide open.” Lasyone used a rather old-school approach to finding the area: actually fishing. “I think I found fish that no one else did because I put my trolling motor down and fished a mile and a half before I got a couple big bites,” he reveals. “I don’t even know how to use all that scanning technology.” Lasyone’s primary lure during the event was a 3/4-ounce V&M jig in black/blue/ gold with a watermelon seed trailer. TJ Goodwyn of Center finished second with 42 pounds, 10 ounces, winning $22,600. He was followed by Scotty Villines of Ponca, Arkansas with 41 pounds, 3 ounces and Kris Wilson of Montgomery with 39 pounds, 5 ounces.

ROCKPORT: Trout are fair to good in Morris-Cummings Cut on free-lined shrimp. Black drum are good in the Lydia Ann Channel on crabs. Trout are fair over grass while drifting with live shrimp. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good at East Flats on shrimp. Black drum are good in the Shrimpboat Channel on crabs and finger mullet. Redfish, black drum and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp. CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on scented plastics and live shrimp. Black drum are good in the Humble Channel at night on crabs and table shrimp. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good while wading mud and grass on Corkies, Down South Lures and Gamblers. Black drum are good in the Land Cut on crabs. Trout are fair to good in the Land Cut on glow plastics. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are good on Custom Corkies around sand and grass at Green Island. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on scented plastics and shrimp. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are good around the spoil islands, channel edges and color changes on DOA Shrimp in 3-4 feet of water. Black drum and redfish are fair at the jetty. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the flats while wading with Corkies and Soft– Dines. Redfish are fair at Three Island on small top-waters and soft plastics under rattling corks.

—TPWD

Angelina River fishing

MADE IN USA

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New

Walk where no other topwater has walked before!

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the jetties on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good on Corkies and Soft-Dines on the south shoreline. Trout are fair to good for drifters on Bass Assassins and Down South Lures over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Redfish are fair to good on the edge of Oyster Lake and at Shell Island on

shrimp and crabs. Trout are fair on shell and grass on soft plastics. Black drum are fair to good at the jetty on crabs. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are good on top-waters over soft mud in waist–deep water in San Antonio Bay. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes with scented plastics.

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standards, but has big-time fishing potential for white bass and crappie. A friend of mine was there last week and they had 93 white bass and crappie. They caught several largemouth bass as well. While fishermen are waiting for the white bass in much of the state, the run is on on the Angelina. “It’ll go on through the end Ken Chaumont reaches for a white bass while fishing the Angelina River. of March, and the Photo by Robert Sloan. crappie are in prespawn mode and feeding on lots of shad,” Fondren said. fish is about 3 1/2 miles long. The water “You never know from one cast to the next is dark and clear and perfect for fishing what you’ll catch. I’ve caught a number of spinner baits. One of the most popular is catfish in the Angelina while running jigs a Roadrunner. Fondren said that when the along bottom.” whites and crappie are up on the beds, This river is fairly predictable this time of he’ll use a 1/8-ounce Roadrunner in white year. Its water level doesn’t change a whole or white/chartreuse. When the whites are lot. Fondren said the river is 3 1/2-feet low on the open flats of sloughs, he’ll tie on a now, which is perfect for finding big num- 1/4-ounce chrome lipless crankbait. bers of white bass in pockets of shallow wa“A lot of the fishing here is along brush ter along the shoreline. He’ll also be fishing adjacent to the shoreline, in about 5 feet of in backwater sloughs that are 2- to 5-feet water,” Fondren said. “Something I like to deep. do is work 1/4-ounce Stanley spinnerbaits “When the water is low, like it is now, we rigged with wedge tails along the brush. A can flat tear up the whites,” he said. “There good color combination is black and charare a couple of wide-open sloughs that treuse. That’s how a whole lot of the craphold so many whites you can almost walk pie and largemouth bass were caught last on them. That’s when a 200-fish day is not week. The white bass are all over the sand uncommon.” bars in about 3 feet of water.” Access to this river is limited. The most A few of the water body records on the popular boat ramp is at Marion’s Ferry on Angelina include a 3.10-pound white the upper end of Sam Rayburn off CR 103. bass; a 10.85-pound largemouth bass and The stretch of water that most anglers 1.82-pound crappie.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Omori wins Elite event

The Inland Fisheries College Station-Houston District is seeking to fill a paid internship position this summer. Applicants must be currently enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student in an accredited college or university. Information may be found at facebook.com/TPWInlandFisheriesCollegeStationHouston/ —TPWD

Houston Safari Club’s Annual Convention and Hunting Expo was held at the George R. Brown Convention Center for the first time in 2018. The exhibitors showcased were nearly double the number in previous conventions, and attendance figures surpassed expectations. Both banquet events were sold out. Peter Tam of Tam Safaris was recognized as the Professional Hunter of the Year. Tristan Pepper was awarded the Youth Hunter of the Year award. Denise Welker was named Huntress of the Year and William “Bill” Newlin was recognized as the Hunter of the Year. —HSC

Hunting dog killed, reward offered On Feb. 13, Beau, a chocolate lab belonging to Cass Coroiescu of Conroe, went missing. When he was found, his owner learned his dog had been shot. “We saw some buzzards about 300 yards from our house on the pipeline so we walked back in there and that’s where we found her,” Coroiescu told Fox 26 in Houston. “At first I didn’t want to believe it.” Coroiescu said the dog loved to hunt and play with neighborhood children, and was wearing a pink collar when she was shot. He is offering a $5,000 reward to find Beau’s killer. —Staff report

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For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Page 15

HSC convention sets records

Takahiro Omori won the FLW Tour event on Alabama’s Lake Martin in 2001. He returned to Lake Martin for the Bassmaster Elite event in February and won again. Omori, of Emory, took a 4-pound, 2-ounce lead into the final day, and then landed a final-day catch of 14 pounds to claim the victory with a four-day total of 59 pounds, 8 ounces. It was Omori’s seventh career victory with B.A.S.S. “This time of year, I like to fish shallow — especially during the prespawn,” said Omori, who won $100,000. In practice, Omori identified one small area up the lake Photo by B.A.S.S. where current was flowing behind a small island. The water on the outside of the island was so shallow that Omori had to trim up his outboard and churn mud off the bottom just to reach the right spot. Once he was in place, he made repeated casts into the current with a square-billed crankbait. He was able to land quick limits from the spot each morning. Rookie angler Roy Hawk from Arizona finished second with 52 pounds, 8 ounces, and Adrian Avena of New Jersey followed with 50 pounds, 13 ounces. —B.A.S.S.

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Page 16

February 23, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Sofia Olivarez, of Rio Hondo, landed this 24-inch redfish on the Arroyo Colorado. While hunting with his family in South Texas, Frank DeLeon shot this coyote.

Hannah Powell, 13, took her first animal, a Rio Grande turkey, during her first season to hunt with her father, Brian.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers?

Mark Loredo, hunting in Encino, shot this nilgai at 30 yards with a handgun. Steve Boone shot this buck at the Hawks Double Mountain Ranch in West Texas, using his custom Lapua .338.

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 23, 2018

Page 17

The Brigade experience By Joseph Richards Light penetrated through the old oak groves to reflect on the undisturbed pool of water that lie before me. The tall stands of water reeds and bristlegrass danced in the slight breeze. A surplus of crawling insects traversed my jeans as I waited in complete silence. However, my surrounding environment was not as mute. The humid air carried the songs of a dynamic bird symphony. White-winged dove cooed from the thickets while vibrant red cardinals chased and called their mates in courtship. The subtle night heron released a cackle of unfiltered laughter, and two bullbats screeched like fighter jets over the transparent pool. A turkey gobbled in the distance and the soft hooting of a great horned owl evoked a sense of mystery. I was certainly not alone amidst the great outdoors. This was the morning of June 24, 2017. I had been patiently observing and listening to the avian messages when I heard a single diverse cry for attention. The familiar outlier amongst performers was the northern bobwhite quail. The chorus of songbirds and gamebirds was overwhelming, but the conversant anthem “bob-white, bob-white” echoes in my ears from a passion of searching for this elusive Texas denizen. Waking up at 5:45 a.m. to record bird calls may seem unappealing to the average high schooler. Even more insane may be sacrificing a week of one’s summer vacation to spend long, hot hours in the thorny brush country studying plants and sleepless nights working on homework projects. However, these are a few aspects of a typical South Texas Bobwhite Brigade. The summer program, sponsored by Texas Brigades and Texas Wildlife Association, is an intense youth camp geared to educating today’s future generations on sustainable management of our wildlife and natural

resources while promoting strong work ethics, teamwork and leadership skills. Each group of cadets is called a “covey”— the same as a group of quail. Cadets learn to develop leadership qualities and enhance their skills while working in a team environment. The cadets from each covey engage in outdoor activities such as plant identification, firearm safety, soil assessment, wildlife surveys and habitat evaluation. They also learn about public speaking and media skills for promoting conservation and educating the public about properly managing the land and its resources. One of my favorite events of the brigades was the “dissection of the sunrise” where my covey waited by a brushed water tank for quail and other wildlife. Another interesting activity was Quail Trivia. Each day, we would have several opportunities to display our knowledge over the discussed topics of quail biology and ecology. I am not an exceedingly competitive individual; however, over the course of the camp, I was deemed as my covey’s active entomologist — a person who studies insects. Through my knowledge of insects, I was able to support my team and help carry us to victory in several trivia rounds. The most unique experience of the camp was tracking a collared bobwhite quail using radio telemetry. The process involved attaching a small transmitter collar to a live quail. As our covey traveled through an area of mesquite scrub, I held the antennae and was able to determine the quail’s direction by homing in on its signal. It was an informative and hands-on technique to learn how radio telemetry can help wildlife personnel track and record valuable data on the movements and behaviors of quail and other animals. The South Texas Bobwhite Brigade provided me the ability to work alongside many experts in my prospective field of study. Field

biologists, land managers, foresters, game wardens, wildlife professionals, brigades staff, and many more work in cooperation to create advances for the future of our nation’s environment by sacrificing their time and resources to educate youth about the importance of good stewardship. Their efforts confirmed my hopes and sharpened my interest to pursue a career in wildlife management at Texas A&M University this fall. The Texas Brigades accomplishes a noble goal for conservation by providing an outlet for youth to experience the great outdoors through educational wildlife management programs. Applications for the Texas Brigades are open, and are due by March 15. Application information is at texasbrigades.org.

Photos from Joseph Richards


Page 18

February 23, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Mar 1

Mar 9

Mar 17

Mar 21

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb/Mar Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb/Mar Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 01 Thu

11:37 5:23 12:03 6:18 12:57 7:12 1:51 8:07 2:46 9:01 3:40 9:54 4:34 10:48

----- 5:51 12:32 6:47 1:27 7:42 2:22 8:37 3:16 9:31 4:09 10:23 5:01 11:15

07:01 07:00 06:59 06:58 06:57 06:56 06:54

02 Fri

5:28 11:41

5:54

06:53 06:24 7:25p

03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

6:22 12:10 7:16 1:04 8:10 1:58 9:03 2:51 9:54 3:42 10:44 4:32 11:32 5:20

6:47 12:35 7:40 1:28 8:33 2:22 9:26 3:14 10:17 4:06 11:07 4:55 11:56 5:44

11:31 5:17 12:02 6:12 12:51 7:07 1:46 8:01 2:40 8:55 3:34 9:48 4:28 10:42 5:22 11:35 6:16 12:04 7:11 12:58 8:04 1:52 8:57 2:45 9:48 3:36 10:38 4:26 11:26 5:14

11:59 5:45 12:26 6:41 1:22 7:37 2:16 8:31 3:10 9:25 4:03 10:17 4:56 11:09 5:48 ----6:41 12:29 7:35 1:23 8:28 2:16 9:20 3:08 10:11 4:00 11:01 4:50 11:50 5:38

06:53 06:52 06:51 06:50 06:49 06:48 06:47 06:45 06:44 06:43 06:42 06:41 06:40 06:39 06:38

06:15 06:16 06:17 06:17 06:18 06:19 06:20 06:20 06:21 06:22 06:22 06:23 06:24 06:24 06:25

12:05p 12:59a 12:57p 2:02a 1:55p 3:05a 2:58p 4:05a 4:04p 5:01a 5:11p 5:52a 6:17p 6:39a 7:21p 7:21a 8:22p 8:01a 9:21p 8:38a 10:19p 9:15a 11:15p 9:51a NoMoon 10:29a 12:10a 11:09a 1:03a 11:52a

-----

06:52 06:51 06:50 06:48 06:47 06:46 06:45

06:18 06:19 06:20 06:21 06:22 06:22 06:23 06:25 06:26 06:26 06:27 06:28 06:29 06:29

12:05p 12:57p 1:55p 2:58p 4:05p 5:13p 6:20p

1:10a 2:14a 3:17a 4:17a 5:12a 6:03a 6:48a 7:29a

8:28p 8:07a 9:29p 8:43a 10:28p 9:19a 11:25p 9:54a NoMoon 10:31a 12:21a 11:10a 1:15a 11:52a

San Antonio

Amarillo

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb/Mar Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2018 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb/Mar Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

11:44 5:30 12:10 6:24 1:04 7:19 1:58 8:13 2:52 9:07 3:46 10:01 4:41 10:54 5:35 11:48 6:29 12:16 7:23 1:11 8:17 2:05 9:09 2:58 10:01 3:49 10:50 4:39 11:38 5:27

----12:39 1:34 2:29 3:22 4:15 5:08 6:01 6:54 7:47 8:40 9:33 10:24 11:14 -----

5:58 6:54 7:49 8:44 9:37 10:30 11:22 ----12:41 1:35 2:28 3:21 4:12 5:02 5:50

07:05 07:04 07:03 07:02 07:01 07:00 06:59 06:58 06:57 06:55 06:54 06:53 06:52 06:51 06:50

06:28 06:29 06:30 06:30 06:31 06:32 06:32 06:33 06:34 06:34 06:35 06:36 06:36 06:37 06:38

12:18p 1:11a 1:11p 2:14a 2:09p 3:17a 3:12p 4:17a 4:18p 5:13a 5:25p 6:04a 6:30p 6:51a 7:34p 7:34a 8:35p 8:14a 9:34p 8:51a 10:32p 9:28a 11:28p 10:05a NoMoon 10:43a 12:22a 11:23a 1:15a 12:06p

11:57 5:43 12:23 6:38 1:17 7:32 2:12 8:27 3:06 9:21 4:00 10:14 4:54 11:08 5:48 ----6:42 12:30 7:36 1:24 8:30 2:18 9:23 3:11 10:14 4:02 11:04 4:52 11:52 5:40

----12:52 1:48 2:42 3:36 4:29 5:22 6:14 7:07 8:01 8:54 9:46 10:37 11:27 -----

6:11 7:07 8:03 8:57 9:51 10:43 11:35 12:01 12:55 1:48 2:42 3:34 4:26 5:16 6:04

07:24 07:23 07:21 07:20 07:19 07:18 07:16 07:15 07:14 07:13 07:11 07:10 07:09 07:07 07:06

06:36 06:37 06:38 06:39 06:40 06:41 06:41 06:42 06:43 06:44 06:45 06:46 06:47 06:48 06:48

12:21p 1:36a 1:13p 2:40a 2:10p 3:43a 3:14p 4:43a 4:22p 5:38a 5:31p 6:28a 6:39p 7:12a 7:45p 7:52a 8:49p 8:29a 9:51p 9:03a 10:51p 9:37a 11:50p 10:12a NoMoon 10:48a 12:47a 11:26a 1:41a 12:07p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 3:10 AM 4:12 AM 5:13 AM 6:12 AM 7:08 AM 12:52 AM 1:55 AM 2:56 AM 3:56 AM 4:58 AM 6:06 AM 12:23 AM 1:17 AM 2:14 AM 3:15 AM

Rollover Pass Height -0.24L -0.41L -0.54L -0.63L -0.67L 1.41H 1.46H 1.47H 1.44H 1.38H 1.30H 0.16L 0.12L 0.09L 0.07L

Time 11:07 AM 12:26 PM 1:24 PM 2:10 PM 2:51 PM 8:00 AM 8:51 AM 9:39 AM 10:26 AM 11:12 AM 11:58 AM 7:22 AM 8:55 AM 10:40 AM 12:15 PM

Height 1.17H 1.29H 1.38H 1.43H 1.45H -0.63L -0.51L -0.32L -0.08L 0.19L 0.46L 1.24H 1.21H 1.23H 1.29H

Time 3:28 PM 4:57 PM 6:07 PM 6:59 PM 7:44 PM 3:27 PM 4:02 PM 4:34 PM 5:06 PM 5:37 PM 6:07 PM 12:49 PM 1:50 PM 3:15 AM

Height 0.96L 1.05L 1.07L 1.02L 0.93L 1.43H 1.39H 1.34H 1.29H 1.23H 1.18H 0.71L 0.92L 0.07L

Time 7:48 PM 8:57 PM 10:25 PM 11:43 PM

Height 1.12H 1.17H 1.24H 1.33H

8:27 PM 9:12 PM 9:57 PM 10:44 PM 11:32 PM

0.80L 0.65L 0.49L 0.35L 0.24L

6:34 PM 6:56 PM 12:15 PM

1.12H 1.08H 1.29H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 3:00 AM 4:05 AM 5:14 AM 6:16 AM 7:13 AM 12:46 AM 1:59 AM 3:07 AM 4:09 AM 5:09 AM 6:17 AM 12:21 AM 1:12 AM 2:10 AM 3:09 AM

Height -0.36L -0.52L -0.65L -0.74L -0.77L 1.16H 1.23H 1.28H 1.29H 1.25H 1.18H 0.02L -0.04L -0.08L -0.10L

Time 11:39 AM 12:59 PM 1:56 PM 2:44 PM 3:24 PM 8:09 AM 9:07 AM 10:02 AM 10:49 AM 11:33 AM 12:18 PM 7:44 AM 9:07 AM 10:34 AM 12:14 PM

Height 1.09H 1.24H 1.35H 1.39H 1.38H -0.71L -0.58L -0.40L -0.17L 0.09L 0.36L 1.13H 1.12H 1.14H 1.19H

Height -0.31L -0.46L -0.58L -0.66L -0.69L 1.01H 1.08H 1.14H 1.17H 1.18H 1.17H 0.10L 0.01L -0.03L -0.06L

Time 11:33 AM 12:52 PM 1:45 PM 2:30 PM 3:12 PM 7:46 AM 8:41 AM 9:41 AM 10:38 AM 11:30 AM 12:25 PM 7:13 AM 8:52 AM 10:17 AM 11:44 AM

Height 1.21H 1.38H 1.50H 1.54H 1.51H -0.64L -0.51L -0.31L -0.07L 0.18L 0.44L 1.15H 1.17H 1.22H 1.28H

Height 0.06L -0.01L -0.07L -0.11L -0.12L -0.11L 0.74H 0.69H 0.63H 0.39L 0.28L 0.19L 0.13L 0.09L 0.07L

Time 6:37 PM 7:27 PM 8:27 PM 9:33 PM 11:07 PM

Height 0.72H 0.79H 0.82H 0.82H 0.79H

11:34 AM 12:15 PM 12:54 PM 5:59 AM 8:31 AM 10:44 AM 3:32 PM 4:16 PM 5:05 PM

-0.05L 0.04L 0.15L 0.57H 0.54H 0.55H 0.61H 0.67H 0.70H

Height -0.33L -0.36L -0.37L -0.36L -0.34L 0.39H 0.35H 0.32H 0.29H 0.13L 0.04L -0.04L -0.10L -0.14L -0.14L

Time 8:47 PM 9:25 PM 10:11 PM 11:05 PM

Height 0.37H 0.41H 0.43H 0.41H

1:52 PM 2:38 PM 3:21 PM 4:01 PM 9:09 AM 11:23 AM 8:31 PM 6:21 PM 7:12 PM 7:58 PM

-0.30L -0.23L -0.14L -0.03L 0.27H 0.26H 0.32H 0.40H 0.45H 0.49H

Time

Height

8:21 PM 8:51 PM 3:58 PM 4:28 PM 4:56 PM 5:21 PM 5:45 PM 6:06 PM 1:16 PM 2:47 PM

1.01L 0.94L 1.33H 1.26H 1.17H 1.09H 1.03H 0.97H 0.61L 0.81L

Time

Height

9:36 PM 3:47 PM 4:17 PM 4:41 PM 5:02 PM 5:19 PM 5:33 PM 1:42 PM 3:29 PM

0.93L 1.42H 1.30H 1.17H 1.05H 0.96H 0.90H 0.66L 0.82L

Time

Height

Time

Height

11:16 PM

1.09H

9:20 PM 9:51 PM 10:24 PM 10:58 PM 11:37 PM

0.81L 0.63L 0.45L 0.27L 0.13L

6:23 PM 6:36 PM

0.94H 0.92H

Time

Height

Time 2:30 AM 3:29 AM 4:35 AM 5:46 AM 6:49 AM 12:08 AM 01:23 AM 2:30 AM 3:39 AM 4:46 AM 5:52 AM 12:07 AM 12:49 AM 1:41 AM 2:40 AM

9:55 PM 10:16 PM 10:38 PM 11:03 PM 11:32 PM

0.85L 0.73L 0.56L 0.39L 0.23L

5:44 PM 5:42 PM

0.86H 0.85H

Time

Height

Port O’Connor Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 5:24 AM 6:36 AM 7:46 AM 8:54 AM 9:55 AM 10:48 AM 1:07 AM 2:40 AM 4:07 AM 12:21 AM 1:11 AM 2:04 AM 3:07 AM 4:20 AM 5:34 AM

Time 8:40 AM 9:52 AM 11:01 AM 12:03 PM 1:00 PM 12:11 AM 4:01 AM 5:43 AM 7:26 AM 3:56 AM 4:50 AM 5:41 AM 6:34 AM 7:32 AM 8:39 AM

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 3:23 AM 4:22 AM 5:26 AM 6:29 AM 7:30 AM 12:30 AM 1:43 AM 2:53 AM 4:00 AM 5:08 AM 12:04 AM 12:50 AM 1:37 AM 2:25 AM 3:16 AM

Time 7:08 PM 7:30 PM 7:56 PM 8:19 PM 11:24 AM 3:32 AM 4:43 AM 5:51 AM 7:01 AM 8:14 AM 9:39 AM 11:38 AM 4:21 PM 5:28 PM 6:16 PM

Height 0.81H 0.91H 0.96H 0.97H -0.49L 0.98H 0.99H 0.97H 0.93H 0.87H 0.80H 0.76H 0.84H 0.94H 1.00H

Height -0.27L -0.37L -0.44L -0.49L -0.49L 0.83H 0.86H 0.88H 0.88H 0.84H 0.15L 0.06L -0.01L -0.04L -0.04L

Time 1:25 PM 2:36 PM 3:21 PM 3:53 PM 4:14 PM 8:27 AM 9:22 AM 10:17 AM 11:12 AM 12:09 PM 6:25 AM 8:07 AM 10:14 AM 12:21 PM 2:04 PM

Height 0.78H 0.87H 0.93H 0.93H 0.90H -0.46L -0.36L -0.22L -0.04L 0.17L 0.80H 0.77H 0.80H 0.86H 0.91H

Height 0.06L -0.06L -0.13L -0.16L -0.16L -0.11L -0.02L 1.25H 1.17H 1.07H 0.98H 0.95H 0.19L 0.14L 0.14L

Time 3:08 PM 4:03 PM 4:58 PM 5:55 PM 10:47 PM 11:58 PM

Height 1.22H 1.33H 1.39H 1.37H 1.33H 1.31H

9:23 AM 10:16 AM 11:09 AM 12:07 PM 1:27 PM 12:15 PM 1:46 PM 2:43 PM

0.12L 0.29L 0.49L 0.69L 0.88L 1.04H 1.14H 1.20H

Height 0.12L 0.01L -0.08L -0.14L -0.17L -0.14L 1.07H 1.07H 1.04H 0.99H 0.93H 0.25L 0.18L 0.14L 0.13L

Time 3:13 PM 3:48 PM 4:26 PM 5:07 PM 5:50 PM 4:13 PM 8:50 AM 9:48 AM 10:45 AM 11:39 AM 12:28 PM 8:08 AM 9:36 AM 2:19 PM 3:03 PM

Height 1.01H 1.09H 1.12H 1.10H 1.03H 0.93H -0.05L 0.08L 0.24L 0.41L 0.58L 0.91H 0.92H 0.96H 1.01H

Height -0.19L -0.32L -0.41L -0.47L -0.47L -0.42L 1.05H 1.05H 1.03H 1.01H 0.99H 0.13L 0.03L -0.02L -0.03L

Time 1:34 PM 2:51 PM 3:45 PM 4:32 PM 5:12 PM 5:35 PM 8:47 AM 9:43 AM 10:38 AM 11:32 AM 12:27 PM 7:46 AM 9:38 AM 11:32 AM 1:26 PM

Height 1.02H 1.16H 1.24H 1.25H 1.19H 1.07H -0.30L -0.13L 0.08L 0.31L 0.53L 0.99H 1.02H 1.07H 1.12H

Time

11:51 PM 8:32 PM 12:16 PM 1:06 PM 1:54 PM 2:43 PM 3:33 PM 4:28 PM 5:39 PM

Time

8:58 9:21 4:31 4:47 5:04 5:21 5:38 1:12 2:30

Height

0.90L 0.95H -0.47L -0.37L -0.21L -0.01L 0.23L 0.46L 0.66L

Height

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

0.74L 0.71L 0.85H 0.79H 0.73H 0.69H 0.67H 0.37L 0.55L

Time

Height

Time

8:39 8:46 8:52 8:55 8:55 8:58 9:05

Height

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

0.89H 0.82H 0.76H 0.71H 0.70H 0.72H 0.77H

Time

Height

11:13 PM

0.78H

9:45 PM 10:12 PM 10:43 PM 11:21 PM

0.64L 0.53L 0.40L 0.27L

5:54 PM 6:06 PM

0.66H 0.66H

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 2:40 AM 3:32 AM 4:30 AM 5:32 AM 6:34 AM 7:34 AM 08:30 AM 1:10 AM 2:26 AM 3:53 AM 5:46 AM 8:06 AM 12:45 AM 1:29 AM 2:12 AM

3:58 3:59 4:19 4:41

PM PM PM PM

0.81H 0.88H 0.94H 0.99H

Time

Height

Time

10:12 PM 11:09 PM 11:59 PM

Height

0.62L 0.44L 0.29L

Port Aransas

9:27 8:53 1:32 2:10 2:50

PM PM PM PM PM

0.52H 0.44H 0.28L 0.41L 0.52L

Time

Height

11:29 PM

0.50L

7:19 PM 6:11 PM 5:23 PM

0.42H 0.46H 0.53H

Time

Height

Nueces Bay Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

San Luis Pass

Height -0.17L -0.28L -0.39L -0.46L 0.95H 0.86L 0.78L 0.67L 0.54L 0.39L 0.26L 0.16L 0.09L 0.05L 0.02L

East Matagorda

Freeport Harbor Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 7:18 AM 8:27 AM 9:31 AM 10:29 AM 2:19 AM 12:19 AM 12:51 AM 1:26 AM 2:05 AM 2:49 AM 3:38 AM 4:32 AM 5:34 AM 6:41 AM 7:47 AM

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 2:17 AM 3:34 AM 4:54 AM 6:00 AM 6:58 AM 7:54 AM 12:58 AM 2:06 AM 3:12 AM 4:19 AM 5:44 AM 12:20 AM 1:01 AM 1:44 AM 2:35 AM

8:34 8:55 4:10 3:57 4:04 4:22 4:41 1:14

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

0.97L 0.89L 0.85H 0.80H 0.78H 0.78H 0.80H 0.74L

Time

Height

Time

Height

11:45 PM

1.05H

9:27 PM 10:09 PM 10:54 PM 11:38 PM

0.77L 0.64L 0.49L 0.36L

4:50 PM

0.83H

South Padre Island

10:17 PM 4:41 PM 5:23 PM

0.16H 0.08L 0.20L

9:01 PM 8:39 PM

0.19H 0.25H

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Time 2:26 AM 3:27 AM 4:35 AM 5:43 AM 6:47 AM 7:48 AM 12:28 AM 2:01 AM 3:22 AM 4:40 AM 6:04 AM 12:01 AM 12:44 AM 1:29 AM 2:18 AM

9:24 5:29 5:08 4:58 4:58 5:01 1:28

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

0.98L 0.93H 0.82H 0.76H 0.75H 0.77H 0.72L

Time

Height

9:32 PM 9:59 PM 10:37 PM 11:18 PM

0.83L 0.64L 0.45L 0.27L

4:58 PM

0.81H

Texas Coast Tides

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9

Date Feb 23 Feb 24 Feb 25 Feb 26 Feb 27 Feb 28 Mar 1 Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 4 Mar 5 Mar 6 Mar 7 Mar 8 Mar 9


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

PRODUCTS

February 23, 2018

Page 19

Custom lures Continued from page 1

whole operation over to L&S Bait Company that makes Mirrolures and the Paul Brown line of Corkys and Soft-Dines, and now the custom lures are made at a Costa Rica factory. Currently the custom lures are sold at only two stores in Texas, the Waterloo Rod Company in Victoria and Johnny’s Sport Shop in Eagle Lake. Carson Marek is the shop manager at Waterloo, which is best known for making high-end rods. But they also sell an assortment of fishing gear and clothing. For the past year they have been in the lure business — as in one lure. It’s the lineup of Paul Brown’s custom Fat Boys and Soft Dines. So why just one? “They are good lures that are proven and known to catch big trout,” he said. “We sell a lot of them, up to 100 a day. The cost is $15. Our top selling colors are Pistachio, Gringo and Pear Harbor for both the Fat Boys and Soft-Dine XL’s. We also sell them online. We sell to everybody from the Laguna Madre to Louisiana. Most are sold from December through April.”

STUMP KICK-OUT BLIND: Up top, dual roof kick-outs add height to this Ameristep hunting blind where it’s needed most, creating a generous increase in headroom for standing and enhanced visibility. Even the blind’s wrap-style carrying sling delivers value-added utility, serving double duty as a handy, hanging storage system. Inside, a104inch by 84-inch footprint and 75-inch shooting width allows ample space for up to three hunters to disappear against the blind’s stealthy ShadowguardTM interior. The MSRP will be $279.99.

>>

MONARCH 3000 STABILIZED RANGEFINDER: Nikon’s incredibly small, lightweight unit is feature-packed with award-winning optical image stabilization technology, crisp new red OLED display and 3,000-yard fast-ranging capability. The optical stabilization system reduces viewfinder vibrations while simultaneously aligning the viewed image with the laser. This function begins immediately when the unit is powered-up and ensures faster, more successful “first-shot” measurements. The rangefinder has a maximum measurement distance of 3,000 yards on reflective targets and displays distances in .1-yard increments. Measurements are displayed in approximately 0.3 seconds, regardless of the distance. By holding down the power button on the rangefinder, hunters can continuously measure across multiple targets for eight seconds. The rangefinder integrates the company’s incline/decline technology to take the angle out of the shooting equation, up to +/- 89 degrees. It also offers the ability to switch between First Target Priority Mode (for close targets) or Distant Target Priority Mode (for targets farther away, even through clutter, branches, etc.) The rangefinder’s 6x monocular features bright, fully multicoated optics, 18mm eye relief, and a wide 7.5-degree field of view. The 6.3-ounce unit costs about $420.

>>

>>

Jay Watkins, below, and his son, Jay Ray, are both guides who use a custommade Corky this time of year to catch big speckled trout. If you can catch Jay Watkins at the boat ramp, he may sell you some off of his boat. Photos from Jay Watkins.

S100 RIFLES: Sauer has expanded its line of 100 bolt-action rifles with the addition of five new models, including the S100 Cherokee. These entry-level rifles feature a crisp, user adjustable single-stage trigger, three-position safety, cold hammer-forged barrel, and smooth-action bolt. The S100 Cherokee offers a synthetic digi-camo stock and tundra green cerakoted barrel and action and is designed to blend seamlessly into darker terrain. The rifles, which start at about $800, are available in a wide choice of calibers, including the new 6.5 PRC chambering from Hornady.

TRI-WING MINI BUZZ KING BAIT: Strike King’s 1/8-ounce freshwater buzzbait features a Diamond Dust head and silicone skirt. The three-blade diamond-pattern prop creates the sound and flash that attract bites and enable slow retrieves. This bass lure costs about $4.50.

>>

PALIX RIVER BOOTFOOT WADERS: These waders by Redington are for anglers looking for easy on and off convenience, Constructed from three-layer waterproofbreathable, DWR-coated fabric, these waders incorporate a fleece-lined hand warmer pocket and built-in Thinsulate insulated durable rubber-soled boots for maximum comfort. They cost about $300.

>>

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276

Big bags despite fog delay A three-hour delay in the start of the Bass Champs East Region event didn’t hamper the ability of some teams to catch a big bag, with the winning team still managing more than 28 pounds. A blanket of fog prevented a safe launch for the 279 teams, with Louisiana anglers bringing in the top three catches. “It was hard to make out anything, just feet away,” said tournament director Chad Potts. Benjamin Gulett, of Converse, Lousiana and Dustin Rivers, of Noble, Louisiana, came out on top the event with 28.58 pounds, winning $20,000. The team used lipless crankbaits, and

caught most of their fish after 3 p.m. Second place finishers Shannon Wingate, of Deridder, Louisiana, and Cole Moore, of Anacoco, Louisiana, also used lipless crankbaits in 4 to 8 feet of water to bring in 25.85 pounds and a $6,000 check. Sean Kennon, of DeQuincy, Louisiana and Jordan Hollingsworth, of Vinton, Louisiana, used football jigs around brushpiles in 25 feet to land 24.78 pounds, good for third place and $4,500. The big bass of the event was brought in by the team of Brannon Mire, of Broussard, Louisiana, and Eric Arnold, of Lafayette, Louisiana, at 10.65 pounds. —Bass Champs


Page 20

February 23, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Sales jobs at Bangers

Solution on on Page Solution Page23 22

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Bonnier Corp named Sam White as editor-in-chief of Marlin, an offshore fishing magazine.

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Bangers LP, A shooting sports distributor based in Birmingham, Alabama, is expanding its sales organization.

New editor at Marlin

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Ammo Inc. retains Chevalier Ammunition manufacturer Ammo Incorporated hired Chevalier Advertising and Public Relations as its official agency of record.

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Harris named media director

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SIG SAUER, Inc. hired Joel Harris as director of media relations and communication.

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38 39

Across

ACROSS 1. An African game species 1. Anfood African game species 8. A favorite for deer 8. call A favorite for deer 11. Turkey for thefood mouth Turkeylaunching call for theboat mouth 13. Put 11. on before 16. New13. head TPW Commission Putofon before launching boat 18. Big member flounder family 16. New of head of TPW Commission 20. Captures desert water for wildlife 18. Big member of flounder family 23. The eagle's claws 20. Captures watertoforloud wildlife 24. Turkey's gobble indesert response noise 26. The23. self-propelled The eagle’sboat claws 28. The24. slippery swimmer Turkey’s gobble in response to loud noise 29. Pump that removes water from boat's hull 26. The self-propelled boat 30. Feathers from this bird are used to make flies 28.the TheShad slippery 32. Makes Rapswimmer that removes water from boat’s hull 33. Type29. of Pump fly 34. An oryx species from this bird are used to 30. Feathers 37. Collection of fishing make flies equipment 38. A good striper lake Makes the Shad Rap 39. The32. white goose 33. Type of Texas fly 40. Smallest fox in 34. An oryx species 37. Collection of fishing equipment 38. A good striper lake 39. The white goose 40. Smallest fox in Texas

40

Down

DOWN 1. A fundraising method at banquets fundraising at banquets 2. 1. AnAexotic animalmethod organization An exotic organization 3. 2. A good lakeanimal to catch a bowfin A good lake to catch a bowfin 4. 3. Scanning the area for game 5. 4. The male turkey Scanning the area for game 6. 5. The three-pointed The male turkey hook 7. A bluegill species The three-pointed hook 9. 6. Relative of the redfish bluegill species 10. 7. AnAbullet brand 12. 9. Invasive loved by largemouths Relativeplant of the redfish 14.10. A porcupine's weapons A bullet brand 15. State known for elk numbers Invasive loved by largemouths 16.12. A way wildplant turkeys clean their feathers 14. A porcupine’s weapons 17. A minnow species State known for elk 19.15. Deer part you can sellnumbers 21.16. Emptying water fromclean the boat A way wild turkeys their feathers 22.17. A man-made lake A minnow species 23. A shad species Deernot partoften you can sell 25.19. A teal found in Texas Emptying water destination from the boat 27.21. A moose-hunting 29.22. A crossbow manufacturer A man-made lake 30.23. The left side of the boat A shad species 25. A teal not often found in Texas 27. A moose-hunting destination 29. A crossbow manufacturer 30. The left side of the boat

Mercury unveils new four-strokes Mercury Marine introduced its new line of V-6 four-stroke outboard in 200 and 225 horsepower.

Buck Knives names top rep

Chemi joins Freedom Boat Club Louis Chemi was named chief operating officer of Freedom Franchise Systems and Freedom Outdoor Adventures, divisions of the Freedom Boat Club.

PF/QF draws big crowd Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever’s 2018 National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic drew 28,868 attendees in Sioux Falls.

Offshore oil leases offered Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced that the Department of the Interior will offer 77.3 million acres offshore Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida for oil and gas exploration and development.

Miles joins Hunting Heritage Trust board David Miles, president of Baron Technology, was elected to the Hunting Heritage Trust’s Board of Directors.

Deb Garvick of Tackett Brothers received the Sales Rep of the Year award from Buck Knives.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Spiced snapper Tunisian 4 (6-ounce) snapper fillets 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds 1/2 tsp. coriander seeds 1/2 tsp. dried hot pepper flakes 1/2 tsp. caraway seeds 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1 medium onion, thinly sliced 2 medium tomatoes, chopped 1/2 cup raisins 1/4 cup pine nuts 1 cup fish stock Parsley for garnish Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a skillet over medium heat, roast cumin and coriander seeds and pepper flakes for 2-3 minutes until fragrant. Remove from heat; grind spices

in a spice grinder or with a mortar and pestle. Rub spice mix on the fillets. Let stand 10 minutes. In a small bowl, toss together the garlic, onion, tomatoes, raisins and pine nuts. Spoon 1/2 of this vegetable mixture into a greased flat ovenproof dish; place fillets on the vegetable layer. Top the fillets with remaining 1/2 of the vegetable mixture. Pour fish stock or clam juice over fillets. Bake for 20-30 minutes until fillets are cooked through. Garnish with parsley. —Florida Dept. of Agriculture

Grilled quail with honey and tarragon marinade 6 whole quail Marinade: 1 1/4 cup white wine 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 cup of honey 1 tbsp. tarragon 1/4 cup melted butter 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced 1 tbsp. olive oil 6 green onions and their tops, chopped 2 tsps. sugar

Split quail in half lengthwise. Place halves in marinating pan and pour marinade over birds being sure that both sides are coated. Refrigerate overnight. Remove quail from marinating pan and grill birds over medium hot coals. Heat remaining marinade enough to melt butter and mix thoroughly. While quail are cooking, baste birds with marinade. —Outdoor Alabama


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 23, 2018

Page 21

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

SOUTH TEXAS DEER HUNTS No pen raised deer 3,000+ Acres Trophy & Management Hunts Hogs, Does & Everything else South Texas has to offer. Veteran Discount. (713) 516-2954

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does.Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159 QUAIL HUNTING

Bird Dog Training Facility 700 yard RANGE PoetryShootingClub.com (214) 728-2755 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 (214) 361-2276

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 AMERICAN LAB PUPPIES Excellent pedigrees from field trial, hunt test, hunting lines. Owners has trained dogs for 10 years, can train if requested. 3 yellow males, 2 yellow females, 1 black male. All come with certification, shots. Call Jeff. (214) 384-5641

CLASSIFIEDS

$1 PER WORD

2 ISSUE MINIMUM ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@ GMAIL.COM

RANCH FOR SALE

470 Low Fence Acres 1.5 Hours North of DFW Boone & Crockett Deer Turn Key: Cabin, Food Plots, Feeders, Tower Stands. (940) 464-0121

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582 SWAROVSKI

SLC 10x42 Binoculars Like new $1,200 obo Call Dan (210) 912-8223

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210 AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

Network of Indoor & Outdoor Ranges TEXASARCHERY.INFO FISHERMEN/DUCK HUNTERS Flour Bluff/Corpus Christi Rental Two BR, Two Bath, Sleeps Six, Fully Furnished. One Mile from Boat Ramp, Parking on Site for Boat & Trailer View online: The Blue Heron Corpus Christi. All Bookings thru Airbnb TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

STEEL TOOL BOX 60”x21”x21” For pickup truck Key, black, some paint missing $200 (214) 616-0293

FISHING DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS Actively purchasing authentic Texas artifacts. One piece to entire collections. Call (210) 557-9478 REPORTER/ JOURNALIST JOB Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter at its Dallas office. Journalism degree preferred. (214) 361-2276

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com.Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503 BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Call About Our Winter Discounts! (956) 551-1965


Page 22

February 23, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL KANSAS

Garmin, Navico settle disputes Navico, parent company to the Lowrance, Simrad and B&G brands, and Garmin International Inc., ended a three-year-long legal dispute relating to sonar and auto guidance patents. The agreement includes a broad cross-licensing of patents and other intellectual property, which will allow both companies to bring new innovations to the market faster and benefit all marine customers. —Staff report

FLORIDA

Air guns to be legal for big game The Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission approved the use of big bore PCP air guns for harvesting deer and turkey starting in the fall of 2018. The rule change will allow for lawful use of .30 caliber and above for deer and .20 caliber or larger for turkey. —Crosman

KOHL KENNEDY, 14, OF FAIR OAKS RANCH, ARROWED THIS 11-POINT BUCK ON THE FAMILY LEASE IN MEDINA COUNTY. HE MADE THE 15-YARD SHOT ON HIS 14TH BIRTHDAY, USING A DIAMOND ARCHERY EDGE PRO BOW WITH A 100-GRAIN RAGE BROADHEAD.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Wheeler’s Feed & Outfitters 32450 IH-10 West Boerne, TX 78006 (830) 249-2656 wheelersfeed.com

NATIONWIDE

Migration corridors focus of new order Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3362, which promotes collaboration between the Department of the Interior and Western state fish and wildlife agencies for the conservation of big-game winter range and migration corridors. Order 3362 fosters collaboration among states, private landowners, and other stakeholders to use the best available science for development of management guidelines that ensure big game populations, including antelope, elk, and mule deer, thrive. In a Department of the Interior statement, Secretary Zinke said, “My goal is healthy herds for American hunters and wildlife watchers, and this order will help establish better migration corridors for some of North America’s most iconic big game species like elk, mule deer and antelope. American hunters are the backbone of big game conservation efforts, and now working with state and private landowners, the Department will leverage its land management and scientific expertise to both study the migration habits of wildlife as well as identify ways to improve the habitat. For example, this can be done by working with ranchers to modify their fences, working with states to collaborate on sage brush restoration, or working with scientists to better understand migration routes.” This order will assist state wildlife management in Western states including: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. —DOI

Powerboat numbers up in 2017 According to the National Marine Manufacturers Association, new powerboat registrations were up 5 percent in 2017, compared with 2016. Registrations for cruisers were up 10 percent, pontoons up 7 percent and personal watercraft up 5 percent. —NMMA

MONTANA

No grizzly season proposed Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is proposing not to hunt grizzly bears in southwest Montana this year, but still retain its share of the discretionary mortality, per the agreement with the states of Wyoming and Idaho. The proposal will be before the Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission at their regular meeting Feb. 15. The grizzly management plan for the Yellowstone area and the agreement between three states, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho,

outlines the total allowable mortality of independent male and female bears, and dependent young, based on the population, that can occur in a year within the states or Yellowstone National Park. This could include management actions for conflict bears or hunting. “Our focus, now they are delisted, is managing these iconic species for long-term recovery and at the same time having the ability to respond to conflicts in the Yellowstone ecosystem,” said FWP Director Martha Williams. “Holding off on hunting for now, I believe, will help demonstrate our commitment to long-term recovery and at the same time allow us the science-based management flexibility we need.” —MFWP

MAINE

Moose lottery applications The 2018 Maine moose permit lottery application process is now open. Applications will be accepted online only at mefishwildlife.com. The deadline to apply for the lottery is 11:59 p.m. on May 15. —Maine Fish and Wildlife

DELAWARE

Remington cuts bankruptcy deal Remington Outdoor Company reached a restructuring support agreement with creditors to reduce outstanding debt and fund operations during bankruptcy proceedings. Holders of the $550 million term loan get 82.5 percent ownership and third lienholders will get the remaining 17.5 percent. The creditors will also supply a $100 million debtor-in-possession loan to finance operations through bankruptcy. The company’s loan debt is more than $950 million. —Staff report

LOUISIANA

Restaurants caught selling swai as catfish Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited three restaurant managers in central Louisiana for allegedly selling swai fish as catfish. Agents received a tip that the Rosie Joe’s restaurant in Alexandria and the Crazy Cajun restaurant in Tioga were selling swai fish as catfish. Agents performed an inspection of both restaurants and found that catfish was listed on the menu and found swai fish in the freezer. Agents also learned that the same practice occurs at the Debarge’s Crawfish restaurant in Alexandria. Swai is a freshwater fish native to Vietnamese rivers. Selling swai fish as catfish brings a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail. —LDWF

INTERNATIONAL

Alberta bans spear hunting Spear hunting is being banned in Alberta following outcry after a viral video showed an American hunter killing a black bear with a spear. Environment Minister Shannon Phillips asserted that spear-hunting was “not humane because most hunters know that the chances of getting close enough to hit that moving target with big game, and sufficient accuracy and force to kill immediately is next to zero.” The video, posted on YouTube by hunter Josh Bowmar, showed a spear being launched at the animal, and showed Bowmar celebrating when the bear was hit. —Staff report


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 23, 2018

Page 23

DATEBOOK FEBRUARY 24

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Texas Hill Country Banquet Georgetown Community Center rmef.org Ducks Unlimited Kerrville Banquet Hill Country Shooting Sports Center (830) 377-2838 ducks.org/Texas

FEBRUARY 27-MARCH 2

Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo rodeohouston.com

FEBRUARY 28

Delta Waterfowl Collin County Banquet Nohas Event Venue, Plano (618) 691-9364 deltawaterfowl.org

MARCH 1-4

Exotic Wildlife Association 51st Annual Membership Meeting YO Hotel and Conference Center, Kerrville (830) 367-7761 myewa.com

MARCH 2

Coastal Conservation Association Brazos Valley Banquet Brazos Center, Bryan (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org National Wild Turkey Federation Cross Timbers Banquet Decatur Civic Center (940) 393-8908 nwtf.org

Ducks Unlimited Conroe Banquet Montgomery County Fairgrounds (836) 537-1561 ducks.org/Texas

MARCH 3

Lubbock Sportsmen’s Club Hunters’ Banquet and Auction Lubbock Memorial Civic Center (806) 789-2241 lubbocksportsman.com

MARCH 9

MARCH 9-11

Delta Waterfowl Marshall Banquet Marshall Visual Arts Center (903) 407-2586 deltawaterfowl.org

MARCH 10

Stewards of the Wild San Antonio Chapter Sausage Showdown Beethoven Maennerchor tpwf.org

MARCH 8

Park Cities Quail Dinner and Auction Frontiers of Flight Museum parkcitiesquail.org Whitetails Unlimited Brazos Valley Deer Camp Brazos Center, Bryan whitetailsunlimited.com

MARCH 22

National Wild Turkey Federation Marble Falls Banquet Lakeside Pavilion (830) 693-7520 nwtf.org

Texas Dove Hunters Association Shooting for Scholarships National Shooting Complex, San Antonio (210) 764-1189 texasdovehunters.com

MARCH 4

Ducks Unlimited Lake Lewisville Sporting Clay Shoot Fossil Pointe Sporting Grounds, Decatur (214) 287-1219 ducks.org/Texas

Ducks Unlimited San Antonio Rescue Our Wetlands Dinner San Antonio Country Club (830) 221-8046 ducks.org/Texas

Whitetails Unlimited North Texas Deer Camp Myers Park Show Barn, McKinney whitetailsunlimited.com Coastal Conservation Association Helotes Banquet Helotes Ag Building (210) 535-6810 ccatexas.org

Kimble County Chamber of Commerce Predator Calling Contest Coke Stevenson Center junctiontexas.net

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting and AGM (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

Tarrant Regional Water District Flyfest trwdflyfest.com

MARCH 23-25

Mule Deer Foundation Kimble County Banquet Simon Brothers Mercantile (817) 565-7121 muledeer.org

Texas Trophy Hunters Association Hunting and Fishing Extravaganza American Bank Center, Corpus Christi huntersextravaganza.com

MARCH 24

MARCH 10-11

Coastal Conservation Association Port O’Connor Banquet Community Center Pavilion (979) 824-0110 ccatexas.org

Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival Plano Event Center txflyfishingfestival.org Ladies Sporting Weekend Joshua Creek Ranch, Boerne (830) 537-5090 joshuacreek.com

Ducks Unlimited Kaufman County Dinner Reunion Ranch, Terrell (469) 719-4909 ducks.org/Texas

MARCH 17

Bass Champs Mega Bass Tournament Lake Fork Marina (817) 439-3274 basschamps.com

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Greater Hill Country Banquet Gillespie County Fairgrounds rmef.org

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 22

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1. An African game species [REEDBUCK] 8. A favorite food for deer [ACORNS] 11. Turkey call for the mouth [DIAPHRAGM] 13. Put on before launching boat [PFD] 16. New head of TPW Commission [DUGGINS] 18. Big member of flounder family [HALIBUT] 20. Captures desert water for wildlife [GUZZLER] 23. The eagle's claws [TALONS] 24. Turkey's gobble in response to loud noise [SHOCK] 26. The self-propelled boat [KAYAK] 28. The slippery swimmer [EEL] 29. Pump that removes water from boat's hull [BILGE] 30. Feathers from this bird are used to make flies [PHEASANT] 32. Makes the Shad Rap [RAPALA] 33. Type of fly [DRY] 34. An oryx species [GEMSBOK] 37. Collection of fishing equipment [TACKLE] 38. A good striper lake [BUCHANAN] 39. The white goose [SNOW]

T A C K L E

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Down

T F T

1. A fundraising method at banquets [RAFFLE] 2. An exotic animal organization [EWA] 3. A good lake to catch a bowfin [CADDO] 4. Scanning the area for game [GLASSING] 5. The male turkey [TOM] 6. The three-pointed hook [TREBLE] 7. A bluegill species [WARMOUTH] 9. Relative of the redfish [CROAKER] 10. An bullet brand [SWIFT] 12. Invasive plant loved by largemouths [HYDRILLA] 14. A porcupine's weapons [QUILLS] 15. State known for elk numbers [IDAHO] 16. A way wild turkeys clean their feathers [DUSTING] 17. A minnow species [SUCKER] 19. Deer part you can sell [ANTLER] 21. Emptying water from the boat [BAILING] 22. A man-made lake [RESERVOIR] 23. A shad species [THREADFIN] 25. A teal not often found in Texas [CINNAMON] 27. A moose-hunting destination [ALASKA]

Puzzle solution from Page 20


Page 24

February 23, 2018

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

FX-MOA RETICLE 30

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FX-MRAD RETICLE 8

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February 23, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  
February 23, 2018 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  
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