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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

December 9, 2016

Volume 13, Issue 8

Battling for breeding rights

Protect the rifle crown

Small burr affects accuracy By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

These two whitetail bucks were photographed in a raging fight in November in Starr County. Wildlife photographer Hardy Jackson said he can’t remember seeing a fight as serious as this so early in the season. He reported that both bucks walked away without any visible injuries. Across the state, bucks have been showing their dominance during the last 30 days. In some areas of the state, hunters are seeing lots of broken antlers. Hunters in other areas are still waiting to experience the long-awaited phenomenon. Photo by Hardy Jackson, Campos Viejos Ranch.

The rifle had been reliable — dead on for several years. When PROBLEM SOLVED: A sighting it in small amount of damfor another age to the crown of a to use on a rifle barrel affects the gun’s accuracy. Photo hunt, someby Tim Sharp, for Lone thing was Star Outdoor News. off when the young hunter took the shots at the range. Some shots missed the target entirely. Others were way off of center. Three more seasoned shooters took their turn. The groupings were better, but one shot well to the left of center and the other to the right. It clearly wasn’t the young hunter’s fault. The scope was checked. The rings and bases were checked. The ammunition was checked. The gun was put away and another one was used on the hunt. The next stop for the 7mm-08 Please turn to page 6

CONTENTS

Big trout starting up

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 11 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 20 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 24

Fearless shooting with a modern rifle

By Craig Nyhus

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Capt. Javi Castillo lives in Bishop because it’s halfway between Corpus Christi and Baffin Bay. Lately, he’s been braving the winds and fishing near Shamrock WINTER FISHING: Some bigger speckIsland. “I fish half the year led trout are being landed, with more on the Corpus side and expected as water temperatures drop. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star the other half in BafOutdoor News. fin,” he said. “I have a few areas to the north that their eggs,” he said. “We’ve been catching some 7- and turn on before Baffin does.” Castillo said oyster shell 8-pounders.” Bad weather is Castillo’s and deeper water have been friend this time of year. the keys. “The worse the condi“There are a few short tions — like duck-hunting wells out there, and the shell and deeper water is conditions, the better,” he where the fish like to lay said.

In the traditional world of hunting, the idea of teaching youths to use an AR-15 type rifle with a silencer to shoot a deer isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. But that may be about to change — albeit slowly. With the proliferation of modern guns and possibility of silencer purchases becoming less restrictive, novice hunters may learn to hunt in a way their parents never did. The underlying reason for the movement will likely stem from the advantages semiautomatic rifles offer, according to Andrew Houser, an owner of Modern Outfitters in the Dallas area. “They are gaining in popular-

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Lone Star Outdoor News

Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

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INSIDE

Lone Star Outdoor News

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 25

HUNTING

Testing hassle

Hunting sandhills

West Texas rancher gets certified to take CWD samples. Page 4

Texas Panhandle crane hunts have been great. Page 21

QUIETER, LESS KICK: Natalie Houser, 12, shot a 10-point buck this season using a modern rifle equipped with a suppressor. Photo by Andrew Houser.

FISHING

Flounder catches increasing Warmer water temps delayed annual run. Page 8

Winter rainbows Anglers brave cold, rain to land trout. Page 8


December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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December 9, 2016

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December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HUNTING

Going the extra mile Rancher gets certified to take deer samples for testing By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Portions of Culberson County, including the portion containing the Delaware Mountain Ranch, were included in the mandatory CWD Surveillance Zone this season. Getting a mule deer to the check station from the ranch is another story. “It’s a minimum of 2 1/2 hours to get to the closest check station in Van Horn,” said owner Earl Calhoun. “So that’s a minimum five-hour trip.” Before the season, Calhoun was concerned for his hunters and decided to get trained to take samples himself. “This has been a very invasive regulation they put into play,” Calhoun said. “I don’t think they put much thought into it. Most of the hunters come in groups — but it’s incumbent on the hunter to get the deer tested within 24 hours. If a guy killed a deer yesterday, he wants to help his buddies the next day.” Calhoun, with a lot of help, got his certification shortly before the season began. “I called the Texas Animal Health Commission and told the switchboard operator my plight,” he said. “The operator referred me to Dr. Susan Culp, who called me a few days before I left town.” Culp called a veterinarian, Bob Dit-

tmar, now Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s state veterinarian, who met Calhoun in Kerrville and trained and certified him. “Susan also called Shawn Gray (TPWD’s mule deer and pronghorn leader),” Calhoun said. “He came to Van Horn from Alpine to deliver the items needed to do the testing. He went out of his way to help me; it saved me a trip that was 100 miles out of my way — they did a great job of getting me certified.” Calhoun said he knows of two other ranches in the area that received similar certifications to avoid the long drives to the check station. “I try to maximize the hunters’ experience,” he said. “Any time someone is way out here, there is someone at Please turn to page 23

CUSTOMER SERVICE: Earl Calhoun’s family has owned the Delaware Mountain Ranch in Culberson County for 100 years. To keep his hunters from taking the bulk of a day to make the long trip to the nearest CWD check station, Calhoun obtained certification to take the samples himself. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Huntress takes up crossbow to bag a birthday buck

The dark side of hog hunting By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Rachel Anderson spent the weekend of her 30th birthday on the cold, hard ground behind a ghost blind. Probably not the way most people would celebrate one of life’s milestones. But for Anderson, it would become the experience of a lifetime. Anderson didn’t expect much during her birthday hunt at Odom Ranch near Brownwood last month. She had a crossbow at her side — an afterthought made necessary by an BIRTHDAY BUCK: After injuring her hand, Rachel injury to her hand. It Anderson hunted with a crossbow for the first time was her only choice, on her 30th birthday and bagged a doe and this really, if she wanted to 11-point buck. Photo from Rachel Anderson. hunt with a bow. She wasn’t able to draw the compound bow, which she She didn’t know anyone who knew how to use. But she could had been successful with one. Still, she practiced shooting it a cock a crossbow. Anderson killed a raccoon couple dozen times while at the with her compound bow once. ranch that weekend and decided But hunting with a crossbow? to give it a try. Please turn to page 14

Wild pigs are among the craziest animals you’ll ever hunt. They are totally unpredictable, multiply like there is no tomorrow and many hunters feel they are wiser to hunting pressure than white-tailed deer. To increase their chance of success, many hunters have taken to stalking them in the dark of night. Plus the acorns are still falling in South Texas and the Hill Country — a big draw for pigs. “Night hunting is the only way to consistently stay on them, or at least try to control their numbers,” said Carlos Fernandez, who has made it his goal to remove as many pigs on his family ranches as possible. He’s been after them with bow and gun since 1999. “We’ve had a pretty good success rate on killing them for about the past six weeks. As long as the acorns keep falling, we’ll keep killing them. One of our best areas to hunt is in a creek bottom with lots TECHNO HUNTING: Cody Bell III uses a drone and night vision scope to of acorns on the ground.” His latest success came on Thanksgiving eve. locate and pursue hogs in Burnet County. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News. “We had a pretty good hunt,” Fernandez said. “I had my nephew, Kyle Fernandez, and about 175 pounds and provided lots of meat.” his girlfriend, Katy Truxell, on a hunt at the 4MR Most of Fernandez’ hunting is in Atascosa County. Ranch. We were out at dark on a hill where the pigs “I do best with a half- to full moon,” he said. “That had been coming to a feeder, then moving into a way I have enough light to see pigs moving at a pretcreek bottom to feed on acorns.” ty good distance. That allows me to stalk them — a Truxell was equipped with snake boots and an AR- pretty exciting way to hunt. You never know what’s 15 in a .223 caliber. going to happen from one step to the next.” “We got going about 7 p.m. and she had her first Fernandez said his favorite rifle for taking pigs at pig on the ground in short order with a single 75- night is a .223, set up with a scope that has a lighted yard shot,” Fernandez said. “That one weighed red dot in the crosshairs. He has about a 90-percent Please turn to page 14


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

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Researchers seek quail crop contents Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch is soliciting crop contents of quail harvested across the Rolling Plains (Texas and Oklahoma) in an attempt to compile a comprehensive seed collection of plants eaten by quail. As hunters clean birds at the end of the day’s hunt, they can dissect out the crop and empty the contents into an empty shotgun shell box so they will dry out. Then, hunters are asked to tape the seams with duct tape. However, hunters should not put them in a plastic bag, as they will mold. At the completion of the season, send the box and contents to RPQRR, P.O. Box 220, Roby, TX 79543. — RPQRR

Video of second-grader shooting a deer with modern rifle goes viral A 7-year-old girl from Jacksboro shot her first deer using an AR-15 about as big as she was. That might have been news enough on a local level, but the video of the girl, Lilly, breaking out into a happy grin was shared and ended up going viral in early December. The girl’s father, Cody Klapper, posted the

video on his Facebook page with a cautionary note saying the video may not be for everyone. The video was viewed by nearly 2.5 million people and shared thousands of times, with both praise and criticism. —Staff Report

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December 9, 2016

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Successful hunt with LSONF

Damaged rifle crown Continued from page 1

was with Tim Sharp, the owner of Small Groups Range near Sulphur Springs. After checking all of the more common causes of accuracy problems, Sharp checked the gun’s crown along the inside edge of the rifle muzzle. “It had a burr in the crown that threw it off,” Sharp said. “It shoots fine now, less than a 1-inch group at 100 yards.” What may be an uncommon issue can often be avoided, Sharp said. “It happens from riding in a truck with the barrel down,” he said. “A pebble on the floorboard is enough to damage the crown if it hits it right. It also can happen from a fall or anytime the end of the barrel strikes something.” Other times, the crown is damaged from extensive use and cleaning. “The crown can be damaged from cleaning rods and brushes or simply by erosion from a high round count,” Sharp said. Jason Dunbar, a gunsmith and owner of Diamond D Arms in Stephenville, agreed. “The crown is the last thing anyone ever thinks about,” he said. “But it doesn’t take much to put a burr on the crown and affect the rifle’s accuracy. It can affect a shotgun, too, if it’s a big enough burr. It will catch the wad on the way out and throw off the shot.” The two gun experts provided tips to avoid crown damage on any gun. “You can ride with the muzzle up, but many people are uncomfortable with that,” Sharp said. “If you can’t keep the muzzle off of the floorboard, I would suggest unzipping your gun case and set the gun in the case when riding on the ranch. Keep in mind, though, even a case with a metal zipper can cause damage.” Dunbar uses an old leather glove. “Just slide it over your muzzle,” he said. “It protects the crown while riding in the truck.” Accurateshooter.com provided a tip if the rifle has suddenly lost its accuracy. “Check the edges of the crown by pulling a Q-tip gently out past the edge of the crown. If you have a burr, it will grab the cotton and leave strands behind.”

HUNTER FOR LIFE: Kara Deolloz of Austin shot her first buck and added a feral hog on her first hunt, taken with Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation in Atascosa County. Photo by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Kara Deolloz of Austin grew up around hunting, but was never invited to tag along. “My grandparents hunted and I had asked them to take me, but they never did,” she said. “They went with friends and the invitation didn’t extend to the kids.” The 23-year-old college student got the chance in November with the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. “I dated a hunter, and I would get excited every time he would go. When I heard about this chance, no one had to convince me,” Deolloz said. On her first hunt, two bucks were seen in the dis-

tance. The next morning, a 6-pointer showed up. “I wasn’t nervous,” Deolloz said. “He dropped right there.” There was still one hunt left that evening. “Five hogs came out, and I shot one at 160 yards with a .243,” she said. “I wanted to get the biggest one. It was frustrating, the hogs kept moving around and changing places. Finally he stopped and I shot him.” Deolloz attended Texas State University and plans to finish her business management and accounting degree at the University of Texas. When looking at her buck while photographs were being taken, Deolloz made an unusual observation. “He has really pretty eyelashes,” she said.

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December 9, 2016

Youth finds success in the nick of time By Jillian Mock

For Lone Star Outdoor News After 9 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 30, Shane Wilson called his daughter to break the news. On the last hour of the last day of the youth hunting season, her younger brother shot the biggest buck on their Throckmorton lease. Wilson remembers chuckling at her response tinged with envy: “You’re kidding me. Hunter got the big one?” For the Wilson family, hunting is a family affair. Shane Wilson has taken daughter Bailey, 19, and son Hunter, 16, hunting, fishing, and camping since they were around 5 years old. Now, Bailey meets her dad and brother out at the lease whenever she can get away from her studies at Texas Tech University. As for Hunter, he is outside as much as possible. “He would rather live out there in the camper than be at home ever. He just lives and breathes this stuff,” Bailey said. Over the summer, Hunter and Shane noticed a giant 12-point buck on the game cameras posted around the lease but never saw the deer during bow hunting season. At 16, Hunter was approaching his final youth-only whitetail season, and he was determined to make it count. “From the time I got there Friday night, Hunter had been talking about this buck nonstop — no matter what, he was leaving that weekend with that buck,” Bailey said. That Saturday morning, Hunter, Bailey, and Shane split up. Hunter went to track down the buck, nicknamed Big 12, and Bailey and Shane went together to shoot pigs from a tall blind. The father-daughter team saw Big 12 but neither could legally take a shot. When the deer disappeared, they expected to hear the crack of Hunter’s rifle, but none came. Hunter didn’t see Big 12 the next morning either. Normally, Shane and Hunter left the lease around midday on Sundays to make the three-

hour drive before dark. This time, Hunter begged his dad to stay until dusk so he could have one more chance at the deer. “I knew it was either now or never,” said Hunter, noting that as soon as the season opened the following weekend, another sportsman would surely have harvested the trophy deer. Shane relented. They packed the car and brought everything with them to the blind, where they waited as the sun set. As Shane prepared to call it a night, Hunter spotted movement near the blind. Another buck, nicknamed Big 8, emerged from the bushes. He frequently saw Big 8 and Big 12 together on the cameras and knew the bigger deer must be close. Finally, in the last few moments of Hunter’s final youth season, Big 12 walked into view. “That was one of my memory bucks, I’ll never forget,” said Hunter, who plans to have the buck — which ended up being a 15-pointer — put on a pedestal mount. Happy as she was that her little brother achieved his goal, this was not the first time Hunter snagged the bigger deer before Bailey had a shot. To make up for it, Hunter persuaded her to come shooting with him when general gun season opened and promised to put her on another big deer he had nicknamed Hightower. Hunter made good on his word, and the next weekend Bailey got her own trophy. “Hunter was fired up. I think the first thing he did after that was text dad,” said Bailey. It has been a good season for Hunter, Bailey, and Shane. But for this family, hunting is as much about time spent together as it is about trophy deer. “It’s something I’ll never forget,” Shane said. “It’s always fun to get out there with your kids, especially doing something that they enjoy too.”

SIBLING HUNTERS: Hunter Wilson, below, bagged his buck on the last day of his last year to participate in the youth hunting season while hunting with his father, Shane. His sister, Bailey, followed up with her buck when the general season opened, being guided by her younger brother. Photos by Shane Wilson.

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December 9, 2016

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FISHING

Anglers report success fishing over the rainbows By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

FUN ON THE RIVER: Trout stockings have begun in Texas, including Hill Country rivers, where some larger trout are available to be caught. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Cold, rainy weather the first weekend of December dampened the turnout of anglers taking advantage of the annual rainbow trout stocking at the Guadalupe River. But for those who braved the elements, the fly-fishing was reportedly excellent. Dylan Mendoza, a fly-fishing guide out of Action Anglers in New Braunfels, said the season got off to a fantastic start despite the weather. “They’re hungry,” Mendoza said, adding that he took out a group of friends who caught a dozen rainbows in four hours and missed another dozen in the same period. His group’s biggest catch was an 18inch rainbow. Every year the river is stocked by Trout Unlimited with 16-17 inch rainbows on average, with private

property access available to members. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department also stocks the river below the Canyon Lake dam at Guadalupe Park and Camp Huaco Springs. Trout are 10 inches on average. Mendoza compared this year’s start to last year — which he considered one of the best seasons ever. The rain tended to give those driftfishing and wade-fishing more cover, enabling them to move closer to the trout. The fishing will get tougher, though, once the fish get acclimated. “It’s easy fishing right now. Give them a week and these fish will have Ph.D.s,” Mendoza said. Chris Jackson, an area representative for Trout Unlimited who also guides from Action Anglers, said the turnout was light due to rain. Those who showed up were successful with caddis and stonefly patterns. Many were drift-fishing, using Please turn to page 9

Flounder run delayed, gets jump-start via cold front By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The annual fall flounder run was delayed this year after record high temperatures, but all that changed on the last day of November when the best cold front of fall blew in with a blustery north wind and falling water temperatures. Jerry Mambretti, the TPWD Coastal Fisheries Division regional director for the upper coast, said we needed a quick drop of about 10 degrees to jumpstart the run, and mentioned that the Nov. 30 front should get it to going. Mambretti agreed the fall flounder run was off to a delayed start, however catches are picking up along Sabine Lake and in Galveston and San Antonio bays. “The flounder run usually coincides with falling water temperatures,” Mambretti said. “We’ve been getting slow temperature drops of maybe 2 to 3 degrees. That’s not enough to stimulate a good run. Up until November 30, we didn’t have any significant fronts. For the last three years the fall flounder run has been the best we’ve had in years. I expect that to happen again.” Lower water temperatures force flounder to migrate from the bays into the Gulf of Mexico to spawn. This “flounder run” typically happens in November and is a popular time for anglers to target flounder. This year, the big push is expected in

early December. Clarence Oswalt has been fishing the run at Rollover Pass on Bolivar Peninsula for years. “It’s a little late this year,” he said. “But I’ll be right here fishing jigs along bottom when it all starts. The best tide will be outgoing. If we have green water a jig in glow with a chartreuse tail is good. If the water is a little murky I’ll go with fire tiger. The current can be pretty strong here at times. A 1/4-ounce jig head is best. Or if we’re loaded up with fishermen, I’ll use a live finger mullet on a Carolina rig.” Sabine Lake guide Jerry Norris said the run will pick up. “We typically don’t have a real good push of cold weather until the first week or so of December,” he said. “Some of my best flounder catches BETTER LATE THAN have been in December. NEVER: The annual I use a lot of Gulps on flounder run along 1/8-ounce jig heads. The the Texas coast is curl tail ones are best beunderway, albeit cause they have more aclater than normal tion. My favorite colors due to higher water are white or chartreuse.” temperatures. RePerry Trial, TPWD cent cold fronts are Coastal Fisheries Division triggering the run. Photo by Robert regional director for the Sloan, for Lone Star lower coast, said flounOutdoor News. der have been abundant Please turn to page 19

Port Mansfield state waters a hot snapper spot By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Red snapper fishing out of Port Mansfield is some of the best along the entire Texas coast throughout the year. But right now catches of monster red snapper are off the charts in state waters out to 9 nautical miles at this South Texas hot spot. Capt. Steve Ellis with Get Away Adventures Lodge in Port Mansfield had some recent exOFFSHORE ACTION: In state waters out from Port Mansfield, anglers are enjoying fighting some big red snapper. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

cellent catches of snapper. “It was good a few weeks ago, but with the water temperature dropping a few degrees it’s gotten to be off the charts good,” Ellis said. “I don’t know of any place else along the Texas coast where you can catch them upwards of 20-plus pounds in state waters.” Capt. Chad Kinney with Bamm Bamm Charters is a snapper catching guru out of Mansfield. He runs a 38-foot Bertram and is on the water and catching snapper, and even ling. Please turn to page 9


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December 9, 2016

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State-water snapper Continued from page 8

“We had a trip out last week and limited on snapper to 25 pounds,” Kinney said. “It was one of those great days. We were fishing over some rocks in about 60 to 90 feet of water. It was pretty calm. We made the short run out past the jetties and the fish were on a big feed.” Kinney and his customers used mostly squid and cigar minnows for bait. “The water was 68 degrees, down a couple of degrees from a couple of weeks back,” he said. “As the cold fronts begin to move through, the temperature will go down a few more degrees. The fishing will still be very good. We don’t get the cold weather and water this far down the coast, so our fishing is not as affected by fall and winter fronts.” If you don’t mind hauling your boat to South Texas, this is a good area to give a try. “We’re a little off the main

grid,” Ellis said. “But if you can get here, the fishing is a no-brainer.” Most of the snapper fishing out of Mansfield is done over rocks that are anywhere from 2 to 12 miles offshore. Most are well within state waters so the snapper fishing is open year-round, and an easy run out of the harbor at Port Mansfield. “Once we leave the dock we’re fishing within an hour, when the seas are calm,” Kinney said. “Many rocks and reefs are about 9 miles from Mansfield. The rocks and reefs can be reached within 30 minutes or so once we clear the jetties.” On most trips, Kinney fishes on the bottom or free-lines fresh dead baits. He owns a marina in the harbor with croaker boats, so he usually has excellent fresh dead bait. “Squid is good, but lizard fish (similar to a cigar minnow) are

HAPPY ANGLERS: Squid and lizard fish are the current baits of choice for red snapper, according to Port Mansfield guides. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

used too,” he said. “The amount of current dictates what depth we’ll be fishing. With a hard current we’ll be fishing on bottom with enough weight to get the baits, rigged on 13/0 circle hooks, down to the rocks or reef. But

Two fishermen drown Authorities found the bodies of two men who apparently drowned while fishing from a boat at Crescent Lake in Madisonville. When first responders arrived at Crescent Lake, they found a boat with a fishing pole inside. Law enforcement said there was also a lawn chair floating in the water nearby. Authorities have identified the deceased men as Reginald Dexter Carter, 57 and Christopher Tolliver, 39. A neighbor who lives in a home nearby the lake said he noticed the two people on the boat just after 5 p.m. He looked back a short time later and said neither person was in the boat. He says he checked with binoculars to make sure, and when he didn’t see them, he called police. —Staff Report

when the tide is running really slow, like maybe a half knot, we’ll free-line baits. That’s a real good way to catch some trophy snapper. So far we’ve caught them up to 33 pounds.” A popular reef is the South Pa-

dre Island-1047 reef. It has a water depth of 65 feet and is 6.51 miles from the Mansfield jetties. Capt. Chad Kinney (956) 802-2269 Capt. Steve Ellis (956) 492-8472

Rainbows in the cold Continued from page 8

nymphing techniques. Jackson expected the flow rate on the Guadalupe to increase due to water being released from Canyon Lake. The flow rate might make wade-fishing difficult, but it should be good for drift-fishing. Unusually warm weather almost foiled TPWD’s annual stocking, said Mike Matthews, manager of A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery. However, all sites were stocked on schedule. Rainbows do best in water temps below 70 degrees.

Marcos De Jesus, a biologist with TPWD, said Friday’s turnout for the public trout stocking was great, but undoubtedly the rain on Saturday dissuaded anglers. The fishing conditions were optimal for those who showed up to take advantage of the program, he added. “They were literally biting out of the truck,” De Jesus said. “The rest of the weekend was probably a bust.” See lsonews.com for statewide stocking locations.

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained up river; 49–55 degrees; 1.73’ low. Black bass are good on black buzzbaits at first and last light with lots of small bass on baby bass wacky worms with chartreuse tips fished around grass. Spoons are catching schooling bass all day in 25–50 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on juglines baited with goldfish, perch or minnows. AMISTAD: Water murky; 74–78 degrees; 16.89’ low. Black bass are good on spinner baits, frogs, crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on slabs, spoons and small crankbaits. White bass are fair on top-waters. Catfish are good on stink bait and shrimp over baited holes. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 49–56 degrees; 0.66’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, dropshot rigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 60–63 degrees; 0.69’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, flukes and weightless stick baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait and rod and reel. BASTROP: Water stained; 71–75 degrees. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.29’ high. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms in coves. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows at night. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 62–65 degrees; 1.89’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, bladed jigs and square-billed crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 2.71’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits, jigs and Texas-rigged soft plastics. Crappie are good on brush piles with jigs and jigs. Catfish are good on cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are good on spinner baits and dark soft plastic worms. Striped bass are good on green striper jigs and shad. Redfish are good on crawfish, shad and shrimp. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp, cut bait and cheese bait near the dam. Blue catfish are fair on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 60–64 degrees: 0.04’ high. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits and bladed jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.31’ high. Black bass are good on top-water frogs, watermelon crankbaits and green pumpkin soft plastics. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and crankbaits in 12–16 feet, and on minnows and jigs under lights at night. Crappie are good on minnows or white tube jigs. Channel catfish are slow. Blue catfish to 5 pounds are good on cut perch and shad. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 2.00’ low. Black

bass are good on watermelon top-waters and Texas-rigged silver flake stick baits in 10–15 feet. Striped bass are fair on lipless crankbaits and Spoiler Shads off points in 20–30 feet near the dam. White bass are fair on small traps and pet spoons in the river channel. Crappie are fair on chartreuse crappie jigs and live minnows. Channel catfish are good on liver and stink bait. CADDO: Water stained; 63–66 degrees; 0.50’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits and weightless stick baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on blue soft plastic worms with gold flakes. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. Redfish are fair on live bait. Channel and blue catfish are good on cheese bait and shad in 181 Cove. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 69–73 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are fair to good on watermelon red stick baits, dark spinner baits and lipless crankbaits along creeks in 8–20 feet. Striped bass are fair on deep-running crankbaits and blade baits around humps in the lower end of the lake. White bass are slow. Smallmouth bass are good on white curl tail grubs on jigheads and watermelon jigs along ledges and over rock piles in 8–18 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs upriver. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with live perch. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 1.80’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 19.58’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits early and late. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on frozen shrimp, hot dogs and stink bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 1.10’ low. Black bass are good on small spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait and liver. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 69 degrees at the hot water discharge, 69 degrees in main lake; 2.68’ low. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed soft plastics and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs near Coletoville Bridge in 8–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live perch and cut bait in 8–12 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.91’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits in 15–25 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crap-

pie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are fair on liver and nightcrawlers. FALCON: Water murky; 73–77 degrees; 29.07’ low. Black bass are good on perch-colored creature baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on cut bait and bloodbait upriver. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on Carolina-rigged soft plastic worms, top-waters and shad-colored crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish are slow. FORK: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 2.77’ low. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, spinner baits and flutter spoons. White and yellow bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 50–56 degrees; 0.45’ low. Black bass are fair on shakyheads, chatterbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on stink bait and live bait.

GRANBURY: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on hellbenders and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are fair on shrimp and live minnows. GRANGER: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are fair on green pumpkin soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on shad upriver. Crappie are slow. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits, and on juglines baited with cut bait and Zote soap. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 60–63 degrees; 0.17’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged soft plastics and square-billed crankbaits. White bass and hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. GREENBELT: 31.31’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and finesse jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 65–69 degrees; 0.18’ high. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed creature baits around structure. Crappie are slow. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 51–55 degrees; 0.51’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and spinner baits. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 62–65 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, shaky heads and soft jerkbaits. White bass are good

on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 63–66 degrees: 0.40’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits and flipping jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. LAVON: Water stained; 62–65 degrees: 3.20’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs and flipping jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.77’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits, watermelon soft plastics, and wacky-rigged green pumpkin stick baits along laydowns and stumps. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good vertically jigging under birds. Crappie are good on watermelon crappie jigs and live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on liver and stink bait. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live bait. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 0.04’ high. Black bass are fair on shaky-head worms, flukes and square-billed crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.32’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastics and spinner baits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad, shrimp and prepared baits. MACKENZIE: 73.49’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 85–88 degrees; 2.32’ low. Black bass are fair on flukes, shaky heads and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MEREDITH: 60.71’ low. Reports of black bass are rare. No reports of smallmouth bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 84–87 degrees; 0.09’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. NASWORTHY: 49–55 degrees; 1.17’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and chatterbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.18’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs at the fishing docks in Liberty Hill Park. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. Blue catfish are fair on shad and perch. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 49–56 degrees; 34.22’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 48–56 degrees; 9.63’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are

fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 1.87’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged worms, finesse jigs and soft jerkbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 48–55 degrees; 0.04’ low. Black bass are fair to good on jigs, Texas rigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.73’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon red soft plastic worms and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are very good on stink bait and frozen shrimp. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 62–65 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, wake baits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 61–64 degrees; 0.29’ high. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, spinner baits and Carolina-rigged creature baits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 62–65 degrees; 1.32’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs and Texas-rigged worms. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 69–73 degrees; 3.64’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastic worms, spinner baits and crankbaits in 20–30 feet. White bass are good on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Bream are fair on worms. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp, and liver. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 72– 76 degrees; 0.16’ high. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are good on small watermelon spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on chicken livers and dough bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live bait. STAMFORD: 0.21’ low. Black bass and crappie are fair to good, but mostly undersized. White bass are fair to good on minnows and Rooster Tails. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 70–74 degrees; 0.29’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 11

fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows and liver. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 62–65 degrees; 2.47’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws and flipping jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water stained; 61–64 degrees; 1.40’ high. Black bass are good on jerkbaits, medium crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 4.89’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms, top-waters and shallow-running crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver spoons and striper jigs. White bass are good on minnows and hellbenders. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows and prepared bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.13’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are fair on small traps and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs in 15–20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait in 20–45 feet. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on chartreuse deep-running crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and shrimp. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 45–52 degrees; 19.43’ low. Black bass are very slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 70–74 degrees; 1.90’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon red soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink/white tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and stink bait.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT

Pint-sized angler catches gallon-sized fish Layke Brucker, 8, of Wichita Falls, set a new junior lake record for blue catfish at Lake Arrowhead. Layke caught a 47-pound blue catfish in late November, breaking the previous record of 44 pounds. He used shad on rod and reel with his dad, and they successfully released the fish. The overall lake record is still 74.7 pounds. —Staff report

Texans have an edge in 2017 Bassmaster Classic Five Texas competitors will have a home-turf advantage for the Bassmaster Classic this March at Lake Conroe. Qualifiers from the Lone Star State include Keith Combs, an Elite Series angler from Huntington. He probably has more familiarity with Conroe than anyone else in the field. He has won two championships in the Toyota Texas Bass Classic tournaments held on the lake. Other Texas fishermen are Todd Faircloth of Jasper, former Classic winner Takahiro Omori of Emory, 2009 champion Alton Jones Sr. of Lorena and his son, Alton Jones Jr., who qualified through the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens circuit. Lake Conroe also hosted the B.A.S.S. Nation Championship in November. Ryan Lavigne of Gonzales, Louisiana., the B.A.S.S. Nation champion, gave fishing fans a preview of the quality of fishing anglers can expect from Conroe when he recorded 14 bass weighing a total of 58 pounds, 3 ounces, in three days of competition. Lavigne also had the distinction of winning without using a boat. The 51 anglers who have qualified so far represent 20 states ranging as far west as Idaho, California and Nevada, and as far north and east as Michigan, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Alabama is sending the largest contingent to the Classic — nine — while Texas and California account for five each. —B.A.S.S.

NORTH SABINE: Trout are good under birds and pods of shad on soft plastics. Redfish and flounder are good in the marsh on shrimp. Flounder are good on the falling tide on the muddy shorelines. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are good under birds and pods of shad. Redfish are good at the jetty on live bait and cracked crabs. Flounder are good on scented plastics in the bayous. BOLIVAR: Trout, black drum, sand trout and redfish are fair at Rollover Pass. Trout are fair to good while drifting shell on plastics. Bull redfish are good on the beachfront. TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for drifters working deep shell. Trout are good under birds on soft plastics. Redfish are good at the Spillway on shrimp and scented plastics. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout and large Gulf trout are good for drifters working deep shell on plastics and fresh shrimp. Redfish and flounder are fair to good in the marsh around drains on shrimp. Trout and redfish are good under the birds. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Bull redfish and flounder are good at San Luis Pass on shrimp and shad. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Trout are good under the birds in the afternoon over deep shell. TEXAS CITY: Bull redfish are good in the channel on shrimp and crabs. Gulf trout are good in the channel on fresh shrimp. FREEPORT: Trout are good on reefs on shrimp and DOA Shrimp under corks. Redfish are fair to good on the reefs in Christmas Bay and Bastrop Bay. Bull redfish are good on the beach. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell and under birds when the wind allows. Trout and flounder are fair to good on muddy shorelines on scented plastics. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are

good on live shrimp at Shell Island, Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and Mad Island. Flounder are good in the Diversion Channel on scented plastics. PORT O’CONNOR: Bull redfish are good at the jetty on crabs, mullet and shad. Trout are fair to good on the reefs in San Antonio Bay on live shrimp. Flounder are fair to good in bayous on scented plastics and jigs tipped with shrimp. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair to good on Corkies while working reefs. Redfish are good in Redfish Bay on mullet and crabs. Bull redfish, black drum and flounder are good in the Lydia Ann Channel on shrimp and mullet. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair at Shamrock on topwaters and plum soft plastics. Bull redfish are good at the jetty and on the beachfront on natural baits. CORPUS CHRISTI: Bull redfish are good in the surf on mullet and shrimp. Trout are fair for waders working mud and grass on scented plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good in the channels on natural baits. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and Gamblers around rocks and grass. Trout are good while drifting deep rocks on plum plastics. Redfish are fair to good on scented and plum plastics around spoil islands. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are good while drifting potholes on top-waters and soft plastics under a popping cork. Trout and redfish are fair to good on the spoils on small top-waters and red shad plastics. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are fair to good while drifting grass and mud on plastics and live shrimp. Redfish are good in Airport Cove and around the causeway on scented plastics and DOA Shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are good while drifting sand and grass on scented and soft plastics. Bull redfish are good along the channel near the causeway on mullet. —TPWD


Page 12

December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER SILENCE IS A VIRTUE Further evidence that some people just don’t learn from their mistakes, a Titus County game warden was having a conversation in a parking lot on the White Oak Creek Wildlife Management Area when he was interrupted by a man who asked the warden out of the blue if he wanted to inspect his hunting license. The warden recognized the man as a convicted felon he had filed charges on twice before for possession of a firearm and obliged the request. The warden then discovered the felon was once again in possession of a firearm, a 12-gauge shotgun and ammunition. The man also had two freshly killed cat squirrels in his vehicle. A criminal history check identified at least six felony convictions and the suspect was arrested for a third time for felon in possession of a firearm. IN THE SPOTLIGHT A Matagorda County game warden in the College Port area saw someone in a vehicle spotlighting and shooting from a public road. A short time later, another truck appeared. The warden saw one person leave one of the vehicles, which then drove off. Both vehicles were stopped and another warden was called to assist. Using thermal imaging, the wardens located the person in the field. The onsite investigation revealed that the suspect had wounded a white-tailed buck but was not able to locate the deer. Narcotic paraphernalia was located in the suspect’s vehicle, along with a spotlight, a .22 hornet rifle and a spent shell casing. Citations are pending.

PICTURE THIS A photo sent to a Titus County game warden led to citations and restitution for several teens. The photo showed a juvenile holding the head of a white-tailed deer that was suspected of being harvested illegally. After enlarging the picture on a computer, the deer appeared to be a legal spike but the informant said the teen was acting like he did something wrong. The warden interviewed the youth

FISHING FOLLY After receiving a trespassing complaint in Titus County, a game warden arrived on the scene to find an unoccupied vehicle parked along the property’s fence line. About 15 minutes later, two men came walking toward the truck carrying fishing poles. One of the men already had an active arrest warrant for criminal trespass and both were arrested for trespassing. An additional charge of fishing without landowner consent was also filed. GUNS, GAME AND GOTCHA For a year, Tarrant County wardens had been investigating illegal hunting on Tarrant Regional Water District property next to Eagle Mountain Lake and Azle High School. Over the past year, the wardens had located stands, feeders, a compound bow and even a rifle stashed in the woods. While in the area one evening, wardens noticed a person with a light walking through the woods. When the wardens made contact and identified themselves, the hunter turned and pointed his rifle at the wardens and then threw it on the ground.

in the photo and his guardian. The investigation found that three juveniles and an 18-year-old male shot the deer from the road. The entire deer, except for the head, was then dumped deep in the woods on a private ranch. Citations included hunting from a public road, hunting deer with the aid of artificial light and waste of game.

The suspect was quickly detained and said he was hunting ring-tailed cats. He was booked on charges of hunting without landowner consent and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon on an officer. Officials returned to the scene and found a blood trail with shoe prints following behind the blood trail. No game was located, but DNA evidence was recovered. The following day, officers found the suspect’s bicycle that he allegedly admitted to using to get to the property. A search of that area also uncovered a loaded sawed-off 20-gauge shotgun stashed in the woods near the bicycle. Further search of the property revealed five more stands and two more feeders. The case is pending. GPS MADE THE CASE A Morris County game warden on patrol observed a truck in the middle of a pasture spotlighting the area, which he know was off-limits to hunting. Upon making contact with the two men in the vehicle, the warden noticed two dogs fitted with GPS tracking collars in the bed of the pickup and a handheld

GPS unit on the dashboard next to a spotlight. The men received citations for not having hunting licenses and were later arrested after the landowner filed criminal trespass charges. ILLEGAL BUCK NOT TAGGED Acting on information he received about an untagged and illegal buck being taken, a game warden confronted the suspected violator who admitted to taking the illegal buck and not tagging it because he did not want to use his buck tag on the deer, which did not meet the minimum antler restrictions for the county. In addition to a citation for failing to tag the deer, the man was also cited for taking an illegal buck and failing to fill out the required license harvest log. The antlers were confiscated and the venison donated to a local needy family. Cases and restitution are pending. TRIPLE WHAMMY Williamson County game wardens were checking fishing activities at the Granger Spillway when they came across three individuals loading fishing gear into a truck. Asked

how the fishing was, one of the men said he had caught just two and showed them to the wardens. The wardens noticed a cast net and fishing line and hooks attached to two plastic bottles. It is illegal in Texas to use floating “juglines,” fishing devices with line and hooks attached or cast nets to catch game fish. The wardens also found a white plastic bag containing undersized crappie and white bass. One of the men admitted to catching the crappie and bass and the other two said they used the homemade fishing devices to catch the rest. All three subjects were cited for not having fishing licenses, fishing by illegal means and methods and possession of undersized fish. Civil restitution cases were also filed. FATHER DOESN’T ALWAYS KNOW BEST A Shelby County game warden received a tip about a white-tailed buck being cleaned at a nearby hunting camp. At the camp, the warden found an 8-point buck that had supposedly been harvested that afternoon. The hunters had to track the buck for some time, which was the reason it was being cleaned so late. After further investigation, it was discovered that a juvenile had shot it with a rifle. The father of the juvenile, hunting in the same stand, allegedly confessed to telling his child to shoot the buck a day before youth weekend. Charges and restitution are pending.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

Page 13

Modern, quiet rifles Continued from page 1

ity in Texas,” Houser said, adding they are perfectly suitable for deer or hog hunting. Another factor that’s increasing the popularity of modern rifles is the cool factor. With their coloring, custom triggers, match barrels that increase accuracy and lighter weight, these rifles are the equivalent to a souped-up sports car. Houser taught his three children to hunt with his modern carbine rifles and suppressors for simple reasons: The rifles are relatively lightweight and have adjustable stocks to fit smaller frames, and the suppressors cut down on noise and recoil. The loud noise and kick make children afraid to shoot guns, and it makes them develop bad habits like flinching when they take a shot, he said. “A suppressor eats recoil,” he added. Using one with a .308 cuts the recoil to something akin to shooting a .223. Houser said he has purposefully put empty rounds in a .30-06 to demonstrate that most adults will jerk when they pull the trigger because they expect a blast and recoil. These types of bad habits aren’t developed when children are trained on nontraditional rifles and equipment from the beginning. Another issue is missing that teachable moment in the blind when a game animal approaches. Children with ear protection have a hard time hearing adults instructing them on shooting. A suppressor pretty much eliminates that problem, plus it is less likely to scare away any remaining animals. Of course, cost is what drives many parents to buy youth rifles because they are inexpensive. Families spend $400 on a youth rifle, but have no use for it once the child matures. Houser pointed out that an AR-15 type rifle costs more, but it can be used from childhood to adulthood. Modern rifles can also be used by other adults in the family, making it an economical purchase.

TAKING AIM: Advocates say a modern rifle with a suppressor helps alleviate a young or new hunter’s apprehension, as they are quieter and have less recoil. Photo by Andrew Houser.

Houser’s children — Natalie, and twins Jack and Luke — have used modern rifles since they were around 6 or 7 years old. Natalie, now 12, said many kids get their first impressions of guns from Hollywood. Guns seem loud and scary when watching people shoot them in the movies. But when she actually shot a gun with a silencer, her experience was totally different than what she expected. “I think it made it a lot less scary,” she said. While she has been raised to shoot a modern rifle with a silencer, she also knows firsthand what it’s like to shoot a traditional rifle. About two years ago a friend asked her to shoot a rifle while at a deer lease. She put on earmuffs and pulled the trigger. What she remembers most is the kick and the noise. With her rifle it’s different: “Instead, it just glides back and keeps you steady and focused,” she said. This year she shot a 10-point buck with a Modern Carbine MC6 in 6.8 SPC with Leupold Mark 6 scope and a Surefire Genesis silencer. Her 9-year-old brothers both seem to like using modern hunting rifles as well. Jack said he likes the silencers because when he’s hunting pigs they don’t run away because of the noise. “It made me fearless shooting a gun. I just think it’s really cool,” he said.

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Page 14

December 9, 2016

Crossbow buck Continued from page 4

“Saturday morning I froze my butt off,” Anderson said. As she shivered behind the blind that morning, she remembers thinking there was no way a deer would come in close enough for a shot. After three hours in the cold, she was about to give up. Not long after that, a doe wandered in close to the feeder. Anderson took her shot from about 20 yards away and hit her mark. The doe ran about 60 yards before succumbing. Anderson was ecstatic and couldn’t believe her luck. But, of course, that was only the cake. The icing came the next morning. With renewed confidence, Anderson set up in her ghost blind again Sunday before sunup. It wasn’t as cold, but she was fidgety and worried her slight movements would alert a deer. But her worries faded away when she saw a magnificent buck stroll into sight, not 20 yards away. It was déjà vu, but only better. “I didn’t expect to see that big monster come out,” she said. The buck came in grunting, looking for a doe. He walked into the feeder area and then out again. Finally, he turned just right and Anderson let her arrow fly. She hit him in the shoulder and tracked him to where he fell about 20 yards away. Anderson couldn’t believe her luck. She ran to get her boyfriend, Kevin Smith. Smith thought his girlfriend was overly excited as she described

shooting the giant buck. “I was thinking, ‘How big could it really be?’” But as she led him to the buck, Smith kept wondering “if those antlers were ever going to shrink.” There on the ground was a large 11-point buck — just like she said. “That’s a very impressive buck,” he told his girlfriend. “That’s amazing.” Smith said the buck was the biggest ever shot at the ranch on his side of the family, and one of the biggest ever taken off the low-fence ranch, period. “There are people who hunt with a rifle every week who never get a buck that size,” Smith said, adding that it was bigger than his bucks. Joanna Hajdik, a veteran crossbow hunter for 10 years who participates in public hunting, was impressed. “I haven’t gotten anything that big,” she said. Of course, Anderson was pleased to now have something to brag about. She shot a small buck last year while rifle hunting, but nothing like her birthday buck. As it turned out, the buck was one the family had been seeing on the game camera about two weeks before the hunt. Now the buck’s going to hang on her wall — a token of a birthday hunt she will never forget.

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Nighttime hogs Continued from page 4

recovery rate on night-shot hogs. Conversely, Cody Bell III is a techno-pig hunter. He hunts in Burnet County with a drone, a .300 Blackout rifle equipped with an IR Hunter Mk II night vision scope and a suppressor. Prior to a hunt, at last light, he’ll scout areas that hold the most pigs with a drone equipped with a real-time video camera. If he sees pigs, he’ll bring in the DJI Phantom 4 drone, load up the ATV and head out after them “Thanks to modern technology, I’ve got the upper hand on pigs when the sun goes down,” Bell said. “The drone is a huge asset. I can easily see them with my night vision scope and put them down with a rifle that’s set up with a suppressor. Because of the low amount of noise from the gun, the pigs don’t always spook and run. Or they will run a few yards and stop to see what’s going on. That’s just about always a fatal mistake.”

BIG PIG: Hunting a creek bottom loaded with acorns, Katy Truxell shot this 175-pound hog while hunting with her boyfriend, Kyle Fernandez. Below, Cody Bell III sights in his rifle with night vision. Photos by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.


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December 9, 2016

BELIEVE MONSTERS IN

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Page 15


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December 9, 2016

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NATIONAL Oklahoma pheasants up A recovery of Oklahoma’s pheasant population began in 2013 and has continued this year. Survey results from spring and summer indicate a higher numbers of birds in the 13-county survey area in northern Oklahoma compared to 2015 results. This year’s crow count survey is 61.5 percent above the historical average and 46.3 percent above what was recorded in 2015 in the traditionally higher counties. While the brood survey is 31 percent below the historical average, the brood surveys are 30 percent higher than in 2015 in the traditionally higher population counties and 60 percent higher across the statewide range. Pheasant hunting season opened Dec. 1 and will run through Jan. 31, 2017. —ODWC

Arkansas CWD results AUGUSTA “GU SSIE” CORTEZ, 24, SHOT HER FIRST BUCK N OV. 12 AT KALLIES R ANCH IN BELMONT TH IS MONTH, NEAR SEGUIN . CORTEZ HAD SEEN THE BUCK A COUP LE OF TIMES ON TH E GAME CAMERA TWO WEEKS PRIOR TO HU NTING. WHEN SHE G OT TO THE BLIND ON TH E DAY OF THE HUNT, H ER 8-POINT BUCK SHOWED UP AT THE FEEDER 5 MINUTES LATER.

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Twenty-eight new cases of chronic wasting disease were identified from voluntary sampling stations run by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission during the opening weekend of modern gun season, Nov. 12-13. The samples were collected from 25 sampling sites in north Arkansas. —AGFC

Munson joins Montana HOF The Montana Outdoor Hall of Fame named Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation cofounder Bob Munson among its 2016 inductees. Munson was one of four Montana elk hunters who founded RMEF in 1984. —RMEF

Archery participation up, but still down from decade ago Archery and bowhunting participation jumped more than 20 percent from 2012 to 2015, with 23.8 million American citizens age 18 and older taking part a year ago, according to a nationwide survey by Responsive Management on behalf of the Archery Trade Association in April 2016. The results found 9.9 percent of Americans 18 and older participate in archery sports in 2015. According to Jay McAninch, ATA’s CEO, retailers have not seen an increase in archery equipment purchases. “This survey overall was a case of good news, bad news,” he said. “The good news is that participation continues to grow overall, and recreational archery is bringing new people into our market. The bad news is that bowhunting participation remains lower than a decade ago.” To address this recent trend, the ATA developed a “Bowhunting Initiative,” which focuses substantial staff time and resources to improve bowhunter numbers. —ATA

Early participation in bowhunting The starting age of bowhunting participants skews a bit older compared to that of target archery participants, although a majority of bowhunters (60 percent) had their first experience with the activity before adulthood. The mean starting age of bowhunting participants is 19.6 years old and the median is 16 years old.

New York warden shot A New York state environmental conservation police officer was hospitalized with a gunshot wound after being shot while investigating reports of illegal hunting. The Department of Environmental Conservation said two of its enforcement officers were checking out reports of possible illegal hunt-

ing southeast of Albany. One of the officers was shot in the leg after arriving on the scene. The officer underwent surgery at Hudson Regional Hospital and is listed in stable condition. The man who shot the officer was charged with assault. —NYDEC

NRCS adds projects for declining species The U.S. Department of Agriculture is adding dozens of new target species to its premier wildlife conservation effort that helps agricultural producers make wildlife-friendly improvements on working lands. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is adding 11 new projects to Working Lands for Wildlife: the agency’s targeted, science-based effort to help producers restore and protect habitat for declining species on farms, ranches and working forests. Projects for the northern bobwhite in grasslands and in pine savannas, the American black duck and Colorado River aquatic species are included. —NRCS

Maryland deer opener Hunters reported harvesting 13,488 deer on the opening weekend of the 2016 Maryland firearm season. The harvest represents a 24 percent increase over last year’s estimate of 10,859 for the same period. The total includes 6,159 antlered and 7,329 antlerless deer with sika deer comprising 224 of the antlered and 232 of the antlerless totals. —Maryland DNR

Record blue cat in Colorado While walleye fishing with a friend on Colorado’s Pueblo Reservoir, Charlie Black landed a few on a Purpledescent Jigging Rap. Then he set the hook on a really big fish. The fish turned out to be a blue catfish. The fish was taken to a nearby fish hatchery, officially weighed and the paperwork was filled out for Black’s new Colorado staterecord blue catfish.

Mountain lion sightings in Kansas Four confirmed mountain lion sightings have taken place in Kansas this year. A hunter recently checked his trail camera on Fort Riley to find a photo of a mountain lion taken on Nov. 9. On Nov. 20, about 55 miles away, another hunter’s trail camera in Shawnee County snapped several photos of a mountain lion passing by at around 1 a.m. Four days later and about 20 miles away, raccoon hunters with a single hound treed a lion. The hunters took photos and video, and biologists later recovered a few hairs from the tree limbs. —Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism

INTERNATIONAL Man arrested with 18 rhino horns A Chinese national in transit from Windhoek, Namibia to Hong Kong was arrested with 18 rhino horns at the OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa on Nov. 30. According to Namibian Police, the 28-year-old Chinese man was arrested after he departed from Hosea Kutako International Airport in Windhoek. He was travelling on board a South African Airways flight to Hong Kong. —Namibian Sun


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

Please join us in conservation, education and protecting hunters’ rights.

Next DSC Convention January 5-8, 2017 biggame.org

G R E A T E S T H U N T E R S C O N V E N T I O N O N T H E P L A N E T TM

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December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HEROES

Rene Loredo shot this nilgai in Encino using a .270 while hunting with friends and family. Logan Cade, 7, of Childress, made a 90-yard shot using a Remington .243 to get his deer.

Jacob Clayton shot his first limit of ducks while hunting with his dad on a private pond in Hunt County. Their dog, Tilley, made many great retrieves.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers?

Tanner Pettitt, 13, of Burlington, shot a 10-point mule deer on a family hunting trip over Thanksgiving weekend at Broken Springs Ranch near Ashtola. He also bagged a hog and coyote.

Maiara Wilson, 9, of Boerne, was fishing with family and caught this nice rainbow trout over Thanksgiving weekend.

Email them with contact and caption information to editor@ lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

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December 9, 2016

Page 19

Flounder moving Continued from page 8

in their surveys, but landings are down this fall. “Higher than normal tides in October and the November ban on gigging have contributed to the low landings,” he said. Due to declining flounder numbers, new regulations were put into place in 2009 and 2014 to increase the abundance of flounder coast wide. During the month of November, the daily bag limit for flounder drops from 5 to 2. Only a rod and reel may be used to harvest flounder in November. From Dec. 1-14, the daily bag and possession limit are 2, but flounder may be taken by any legal fishing device including a gig. The minimum size limit is 14 inches. After Dec. 14, the daily bag limit returns to five fish.

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Missouri angler lands final Classic spot Scott Clift of Dadeville, Missouri became the final competitor in the 2017 Bassmaster Classic after winning the Bassmaster Team Championship Classic Fish-Off on Dec. 3. The tournament began on Kentucky Lake on Nov. 30 when 186 two-person teams launched in the 2016 Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship. The field was whittled to the top three teams after Thursday’s weigh-in, and those tandems were separated into six individual anglers whose weights were zeroed for the two-day fish-off. The 39-year old Clift landed 17 pounds, 8 ounces on the first day for a 7-pound lead on the other five anglers. On the second day, Clift struggled but landed three fish later in the morning after switching from a jerkbait to a stick bait. He finished the day with 13 pounds, 2 ounces, enough to top Georgia’s Barron Adams by more than six pounds. Clift will join 51 other anglers at the Classic at Lake Conroe on March 24-26, 2017. —B.A.S.S.

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December 9, 2016

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Dec. 13

Dec. 20

Dec. 29

Jan. 5

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu

12:45 6:58 1:31 7:45 2:20 8:34 3:12 9:26 4:08 10:23 5:08 11:24 6:12 12:03

1:11 7:24 1:59 8:12 2:48 9:03 3:41 9:56 4:38 10:53 5:39 11:54 6:42 12:27

07:17 07:18 07:19 07:20 07:20 07:21 07:22

2:21p 3:02p 3:48p 4:38p 5:33p 6:32p 7:35p

2:11a 3:17a 4:25a 5:33a 6:41a 7:46a 8:45a

16 Fri

7:16 1:02

7:45

1:31

07:22 05:22 8:39p

9:39a

17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

8:19 9:18 10:12 11:01 11:45 12:05 12:45

8:46 9:43 10:36 11:23 ----12:27 1:06

2:32 3:30 4:24 5:12 5:56 6:37 7:17

07:23 07:23 07:24 07:24 07:25 07:25 07:26

12:39 6:52 1:26 7:39 2:14 8:28 3:06 9:21 4:02 10:17 5:03 11:18 6:06 ----7:11 12:56 8:13 2:00 9:12 2:59 10:06 3:54 10:55 4:44 11:40 5:29 ----- 6:10 12:39 6:49

1:05 7:18 1:53 8:07 2:43 8:57 3:35 9:50 4:32 10:48 5:33 11:48 6:36 12:21 7:39 1:25 8:40 2:27 9:37 3:25 10:30 4:18 11:18 5:06 ----- 5:51 12:21 6:32 1:00 7:11

07:05 07:05 07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:09 07:09 07:10 07:10 07:11 07:11 07:12 07:12 07:13

05:21 05:21 05:22 05:22 05:22 05:22 05:23 05:23 05:23 05:24 05:24 05:25 05:25 05:25 05:26

2:16p 2:05a 2:59p 3:09a 3:46p 4:15a 4:37p 5:23a 5:32p 6:30a 6:32p 7:34a 7:34p 8:34a 8:37p 9:28a 9:39p 10:17a 10:38p 11:00a 11:35p 11:40a NoMoon 12:16p 12:29a 12:51p 1:22a 1:25p 2:14a 1:58p

2:05 3:05 4:00 4:49 5:34 6:16 6:55

05:20 05:20 05:20 05:20 05:21 05:21 05:21 05:22 05:22 05:23 05:23 05:24 05:24 05:25

9:41p 10:27a 10:41p 11:09a 11:39p 11:48a NoMoon 12:23p 12:35a 12:56p 1:29a 1:29p 2:22a 2:02p

San Antonio 2016 Dec.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

12:51 7:04 1:38 7:52 2:27 8:41 3:18 9:33 4:14 10:30 5:15 11:30 6:19 12:04 7:23 1:09 8:26 2:12 9:24 3:12 10:18 4:06 11:07 4:56 11:52 5:41 12:12 6:23 12:51 7:02

1:18 2:05 2:55 3:48 4:45 5:46 6:49 7:52 8:53 9:50 10:42 11:30 ----12:33 1:13

7:31 8:19 9:09 10:03 11:00 ----12:34 1:37 2:39 3:37 4:30 5:19 6:03 6:44 7:23

07:16 07:17 07:17 07:18 07:19 07:19 07:20 07:21 07:21 07:22 07:22 07:23 07:23 07:24 07:24

05:35 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:37 05:37 05:38 05:38 05:39 05:39 05:40

2:29p 2:18a 3:12p 3:22a 3:59p 4:28a 4:50p 5:35a 5:46p 6:42a 6:46p 7:46a 7:48p 8:46a 8:51p 9:40a 9:52p 10:29a 10:51p 11:13a 11:48p 11:52a NoMoon 12:29p 12:42a 1:04p 1:35a 1:37p 2:26a 2:12p

Amarillo

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

1:05 7:18 1:52 8:05 2:40 8:54 3:32 9:47 4:28 10:43 5:29 11:44 6:32 12:17 7:36 1:22 8:39 2:25 9:38 3:25 10:32 4:20 11:21 5:10 ----- 5:55 12:25 6:36 1:05 7:15

1:31 2:19 3:09 4:01 4:58 5:59 7:02 8:05 9:06 10:03 10:56 11:44 12:06 12:47 1:26

7:44 8:33 9:23 10:16 11:14 ----12:47 1:51 2:53 3:51 4:44 5:32 6:16 6:58 7:37

07:44 07:45 07:45 07:46 07:47 07:47 07:48 07:49 07:49 07:50 07:50 07:51 07:51 07:52 07:52

05:34 05:34 05:34 05:34 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:37 05:37 05:38 05:38

2:40p 2:33a 3:21p 3:40a 4:05p 4:49a 4:54p 5:58a 5:49p 7:07a 6:48p 8:12a 7:51p 9:11a 8:55p 10:04a 9:59p 10:51a 11:00p 11:33a NoMoon 12:10p NoMoon 12:44p 12:55a 1:17p 1:50a 1:49p 2:44a 2:20p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Time 5:28 AM 6:10 AM 6:54 AM 12:28 AM 1:05 AM 1:45 AM 2:28 AM 3:12 AM 4:01 AM 1:03 AM 2:37 AM 4:00 AM 4:53 AM 5:31 AM 6:02 AM

Port O’Connor Height 0.1L -0.2L -0.5L 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L

Time 12:17 PM 1:20 PM 2:16 PM 7:39 AM 8:25 AM 9:12 AM 10:01 AM 10:50 AM 11:41 AM 5:03 AM 6:44 AM 8:58 AM 10:52 AM 12:20 PM 1:26 PM

Height 1.2H 1.4H 1.5H -0.8L -0.9L -1.0L -0.9L -0.8L -0.6L 1.0H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H

Time 5:26 PM 6:29 PM 7:25 PM 3:09 PM 4:00 PM 4:51 PM 5:44 PM 6:37 PM 7:32 PM 12:33 PM 1:30 PM 2:33 PM 3:45 PM 5:04 PM 6:16 PM

Height 0.6L 0.7L 0.9L 1.6H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H -0.3L 0.0L 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.7L

Time 1:21 PM 11:53 PM

Height 1.3H 1.4H

8:17 PM 9:06 PM 9:54 PM 10:47 PM 11:48 PM

0.9L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L

8:27 PM 9:18 PM 10:03 PM 10:41 PM 11:13 PM 11:41 PM

1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 5:36 AM 6:14 AM 6:55 AM 7:43 AM 12:38 AM 1:31 AM 2:34 AM 3:27 AM 12:51 AM 1:43 AM 2:28 AM 3:37 AM 5:09 AM 5:42 AM 6:06 AM

Height 0.1L -0.2L -0.5L -0.7L 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.0L 0.8L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L 0.0L

Time 12:39 PM 1:49 PM 2:54 PM 3:43 PM 8:38 AM 9:31 AM 10:19 AM 11:06 AM 4:11 AM 4:58 AM 7:43 AM 9:03 AM 10:34 AM 11:54 AM 1:02 PM

Height 1.3H 1.5H 1.7H 1.8H -0.8L -0.8L -0.8L -0.6L 1.2H 1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H

Time 5:40 PM 6:35 PM 7:33 PM 8:55 PM 4:27 PM 5:13 PM 6:06 PM 7:02 PM 11:55 AM 12:47 PM 1:35 PM 2:19 PM 3:12 PM 5:11 PM 6:11 PM

Height 0.9L 1.0L 1.1L 1.2L 1.9H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H -0.4L -0.2L 0.1L 0.3L 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L

Time 10:36 PM 11:16 PM 11:56 PM

Height 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H

9:59 PM 10:47 PM 11:43 PM

1.2L 1.1L 1.1L

7:48 PM 8:27 PM 9:03 PM 9:40 PM 10:18 PM 10:54 PM 11:14 PM

1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H

Height 0.3L 0.1L -0.1L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.2L 0.7L 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 0.2L 0.0L

Time 1:12 PM 2:35 PM 3:54 PM 4:49 PM 5:37 PM 6:31 PM 7:29 PM 8:19 PM 8:59 PM 5:24 AM 7:39 AM 9:23 AM 11:48 AM 1:23 PM 2:47 PM

Height 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H

Time 6:55 PM 8:05 PM 9:32 PM

Height 0.8L 0.9L 1.0L

Time 11:16 PM 11:35 PM 11:59 PM

Height 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 6:28 AM 6:53 AM 7:27 AM 8:10 AM 9:03 AM 9:59 AM 10:51 AM 11:41 AM 12:34 PM 3:09 AM 3:56 AM 4:46 AM 5:34 AM 6:13 AM 6:46 AM

1:37 2:40 3:47 5:18 6:35 7:35

0.0L 0.2L 0.4L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L

9:31 PM 9:56 PM 10:14 PM 10:30 PM 10:44 PM 10:33 PM

1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

Height 0.4L 0.1L -0.1L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L -0.6L -0.5L -0.3L 0.0L 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L

Time 12:05 PM 1:19 PM 2:23 PM 3:21 PM 4:18 PM 5:12 PM 6:04 PM 6:53 PM 7:37 PM 8:15 PM 6:07 AM 8:07 AM 10:13 AM 12:09 PM 1:28 PM

Height 1.3H 1.6H 1.8H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 1.9H 1.8H 1.7H 1.5H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 1.1H 1.2H

Time 5:44 PM 7:23 PM 8:49 PM

Height 0.9L 1.0L 1.1L

Time 10:54 PM 11:20 PM 11:45 PM

Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H

1:08 PM 2:17 PM 3:52 PM 5:37 PM 7:08 PM

0.2L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.0L

8:47 PM 9:14 PM 9:38 PM 10:01 PM 10:24 PM

1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H

Height 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 0.9L -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L -0.4L 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H

Time 9:48 AM 10:17 AM 10:50 AM 2:56 AM 9:27 PM 10:30 PM 11:27 PM

Height 0.2L -0.1L -0.2L 1.0H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H

Time 4:14 PM 5:54 PM 7:13 PM 11:29 AM

Height 0.8H 0.9H 1.1H -0.4L

Time 9:37 PM 11:01 PM

Height 0.7L 0.8L

8:22 PM

1.1H

3:40 PM 4:37 PM 5:35 PM 8:18 AM 8:52 AM 9:28 AM 10:03 AM

-0.3L -0.2L 0.0L 0.4L 0.2L 0.0L -0.1L

PM PM PM PM PM PM

Freeport Harbor Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Time 5:28 AM 5:58 AM 6:36 AM 7:18 AM 8:03 AM 8:51 AM 9:39 AM 10:29 AM 11:19 AM 12:11 PM 3:36 AM 4:08 AM 4:41 AM 5:14 AM 5:47 AM

Time 2:03 AM 2:17 AM 2:35 AM 12:16 AM 12:12 PM 1:00 PM 1:51 PM 2:44 PM 12:15 AM 12:51 AM 1:15 AM 1:25 AM 1:22 AM 1:21 AM 1:27 AM

Time 10:50 PM 10:36 PM 10:27 PM 10:42 PM 11:25 PM

Height 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H

12:22 PM 1:15 PM 2:05 PM 2:50 PM 3:25 PM 3:48 PM 3:46 PM 11:21 PM 10:34 PM

-0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.4H 0.4H

Time 12:44 AM 12:26 AM 12:23 AM 12:39 AM 1:11 AM 1:55 AM 2:45 AM 3:38 AM 4:31 AM 5:23 AM 6:13 AM 7:07 AM 12:13 AM 07:59 AM 08:43 AM

Height 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2H 0.1H 0.1H 0.1H 0.0L -0.1L

Time 9:11 AM 9:43 AM 10:25 AM 11:11 AM 12:00 PM 12:50 PM 1:39 PM 2:26 PM 3:07 PM 3:41 PM 4:06 PM 4:19 PM 4:16 PM 12:18 PM

Height 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0H

Height 0.3L 0.0L -0.3L -0.5L -0.7L -0.8L -0.8L -0.8L -0.6L -0.4L -0.1L 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L -0.1L

Time 12:39 PM 1:54 PM 2:56 PM 3:52 PM 4:44 PM 5:34 PM 6:21 PM 7:04 PM 7:42 PM 8:13 PM 8:39 PM 6:59 AM 9:50 AM 12:04 PM 1:30 PM

Height 0.5L 0.1L -0.3L -0.5L -0.7L -0.8L -0.8L -0.6L -0.4L -0.1L 0.2L 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L

Height 0.4H 0.1L 0.0L 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.0L 0.1L 0.4H 0.4H 0.2L 0.1L 0.4H

Time

11:42 PM

Time

Height

Time

Height

Time

Height

0.4H

Height

11:51 PM 3:32 PM

0.1H 0.0L

11:50 PM

0.1H

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Time 5:10 AM 5:42 AM 6:19 AM 7:01 AM 7:46 AM 8:33 AM 9:20 AM 10:08 AM 10:56 AM 11:45 AM 12:35 PM 3:41 AM 4:05 AM 4:36 AM 5:09 AM

Height 1.3H 1.6H 1.9H 2.0H 2.1H 2.0H 1.9H 1.7H 1.5H 1.3H 1.1H 0.6H 0.6H 0.8H 1.0H

Time 5:03 PM 6:54 PM

Height 1.1L 1.3L

Time 9:54 PM 9:53 PM

Height 1.4H 1.4H

1:30 2:37 4:09 6:08

0.1L 0.4L 0.7L 0.9L

8:58 9:11 9:16 9:05

1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

Time 12:25 PM 1:51 PM 3:00 PM 4:01 PM 4:57 PM 5:50 PM 6:38 PM 7:20 PM 7:54 PM 8:20 PM 8:40 PM 6:44 AM 9:42 AM 12:14 PM 1:54 PM

Height 1.3H 1.5H 1.6H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 0.9H 0.9H 1.1H 1.2H

Time 4:45 PM 6:41 PM

Height 1.1L 1.3L

Time 9:35 PM 9:25 PM

Height 1.3H 1.3H

1:21 2:17 3:31 5:20

0.5L 0.8L 1.0L 1.2L

8:54 9:03 9:05 8:55

1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H

Time 6:39 AM 11:47 PM 6:26 PM 9:28 AM 9:52 AM 0:21 AM 10:56 AM 11:52 AM 11:42 PM

Height 0.1L 0.4H 0.4H 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.4H

Time 11:35 PM

Height 0.4H

10:00 PM 7:29 PM

0.4L 0.5H

11:46 PM

0.4H

4:04 AM 5:23 AM 11:36 AM 3:03 PM 6:58 AM

0.3L 0.3L 0.3H 0.3H 0.1L

6:07 7:31 5:45 6:10 4:01

0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.3L 0.3H

PM PM PM PM

PM PM PM PM

South Padre Island

Rollover Pass Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Height 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L 0.8H 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.0L -0.1L

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Rockport

Time 8:11 AM 8:29 AM 9:02 AM 9:45 AM 10:34 AM 11:27 AM 12:19 AM 1:11 AM 1:48 AM 1:37 AM 12:57 AM 12:56 AM 12:49 AM 9:10 AM 8:41 AM

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Time 5:01 AM 5:33 AM 6:12 AM 6:55 AM 7:42 AM 8:29 AM 9:18 AM 10:07 AM 10:55 AM 11:43 AM 12:32 PM 3:36 AM 4:05 AM 4:40 AM 5:16 AM

PM PM PM PM

PM PM PM PM

East Matagorda

11:16 AM 3:28 PM

0.4H 0.4H

6:33 PM 7:32 PM

0.2L 0.4L

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Time 12:18 AM 7:09 AM 9:05 AM 12:13 AM 12:39 AM 1:03 AM 12:16 AM 12:26 AM 1:50 PM 2:15 PM 12:06 AM 12:28 AM 5:59 AM 6:29 AM 12:05 AM

AM AM PM PM PM

Time

Height

9:56 PM

0.4L

2:41 PM 3:15 PM 11:42 PM

0.1L 0.2L 0.4H

6:20 PM

0.3L

Texas Coast Tides

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23

Date Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22 Dec 23


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

Page 21

Sandhills galore in the Panhandle Lone Star Outdoor News The Texas Panhandle is teeming with cranes this season, and hunters are hitting the road to take advantage. Mike Lambert of Muddy Waters Outfitters is based in Wichita Falls, but has been heading more and more into the Panhandle this season. “We did well around Wichita Falls, but there aren’t as many birds as there has been in the past,” Lambert said. “But there are a bunch of cranes in the Panhandle.” Lambert’s crews put on the miles, running from Amarillo to Wichita Falls. “We hunt them all over the place,” he said. “There are new birds showing up closer to Wichita Falls now.“ Lambert often uses “stuffers” for decoys (actual taxidermied birds) but has been switching to full body decoys made by Deception Outdoors. “We have the stuffers, but we don’t tear the decoys up as much and they are working fine,” he said. The geese have arrived, and numbers are up each day. “They showed up a few weeks ago,” Lambert said. “They are arriving every day.” Greg Hodsdon normally guides duck hunters and fishermen out of Fulton, but took advantage of the split in the duck season to head west with a friend and hunt with Crooked Wing Outfitters out

BIG BIRDS: Sandhill cranes have poured into the Texas Panhandle, and hunters in the right spots with a good decoy spread are having no trouble reaching their 3-bird daily bag limit. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Please turn to page 23

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Page 22

December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on on Page Solution Page26 26

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SMG seeks international sales rep

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Across

ACROSS 4. A sunfish species 8. The reptile fearedspecies by quail hunters 4. A sunfish 10. A trout species 8. Thespecies reptile feared by quail hunters 11. A snapper 12. A sea 10.duck A trout species 13. Person who repairs the rifle 11.Texas A snapper species 17. South speckled trout limit 18. A favorite duck food 12. A sea duck 19. A diving duck 13. Person who repairs rifles 22. A riflescope manufacturer 17. South Texas troutfishing limit 23. Popular coastal passspeckled for flounder 24. These are off limits for hunters 18.pheasants A favorite duck food 28. Get deer tested at a check _______ 19. Aof diving duck 29. Location Texas pheasants 31. Person who prepares the mount 22. A riflescope manufacturer 33. The pheasant-hunting month in Texas 23. Popular coastal pass for flounder fishing 34. The white goose 35. WMA warthogs 24.with These pheasants are off-limits for hunters 28. Get deer tested at a check _______ 29. Location of Texas pheasants

Sportsman Manufacturing Group is seeking a qualified individual to represent its brands outside the U.S.

Intrepid Powerboats sold

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New PR agency for Zeiss Carl Zeiss Sports Optics signed Dunkin-Lewis, Inc. as its public relations agency to cover all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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LSONews.com

Down

1.DOWN Popular city for Texas goose hunters 2. 1. State that harvests the most Popular city for Texas goosemallards hunters 3. A good shooting rest State term that harvests the hunter most mallards 5. 2. Biblical for a skillful 6. 3. AnAelk organization good shooting rest 7. A quail hunter's friend 5. Biblical termthrough for a skillful 9. River running Austinhunter 12. 6. Fish often landed at Lake Texoma An elk organization 14. 7. Used in rod-making A quail hunter’s friend 15. Daily limit for bobwhites River running 16. 9. Tossing a jig intothrough nearbyAustin cover 18.12. Deer the Trans Pecos Fishinoften landed at Lake Texoma 20. A versatile fly Used in rod-making 21.14. The gentleman's bird 24.15. A crossbow Daily limit manufacturer for bobwhites 25. The crane species hunted in Texas Tossing a jig into nearby cover 26.16. Short bill on a crankbait 27.18. Preparing the Trans animal hide Deer in the Pecos 28.20. A good-sized crappie A versatile fly 30. Needed from feds to hunt ducks The way gentleman’s bird 32.21. Quiet to communicate between blinds

David Gillikin, a Dallas, Texas investor who was formerly a Cummins engine distributor, purchased Intrepid Powerboats of Largo, Florida.

Koola hires PR group Koola Buck, the inventor of the Koola Buck portable refrigeration system, named Hunter Outdoor Communications its public relations agency of record.

New VP at Ozonics Buddy Pilan was promoted to vice president of marketing at Ozonics.

Boating pioneer dies George M. Irvine Jr., a pioneer in fiberglass hull construction and a leader in the fabrication of hardtops and towers for sportfishing boats, died Nov. 13 of a heart attack at his home in Fort Lauderdale. He was 89.

New sales director PolyCase Ammunition, LLC named Jens Heider its new director of International Sales.

Bass Cat founder dead at 81 Ron Pierce, the founder of Bass Cat Boats, died on Dec. 2 in Mountain Home, Arkansas. Pierce also served as an Arkansas Game and Fish commissioner for 7 years and competed in 130 B.A.S.S. Tournaments between 1974-2008.

Conservation group changes name The Center for Coastal Conservation, an advocate for saltwater recreational anglers, has changed its name to the Center for Sportfishing Policy.

New marketing director at MDF Robert Weekes, former chief marketing officer for USA Shooting, will join the Mule Deer Foundation as its director of marketing and development.

Nightforce marketing hire Nightforce Optics, Inc., named Frederick Karl as strategic marketing manager.

Parker Bows sales manager Chip Wilson is the new regional sales manager for Parker Bows in Michigan and Ohio.

24. A crossbow manufacturer

31. Person who prepares the mount

25. The crane species hunted in Texas

33. The pheasant-hunting month in Texas

26. Short bill on a crankbait

34. The white goose

27. Preparing the animal hide

35. WMA with warthogs

28. A good-sized crappie 30. Needed from feds to hunt ducks 32. Quiet way to communicate between blinds

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Canned venison

Nature’s Calling

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

Vension, cut into cubes Salt Beef soup bone Water Brown deer chunks in water in a soup pot. Add a beef soup bone to give the broth some fat. Fill quart jars with meat chunks within 1 inch of lid. Add 1 tsp.

salt. Fill jar with enough broth to just cover meat. Pressurecook according to your cooker manufacturer’s recommendations or for 90 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure. —Missouri Department of Conservation

Striped bass with tarragon 4 to 6 fillets of striped 4 tbsps. butter 1 to 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 4 to 6 green onions, finely chopped 2 to 3 sprigs fresh parsley, finely chopped 1 tbsp. fresh tarragon leaves, chopped Salt and pepper to taste Juice of one lemon

minutes but do not brown. Season fish with salt and pepper; sauté gently in butter mixture for 2 to 4 minutes on each side depending upon thickness. Place fish on warm serving dish. Remove skillet with butter mixture from stove and allow to cool for 1 minute. Add lemon juice and reheat briefly and pour over fish. Extra tarragon or garlic can be added for taste.

In skillet, melt butter and add garlic, onion, parsley and tarragon. Simmer lightly 1 to 2

—North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission


LSONews.com

Crane Continued from page 21

December 9, 2016

Page 23

Sampling mule deer Continued from page 4

of Lubbock. “It was awesome, I bet we saw 10,000 cranes,” Hodsdon said. “The cotton is just being harvested and the farmers are turning over the peanut fields.” Hodsdon said the group hunted one day north of Lubbock and the second day they went south. “Evan (Botsford) has a good group of guys and they put us on the birds,” he said. “We shot a nine-man limit of cacklers (Canada geese) in no time and a six-man limit of cranes the next day in two hours.” While driving back to Port Aransas, Hodsdon marveled at the number of birds on the small playa lakes in the middle of agricultural fields. “They are all covered with birds,” he said. Scott Curtsinger with Longneck Outfitters also reported great crane action in the area. “It was nasty today (Dec. 3) but we whooped them good,” he said. Muddy Water Outfitters (940) 781-3129 Crooked Wing Outfitter (512) 217-6229 Longneck Outfitters (806) 789-5531

For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2016 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

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For home delivery subscriptions www.LSONews.com • (214) 361-2276

home pressuring them to come back. I chose to do this to make it as easy as I could on my hunters.” Calhoun was critical of the line passing through the county that included his ranch, but left out other ranches in the county. “If they take any part of one county, they should take the whole county, not just an arbitrary line,” he said. One of Calhoun’s neighbors is Bill Sibley of Sibley’s Last Chance Ranch. “Our family has been in this country for 116 years,” Sibley said. “Our ranch is one of the first ones to start sampling for CWD, we’ve been doing it for 15 years even though we are 150 miles from where they found the disease. Now, all of a sudden, they

changed the boundaries and we have to take everything to one of the check stations.” Taking a deer in for sampling is no easy feat. “To Van Horn, we have 40 miles of dirt road and it takes three hours,” Sibley said. “To Guadalupe Peak takes two hours if the roads are good. “We love being in the country, but it’s aggravating to have to go so far with each deer.” Although critical of the hardship of the surveillance, Calhoun was quick to compliment the agency and its employees. “It’s my experience that TPWD is the best agency in the western states — they do the best job,” he said. “But, this deal has caused a hardship on the hunter, number

one, and to a lesser extent, the rancher. The bottom line is it’s hard to do my other duties, I had to hire additional help.” Calhoun said one IN COMPLIANCE: Youth hunter Guy George shows his CWD receipt group of indicating he checked his animal in. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone three hunters Star Outdoor News called to canthe ranches and the little towns cel their hunt around here. once learning of the regulations. “My hope is this year we get “I talked them out of it, though, and they came and had enough samples that it’s a onea good time. But, if it continues, and-done proposition.” the hunters will just go to New Mexico,” he said. “It will impact


Page 24

December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

PRODUCTS WINTER REDFISH LINE: RIO Products has a new line for saltwater anglers who target Gulf reds in cooler weather. Because fishing in the Gulf during the winter can mean extremely short casts (due to low light and murky water) as well as fast, long casts to ranging bulls, this line compensates with its short, easy-loading head and thicker handling section. It also has a short, powerful front taper that has no problem turning over large mullet and baitfish patterns. Created with the company’s “XS” and “AgentX” technologies and built with a slick coating over a medium-stiff monofilament core, this line will not tangle in cooler conditions. Its gray head and orange running line allows anglers to easily find the perfect loading point of the line and it has welded loops on both ends for easy rigging. The Winter Redfish line comes in three sizes (WF8F, WF9F and WF10F) and costs about $90.

GHOST 415 REVENANT CROSSBOW: Barnett’s crossbow, which is built on a Carbonlite riser, is a nimble 7 pounds of power on a 20-inch axle-to-axle frame. This crossbow — like all models in the Ghost line series — has been updated with the company’s Bristle Retainer, which provides a solid and durable anchor that doesn’t get bent in the field like traditional exposed retention brackets. Other innovations include the Crosswire string and cable system and composite laminated limbs for power and efficiency as well as finger reminders and a pass-through foregrip for safe shooting. The crossbow comes with an illuminated scope, a rope-cocking device, a three-arrow quiver, and three Headhunter arrows. It sells for about $1,200.

>>

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SPORTZ CAMO TRUCK TENT 57 SERIES: Take Napier Truck Tents’ latest along on the next fishing or hunting trip. The tent assembles in the bed of a pickup truck to create a comfortable sleeping area — with more than 5 feet, 7 inches of headroom — for two adults. With a sewn-in floor and a rainfly, the tent will keep outdoorsmen warm and dry in stormy weather. Features include two side vents and two large windows with a middle divider for ventilation. Its rear access panel allows easy access to the truck’s cab for added convenience. A 4-foot by 4-foot awning, which fastens to the tailgate, will provide shade during the day. Available in Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity Camo, it costs about $270. (800) 567-2434 napieroutdoors.com

>>

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(800) 553-0838 rioproducts.com

ARCTIC HUNTER BOOTS: These women’s Muck boots from Girls with Guns Clothing offer performance and comfort. Built with a slip-resistant outsole for enhanced traction on tough terrain, the boots also feature an insulation package — to include a comfy fleece lining — that will keep feet warm down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit. The boots have an extended rubber exterior decorated in Mossy Oak Break Up Country Camo. Available in women’s whole sizes 5 to 11, the boots cost about $185.

ROAD FEEDER EXTENSION KIT: Texas Hunter Products’ bracket extends road feeders away from the vehicle and increases ground clearance. This little bit of extra space away from a hunter’s UTV, Jeep or truck will keep the feeder from getting dented or knocked around when the vehicle hits a bump in the road. Made from heavy-duty, powder-coated steel, the extension kit comes with a hitch pin. It costs about $120. (800) 969-3337 texashunterproducts.com

>>


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 9, 2016

Page 25

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING DISCOUNT WHITETAIL AND EXOTIC HUNTS In the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Whitetail,Fallow, Blackbuck, Axis, Red Deer, and other species. Trophy hunts, Budget hunts or Meat hunts. AlpineRanch2016@gmail.com  (972) 207-0996 NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996 TROPHY WHITETAIL HUNTS “May kill buck of lifetime “ $ 700 - 2 DAYS Wife or child 1/2 price South TX- Brackettville Web site www.b-jranch.com E-mail: Huntsbj@gmail.com (830) 563-2658

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SEEKING HUNTING PROPERTY Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is looking for hunting property to continue its mission of creating hunters for a lifetime by providing hunting experiences for those that have the passion but lack the opportunity. All hunting rights sought, house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276 WORLD CLASS RED STAGS $4,000-$26,000 90 Miles Southwest of Dallas (214) 616-6822 CLINTON, ARKANSAS 210 acres with house, cabin, Turkeys Deer, Hogs, Bears All offers welcome (501) 412-6621 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

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SALES POSITION ENTRY LEVEL SALES Lone Star Outdoor News is looking for an entry-level sales person for its growing advertising business. Position will be based in its Dallas office. Must have hunting and fishing experience. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM

VEHICLES HUNTING FOR TRUCKS? New Ford and used trucks below. 2014 Ford F-150 STX SuperCrew Cab 4x2 5.0L V8 Automatic, Running Boards Ingot Silver Metallic 14,768 Miles Stock # EKF18577 2013 Ford F-150 Lariat SuperCrew Cab 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost Automatic Leather Ingot Silver Metallic 18,493 Miles Stock #DKF93180 2014 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew Cab 4x4 3.5L V6 Ecoboost 4X4 Automatic Leather Color, Ingot Silver Metallic Interior, steel gray 20,795 Miles Stock #EKD03236

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December 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

DATEBOOK DECEMBER 9

Ducks Unlimited Stephen F. Austin Waterfowler Hunter Party Banita Creek Hall (Mill Room), Nacogdoches (936) 488-0512 ducks.org/texas

DECEMBER 13

Dallas Woods and Waters Club Annual Christmas Gathering Richardson Land & Cattle Steak House (214) 570-8700 dwwcc.org

DECEMBER 14

Houston Safari Club Holiday Party 612 Hadley Street, Houston (713) 623-8844 houstonsafariclub.org Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Family Fishing Fort Richardson State Park (940) 567-3506 tpwd.texas.gov

DECEMBER 15

Dallas Safari Club Christmas Party (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

DECEMBER 17

Houston Safari Club Waterfowl Hunt (713) 623-8844 houstonsafariclub.org Dallas Safari Club Conservation Society Upland Hunt (972) 980-9800 biggame.org Texas Dove Hunters Association Dove hunt and BBQ Bash Frio County (830) 444-2070 texasdovehunters.com

DECEMBER 27

Ducks Unlimited Woodlands Calendar Raffle The Woodlands (281) 259-9638 ducks.org/texas Ducks Unlimited Navasota Calendar Raffle Courtyard Marriott New Braunfels (936) 825-5600 ducks.org/texas

DECEMBER 29

Ducks Unlimited Conroe Calendar Raffle Conroe (936) 537–1561 ducks.org/texas

JANUARY 4

Weatherby Foundation International Hunting and Conservation Award Dinner Omni Dallas Hotel (866) 934.3976 weatherbyfoundation.com

Large specks Continued from page 1

Castillo checks what bait is jumping — shad or mullet — and the water clarity before determining his lure of choice. “If the clarity is good, I go with natural colors,” he said. “I don’t choose chartreuse for big fish. Last year, we caught seven fish over 29 inches and none of them were caught on a lure with a chartreuse tail.” Recently, he has been using the Homewrecker and the larger Down South lures. “The Homewrecker lure is white on top and clear with silver glitter on the bottom,” Castillo said. “We’ve had to throw up to 1/4-ounce jigheads because it’s been so windy.” At Port Mansfield, Capt. Joe Prado said the trout fishing has been good between cold fronts. “When the water warms up a little bit, it’s good,” the 22-year-old guide said. “The fish are sitting on the muddy bottoms where it’s a little warmer. When we get four or five days of warmer weather in a row, it’s better.” Prado has been wading in about 3 1/2 feet of water, throwing either soft plastics or Corkies. “We’re not throwing many top-waters now,

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4. A sunfish species [LONGEAR] 8. The reptile feared by quail hunters [RATTLER] 10. A trout species [BROOK] 11. A snapper species [MANGROVE] 12. A sea duck [SCOTER] 13. Person who repairs the rifle [GUNSMITH] 17. South Texas speckled trout limit [FIVE] 18. A favorite duck food [MILLET] 19. A diving duck [SCAUP] 22. A riflescope manufacturer [LEUPOLD] 23. Popular coastal pass for flounder fishing [ROLLOVER] 24. These pheasants are off limits for hunters [HENS] 28. Get deer tested at a check _______ [STATION] 29. Location of Texas pheasants [PANHANDLE] 31. Person who prepares the mount [TAXIDERMIST] 33. The pheasant-hunting month in Texas [DECEMBER] 34. The white goose [SNOW] 35. WMA with warthogs [CHAPARRAL]

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RIFLE AND HANDGUN SHOOTING ONE HOUR EAST OF DALLAS ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS

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20 CONCRETE BENCHES 100, 200 AND 300 YARD TARGETS

Capt. Javi Castillo (361) 815-4865 Capt. Joe Prado (956) 357-1301

Solution on Page 26

Dallas Safari Club Convention and Sporting Expo Dallas (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

Texas Gun and Knife Association Gun Show Abilene Civic Center texasgunandknifeshows.com

unless it really warms up,” he said. “You have to fish slow and twitch the lure right in front of the fish.” In Galveston bays, the tides had dropped somewhat to more normal levels, but water levels rose with the rains the first weekend of December. For those braving the elements, the trout were feeding, according to HotSauce and SkiffStiff on 2coolfishingforum. HotSauce paddled his kayak to a marsh drain and threw the brightest rig he could find. “Trout were feeding just a few feet from the freshwater surface,” he posted. “I learned that speckled trout don’t always prefer salinity over freshwater.” SkiffStiff found trout just before the weekend rains, using a rattling cork with limetruese Assassins. “I had two days of finding fish while ducking the winds,” he posted. “All were solid fish in the mid- to upper 20s.”

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Down

1. Popular city for Texas goose hunters [LUBBOCK] 2. State that harvests the most mallards [ARKANSAS] 3. A good shooting rest [BENCH] 5. Biblical term for a skillful hunter [NIMROD] 6. An elk organization [RMEF] 7. A quail hunter's friend [POINTER] 9. River running through Austin [COLORADO] 12. Fish often landed at Lake Texoma [STRIPER] 14. Used in rod-making [GRAPHITE] 15. Daily limit for bobwhites [FIFTEEN] 16. Tossing a jig into nearby cover [FLIPPING] 18. Deer in the Trans Pecos [MULEY] 20. A versatile fly [CLOUSER] 21. The gentleman's bird [BOBWHITE] 24. A crossbow manufacturer [HORTON] 25. The crane species hunted in Texas [SANDHILL] 26. Short bill on a crankbait [SQUARE] 27. Preparing the animal hide [TANNING] 28. A good-sized crappie [SLAB] 30. Needed from feds to hunt ducks [STAMP]

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December 9, 2016

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Page 27


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December 9, 2016

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December 9, 2016 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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