Page 1

Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

December 22, 2017

Volume 14, Issue 9

A rare treat

Returning to normal

Emily Gilstrap returned to Galveston for her winter break from school in College Station and landed this redfish with a heartshaped spot in the Galveston Bay complex during a father/daughter outing. Photo from Emily Gilstrap.

Reds, trout on rocks, flats and in rivers By Robert Sloan

Texans hunting in the snowstorm

The water temperature plunged an estimated 30 degrees during the first week of December with two strong cold fronts. A good thing for most duck hunters, but the combination of a full moon and some snowy weather slowed fishing for both reds and trout for a period of days. By Dec. 9, though, everything was kicking on all cylinders and is still going strong. “Once the water temperature stabilized the fish went on a big feed,” said East Galveston Bay guide Jim West. “Both trout and reds are bunched up in the bayous and the drains. We’ve still got a lot of small trout under the birds. I think the bird action will slowly come to a halt with one more front.” One good pattern has been to

By Craig Nyhus

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News After a freak winter storm hit the Hill Country, South Texas and areas near the Texas coast, Jake Cooper of Waller had an idea. He created a snow deer. “I was just being a redneck, I guess,” he said. “I got a bunch of snow, piled it up and carved it like a deer. The ears were pretty hard to do, though.” Cooper attends Blinn College in Bryan and will attend Texas A&M Uni-

versity next spring. He hunts on a family ranch, but school got in the way of hunting. Viewing his snow deer, one can tell it was more than just piling up some snow. “I come from an artistic family,” Cooper said. “My mom and sister are very artistic. I did win 6th place in the state with a rattlesnake belt I made.” Some fortunate Texans experienced the unexpected treat of hunting in the snow, especially in places like Carrizo Springs and Eagle Pass. Photos from other hunters across South and West Texas made their way to social media. In far West Texas, Chayden Feist, an Please turn to page 17

Nilgai and cattle fever ticks

Please turn to page 9

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Officials hope new treatment helps outbreak By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News Nilgai are believed to be at the crux of a cattle fever tick outbreak in South Texas. “They definitely played a role,” said Callie Ward, a spokeswoman for the Texas Animal Health Commission. “There aren’t fences to

Nilgai have thrived in South Texas, but they carry cattle fever ticks. A new spray is being tested to help control the ticks. Photo by Larry Ditto.

hold them in, and they are wide-ranging. However far a nilgai’s home range is (more than 100 square miles), that’s how far a fever tick can spread.” Nilgai aren’t the only animal that serves as a host for the cattle fever ticks, which carry parasites that destroy the red blood cells of cattle, causing anemia, high fever and enlargement of the spleen and liver. Other hosts include white-

tailed deer, red deer, elk and horses, according to Ward. Nilgai, however, are better adapted for the role of tick host. “They’re the most closely related thing to a cow you can think of,” said John Goolsby, an entomologist for the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Both evolved in India, as did the tick. They’re a really good host.” Nilgai became a staple of South Texas hunting after the Please turn to page 17

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10

HUNTING

FISHING

Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12

Barbed wire buck (P. 4)

No tourneys, but still fishing (P. 8)

Cactus-type buck not caused by briars.

Gary Klein enjoys the time off.

Bighorns make a move (P. 4)

Florida lures, Texas fishing (P. 9)

More than 80 captured, transferred.

DOA owner tests salt and freshwater products here.

Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 16 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 20 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 22

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

A buck peers from snow-covered prickly pear in Maverick County in early December. Below, Jake Cooper created his snow deer in Bryan. Top photo by Donnie Draeger. Bottom photo by Jake Cooper.


Page 2

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

It’s your dream. Let’s make it a reality. At Capital Farm Credit, we understand that a piece of land is more than a place to go hunting; it’s an escape where you create memories with family and friends. That’s why we’re with you every step of the way throughout the entire lending process. We’re a cooperative, and that means your goals are our goals. And our patronage dividend program means we share our profits and put money back in your pocket. Because we’re all in this together. And together we’re better.

Together we’re better. Partnership that really pays.

capitalfarmcredit.com | 877.944.5500 NMLS493828

72073.01 CFC Hunting ad_LonestarOutdoorNews_10.5x15.5.indd 1

1/13/17 2:13 PM


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 3


Page 4

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HUNTING

Hunter bags anything but typical buck By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

Thomas Wilkerson had a good feeling when he set out to do a little hunting at his friend’s property. His friend, T.C. Simmons, whose family owns the Baker Hay fields outside of Fort Worth, had shot an 8-pointer in November. Both men had seen plenty of nice bucks chasing does in the hayfield adjacent to a corner of woods. Wilkerson, though, was pining for a special buck — a 15-point non-typical with briars dangling from his antlers caught on a game camera back in October. “It just reminded me of a cactus. So I called him Cactus Freak Buck,” Wilkerson said. The buck was obviously scrappy and tough, and Wilkerson knew he had to bag him. But this was a low-fence property, so there was no way of knowing if the unusual buck was still around. Still, Wilkerson was feeling lucky when he set out early that December morning, arriving at the deer stand around 5:45 a.m. Wilkerson could see deer roaming near

the feeder by the light of the Wilkerson took aim at the full moon. He got his bow and buck’s shoulder and dropped rifle ready in time to see a doe him at 86 yards. and buck run out of range. Remarkably, it looked like “I didn’t even sit down. I those briars were still on his was just standing up. I just antlers. Wilkerson called his had a good feeling — it almost friend, who headed out with makes your hair stand up,” the truck to pick up the huntWilkerson said. er and his buck. He hit the grunts and bleats When the hunters got a to no avail. But at around 8:05 closer look at Cactus, they disa.m., he saw movement out of covered he had traded in his the west. briars for barbed wire, which “I thought, hell yes, it’s Cac- was tangled and twisted tus,” Wilkerson said. “He was around his antlers. They also at a fast pace, on a beeline.” noticed that the buck had a The buck had his head up long cut from his chest to his and seemed to be Please turn to page 13 on a mission, but he was by himself in The buck finally harvested by Thomas Wilkerson the field. Wilkerson had barbed wire tangled in his antlers and a grabbed his rifle and long cut from his chest to his belly. Photos from gave a grunt. The Thomas Wilkerson. buck didn’t hear it and kept on coming. That turned out to be fortunate because Wilkerson noted tree limbs were blocking his shot. By now, he was shaking with excitement. He waited until he had a clear shot and gave another grunt. This time the buck heard it and stutterstepped to a halt.

A big move

Guide to quail management

Desert bighorns relocated to Black Gap WMA

By Craig Nyhus

By Shane Jahn

Lone Star Outdoor News

For Lone Star Outdoor News A total of 82 desert bighorn sheep, 37 rams and 45 ewes, were captured on Elephant Mountain Wildlife Management Area south of Alpine. A contractor who specializes in wild sheep capture and relocation selectively captured the sheep from a helicopter using the netgun method. “We had three goals in mind,” said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department biologist Austin Stolte. “First, to alleviate some of the grazing pressure and competition on the Elephant Mountain herd. Second, we wanted to increase overall sheep numbers in the Southern Brewster County Herd which now totals 130 desert bighorns.” Elephant Mountain WMA has been very successful and productive sheep country, allowing for excess animals to be relocated. “And It was a great opportunity to gather biological data on the sheep in the forms of tissue samples to check for disease, as well as blood and fecal samples,” Stolte said. Each captured sheep received ear tags with a number unique to individuals, and a satellite collar that essentially tracks the sheep in real-time. Biologists and technicians can locate a sheep at any given time simply by logging in to their computer. The collars are set to automatically release and drop from the sheep at a predetermined

Five bighorns leave the Elephant Mountain WMA via helicopter to southern Brewster County. Photo by Louis Harveson.

time. TWPD employed two release methods in an experiment to gain knowledge of sheep activity in a post-release environment. Stolte added that approximately half of the captured sheep were “soft released,” meaning they were temporarily placed in a 400-acre high-fenced area within Black Gap WMA to give them time to acclimate and Please turn to page 15

Most Texas quail hunters are saying there has been a definite decline in birds this year over the past two boom years. Reports vary from a mild to significant decline, based on different rainfall amounts and habitat conditions. When the numbers drop, more landowner and hunter attention turns to quail management practices. A recently published book by Dr. Bill Palmer examines management practices as part of the Tall Timbers’ Game Bird Program in five southeastern states, where 30,000 radio-tracked wild quail were studied on hundreds of thousands of acres. The 149-page book, titled “Tall Timbers’ Bobwhite Quail Management Handbook,” looks at the quail landscape, habitat management (including frequent fire), and more specific topics like predator management, harvest management and restocking. Although the research was conducted in the Southeast, the authors believe the practices will apply to the entire bobwhite range. One area studied by Tall Timbers was replicated in Texas by Dr. Brad Dabbert of the Quail-Tech Alliance, involving the spreading of supplemental feed to help the survival rate of bobwhite quail. “This book shows how you put quail on the ground,” said quail conservationist Chuck Ribelin. “Dr. Palmer tries to eliminate things that hurt survival to maximize hen nesting. Dead hens lay no eggs.” Over the past 20 years of quail research at Tall Timbers, and using the management practices described in the book, quail hunting success has doubled, chick survival has increased, new wild bobwhite areas have been developed through translocation and plans are in place to add 100,000 acres of new quail land, both private and public. For anyone wanting to understand the ecology and management of bobwhites, the book is an effective tool supported by decades of research and data. The book ($30) is available at talltimbers.org.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

More than a farm and ranch store Hoffpauir’s Lampasas store has everything for hunting, shooting By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Driving through the Hill Country town of Lampasas on Highway 281, you can’t help but lock up on Hoffpauir’s. It’s a ranch and supply store first, but with a lot more to offer, like guns and ammo for deer hunters. Outside, there are rows of deer feeders and hunting blinds, along with big silos full of feed for cattle. Inside the store that serves the towns of Lampasas, Lometa, Copperas Cove and beyond, is a paradise for hunters. Dressed in camo from head to toe, Ricky Cerrato walked up to the door of Hoffpauir’s, opened it, looked at his son and said, “This place is like nothing you have ever seen.” That “place” is packed with guns and ammo, knives, boots, clothes and a whole lot of ranch supplies. Look left and your eyes will lock up on walls of guns, display cases filled with pistols and just about anything else that is firearm related. Look right and you see a room full of western wear, boots and hats. Go out the back door and there are pallets of feed for livestock and plenty of corn for deer and pigs. Jason Hendrick has been the general manager of Hoffpauir’s since it opened in 2013. It’s owned by Lee Hoffpauir, a local and successful businessman who has been in the retail and auto business for years. The ranch and supply side of the business was good from the get-go. But they spiced it up in 2015 by adding a side room that is jammed with guns and ammo. “That’s been a big success,” Hendrick said.

“We’ve expanded the guns and ammo side twice. Our newest expansion is archery. About half of our business is feed for cattle. The deerhunting season keeps us very busy. And it’s been a big success. But the ranch supply side keeps us going year-round.” This is a store that pretty has it all with the exception of two things — groceries and deer processing. “We are definitely not going into deer processing,” Hendrick said. They also sell pet foods and supplies, lawn and garden supplies, horse and tack supplies, hay and animal health products. They offer a full line of AWS feeders and blinds as well as Diamond feeders, Nature blinds and Texas Wildlife feeders and blinds. Christian Richards is a firearms associate at the store. “We stay very busy with guns and ammo sales from about October through January,” he said. “We sell lots of handguns and handle major brands like Colt, Smith and Wesson, Ruger, Glock, Remington, Winchester, Marlin, Springfield and Browning. If we don’t have the firearm you’re looking for in stock, we can special order it. We also offer great layaway options as well.” So, what is their number one selling pistol? “One of the most popular is the Sig Sauer P320,” Richards said. “When it comes to rifles, the most popular is the 6.5 Creedmoor because it’s extremely precise. Something else that sells really well is Tannerite.” That’s the brand name of an exploding target used for firearms practice. But lots of deer hunters have found out that it is perfect for blowing up just about anything that’s useless. The store has seven full-time employees, and three part-time. They are open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m.

Customers check out the guns and hunting products at Hoffpauir’s Ranch and Supply store in Lampasas. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

LYSSY & ECKEL

KEEPING EVERYTHING BIGGER IN TEXAS. Let us serve your needs this season. Stop by one of our convenient locations, visit our website to find local dealers, or check out facebook for our latest offers. POTH 111 E Westmeyer Street Poth, TX 78147 830-484-3314

GEORGE WEST 101 Leona Street George West, TX 78022 361-449-2218

HONDO 2005 19th Street Hondo, TX 78861 830-426-3351

LEFEEDS.COM LLANO 105 E Young Street Llano, TX 78643 325-247-4147

Page 5


Page 6

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Moose

2007 (approximately) — Nov. 10, 2017 By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News In 2008, a black lab, somewhere around 1 year old, showed up at a neighbor of David Sweet’s parents. After they unsuccessfully tried to find the owner, Sweet took the dog to his home in The Woodlands on a trial basis. They named the dog Moose. On one of his first nights at his new home, the family knew the name was perfect. “I let him out to the backyard in the dark, and he took off at a dead run,” Sweet said. “Then I heard a thump. Best we could tell, he ran headfirst into a tree and knocked himself out. We knew Moose was a good name for him.” After three weeks at his new home, Sweet’s 8-year-old daughter, Mikaela, fell through a plate glass window and severed tendons in her hand, requiring the first of two surgeries. “Every night, Moose would come to bed with me and stay until I went to sleep,” Mikaela said. “Then he would creep out of my room and head downstairs.” The family knew Moose would stay. “He cemented his place in the family when he did that,” Sweet said. That July, Sweet took Moose to Roger Conant of Landmark Retrievers for gun dog training. “He was stubborn and didn’t take to the training very well,” Sweet said. “When I picked him up, Roger said, ‘Moose knew what to do, but be patient with him, as he might not do it.’” During Moose’s first dove season, Sweet would stand on his leash while hunting. “We would walk out to where the bird dropped and he would pick up the bird and hand it to me,” Sweet said. “He wouldn’t bring it back, though.” Then came Moose’s first trip to Kansas, where Sweet and friends went on an annual pheasant hunt. “I had him on a leash,” Sweet said. “Then, Moose saw two roosters and I let him go. He flushed them, the other guys shot them, and he retrieved them both. From then on, he was a

hunting machine.” Moose’s name might have been Houdini, had the family known of his antics. “He was an escape artist,” Sweet said. “He would wander off, and a few hours later one of the neighbors would call to tell us Moose was in their pool or that their kids were playing with our dog.” Moose also would occasionally steal an uncooked ribeye off of the counter. “Or a Whataburger. Or a bunch of grapes,” Mikaela said. Sweet figures Moose retrieved hundreds of pheasants in his career, and countless dove. On his last hunt in January, a goose hunt in Missouri, a giant Canada goose was dropped across an icecovered pond. Moose went out, got him, took three steps on the ice back toward us, and dropped it. “It was like he was saying, ‘You come and get this heavy thing,’” Sweet said. Last year, another black lab, Scout, was added to the family, and she and Moose became fast friends. “When Moose got sick this fall, I took Scout dove hunting but left Moose at home,” Sweet said. “He moped the entire time we were gone.” Eventually, Moose’s abdominal cancer took its toll, and it was time. “He couldn’t get up to go out, and he wouldn’t eat,” Sweet said. “I had wanted a black lab to hunt with since I was a kid, and Moose was my first one,” Sweet said. “Now, I’ll never be without one.” Now, Scout, a much more active dog than Moose ever was, will take up the hunting torch. “At least Moose had a year and a half with Scout to help her settle down and become a decent dog,” Sweet said. To Mikaela and her mother, Heidi, Moose was more than a hunting dog. “He was the closest thing to a best friend I had in a long time,” Mikaela said. “There will never be another Moose.”

Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 7

The forgotten season Winter dove hunting back Lone Star Outdoor News Few hunters take advantage of it, but dove season reopened Dec. 15 in all of Texas. “I’m not hearing anything about hunters being out,” said Shaun Oldenburger, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s dove program leader. “I heard there were lots of dove south of San Antonio, and I’m seeing a lot of mourning dove in Hays County, but they are city birds.” Oldenburger said good areas to look are where a second crop of croton took place, often in nondescript pasture-looking areas. The winter dove season can be productive, but birds tend to “The only time you’ll notice the be bunched up and more difficult to pinpoint. Photo by Lone birds will be on wet mornings when Star Outdoor News. they are on the lines,” he said. “But they may be there.” Oldenburger said less than 10 percent of dove hunting and the dove harvest comes after September. Bob Thornton of the Texas Dove Hunters Association planned to hunt in the Texas Panhandle, but landowners are reporting the northern bird haven’t appeared, yet, and they are hoping the cold front expected over the holidays brings more birds in. “The food is here and the weather is cooperating,” he said. Mourning dove love peanuts, and the fields are also worth a check for winter hunters. Thornton said a trip to the Valley may be in order for hard-core dove hunters. “They’ve had birds all year and they still have them,” he said. Randy Edwards had a few hunters on his land near Clyde, and said while they got some shooting, the birds were in large groups and not up to the numbers he has had the past few years. “The guys did OK in the morning when the birds came in, but there were only two of them and they didn’t get many shots at birds leaving the field in big bunches,” he said. Dove season will remain open in the North Zone until Dec. 31; in the Central Zone until Jan. 7, 2018 and in the South Zone until Jan. 21.

2017 KAWASAKI BONUS DEAL RANCH PACKAGE, STARTING AT $14,499 2017 KAWASAKI 4010 TRANSMULE LE W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $14,499 $13,999 CAMO

GREEN

2016 KAWASAKI MULE PRO-FXT

W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $19,399 CAMO

$17,999 $17,999

GREEN

Jan. 13-14 ABILENE Abilene Convention Center

April 14-15 Sept. 8-9 KERRVILLE KERRVILLE Hill Country Youth Event Center Hill Country Youth Event Center

Feb. 17-18 FREDERICKSBURG Gillespie County Fairgrounds

May 19-20 ABILENE Abilene Convention Center

Oct. 20-21 ABILENE Abilene Convention Center

Feb. 24-25 KERRVILLE Hill Country Youth Event

July 14-15 AMARILLO Amarillo Civic Center

Oct. 27-28 FREDERICKSBURG Gillespie County Fairgrounds

March 10-11 AMARILLO Amarillo Civic Center

July 28-29 Nov. 17-18 KERRVILLE KERRVILLE Hill Country Youth Event Center Hill Country Youth Event Center

March 24-25 ABILENE Abilene Convention Center

Aug. 11-12 ABILENE Abilene Convention Center

Dec. 8-9 AMARILLO Amarillo Civic Center

KAWASAKI SxS RANCH PACKAGE (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC)

THE ORIGINAL AND NEW IMPROVED RANCH PACKAGE

• (ALL EQUIPMENT NOW POWDER COATED) FROM DEL RIO POWERSPORTS (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC), GET OUR PACKAGE ON MOSTSIDE X SIDE MODELS • SEAT NOW BUILT WITH 1-1/4” tube steel, no need for under seat wasted space basket welded to keep legs from buckling as our “competitors” have to do • See photos for improved open room in bed for hay bales and feed For Details: DelRioPowerSports.com

PACKAGE INCLUDES: • All Applicable Equipment Now POWDER COATED • 4,000# Winch (2,500# on Kawa 4000 & 4010 Series) • Steel Rollbar Basket • Front Floor Double Gun Holder • HD Tire Tractor Seal

• Steel Roof, Insulated, Powder Coated • Roof Oversize Steel Basket • Rear Utility Seat • Double Gun Holder • Shooter Gun Rest • 50” LED Light Bar

RANCH PACKAGES AVAILABLE ON OTHER MAKES AND MODELS


Page 8

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

FISHING

Not running on empty Convenience store, gas station to reopen in Port M By Tony VIndell

For Lone Star Outdoor News Coastal fishermen flock to Port Mansfield every year, and the ones who have been before know to stock up on fuel for their boats. That is about to change. People have been complaining for years about the inability to buy rea-

sonably priced gasoline. They either have to fill the tank of a boat and vehicle or limit their fishing trip. A local business, Poco Loco, does sells fuel, but it is $1 higher per gallon than the stations in Raymondville, 18 miles away. The complaints should soon fade away. Port Manfield’s last convenience store closed several years ago, but is now being refurbished and is set to open next month. Chad Kinney, a veteran fishing guide who also owns Laguna Madre

Bait, is behind the new enterprise he is calling Laguna Madre Fuel. “The plan is to open sometime in January,” he said. “There will two pumps on each side and fuel will available 24 hours a day.” Kinney acquired the property with a 50-year lease as the land belongs to the Port Mansfield Navigation District, which has jurisdiction over the area. He said one of the reasons behind his newest venture is to sell more affordable fuel, perhaps 20-30 cents

In January, Capt. Chad Kinney will reopen the old gas station and convenience store located in Port Mansfield, naming it Laguna Madre Fuel. Photo by Tony Vindell, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Please turn to page 13

From the lake to the ranch Bass pro Gary Klein feasts on family, outdoors By Craig Lamb

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Even though the tournament season is over, Gary Klein spends time fishing on his family ranch. Photo from Gary Klein.

Gary Klein moved from California to Texas three decades ago, mostly because of the Lone Star State’s renowned fishing and hunting opportunities. Moving east also made practical sense for the now veteran Texas pro in his 39th season on the Bassmaster tournament trail. Klein has appeared in 30 Bassmaster Classics, twice winning the coveted Angler of the Year title, and amassing more than $2 million in earnings. Much of that was wisely invested in real estate. Klein now owns more than 1,000 acres of land near Weatherford. The Kleins manage the ranch for the family’s passion and enjoyment of living on the land: fishing, hunting and observing wildlife.

Klein lives on the ranch with his wife, Jana, and their daughters, both currently enrolled at Tarleton State University. The ranch is where, after eight months of nonstop travel, Klein reconnects with what he loves the most. “Working on the ranch and spending time with my family, that’s what I enjoy from now until February,” he said. Lakota, enrolled in the nursing program, and Kanyon, a wildlife and fisheries science major, are frequent sidekicks of their father when all are at home. “It’s pretty neat to have daughters that enjoy hunting, fishing and connecting with the ranch life,” Klein said. Tending to blinds, feeders and game cameras spread across the ranch is how the father and daughters spend quality time. Hunting and riding horseback to ponds managed for quality bass fishing is another common routine. Klein shuns the “off-season” Please turn to page 13

Buying a used bay boat? Tips to avoid a damaged craft Lone Star Outdoor News Anglers in the market for a used bay boat for their trips to the Texas coast share one concern. How do they know the boat they are looking at wasn’t a victim of flooding from Hurricane Harvey? There were more than 63,000 boats damaged as a result of Harvey and Irma (in Florida). Many will be repaired, but some fear they could end up with stormdamaged lemons. Many boats were damaged during Hurricane Harvey, and used boat buyers should be on the lookout for previously damaged boats. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), cautions used boat buyers that some boats affected by the hurricanes are beginning to hit the market, and that getting a prepurchase survey (called a Condition and Value survey) is very important. “It’s not that you don’t want to buy a boat that’s been repaired, but you should have full knowledge of the repairs and know they were done correctly. It’s a transparency issue that will help you negotiate a fair price,” said BoatUS Consumer Affairs Director

Charles Fort. The boating group offers eight tips to help you spot a boat that might have been badly damaged in a storm: Trace the history. When a car is totaled, the title is branded as salvaged or rebuilt, and buyers know up front that there was major damage at some point in the car’s history. But only a few states brand salvaged boats —Texas does not — and some states don’t require titles for boats. Anyone wishing to obscure a boat’s history need only cross state lines to avoid detection, which can be a

tipoff. Look for recent gaps in the boat’s ownership, which may mean that it was at an auction or in a repair yard for a long time. Look for recent hull repairs. Especially on older boats, matching gelcoat is very difficult. Mismatched colors around a repaired area are often a giveaway and may signal nothing more than filler under the gelcoat, rather than a proper fiberglass repair. Look for new repairs or sealant at the hull-todeck joint. Boats that bang against a dock during a storm often suffer damage Please turn to page 15


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 9

Show and tell Florida lure maker teaches Texas anglers

really drives home how much his products work.” With an ability to make quality artificial lures, it’s Nichols’ connection with people By Dustin Catrett that’s most endeared DOA to so many for For Lone Star Outdoor News so long. “Basically, the stuff I sell to people catchWhen Capt. Mark Nichols, owner of es fish, and I’m just an ordinary fisherman DOA Lures, first created the 3-inch plastic who makes it,” Nichols said. shrimp back in 1988, little did he know Primarily a saltwater lure maker, in rethat some 30 years later, anglers all over cent years Nichols has expanded into the the country would be using it. freshwater market with a new line of soft Building his company on a grassroots plastics for largemouth bass. philosophy, the He took an native Floridearly-morning ian still tweaks three-hour road and tests each trip north to of his creations the Tecomate first before demLa Perla Ranch, onstrating their where Dr. Gary ability to catch Schwarz is atfish by taktempting to ing folks out to grow the next use them. It’s a world-record business model bass to talk lure that’s worked for design with decades that bemanager Blair gan by inviting Schwarz. writers, guides By late afterand television noon, he was personalities to back in Port his home waters Mark Nichols landed this Texas redfish on his new lure, the Isabel holdof Stuart, Florida Sna-Koil. Nichols plans to spend more time in Texas in the ing court in the for a hands-on coming year. Photo by Dustin Catrett. Quik Stop tackle experience with them to see how they shop talking tides and the recent snowfall catch spotted seatrout, snook and tarpon. with a few local anglers. Taking his show on the road, Nichols “I love to talk fishing with real fisherdiscovered the game-rich shallows of the men,” he said, later that evening at BlackLower Laguna Madre near South Padre beard’s Restaurant in South Padre Island. Island to be a perfect match for his latest Seated in front of a cake decorated with line of saltwater lures. DOA’s logo, he was right where he wanted Using a new 15-inch snake lure he to be: surrounded by friends, fisherman dubbed the Sna-Koil that mimics an eel, and writers to celebrate his 67th birthday. both he and Capt. Brian Barrera of Port By morning, he’ll be up again to fish Mansfield connected with a half-dozen or with a few of the guys he met earlier that so football-sized redfish on a recent outing. day in the tackle shop, hoping to convert “He’s an incredible source of knowl- a few more believers in the same way he edge for inshore fishing,” said Barrera. always has. “I’ve watched him on TV and attended his One cast at a time. seminars. So fishing with him personally

Trout, reds back on track Continued from page 1

put the trolling motor down and ease along protected shorelines while working top-water plugs. “The top-water bite along the south shoreline has been excellent,” West said. “It’s a little bit slow early, but when the sun warms things up by about noon, big trout are feeding on mullet. A Super Spook Jr. has been good. The main thing is to work any type of top-water in front of a trout.” West said the water is extremely clear, and he has been using tails while drifting and wading. His best colors have been chartreuse/ metal flake, plum and root beer. The reds are The water temperatures stabilized after a quick good in the bayous on tails worked several drop in early December, and fishing for trout and redfish quickly recovered. Photo by Robert Sloan. feet off the bank. At Port O’Connor, two things are controlling the catches of reds and trout. Extremely low tides have made the drains in West Matagorda Bay and south towards San Antonio Bay an excellent option for waders. The jetties have been good for an assortment of fish like reds, trout and sheepshead. Capt. Ron Arlitt said fishing live shrimp at the jetties is producing a lot of fish. “With clear water and a moving tide, fishing has been good both inside and on the Gulf side of the jetties,” Arlitt said. “The best way to catch reds is to go deep with live or fresh dead shrimp. The trout are best on free-lined shrimp on the Gulf side of the rocks. We’re using a small split shot and letting the shrimp move deep with the current.” Fishing on East Matagorda Bay has remained slow according to guide Charlie Paradoski. He said the water temperature there dropped from 71 to 43 degrees during the first week of December. “Our best fishing for both trout and reds has been in the Colorado River and the diversion canal,” Paradoski said. “That’s where the water temperature has come up into the low 50s.” Pardoski also said the drains feeding into the Intracoastal Waterway are holding good numbers of reds. His best luck has been while using Bass Assassins or scented plastics with white curl tails. “The paddle tails have been better than straight tails,” Paradoski said. “I’m not sure that color is all that important but some of the most reliable are plum/chartreuse, 10W40 and pumpkinseed.”

2018 TXTT TOUR SCHEDULE Subject To Change

January 12th - Toledo Bend February 10th - Sam Rayburn April 14th - Lake Amistad May 5th - Ray Roberts

CHAMPIONSHIP*

June 2nd & 3rd - Sam Rayburn *To qualify for the Championship teams must enter all 4 regular season events and participate in at least 2 of the 4 events.

For more information & registration...

www.texasteamtrail.com E-mail: Info@texasteamtrail.com

Phone: 210-281-1752 or 210-788-4143 1982 St Rd 44 #197 - New Smyrna Beach, FL 32168

TEXAS-SIZED PAYOUTS! Entry Fee - ONLY $250/Team. Over 100% PAYBACK at every event plus additional bonus prizes & cash for qualified Ranger®, Triton®, Nitro®, Evinrude®, & Mercury® owners who finish in the top 25% of the field. Fully Rigged 150HP Tournament Bass Boat Package GUARANTEED 1st place prize at each qualifying event. Two Fully Rigged Tournament Bass Boat Packages GUARANTEED at Championship.


Page 10

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained to muddy upriver; 66 degrees; 4.96’ low. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and spoons. Crappie and bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on punch bait and live worms. AMISTAD: Water murky; 71-75 degrees; 23.70’ low. Black bass are fair on crankbaits, top-waters, jigs and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on silver slabs. White bass are fair on silver slabs and minnows. Catfish are good on cheese bait over baited holes. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 57-66 degrees; 2.24’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 48-53 degrees; 0.97’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 57-66 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on chrome lipless crankbaits and Texas rigs. Sunfish are fair to good on cut nightcrawlers. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. BASTROP: Water stained; 6973 degrees. Black bass are fair on chartreuse and chartreuse/ white soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait, chicken liver and nightcrawlers. BELTON: Water stained; 68-72 degrees; 2.76’ low. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are slow. BENBROOK: Water stained; 47-52 degrees; 3.47’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 49-54 degrees; 1.26’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, finesse jigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. BONHAM: Water stained; 47-51 degrees; 1.68 low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Some fish are being caught around docks and cattails on Texas-rigged plastics and jigs. Crappie are good on jigs over brush piles in 12-15 feet. Catfish are good along creek channel with punch bait and prepared bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Redfish are fair on live perch and shad near the dam. Channel catfish are good on chicken livers, shrimp and cut shad. Blue catfish are good on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water clear, 48-52 degrees: 3.66’ low. Black bass are fair on bone jerkbaits, medium crankbaits and shakyhead worms. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 67-71 degrees; 3.12’ low. Black bass are fair on black/blue jigs, crankbaits and redbug and watermelon soft plastic worms over brush piles. Hybrid striper are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies and crankbaits from lighted docks at night. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers over

baited holes. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 4.47’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon red grubs on jigheads, Texas-rigged blue flake worms and suspending blue-back crankbaits along ledges and points. Striped bass are good drifting live shad and jigging swim baits in 25-40 feet. White bass are fair jigging Tiny Traps, crappie jigs, and blade baits along main lake points. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CADDO: Water stained; 52-56 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Redfish are fair on live perch, shad, and spoons in 15-25 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on chicken livers, shrimp and cut shad. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 67-71 degrees; 3.31’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon red creature baits, Texasrigged watermelon worms and tubes on jigheads along bluffs. White bass are fair on blade baits along main lake bluffs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 49-53 degrees; 2.24’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, Carolina-rigged worms and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and minnows. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 55-68 degrees; 24.31’ low. Black bass are good on soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails and shad-colored lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are slow. Drum are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on punch bait in 2-7 feet. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 66-70 degrees; 2.30’ low. Black bass are good on tequila sunrise soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on white striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait, nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 89 degrees at the hot water discharge, 70 degrees in main lake; 0.90’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics in 6-10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on perch in 8-10 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 68-72 degrees; 0.45’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are good on chartreuse striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on stink bait, liver and shrimp. COOPER: Water stained; 77-87 degrees; 2.09’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, spinner baits and flukes. Crappie are good on minnows. Hybrid striper and white bass are fair on slabs. CORPUS CHRISTI: Water offcolor; 55-63 degrees; 0.12’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits and shaky heads.

White bass are fair on tail spinners. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 47-53 degrees; 1.53 low. Black bass are fair on finesse jigs, Senkos and shakyhead worms. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FAIRFIELD: Water fairly clear. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, swim jigs and spinner baits. No report on other species. FALCON: Water murky; 70-74 degrees; 17.24’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits and crankbaits in creeks and coves. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are very good on shrimp, cut bait and stink bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on electric blue Carolina-rigged soft plastic worms and spinner baits along the outside edges of grass. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and shrimp over baited holes. FORK: Water stained; 49-54 degrees; 1.46’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, bladed jigs, and flutter spoons. White and yellow bass are fair on minnows and slabs Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water off-color; 55-64 degrees; 1.56’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, Texas rigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on tequila sunrise soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on shrimp and nightcrawlers. GRANBURY: Water stained; 67-71 degrees; 0.61’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon and pumpkinseed soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on shrimp, stink bait and live minnows. GRANGER: Water stained; 67-71 degrees; 0.21’ high. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows upriver at night. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 47-51 degrees; 1.04’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 48-57 degrees; 32.27 low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on marabou jigs and live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 64-68 degrees. Black bass are fair on soft plastic worms, crankbaits and minnows in 10 feet. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 58-64 degrees; 2.98’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs.

Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live shiners. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 48-51 degrees; 1.28’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless stick worms, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 50-54 degrees: 0.15’ high. Black bass are fair on shaky-head worms, lipless crankbaits and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 49-54 degrees: 3.32’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 68-72 degrees; 0.67’ low. Black bass are good on jigs, pumpkin worms and green/pumpkin tubes. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on silver minnow imitation lures. Crappie are fair on minnows in brush piles under heated docks. Channel catfish are fair on minnows and worms. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 48-51 degrees; 2.08’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 0.95’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad. MACKENZIE: 73.9’ low. Black bass are fair on shad-pattern crankbaits, spoons and Texas rigs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. No reports on crappie. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 84-90 degrees; 3.47’ low. Black bass are fair on plastic worms and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MEREDITH: Water fairly clear; 47-55 degrees; 47.56’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, suspending jerkbaits and live minnows. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 84-91 degrees; 0.53’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, flipping jigs and Texasrigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 56-65 degrees; 1.18’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and squarebilled crankbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 2.01’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and jigs at night. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait and nightcrawlers. Blue catfish are slow. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 5766 degrees; 37.55’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs

and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 5865 degrees; 10.61’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs and chrome/black lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 48-53 degrees; 1.21’ low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, finesse jigs and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 58-65 degrees; 1.2’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnow. White bass are fair on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water murky; 6771 degrees; 2.83’ low. Black bass are good on black/purple and chartreuse soft plastic worms and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on minnows, small lipless crankbaits and roadrunners. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs in 15 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on juglines baited with cut shad. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 49-52 degrees; 2.12’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, lipless crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 47-52 degrees; 1.29’ low. Black bass are good on lipless crankbaits, Carolina-rigged worms and football jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 48-53 degrees; 2.68’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 67-71 degrees; 2.64’ low. Black bass are fair on shad-colored lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. White bass are fair on minnows and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Bream are good on worms. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, shrimp and minnows. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 6670 degrees; 0.20’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with cut shad and perch. SPENCE: 50.91’ low. Catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers. STAMFORD: Water stained; 48-57 degrees; 0.44’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and live minnows. White bass are fair on live bait and Little Georges. Blue catfish are fair on cut and live bait.

n Saltwater reports Page 11 STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 69-73 degrees; 3.03’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 49-53 degrees; 1.28’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, black and blue flipping jigs and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 47-51 degrees; 1.42’ high. Black bass are good on suspending jerkbaits, stick worms and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Striped bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Catfish are slow. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 78-72 degrees; 4.68’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Bream are fair on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver, shrimp and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 68-72 degrees; 11.57’ low. Black bass are fair on shad crankbaits, black worms and smoke grubs. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and chrome spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows and frozen shad. WEATHERFORD: Water lightly stained; 48-51 degrees; 2.26’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, shaky-head worms and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 53-63 degrees; 21.32’ low. Black bass are slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on cheese bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 4.63’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon, watermelon/red, and watermelon/ gold spinner baits, crankbaits, and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and jigging spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on shrimp, liver and stink bait. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained; 46-51 degrees; 2.96’ high. Black bass are slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on cut shad.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Two men sentenced for snapper violations

USA Fishing Trails suspends schedule

After a hearing in federal court in Houston, two men were sentenced for making false statements to law enforcement regarding the illegal harvest of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. Jamal Marshall was sentenced to six months imprisonment and six months home confinement, and Jacob Brown was previously sentenced on November 29 to two months imprisonment and four months home confinement. In August, Marshall and Brown pleaded guilty to making false statements to agents with the Coast Guard Investigative Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – Office of Law Enforcement. According to court documents filed at the time of the plea, the two illegally harvested more than 1,900 pounds of fish, including 642 snapper, weighing approximately 1,846 pounds. The two subsequently lied to law enforcement agents regarding the possession of these fish in order to hide their illegal harvest from Texas waters. The case was investigated by the NOAA – Office of Law Enforcement, the Coast Guard Investigative Service, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. —U.S. Dept. of Justice

No tournament schedule for 2018 will be released for USA Fishing Trails, also the home of Bass-N-Bucks and the Bud Light Trail. “Over the last nine years, we have had the absolute pleasure of meeting people from all across Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas, and many of you have become great personal friends,” Chris and Charlie Davis said in the announcement. “This is not necessarily the end for USA Fishing Trails. In fact, our goal is to take a step back and determine how we can provide an even better experience for our members in the future.”

MADE IN USA

December 22, 2017

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair on Corkies over soft mud in waist-deep water in San Antonio Bay. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working reefs on live shrimp. Redfish are good at the mouths of drains. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair on the edge of the ICW on glow DOA Shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in the holes on the Estes Flats on mullet and shrimp. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good on the East Flats on scented plastics and mullet. Sand trout are good on shrimp in the channel. Red snapper are good in state waters.

NORTH SABINE: Trout and redfish are fair while drifting mud and shell. Tides are below normal. Trout are fair for waders on Corkies. SOUTH SABINE: Redfish are fair on the edge of the channel on mullet. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp.

BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on slow-sinking plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair to good over clam shell on plastics. Redfish are good at the spillway on crabs and mullet. Tides are below normal. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Trout are good over the deep reefs on plastics when the wind allows. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good for waders working the mud and shell in the afternoon on MirrOlures and Corkies. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Redfish and sand trout are fair to good in the holes in Moses Lake on fresh shrimp. The channel edges have held trout, black drum and a few flounder on scented plastics and shrimp. FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are fair to good on live shrimp on the reefs. Redfish are fair to good at San Luis pass on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on soft plastics over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. Redfish are fair on the shorelines in the guts. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good in the Colorado River on glow plastics during the day and at night under lights. Redfish are fair to good on the south shoreline in the guts and bayous.

—USA Fishing Trails

DOA 1/8

w e N

Walk where no other topwater has walked before!

Compact and durable, the PT-7’s sleek aerodynamic body casts like a bullet and skips into tight places where others can’t. 3 inches in length and 5/8 oz., this soft plastic minesweeper detonates explosive strikes like no other topwater. Snook, redfish, and seatrout, to lunker largemouth bass find its “walk-the-dog” action simply irresistible. Pre-rigged with a single premium 7/0 EWG hook, it keeps the big fish on where standard trebles fail. Available in 10 realistic colors with several more on the way.

CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are good in the Humble Channel on crabs and table shrimp. Trout are fair to good on the edge of the flats on live shrimp and scented plastics. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good in mud and grass on Corkies, MirrOlures and SoftDines. Trout are fair to good in the guts along the King Ranch shoreline on Corkies. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are fair to good on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics under a popping cork around grass holes. Trout are fair to good on mud along the edge of the ICW and around the spoils on Corkies and Soft-Dines. SOUTH PADRE: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish, black drum and mangrove snapper are fair to good in the channel on shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on soft plastics and scented plastics under popping corks. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the channel on shrimp and scented plastics.

—TPWD

w w w . d o a l u r e s . c o m 171003_DOA_4.17_Lonestar Outdoors.ad_PT-7_TROUT_5.1x3.45.indd 1

4/17/17 11:35 AM

800+ Stores Nationwide HarborFreight.com

SUPER COUPON

FREE WITH

ANY

PURCHASE

3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

• 9 LED • Compact, Lightweight

2

$ 99 RAYOVAC MODEL: BRS9LED-B COMPARE TO

ITEM 69111 63599/62522/62573 63875/63884/63886 63888/69052 shown

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/22/18. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON

TRIPLE BALL TRAILER HITCH

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

20% OFF

ANY SINGLE ITEM

LIMIT 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/22/18.

• Air delivery: 5.8 CFM @ 40 PSI, 4.7 CFM @ 90 PSI

99

COMPARE TO $

REESE

49

99

MODEL: 7068833

$19

SAVE 60%

$

3399

SAVE COMPARE TO $ 219 $69 HUSKY MODEL: C201H

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW

$

16999

ITEM 69091/61454 62803/63635/67847 shown

KOBALT

$

299

MODEL: SM3055LW

1,150

MODEL: KRSC33APBO

$

99

ITEM 61427/63308 69397/64059/64060/64061/95272 shown

COMPARE TO $

ARCAN

19999 MODEL: XL2T

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

BLACKHAWK ITEM 68050/62310/60678 shown

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" CAMOUFLAGE 20-60 x 60mm SPOTTING SCOPE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP WITH TRIPOD

$

9

19999 $12

ITEM 61969/61970/69684 shown

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

99

ITEM 63100 COMPARE TO

OPTRONICS

$

33

59

MODEL: TL21RK

SAVE $ 99 70% 18

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

$9

ITEM 63750/63181 shown

$

$1299

15

99

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

STEP STOOL/ WORKING PLATFORM • 350 lb. capacity

NOW

SAVE 25%

NOW

ITEM 61765/46411 shown

49

$4

5

$ 99

SAVE 27%

$3999 $

54

SAVE

COMPARE TO

99

• Height range: 12-1/2" to 24" COMPARE TO

REESE $ 99

ITEM 94555/62774 shown

44

$

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINE

SAVE $230

NOW

99 2999 $19

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating 4-1/2"

ANGLE GRINDER

Customer Rating

NOW

NOW

$9999

99

$17

MODEL: 74410

5755 65%

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $2599 60%

$

GPL MODEL: H-21 ITEM 62515/66911 shown

$ ITEM 69780 41005 shown

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

HONDA

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 4/22/18.

NOW

$

32999

$999

SAVE 61%

11999

COMPARE TO

Coupons Can Be Used In-Store and at HarborFreight.com hft_lonestarnews_1217_M-REG125438.indd 1

MODEL: 970032

Customer Rating Customer Rating

Customer Rating

99

NOW

1999

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

NOW

$

COMPARE TO

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

SUPER COUPON

12 VOLT MAGNETIC 1000 LB. CAPACITY TOWING LIGHT KIT SWING-BACK TRAILER JACK

Customer Rating

NOW

199 $15 9 99

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

NOW

COMPARE TO

SNAP-ON

SAVE 35%

SAVE $13999 $80

NOW

Blade sold separately.

SAVE $169

$119

COMPARE TO $

Customer Rating

• Weighs 99 lbs.

NOW

99

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

SUPER COUPON

• Laser guide

Customer Rating

SAVE $990

.50 CAL METAL AMMO CAN

RAPID PUMP 2 TON LOW PROFILE LONG REACH HEAVY DUTY STEEL Customer Rating FLOOR JACK

• 8100 cu. in. of storage • 704 lb. capacity • Weighs 120 lbs.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON ®

9 $1499

Customer Rating

NOW

ITEM 61914

30", 5 DRAWER TOOL CART

SUPER COUPON

21 GALLON, 2.5 HP, 125 PSI VERTICAL OIL-LUBE AIR COMPRESSOR

SUPER COUPON

COMPARE TO

MODEL: GX200UT2QX2

PERFORMAX

$

2580

MODEL: 2411-1

$

1499

ITEM 69645/60625 shown

LIMIT 6 - Coupon valid through 4/22/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

12/4/17 4:08 PM


Page 12

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER REPEAT OFFENDER A SLOW LEARNER Deer parts were dumped on private property in Montgomery County last season. The game warden made contact with a suspect and found that he had killed two deer, tagging neither and dumped their remains on the private property. The suspect pled not guilty, went to trial, and was convicted of possession of untagged white-tailed deer and littering. This season, the warden got another call from the private property owner about deer parts dumped on the property again. The warden found the same man to be in possession of an untagged deer. The suspect admitted to catching the deer in a trap before killing and processing it. He further admitted to dumping the deer remains at the same location as last year. The suspect received numerous citations. STOPPING FOR GAS WAS THEIR FIRST PROBLEM While patrolling in Walker County, three game wardens observed two individuals at a local gas station hauling a deer in the bed of their truck. They contacted the individuals and soon discovered there were hunting license violations and discrepancies on where the deer was harvested. The wardens followed the individuals back to the location the deer was taken. At the location, the wardens discovered the deer was taken out of the Sam Houston National Forest in San Jacinto County. The subject received a citation for no annual hunting permit, civil restitution and a written warning for unfilled harvest log. The white-tailed deer scored 159 6/8.

HUNTING IN HIS BIRTHDAY SUIT An Upshur County man was arrested by a Gregg County game warden while hunting in the nude along a state highway. The man did not have a hunting license on him. The known nudist/activist later contested the charges. During the trial, the warden’s bodycam footage was played to the

HOST OF VIOLATIONS FOR GROUP While checking deer camps, a Webb County game warden checked a group cleaning a few does. Neither of the does was tagged and one of the individuals said he forgot his license at home. A records check showed that several of the hunters had not taken hunter education, and the one who forgot his license only possessed a fishing license. Several citations were issued and one doe was seized. RIFLE USED IN ARCHERY SEASON A man told a Colorado County game warden he harvested a white-tailed buck with his archery equipment. After an inspection of the animal and an interview of the subject, it was determined that the buck was harvested with a rifle. The buck also violated the 13-inch antler restriction. The hunter did not have a valid hunting license and had used a tag from his elderly father’s license. Cases filed and restitution is pending.

county judge. After hearing testimony and viewing a few seconds of the undressed violator, the judge abruptly stopped the video and ruled in the state’s favor. The citations for hunting without a license, shooting across a property line and disorderly conduct were paid.

REPEAT TRESPASSERS, STOLEN RIFLE A report of subjects hunting without permission was received by a Bastrop County game warden who went to the scene and found four subjects on the property. The group claimed to have permission from the landowner. The warden contacted the absentee landowner and learned the group had been told multiple times not to be on the property and the landowner wanted to file charges for hunting without consent. One of the rifles had been reported stolen. The rifles were seized and charges filed. ALL CAMO BUT NO RIFLES A subject carrying a rifle in a field was observed by a Bastrop County game warden. The warden also noticed a pickup truck with a hog on the tailgate. After finding out that the hunter was not alone, the warden had the subject call his two other buddies, who were out in the woods, to their location. The subjects came out of the woods with

camouflaged clothes, but no guns. After a few moments, the two men showed the warden where they hid their rifles in the woods. Citations for hunting without a valid hunting license were issued. TRAIL CAMERA SNAPS POACHER A Lavaca County ranch contacted the local game warden to view trail camera photos that captured images of someone trespassing and killing a deer. The identity of the poacher was discovered after several days of investigation. The subject was contacted in Travis County and admitted to trespassing and killing the white-tailed buck. Hunting without landowner consent charges are pending. FISHING LICENSE DOESN’T COVER DEER Harris County game wardens received an Operation Game Thief lead regarding a potentially poached white-tailed buck on a family farm during the youth

opener. After locating the suspect in nearby Brazoria County, the wardens interviewed the man who produced the head of the 6-point buck he had shot, claiming it was on his in-law’s property. When asked for his hunting license and evidence the deer was legally harvested and tagged, the man could only produce a Year From Date All Water Fishing License, which he attempted to argue was evidence he had a valid hunting license. It was also discovered the buck was illegal, having a spread of only 11 inches antler. The head and deer meat were seized and citations were issued. HAWK SHOT TO PROTECT CHICKENS A Bowie County game warden received a call in reference to an individual shooting a hawk. The warden responded to the individual’s residence and observed what appeared to be a Cooper’s hawk lying on the back of a vehicle near the suspect’s house. He made contact with the homeowner, who admitted he knew hawks were protected but he didn’t want it to get his chickens. The warden educated the subject on legal and non-lethal options to protect his chickens from birds of prey and other predators. The hawk was seized and the subject received a citation for taking a protected bird species.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263

“The TORIC had one of the highest combined low-light and resolution scores in our test” Outdoor Life, Optics Gear Test. INCLUDES HIGH PROFILE TURRET KIT WITH ZERO STOP AND LOCK

ULTRA HIGH DEFINITION TECHNOLOGY

FEATURING SCHOTT HT AND ED GLASS

WATERPROOF AND FOGPROOF WITH ARGON GAS

4” CONSTANT EYE RELIEF

GLASS ETCHED RETICLE

TORIC 3-15X50 EXTRAORDINARY OPTICS. NO RETAIL MARK-UP. DIRECT TO YOU

SAVE 10% ON YOUR FIRST ORDER* PROMO CODE: LSON17


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

The cactus buck belly — no blood, but it spoke volumes about the buck’s tough nature. The hunters noted it was new barbed wire and went around the property to see if they could see where the buck got stuck, but they never found any sign of his struggle. Deer are fairly hardy animals, even when faced with serious injuries, said Alan Cain, white-tailed deer program leader with Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. While there’s no research on the topic, Cain said there are cases where deer have healed up even with a bro- Barbed wire was entangled in the antken leg bone sticking out after an lers of the buck taken by Thomas Wilkerson. Photo from Thomas Wilkerson. injury. “Deer are tough critters,” Cain said. Wilkerson plans on honoring the deer’s fighting spirit by having Cactus mounted with the barbed wire intact. For Wilkerson, it was the biggest buck he’s shot in his life — and a dream come true, thanks to the generosity of friends. “I’m just still in shock, and still so excited,” he said.

Continued from page 8

stereotype many believe exists with his career. Like many tour pros, he spends more time preparing for the next season, ordering new equipment and a boat, and finalizing sponsorships. “I also have a passion for fishing, and it is very much part of my off-season life,” he said. “You will find that among some of us who never put away the tackle for the winter.” For the past decade, Klein has joined Cliff Brown and his Texas Boat World dealership in supporting Fishing for Freedom. The program pairs up to 350 soldiers from Fort Hood with anglers for a day of fishing. A personal focus for Klein is providing tackle packages to the 30 or more Purple Heart recipients. The Kleins’ dream home is located at the end of a one-mile driveway off the main road. Call it living the simple life. The house is built on a concrete slab measuring 50x100 feet. They wouldn’t have it any other way. Call it what you want, but the off-season doesn’t last long, and Klein makes the most of it.

2 New Feeder desigNs!

Pro angler Gary Klein enjoys his Parker County ranch during his time away from competition, fishing and hunting with his daughters, Lakota and Kanyon. Photo from Gary Klein.

R

U.S. PATENTS 8201520, 7370605, 6920841, D575908, D599503, D602649, D603104, D603105, D604017, D603566, D624706, D624708, D622453, D624707, D636942, D629572, D629976, D629975, D624709, D630802, D630653, D647253, D642750, D681883, 9278813, 9554555 • OTHER PATENTS PENDING • U.S. TRADEMARKS 3629190 & 3625066

Built Right the First time to last a lifetime!

Continued from page 8

above Raymondville prices. Kinney said buying fuel has been a concern for himself and for many anglers who come to this fishing community in eastern Willacy County. Dan Mleynek, an Iowa man who has been coming here for more than a decade, was glad to hear about the coming fuel station. “It’s long overdue,” he said. “You either pay the price here or go to Raymondville to get fuel.” Mlyenek said he and his buddies fish just about every day the weather is fit and the wind is not blowing. They fish for reds, trout, red snapper and for tuna. The tuna trips take them 50 or more miles offshore, so the rig they use requires plenty of fuel each round trip. David Mays, the local police chief, said getting fuel has been as issue since the convenience store that sold gasoline closed several years ago. “Port Mansfield is a big fishing place,” he said. “Getting fuel has been one of the biggest inabilities in town. This is going to be a great thing for everybody.” The old station bore the names of Chevron, Exxon and others over the years, and is viewed by motorists and fishermen as they approach Port Mansfield on Highway 186. A crew began working this month at the site. Area politicians describe the fishing community as one of the jewels of the Rio Grande Valley and for many anglers this is their favorite place to fish whether in waters of the Laguna Madre, in the surf, from the town’s two piers and out in the Gulf of Mexico. The local chamber of commerce hosts dozen of fishing tournaments each year and the list has been steadily growing. Soon, the visitors will be able to fill their tanks.

Page 13

Family fun in the outdoors

Continued from page 4

Fuel, finally

December 22, 2017

New desigN!

The “Share-Kropper” Outback’s tOp Low profiLe feeder NOtch Quality

ChOOsE fROm DiRECTiOnAL OR sPinnER DisTRibUTiOn Directional feeder spreads heavier feed out to 50’ in a 20’ wide pattern. spinner feeder spreads up to 360 degrees. • Works equally well with all types of fish feed, corn or milo • Can be placed on a pier, dock, bank or truck • 24” tank diameter holds 175# floating fish feed or 300# corn

CP REGULATOR

The Regulator has “The Timer” inside the gravity flow system allowing control of the feed amount while maintaining dispensed feed inside the feeder housing and tubes. You program to dispense feed up to 6 times/day at the rate of 2 lbs./ second & 360 lbs./day max.

“BABY-BACK” VeRY lOW pROFile FeeDeRs

• 360o corn distribution or up to 50 feet in one direction via Outback’s “Pistolero” directional unit • 400, 600 & 1000 lb. capacities

New desigN!

Cf CORn fEEDER

with solar Powered Timer • 600, 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities • Optional Fold-up Cage • Optional 4-Tube Adapter on TM Tube

OUTBACK feATUres THe TIMer 12-VOlT COnTrOl UnIT wITH 5 yeAr wArrAnTy

the “grub-Shak” has all the Outback ruggedness & reliability we are known for! “GRUb-shAk” OPEnTROUGh REGULATED fEEDER

• Feed all types of animals including deer, sheep, goats, horses, cattle, etc. • 1000 & 2000 lb. capacities • Built-in rain shield • Removable ladder & platform included

Cp GRAViTY FlOW PROTEin fEEDER • 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities

See our many other products at

.outbackfeeders.com

www

903.734.4210 • 800.396.6313 shop 903.734.6774 • cell 903.790.1071 e-mail: rickmeritt@yahoo.com 5197 FM 2685 • Gilmer, TX 75645

fiRE PiTs • Features swivel grill, Dutch oven support, fire poker & ash pan • 3 sizes: 38” Texas, 30” Junior or 24” Tailgater GReAT BAll OF FiRe WilDliFe sCEnE EmbELLishED fiRE PiT No two alike, each one a work of art! • 1400o high-temp. powder-coat finish • Fire poker & ash pan included

hALf-bACk PROTEin fEEDER

• 700 lb. capacity has 4 feed ports • 1000 lb. capacity has 6 feed ports

All OUTBACK PrOdUCTs Are BUIlT wITH PrIde In AMerICA wITH Only AMerICAn MATerIAls And CrAfTsMAnsHIP


Page 14

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Christopher Perdomo, a Lone Star Outdoor News reader from New Orleans, Louisiana, harvested this Gredos ibex in the Sierra de Gredos Mountains in Spain.

John Haga, a Winter Texan from Michigan, caught this red drum while fishing on the Bay King boat from Pier 19. They were fishing near the jetty.

Cameron Frazier, 11, of McKinney, went on her first dove hunt near Ennis, and used her youth 870 20-gauge shotgun.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Braden Grigar, 7,from Maypearl, shot this buck with a drop tine in Navarro County. He used his Savage .223.

SQUARE 1 CONTAINERS, LLC 20Ft/40Ft Used Containers Modifications Available Hunting Camps Construction Offices

20ft Used Containers - $1600 + Delivery 40ft Used Containers - $2100 + Delivery

Great for storage of: Small Equipment Four Wheelers Feed Anything you want to keep secure and dry Ernie Williamson ernie1@square1containers.com

Fran Linnell fran@square1containers.com

877-470-1662

www.square1containers.com

Everett Powell, 10, took his first buck on November 22 in Burnet County.


LSONews.com

Buying boats Continued from page 8

there. Evidence of sinking. Check for consistent corrosion on interior hardware, such as rust on all hinges and drawer pulls. You might be able to spot an interior waterline inside a locker or an area hidden behind an interior structure. Corrosion in the electrical system. Corrosion on electrical items, such as lamps, connectors and behind breaker panels might mean the boat sank recently. Does the boat have all new electronics? Why? Look for evidence of major interior repairs. Fresh paint or gelcoat work on the inside of the hull and engine room is usually obvious. All new cushions and curtains may be a tipoff, too. Look for fresh paint on the engine. It may be covering exterior rust as well as interior damage. Ask the seller. In some states, a seller isn’t required to disclose if a boat was badly damaged unless you ask. If the seller hems and haws, keep looking.

Bobwhite Quail

Strong Wild Beautiful •

Bobwhite Flight

• (325)

660-7869

645 C.R. 105 - MORAN, TX 76464

GET MORE NEWS!

SIGN UP FOR OUR FREE E-NEWSLETTER

ONLINE LSONews.com CALL 214-361-2276 or EMAIL News@LoneStarOutdoorNews.com

For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Executive Editor

Craig Nyhus

Design Editor

C2-Studios, Inc.

Associate Editor

Mark England

Products Editor

Mary Helen Aguirre

Operations Manager

Mike Hughs

Accounting

Ginger Hoolan

Website

Bruce Solieu

National Advertising Mike Nelson Founder & CEO

David J. Sams

Advertising: Call (214) 361-2276 or email editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com to request a media kit.

For home delivery subscriptions www.LSONews.com • (214) 361-2276

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 15

Sheep make a trip Continued from page 4

become accustomed to their new environment. Using this method, it is thought the sheep may be more likely to develop a tighter home range near that area and not travel off. After three weeks or so, the gates will be opened and the sheep will be allowed to filter out of the enclosure at their leisure. The other half were “hard released,” set free at a predetermined location. Biologists hope to determine if sheep released in this manner tend to travel out of the release area faster and farther than those first released in temporary enclosures. A graduate student at Sul Ross State University in Alpine will be monitoring the newly released desert bighorns on a daily basis. Desert bighorn sheep restoration began in Texas in 1954, and now the now sheep numbers total approximately 1,500.

A desert bighorn ram awaits the move to new home. Photo from TPWD.


Page 16

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

First

Full

Last

New

Dec 26

Jan 1

Jan 8

Jan 16

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec/Jan Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec/Jan Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat 31 Sun 01 Mon 02 Tue 03 Wed 04 Thu 05 Fri

22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu

8:18 9:09 9:59 10:48 11:35 ----12:42

29 Fri 30 Sat 31 Sun 01 Mon 02 Tue 03 Wed 04 Thu 05 Fri

8:12 2:01 9:04 2:52 9:54 3:42 10:42 4:31 11:29 5:18 ----- 6:03 12:36 6:49 1:22 7:35 2:10 8:25 3:03 9:19 4:01 10:17 5:04 11:20 6:09 12:01 7:15 1:00 8:18 2:05

8:35 2:24 9:26 3:15 10:16 4:05 11:05 4:54 11:52 5:41 12:15 6:27 1:02 7:14 1:49 8:03 2:40 8:54 3:34 9:49 4:33 10:49 5:35 11:51 6:40 12:25 7:44 1:30 8:46 2:32

07:12 07:13 07:13 07:14 07:14 07:14 07:15 07:15 07:15 07:16 07:16 07:16 07:16 07:17 07:17

05:25 05:26 05:26 05:27 05:27 05:28 05:29 05:29 05:30 05:31 05:31 05:32 05:33 05:33 05:34

10:17a 9:28p 10:55a 10:23p 11:32a 11:18p 12:08p NoMoon 12:43p 12:14a 1:20p 1:12a 2:00p 2:13a 2:43p 3:16a 3:32p 4:22a 4:27p 5:29a 5:29p 6:36a 6:34p 7:39a 7:42p 8:36a 8:49p 9:28a 9:54p 10:15a

2:06 2:58 3:48 4:37 5:23 6:09 6:55

8:41 9:32 10:22 11:11 11:58 12:21 1:07

2:30 3:21 4:11 4:59 5:47 6:33 7:20

07:25 07:26 07:26 07:27 07:27 07:27 07:28

1:28 7:41

1:55

8:09

07:28 05:28 2:45p

2:16 3:09 4:07 5:10 6:15 7:21 8:24

2:45 3:40 4:39 5:41 6:46 7:50 8:52

9:00 9:55 10:55 11:57 12:30 1:35 2:38

8:31 9:25 10:23 11:25 12:00 1:06 2:11

07:28 07:29 07:29 07:29 07:29 07:29 07:29

05:24 05:24 05:25 05:26 05:26 05:27 05:27 05:29 05:29 05:30 05:31 05:31 05:32 05:33

10:28a 9:30p 11:05a 10:26p 11:40a 11:22p 12:15p NoMoon 12:49p 12:20a 1:25p 1:19a 2:03p 2:21a 3:26a

3:33p 4:33a 4:28p 5:41a 5:28p 6:48a 6:34p 7:51a 7:43p 8:48a 8:51p 9:39a 9:57p 10:24a

San Antonio

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec/Jan Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec/Jan Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat 31 Sun 01 Mon 02 Tue 03 Wed 04 Thu 05 Fri

22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat 31 Sun 01 Mon 02 Tue 03 Wed 04 Thu 05 Fri

8:25 2:13 9:16 3:05 10:06 3:55 10:55 4:43 11:42 5:30 12:04 6:16 12:48 7:01 1:34 7:48 2:23 8:38 3:16 9:31 4:14 10:30 5:16 11:32 6:22 12:06 7:27 1:13 8:31 2:17

8:48 9:39 10:29 11:17 ----12:28 1:14 2:02 2:52 3:47 4:45 5:48 6:52 7:57 8:58

2:36 3:28 4:17 5:06 5:53 6:40 7:27 8:15 9:07 10:02 11:01 ----12:37 1:42 2:45

07:24 07:24 07:25 07:25 07:25 07:26 07:26 07:26 07:27 07:27 07:27 07:28 07:28 07:28 07:28

05:39 05:39 05:40 05:40 05:41 05:42 05:42 05:43 05:43 05:44 05:45 05:45 05:46 05:47 05:48

10:29a 9:42p 11:08a 10:36p 11:44a 11:31p 12:20p NoMoon 12:56p 12:27a 1:33p 1:25a 2:13p 2:25a 2:57p 3:29a 3:46p 4:34a 4:41p 5:42a 5:43p 6:48a 6:48p 7:51a 7:56p 8:49a 9:03p 9:41a 10:07p 10:27a

8:38 2:26 9:30 3:18 10:20 4:08 11:08 4:57 11:55 5:43 12:17 6:29 1:02 7:15 1:48 8:01 2:36 8:51 3:29 9:45 4:27 10:43 5:30 11:46 6:35 12:20 7:41 1:26 8:44 2:31

9:01 9:52 10:42 11:31 ----12:41 1:27 2:15 3:06 4:00 4:59 6:01 7:06 8:10 9:12

2:50 3:41 4:31 5:20 6:07 6:53 7:40 8:29 9:20 10:15 11:15 ----12:51 1:56 2:58

07:52 07:52 07:53 07:53 07:53 07:54 07:54 07:54 07:55 07:55 07:55 07:55 07:55 07:56 07:56

05:38 05:38 05:39 05:39 05:40 05:40 05:41 05:42 05:42 05:43 05:44 05:45 05:45 05:46 05:47

10:52a 9:47p 11:29a 10:44p 12:03p 11:41p 12:37p NoMoon 1:10p 12:40a 1:44p 1:41a 2:21p 2:44a 3:03p 3:50a 3:50p 4:58a 4:43p 6:07a 5:44p 7:14a 6:50p 8:17a 7:59p 9:14a 9:09p 10:04a 10:16p 10:48a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 2:39 AM 1:06 AM 1:06 PM 3:25 AM 4:07 AM 4:46 AM 5:26 AM 6:08 AM 6:52 AM 12:07 AM 12:43 AM 1:28 AM 2:18 AM 3:11 AM 4:13 AM

Rollover Pass Height 1.0H 0.9L 0.0L 0.6L 0.4L 0.1L -0.2L -0.5L -0.8L 1.2H 1.26H 1.30H 1.28H 1.21H 1.08H

Time 11:37 AM 3:15 AM 9:04 PM 6:50 AM 9:53 AM 11:33 AM 12:42 PM 1:37 PM 2:28 PM 7:38 AM 8:24 AM 9:13 AM 10:03 AM 10:54 AM 11:46 AM

Height -0.3L 0.9H 1.1H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 1.0H 1.2H 1.4H -1.0L -1.17L -1.20L -1.13L -0.95L -0.70L

Time 7:42 PM 12:19 PM

Height 1.2H -0.2L

2:02 PM 3:07 PM 4:18 PM 5:27 PM 6:29 PM 7:23 PM 3:17 PM 4:08 PM 4:58 PM 5:48 PM 6:39 PM 7:30 PM

0.2L 0.3L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 1.5H 1.51H 1.48H 1.41H 1.32H 1.23H

Time

Height

Time

Height

8:26 PM

1.2H

9:36 PM 10:03 PM 10:29 PM 10:57 PM 11:29 PM

1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H

8:11 PM 9:02 PM 9:50 PM 10:42 PM 11:44 PM

0.9L 0.93L 0.92L 0.87L 0.78L

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 11:29 AM 12:04 PM 12:44 PM 4:55 AM 5:06 AM 5:22 AM 5:47 AM 6:18 AM 6:56 AM 12:00 AM 12:40 AM 1:28 AM 2:20 AM 3:18 AM 12:39 AM

Height -0.2L -0.1L 0.1L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.0L -0.3L -0.6L 1.2H 1.25H 1.29H 1.30H 1.25H 0.98L

Time 8:18 PM 8:47 PM 9:09 PM 7:17 AM 9:23 AM 11:40 AM 1:06 PM 2:08 PM 3:03 PM 7:38 AM 8:24 AM 9:16 AM 10:07 AM 10:57 AM 4:17 AM

Height 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.1H 1.3H 1.5H -0.8L -1.02L -1.07L -1.02L -0.86L 1.15H

Height -0.2L 0.0L 0.1L 0.6L 0.5L 0.2L 0.0L -0.3L -0.5L -0.8L -0.93L -0.98L -0.93L -0.78L 0.91L

Time 7:44 PM 8:14 PM 8:37 PM 6:55 AM 9:27 AM 11:35 AM 1:00 PM 1:55 PM 2:47 PM 3:40 PM 4:33 PM 5:20 PM 6:05 PM 6:51 PM 3:51 AM

Height 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 0.7H 0.7H 0.9H 1.1H 1.4H 1.6H 1.7H 1.83H 1.81H 1.72H 1.57H 0.95H

Height 0.6H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L -0.4L -0.5L -0.26L -0.29L 0.93H 0.90H 0.83H

Time 2:04 PM 2:46 PM 3:24 PM 3:58 PM 1:24 PM 10:13 PM 9:45 PM 9:53 PM 10:18 PM 10:59 PM 11:40 PM

Height -0.3L -0.2L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.5H 0.5H 0.93H

12:37 PM 1:23 PM 2:07 PM

-0.27L -0.22L -0.12L

Height 0.2 6 0.2 6 0.2 6 0.1 3 0.1 3 0.1 3 0.1 3 0.2 6 0.2 6 0.2 6 0.30 H 0.30 H 0.28 H 0.24 H 0.18 H

Time 5:49 PM 6:11 PM 6:27 PM 6:41 PM 9:34 AM 10:00 AM 10:38 AM 11:22 AM 12:12 PM 01:06 PM 02:02 PM 03:05 PM 04:06 PM 05:01 PM 05:50 PM

Height -0.3F -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.2 -0.4 -0.5 -0.5 -0.6 -0.63 L -0.62 L -0.60 L -0.56 L -0.50 L

1:33 PM 2:32 PM 3:49 PM 5:58 PM 7:14 PM 8:26 PM 3:52 PM 4:41 PM 5:26 PM 6:14 PM 7:05 PM 11:46 AM

0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.0L 1.1L 1.6H 1.73H 1.69H 1.59H 1.46H -0.61L

Time

Height

9:27 PM 9:46 PM 10:10 PM 10:39 PM 11:16 PM

1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H

9:40 PM 10:41 PM 11:16 PM 11:52 PM

1.1L 1.18L 1.16L 1.09L

7:54 PM

1.33H

Time 11:04 AM 11:39 AM 12:18 PM 4:30 AM 4:28 AM 4:40 AM 5:07 AM 5:44 AM 6:25 AM 7:08 AM 7:51 AM 8:40 AM 9:35 AM 10:31 AM 1:49 AM

Time

1:10 2:28 4:04 6:43 8:09

PM PM PM PM PM

11:23 AM

Height

Time

Height

0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.0L

8:59 PM 9:21 PM 9:44 PM 10:09 PM 10:37 PM

1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 1.0H

-0.55L

7:36 PM

1.40H

Time

Height

Port O’Connor Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 12:21 AM 12:49 AM 1:13 AM 1:25 AM 12:16 AM 7:25 AM 7:41 AM 8:15 AM 8:56 AM 9:43 AM 10:58 AM 11:48 AM 1:06 AM 2:07 AM 2:51 AM

Time 3:50 AM 3:17 AM 2:57 AM 3:00 AM 2:55 AM 2:00 AM 1:34 AM 1:37 AM 1:45 AM 1:48 AM 1:34 AM 2:22 AM 3:08 AM 3:47 AM 4:16 AM

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 12:18 PM 1:01 PM 1:49 PM 5:19 AM 5:42 AM 6:05 AM 6:26 AM 6:53 AM 7:28 AM 8:12 AM 12:22 AM 9:24 AM 12:11 AM 12:53 AM 1:39 AM

Time 3:12 PM 3:54 PM 4:39 PM 8:29 AM 8:46 AM 9:10 AM 9:39 AM 10:13 AM 10:51 AM 2:37 AM 10:39 PM 11:30 PM

Height -0.3L -0.2L -0.1L 0.4L 0.2L 0.0L -0.2L -0.4L -0.5L 0.9H 1.09H 1.09H

2:57 PM 3:52 PM

-0.58L -0.44L

Height -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.4L -0.6L -0.7L 0.73H -0.85L 0.72L 0.67L 0.58L

Time 8:52 PM 9:15 PM 9:38 PM 8:55 AM 10:43 AM 12:57 PM 2:22 PM 3:36 PM 4:27 PM 5:08 PM 8:37 AM 6:13 PM 2:11 AM 3:10 AM 4:12 AM

Height 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.3H 0.4H 0.5H 0.6H 0.8H 0.9H 0.9H -0.81L 0.96H 0.75H 0.72H 0.65H

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H -0.45L -0.47L -0.40L -0.28L 1.31H

Time 1:45 PM 2:09 PM 2:32 PM 2:54 PM 11:26 AM 11:27 PM 11:47 PM

Height 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2H 0.3H 0.4H

9:01 AM 9:38 AM 8:47 PM 9:58 PM 10:56 PM

-0.1L -0.1L 1.50H 1.50H 1.43H

11:18 AM

-0.10L

Height -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.3L 0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.4L -0.6L -0.34L -0.36L 1.14H 1.11H 0.98L

Time 7:29 PM 7:46 PM 8:10 PM 8:34 PM 8:34 AM 9:16 PM 9:31 PM 2:46 PM 3:29 PM 4:13 PM 7:57 PM 8:55 PM 9:51 AM 10:49 AM 3:21 AM

Height 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.4H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 1.16H 1.15H -0.32L -0.22L 1.05H

Height 0.0L 0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.4L 0.2L -0.1L -0.3L -0.4L -0.78L -0.82L -0.78L -0.65L -0.46L

Time 8:15 PM 8:40 PM 8:59 PM 9:11 PM 9:14 AM 11:38 AM 1:26 PM 2:43 PM 3:43 PM 4:38 PM 6:30 PM 7:33 PM 8:25 PM 8:56 PM 9:03 PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 0.7H 0.9H 1.1H 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.36H 1.34H 1.26H 1.13H 0.98H

Time

10:55 AM 12:59 PM 3:13 PM 5:15 PM 6:55 PM 8:17 PM 11:34 AM

Time

2:36 3:23 6:06 7:22 8:40

PM PM PM PM PM

Height

0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.7H 0.8H 0.9H -0.6L

Height

0.1L 0.3L 0.4L 0.5L 0.6L

11:04 PM 5:30 PM

0.7L 0.99H

10:14 AM 11:08 AM 12:04 PM

-0.81L -0.70L -0.53L

Time

Height

5:28 PM 6:24 PM 7:39 PM 9:37 PM 11:14 PM

0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.7L

9:25 PM

1.0H

Time

10:00 10:17 10:25 10:28 10:45

PM PM PM PM PM

Height

0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H

6:57 PM 7:42 PM 8:23 PM

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 12:41 AM 12:32 AM 12:25 AM 12:18 AM 7:09 AM 7:25 AM 7:46 AM 8:20 AM 12:08 AM 12:25 AM 7:51 AM 8:39 AM 9:30 AM 10:23 AM 2:25 AM

Time

Height

11:29 PM 3:06 PM

0.3H 0.2L

11:34 PM

1.15H

Time

11:10 PM

Height

0.3H

Port Aransas Time

11:13 PM

Height

0.2H

Nueces Bay Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

San Luis Pass

Height 1.0H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8L -0.68L -0.70L -0.67L 1.05H 0.98H

East Matagorda

Freeport Harbor Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 1:31 AM 12:50 AM 12:48 AM 12:55 AM 01:05 AM 1:18 AM 01:35 AM 1:53 AM 2:15 AM 12:37 AM 12:20 PM 1:10 PM 2:03 PM 12:07 AM 12:29 AM

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 10:47 AM 11:23 AM 11:59 AM 12:36 PM 4:51 AM 5:10 AM 5:31 AM 5:57 AM 6:31 AM 7:13 AM 8:04 AM 8:55 AM 1:12 AM 2:17 AM 12:22 AM

Time

Height

Time

Height

1:15 PM

0.3L

8:56 PM

0.6H

7:25 PM 8:21 PM 9:07 PM

0.7L 0.7L 0.8L

9:50 PM 10:23 PM 11:10 PM

0.7H 0.7H 0.8H

11:04 PM 9:40 PM 10:12 PM 11:44 AM

1.12L 1.10H 1.01H -0.07L

11:42 PM

1.07L

8:38 PM

South Padre Island Time

02:11 PM

Height

-0.1

Time

6:53 PM

Height

-0.1

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Time 11:02 AM 11:38 AM 12:18 PM 1:02 PM 4:29 AM 4:45 AM 5:12 AM 5:47 AM 6:28 AM 7:14 AM 7:56 AM 8:49 AM 9:44 AM 10:41 AM 11:36 AM

Time

1:59 PM 3:55 PM 6:07 PM

Height

0.6L 0.8L 1.0L

Time

9:12 PM 9:05 PM 8:57 PM

Height

1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Texas Coast Tides

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5

Date Dec 22 Dec 23 Dec 24 Dec 25 Dec 26 Dec 27 Dec 28 Dec 29 Dec 30 Dec 31 Jan 1 Jan 2 Jan 3 Jan 4 Jan 5


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 17

Snow hunting Continued from page 1

assistant principal in Brownwood, harvested his first mule deer in the snow on the Horseshoe Mountain Ranch in Brewster County. “It snowed on us the whole time the first day,” he said. “We couldn’t see very far and didn’t see much — we did see several small bucks with groups of does.” The next day, they glassed a nice 10-pointer. “We noticed the acorns on his tines,” Feist said. “We worked our way closer to him and then crept to within 225 yards in the snow. I laid down, used the bipod and made the shot. When we got to him and saw how big and unique he was, it was high-five time.” The wintry mix of rain and snow occurred over South Texas from the morning of December 7 to the early morning of December 8. It was the first wintry precipitation event in South Texas since the icing event in 2014, and the first measurable snow event since a Christmastime snowstorm in 2004, according to the National Weather Service. Most of the southern Coastal Bend saw at least 1 inch of snow. Victoria Regional Airport received 2 inches, its sixth highest snowfall total. Laredo’s official snowfall total of 1.3 inches ranked as the third highest snowfall total in the city’s history. And now, meteorologists are comparing weather models and some are predicting a white Christmas for parts of the state.

Follow the Mumme’s Inc. Facebook page for info on the latest items and special sales!

The mule deer buck taken in Brewster County by Chayden Feist of Brownwood had unique acorns on its antlers. Photo by Terra Peters. The National Weather Service map showed the extent of the snow coverage.

BIG CHINGON

7’ x 7’ with 8 TOWER

LITTLE CHINGON 5’ x 5’ with 5’ TOWER

www.mummesinc.com

For prices and information call

1-800-221-6398 or visit us online at www.mummesinc.com 830.426.3313 Hondo, TX

120 Hwy 173N

830.334.3323 Pearsall, TX

1845 Business I-35N

Nilgai Continued from page 1

King Ranch made several purchases of the animal from zoo stock and released them in Kenedy County in the 1930s. Almost 90 years later, about 35,000 nilgai are believed to roam South Texas. Many are still found along the Texas coast, where the hotspot for a surge in cattle fever ticks has been Cameron County. That led to the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge being put under a cattle fever tick quarantine in 2014, according to Ranger Marion Mason. The quarantine is administered by the TAHC and the USDAAnimal and Plant Health Inspection. For hunters, that means placing a tarp on their vehicle to eliminate contact with a deer or nilgai carcass. And any hides or heads removed from the refuge will be frozen on-site for a minimum of 24 hours to kill any cattle fever ticks. Mason said the precautions are nothing to “be scared of.” “You can still eat the meat even if it had a tick on it,” Mason said. “If anything, it’s just a minor inconvenience to hunters.” Close to 400 nilgai roam the 98,000-acre wildlife refuge. “They are considered a non-native, invasive species,” Mason said. “It’s not open season on them, though, on the refuge. We have established hunting seasons here. During deer hunting season, you can take unlimited nilgai. We also have exotic animal hunts.” Harvest logs show 47 nilgai were taken in 2016. Scientists may soon have an alternative to culling nilgai to stem the tide of cattle fever ticks, however. Goolsby is working on a spray to kill the ticks catching rides with nilgai. “We can’t round nilgai up and dip them like cattle,” Goolsby said. “But their one

weak link is they make common latrines. It’s an instinct developed in India. They defecate in one area. It’s believed to be a defense mechanism to confuse their main predator, the tiger. It can’t follow droppings to find them. “We’re setting up sprayers around the latrines – using a commercial product sold worldwide. We still have a lot of work to do, but the early indications are promising.” The spray transfers nematodes – microscopic, parasitic worms that burrow into the ticks – onto the nilgai. The Agricultural Research Service deployed three sprayers on a ranch near Brownsville to test the nematodes’ effectiveness. “They’re cheap and available, already occurring naturally at the wildlife refuge,” Goolsby said. Las Huellas, a South Texas wildlife conservation group, paid for a graduate research student to help with the project. The student will study the common latrines. “The research can help us find out how many latrine sites there are, whether nilgai go back to each latrine or just use several and whether usage varies among males and females,” Goolsby said. “The more we know, the better. For example, we may find that we don’t need to put sprayers at every latrine, just the bigger ones.” U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela Jr., D-Brownsville, wants to seek funding for additional sprayers in the new farm bill. “We could do a lot more, a lot faster, if we had more funding,” Goolsby said. Goolsby is hopeful, believing the issue of stopping the ticks transcends party lines. “Everyone knows we can’t let this pest get farther north,” he said.

830.931.2215 Rio Medina, TX 10195 FM 2676

Mon-Fri: 8-5:30 Sat: 8-5:00 Closed Sunday


Page 18

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Solution on Solution onPage Page2222

1 5

2

3

4

6

7 8 9

10

11

12 13

14

16 18

15

19 20 23

25

26

27

29

30

31

Across

3. A favorite lure color

3. A favorite lure color 5. Pawing debris away from vegetation 5. Pawing debris away from vegetation 7. A good catfish bait 7. A good catfish bait 9. Used9.byUsed free-divers to land to fish by free-divers land fish 11. A type of shotgun 11. A type of shotgun 12. Type of goose call 13. Keep handy kayak 12. Type in of the goose call 14. Texas' state fish, ____ bass Keep handy in the kayak 16. Deer13. droppings 17. A duck species 14. Texas’ state fish, ____ bass 18. An African game species 16. Deer droppings 20. Popular sunglasses for fishermen 22. To sharpen thespecies knife or broadhead 17. A duck 24. Brand of beer for deer hunters 18. An African game species 26. Arrowhead with a flattened point 27. A safari organization 20. Popular sunglasses for fishermen 29. Flounder limit after Dec. 15 To sharpen the knife or broadhead 30. The22. smallest of a litter 31. Texas' animal 24. fastest Brand of beer for deer hunters 32. Watch for these when wade-fishing 26. Arrowhead with a flattened point

GPO, USA, a new optics company, hired Harris Global Marketing and Communications as its public relations representative.

Gilbert named exec at TCF

Swanson Russell promotes three

The Conservation Fund has appointed John S. Gilbert as executive vice president and chief financial officer.

Brittany Lentz was promoted to project manager, Jeff Salem to senior public relations counsel and Neale Stadler to account manager at Swanson Russell’s Lincoln, Nebraska office.

28

Two outdoor jobs Gray Loon Marketing Group has two open positions focusing on the outdoor, hunting and shooting industries.

Dorseys recognized

32

ACROSS

GPO hires Harris

Brunswick Corporation intends to sell Sea Ray, one of the 15 brands that comprise the Brunswick Boat Group.

Buck Knives surpassed the production of 1.5 million knives in its Post Falls, Idaho facility.

21

24

Sea Ray to be sold

Landmark number of knives

17

22

LSONews.com

DOWN 1. An airgun manufacturer Down

1.2. AnA airgun popularmanufacturer type of rifle when on safari 2. A popular type of rifle when on safari flashlight manufacturer 3.3. A Aflashlight manufacturer 4.4. One Oneofofthe theAfrican AfricanBig BigFive Five 6. Hunters are the best ______ Hunters are the best ______ 8.6. The grey ghost in Africa 10.8. Required huntinonAfrica another's property The greytoghost 12. A group of ducks 10. Required to hunt on another’s property 13. The baldpate 14. A Agood crappie lake 12. group of ducks 15. Where the ducks nest 13. The baldpate 16. Finding dove in the late season 17. Pacific salmon dielake after this 14. A good crappie 19. A shotgun manufacturer 15. Where the ducks nest 21. The G1 23. Protect this when shooting 16. Finding dove in the late season 24. Used to mark a fishing hotspot 17. Pacific salmon die after this 25. Furbearer that eats big fish 27. Some hunters eat this dove organ 19. A shotgun manufacturer 28. A turkey sound 21. The G1

27. A safari organization

23. Protect this when shooting

29. Flounder limit after Dec. 15

24. Used to mark a fishing hotspot

30. The smallest of a litter

25. Furbearer that eats big fish

31. Texas’ fastest animal

27. Some hunters eat this dove organ

32. Watch for these when wade-fishing

28. A turkey sound

Chris and Amy Dorsey and Dorsey Pictures are the recipients of the Curt Gowdy Memorial Media Award, an honor given to leaders in American conservation communication.

Director position at TWA Texas Wildlife Association is seeking a director of adult education based in its San Antonio headquarters.

Lavallee joins Sports Afield Ben Lavallee has joined SA Consumer Products as the director of marketing, product development and sourcing.

Realtree, Academy join forces Realtree and Academy Sports + Outdoors are partnering on Academy’s launch of its new Magellan brand of apparel and accessories.

Hire at Rogers Sports Marketing Gordon Weigle has joined Rogers Sports Marketing in Norcross, Georgia.

Styrka hires Hicks Styrka named Bill Hicks & Company its wholesale distributor.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Quick venison strogranoff 3 cups egg noodles 1/2 stick butter 1 onion, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 1 1/2 cups beef broth 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms Pepper 1 tbsp. Worchestershire sauce 2 pints canned venison 1/4 cup flour 1/4 cup white wine 1 1/2 cups sour cream 2 tbsps. fresh parsley, chopped Cook egg noodles according to directions on package. Melt butter in pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and cook until onion is brown on the edges. Add 1 cup of beef broth, mushrooms, dash of freshly

ground pepper and Worchestershire sauce. Pour venison with juice into pan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. In a separate bowl, mix remaining 1/2 cup beef broth with flour and whisk until smooth. Add to pan and bring to a slow boil. Add white wine. When mixture thickens, stir in sour cream. Turn off heat. Place noodles on plate and cover with meat mixture. Top with parsley. —Kentucky Dept. of Fish & Wildlife

Cajun catfish with shrimp and red bell pepper 2 catfish fillets 8-12 small- to medium-sized shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 red bell pepper, julienned Cajun spice 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 tbsp. peanut oil Rice Fresh chopped parsley Prepare rice before starting catfish. Place oil in pan over medium high heat. Sprinkle Cajun seasoning to taste on fillets.

When oil is hot, place fillets in pan, adjust heat as necessary. Cook 3-4 minutes then turn. Add shrimp and peppers about one minute after flipping. Cook another 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat. Spoon rice onto middle of the plate then place catfish on the rice followed by shrimp and bell peppers. Garnish with chopped parsley. —Ohio DNR


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

Page 19

NATIONAL ILLINOIS

Outfitters receive 50-plus citations The Illinois Department of Natural Resources Conservation Police issued more than 50 citations and warnings to Hadley Creek Outfitters of Barry, Illinois, for illegal deer hunting and related offenses. The illegal activity was discovered on Nov. 8-9, and included the unlawful feeding of white-tailed deer and allowing clients to hunt deer over a baited area. “During the enforcement detail, Conservation Police officers confirmed approximately 6,400 acres were baited and unlawful to hunt in Pike and Adams counties. The illegal areas were baited with trophy rocks, mineral licks, piled corn, and corn scattered among food plots,” IDNR said in a release. —IDNR

Deer harvest up slightly Hunters harvested a preliminary total of 80,021 deer during the seven-day Illinois Firearm Deer Season that concluded on Dec. 3. The 2017 preliminary harvest total compares to the final total of 79,559 deer harvested during the firearm season in 2016. The preliminary harvest for the second segment of the firearm season on Nov. 30 through Dec. 3 was 28,656, compared with 24,977 during the second season in 2016. The preliminary harvest for the first segment of firearm season on Nov. 17-19 was 51,365 deer. —IDNR

NEW MEXICO

New road provides access for elk hunters A new road is in place and being used by elk hunters and others in northeast New Mexico, thanks to funding provided by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Lineberry Foundation. RMEF worked with the New Mexico State Land Office to improve vehicular access to approximately 6,000 acres and walk-in access to another 6,000 acres of State Trust Lands in the White Peak Area. “This project eases the tension of a longrunning dispute in Mora County over access into prime wildlife habitat,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Not only is this mix of private and State Trust Lands key for elk but it’s also home to deer, turkey, bears, mountain lions and other species.” RMEF provided nearly $20,000 in funding to blade the 2.5-mile road that ties into existing ranch roads and old logging roads within Game Management Unit 48 that improves access to Halls Peak, Cooks Peak and Gallinas Mesa, and also paid for a 35-year right-of-way easement. —RMEF

FLORIDA

New commission director Eric Sutton was appointed the executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, after the retirement of Nick Wiley. Sutton has been the FWC assistant executive director since May 2013. He has worked in government and the private sector since the early 1990s in areas including acquisition and management of public lands, land use regulations, listed species policy, invasive species management and coastal management. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degree in zoology from the University of South Florida. —FWC

License sales not keeping pace Florida may proclaim itself the “fishing capital of the world,” but wildlife officials say they need more anglers and hunters to help

cover costs of running state programs. The number of people buying hunting and fishing licenses hasn’t kept pace with population growth in the state, and wildlife officials are concerned that could impact the future management of public lands. To get more Floridians, particularly Generation Xers and millennials, to embrace outdoor activities, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is making that a fixed part of its marketing and outreach efforts. —FWC

WYOMING

Pipe fence for elk, mule deer A wildlife-friendly fence made out of pipe has been installed on the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s Fall Creek Wildlife Habitat Management Area and is estimated to last 100 years or more. The fence was a crucial infrastructure addition within the Red Desert to Hoback mule deer migration route along the foot of the Wind River Range. The Red Desert to Hoback corridor is the longest mule deer migration route ever recorded in the lower 48 states. The fence also allows safe passage of elk in and out of the WHMA. The Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resources Trust Fund allocated $55,000 for the project. Questar Exploration and Production and Jonah Energy also donated 2,000 35foot sections of old drill pipe. —WGFD

WISCONSIN

Deer tags not required The tradition of tagging a deer after harvest is no longer required in Wisconsin. The new state budget removed the requirement that hunters place a carcass tag on the deer they harvest. “Carcass tags for deer and turkey are no longer required,” says Conservation Warden George Protogere. While the 2017 Wisconsin Deer Hunting Regulations pamphlet says otherwise, successful hunters in the field will now only be required to show proof of their license. Hunters must still register their deer, online or over the phone, by 5 p.m. the day after harvest. —Staff report

INTERNATIONAL

Wetland protection, research in Mexico The Louisiana State University Agricultural Center and Ducks Unlimited de México are joining forces in support of collaborative research in wetland and waterfowl conservation. The two organizations have agreed to cooperate on the evaluation and development of wetland conservation and improvement programs, preservation of wetland birds and aquatic species and restoration and preservation of wetland habitats. “This new collaboration with LSU will help us conserve habitats in some of the most critical wintering areas in the United States and Mexico, while also helping build professional waterfowl and wetland management capacity in both countries,” said Eduardo Carrera, CEO of DUMAC. Beginning in the summer of 2018, students from LSU will take classes and conduct research at DUMAC’s John E. Walker Research facility in Celestún. Likewise, DUMAC staff and other Mexican wildlife professionals may take advantage of professional training opportunities through LSU. Approximately 20 percent of the North America’s waterfowl winter or pass through Mexico, including 80 percent of blue-winged teal. —DU

HOG HUNT, MARK OS ON AN AFTERNOON ER ND SE ING LK WA WHILE PATA AND BOBBY , GUIDED BY CARLOS ZA LE VIL NS OW BR OF , CANO FRIEND’S .300 NILGAI BULL. USING HIS IS TH D TE OT SP Z, DIA THE 60-YARD SHOT. BLACKOUT, HE MADE

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Johnny’s True Value 914 West Tyler Ave. Harlingen, TX 78550 (956) 428-4011


Page 20

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does.Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

LSONF LOOKING FOR LEASE Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation creates hunters for a lifetime by giving an opportunity to people who have the passion for hunting but lack the opportunity. LSONF is seeking hunting property to accomplish its mission. All hunting rights sought and house/camp needed. (214) 361-2276

HUNTING DOG AVAILABLE Black lab, 1 1/2 years old. Fully trained on ducks and pheasants. Basic gun training with doubles and diversions in thick cover. Has hunted in South Dakota, the Texas Panhandle, and duck hunted in Texas in thick cover and flooded timber. Contact Jeff (214) 384-5641

SOUTH TEXAS MANAGEMENT BUCK HUNTS,

130 to 150 class $2,000 to $2,500 two day hunts $250 no kill fee per day , guide and meals included Lodging not included but available near by. Call John (512) 517-0299

SOUTH TEXAS DEER HUNTS No pen raised deer 3,000+ Acres Trophy & Management Hunts Hogs, Does & Everything else South Texas has to offer. Veteran Discount. (713) 516-2954

AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 (214) 361-2276

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

AFFORDABLE HUNTS Blackbuck Antelope, axis, fallow, whitetail, turkey & hogs, Crockett County, TX. Bunkhouse & Grub available. (325) 392-5823

South Texas - Brackettville “Special Offer” Wife or child FREE3 day minimum. www.B-JRanch.com Huntsbj@gmail.com James: (830) 563-2658

FISHING PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

RANCH FOR SALE

QUAIL HUNTING Close to Dallas

Bird Dog Training Facility 700 yard RANGE PoetryShootingClub.com (214) 728-2755

TROPHY DEER HUNT

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582

NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444

Network of Indoor & Outdoor Ranges TEXASARCHERY.INFO

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@GMAIL.COM

470 Low Fence Acres 1.5 Hours North of DFW Boone & Crockett Deer Turn Key: Cabin, Food Plots, Feeders, Tower Stands. (940) 464-0121

COLORADO ELK AND MULE DEER RANCH $12.5M Price reduced to $11.5M You could be hunting right now on this 5,800 ac ranch that sits in the middle of the home to the largest elk herd in North America. Remote, end of road. 45 mins SW of Trinidad CO Elevation: 6,389 – 7,543 ft Resident and migrating elk herd with exceptional trophy genes. Large mule deer, bear and turkey population. Custom log home, 3 BR, 3 1/2 Bath 2+ car garage, 2 RV pads with all utilities, beautiful views. For sale by owner. Call Paul Phillips (210) 274-9094

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com.Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES

Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Call About Our Winter Discounts! (956) 551-1965

VEHICLES NEED A HUNTING LEASE CABIN? Move it right in! 2011 Astoria Motor Coach. Only 38,000 miles. 360 HP, Cummins engine. Decked out with everything you need, even a fireplace! You’ll be the envy of your lease. $105,900. See it in the Houston area (806) 438-3048

MISC. FOR INVENTORS\ SMALL-BIZ! Invention, idea, brand? e-mail questions to us! SaveMoneyOnPatents.com

ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

REPORTER/ JOURNALIST JOB Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter at its Dallas office. Journalism degree preferred. (214) 361-2276


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

>>

PRODUCTS

CURADO BASS RODS: This new series of light and strong bass rods by Shimano boasts 21 models that offer both versatile and technique-specific actions for every bass fishing situation. At the core of the 11 casting and five spinning rods are light and sensitive high modulus UD carbon blend and Nano resin blanks, while the five cranking rods have high modulus carbon/glass blend with Nano resin blanks. The blank construction provides anglers with increased sensitivity. Other features include Fuji stainless K guides with Alconite rings, and either Fuji PTS or VSS reel seats with matte rubber soft touch painting, plus high-grade AAA cork grips. MSRP is from $159.99 to $169.99

BB2 ATTRACTANT: Deer will detect this attractant by Big & J from a long ways off. It is its powerful aroma, the result of a proprietary refining process, that draws those deer. But BB2 is more than a attractant; it also offers a high total digestible nutrition (TDN) level, to include a high level of protein. Game managers and property owners can use BB2 during preseason to establish travel patterns and acclimate deer to their property. By middle to late summer, they can use it to attract deer to camera sites to inventory bucks. In season, the attractant will bring the big bucks out during shooting hours and keep the deer on their property. Available in three sizes (40-, 20- and six-pound bags), the BB2 costs $12.99 to $34.99, depending on size.

>>

>>

>>

HITCH HOIST SWIVEL AND GAMBREL SYSTEM: Hunting Made Easy’s (a GSM Outdoors company) accessory will make a hunter’s life easier by helping him lift game off the ground. To use, a hunter simply attaches the accessory to the hitch (using the adjustable leg at the bottom for additional stability and increased support), and lifts the heavy game off the ground and into the vehicle without assistance. The locking gambrel system also allows a hunter to hang game without movement so that he can safely and effectively skin or process it. Features include a 360-degree swivel and a drop option that allows the gambrel to go up and down to a comfortable height for greater comfort. The MSRP is $149.99.

STICK WORM: Waylay’s 5-inch purple worm, like all the company’s baits, is designed to help anglers land big fish. Made from a durable #502 formula plastisol, each worm is hand poured and inspected for imperfections to produce a long-lasting, quality bait. This worm is salt-infused and features glitter to attract fish. A six-pack costs about $4.

QUADPOL PLATFORM: Advantage Blinds’ 10-foot galvanized steel quadpod platform works with all of the company’s two-person blinds. The galvanized steel legs and braces ensure years of use with minimal or no maintenance. The quadpod — with a blind — gives the hunter a viewing height of 14 feet but weighs only about 150 pounds, allowing two people to pick it up and move it. It costs about $740.

>>

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276

December 22, 2017

Page 21


Page 22

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK DECEMBER 27

Dallas Safari Club Exhibitor Bag Stuffing DSC Office (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

JANUARY 4-7

Dallas Safari Club Annual Convention & Sporting Expo Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center (972) 980-9800 biggame.org San Antonio Boat Show Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center (512) 481-1777 sanantonioboatshow.com

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 22

JANUARY 19-20

Deer Breeders Corp New Year’s Deer Auction Horseshoe Bay Resort (972) 289-3100 dbcdeer.com

1 5

6

S C R A P

National Wild Turkey Federation Texas State Banquet Best Western Premier, Bryan (281) 639-9185 nwtf.org

O

M

N

O

S

18

I

V

G

Houston Boat Show NRG Center (713) 526-6361

JANUARY 11

DSC South Texas Legacy Gala Witte Museum, San Antonio (210) 826-2440 dscsouthtexas.org

JANUARY 16

Delta Waterfowl Leon County Banquet Leon County Expo Center, Buffalo (903) 388-4705 deltawaterfowl.org

JANUARY 19

Ducks Unlimited Rusk County Dinner Henderson Civic Center (903) 657-5790 ducks.org/Texas

Taxidermy King Trophy Mount and Western Auction Houston (512) 451-7633 taxidermyking.com

JANUARY 26-28

Houston Safari Club Annual Hunting Expo and Convention George R. Brown Convention Center (713) 623-8844 houstonsafariclub.org

FEBRUARY 3

Mule Deer Foundation Gillespie County Banquet, Fredericksburg (816) 289-9299 muledeer.org Ducks Unlimited Mexia Dinner The Cowboy Club (903) 388-5471 ducks.org/Texas

I

N G

12

I

O

U

A

16 19

E

O

I

N

N

U

O

E

T

N

L

I

I

V E

Across

I

10

14

R

O

S

11

P U M P H

15

R

T

A

C O S T A

G

22

25

23

B

W H E T

B L U N T

A

L

N

O

T

R

I

G

Y

E

I

I

21

B O O N E R 30

R

R

I

O

E

W

27

28

H S C

R U N T

E

L

I

A

U

P R O N G H O R N

R

C

T

K

31

N G R A Y S

3. A favorite lure color [CHARTREUSE] 5. Pawing debris away from vegetation [SCRAPING] 7. A good catfish bait [LIVER] 9. Used by free-divers to land fish [SPEARGUN] 11. A type of shotgun [PUMP] 12. Type of goose call [FLUTE] 13. Keep handy in the kayak [WHISTLE] 14. Texas' state fish, ____ bass [GUADALUPE] 16. Deer droppings [SCAT] 17. A duck species [SCAUP] 18. An African game species [WATERBUCK] 20. Popular sunglasses for fishermen [COSTA] 22. To sharpen the knife or broadhead [WHET] 24. Brand of beer for deer hunters [BOONER] 26. Arrowhead with a flattened point [BLUNT] 27. A safari organization [HSC] 29. Flounder limit after Dec. 15 [FIVE] 30. The smallest of a litter [RUNT] 31. Texas' fastest animal [PRONGHORN] 32. Watch for these when wade-fishing [STINGRAYS]

V E R

N

N

I

I

R

P

24

D

L E

S C A U P

17

I

20

26

K

G U A D A L U P E

M

T

S T

7

8

S P E A R G U N

S C A T

O

S

9

B

S T L E

T

F

4

C H A R T R E U S E

O

W A T E R B U C K

29

3

D

F L U T E

W H

R

32

JANUARY 5-14

13

E

JANUARY 20

Safari Club International Texas Hill Country Fundraiser Hill Country Shooting Sports Center texashillcountrysci.org

2

G

G

Down

E

1. An airgun manufacturer [GAMO] 2. A popular type of rifle when on safari [DOUBLE] 3. A flashlight manufacturer [COAST] 4. One of the African Big Five [ELEPHANT] 6. Hunters are the best ______ [CONSERVATIONISTS] 8. The grey ghost in Africa [KUDU] 10. Required to hunt on another's property [PERMISSION] 12. A group of ducks [FLOCK] 13. The baldpate [WIGEON] 14. A good crappie lake [GRANGER] 15. Where the ducks nest [PRAIRIES] 16. Finding dove in the late season [SCOUTING] 17. Pacific salmon die after this [SPAWN] 19. A shotgun manufacturer [BENELLI] 21. The G1 [BROWTINE] 23. Protect this when shooting [HEARING] 24. Used to mark a fishing hotspot [BUOY] 25. Furbearer that eats big fish [OTTER] 27. Some hunters eat this dove organ [HEART] 28. A turkey sound [CLUCK]

Puzzle solution from Page 18


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 22, 2017

DALLAS SAFARI CLUB

with

SPORTS AFIELD

J A N U A R Y 4 - 7, 2 0 1 8

Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center 650 South Griffin Street Thur/Fri/Sat 9am-5:30pm, Sun 9am-3pm

Wednesday Night: Weatherby Award

Thursday Night: Conklin Award

Omni Dallas Hotel

555 South Lamar - Evening Banquets, Auctions, Ladies’ Luncheon & Life Member Breakfast

Friday Night: CCYH Award

Saturday Night: OHAA Award PHCHH Award

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N & B A N Q U E T R E S E RVAT I O N S

800.9GO.HUNT | info@biggame.org | www.biggame.org | 972.980.9800

The Greatest Hunters’ Convention on the Planet

TM

Page 23


Page 24

December 22, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NEW 1900 YARD RANGEFINDER BINOCULAR With split-second ranging capability out to 1,900 yards* and the optical prowess to bring the farthest targets to focus, the new LaserForce 10x42 is your single optic solution for serious hunting and shooting. — ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass

for high contrast viewing — ID Technology Compensates for

Incline/Decline Shot Angles — OLED display offers 4 brightness levels — Waterproof, fogproof and

shock resistant

ONE MILE

All Nikon trademarks are the property of Nikon Corporation.

*FOR REFERENCE. UNDER NIKON’S MEASUREMENT CONDITIONS.

OF INSTANT GRATIFICATION

LIFETIME

Become Inseparable.

REPAIR/REPLACEMENT Excludes lost or stolen products and intentionally caused damage, and also excludes Nikon Rangefinders, StabilEyes Binoculars & Specialty Optics

HOUSTON NORTH: (281) 443-8393 | WEST: (713) 461-1844 SOUTHWEST: (281) 879-1466 | PASADENA: (713) 475-222

201 SPRING PARK DR | MIDLAND (432) 686-2500

2231 W. BEAUREGARD AVE. | SAN ANGELO (325) 947-8859

NikonSportOptics.com

5483 SHELBY RD | FORT WORTH (817) 478-6613

1055 TEXAS AVE. SO. STE 104 | COLLEGE STATION (979) 695-2807

(800) 486-7497

2915 SAN GABRIEL | AUSTIN (512) 472-6613

1400 BAYPORT BLVD | SEABROOK (281) 474-3229

32450 IH10 WEST | BOERNE (830) 331-2975

December 22, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  
December 22, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

Advertisement