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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

December 8, 2017

Volume 14, Issue 8

Spearfishing monster yellowfin tuna By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Deer beer Two new brands feature deer-related themes

Adventurous divers have been spearfishing anything from red snapper to ling in the Gulf of Mexico for decades, but just recently 39-year-old Clay Likover took it to a new level when he speared a 229-pound yellowfin tuna while free-diving in about

100 feet of water. Generally, spear fishermen find a shrimper that’s culling, put on free-dive fins, a mask and snorkel, grab a spear gun and jump in the water. The only glitch is that with a load of bycatch being shoveled into the green Gulf of Mexico it’s a sure-fire thing that plenty of sharks will be in a feeding frenzy, along with an assortment of othFree divers seeking yellowfin tuna often deal with numerous sharks behind a culling Please turn to page 23 shrimp boat. Photo from Clay Likover.

Sniff, scrape, lick, repeat

By Julia Bunch

For Lone Star Outdoor News Hunting, one of the world’s oldest pastimes, often comes with a lot of reflection and storytelling — often fueled by a cold beer after the hunt. “Hunting is a time that you reflect on a lot of things in life. While you’re reflecting, having a beer to put you in the right mood, well that just goes hand-andhand,” said Booner Beck of Beck and Associates. Prudent beer brewers have realized that connection, and two Texas breweries have created deerthemed beers, perfect for enjoying after the hunt. Last September, Blanco craft brewery Real Ale Brewing Co. launched Axis IPA. “We looked at our portfolio, and we didn’t have a hop-forward IPA that embraced this new approach of having aromatic quality,” said Brad Farbstein, president of Real Ale. The beer is what Farbstein calls a Texan’s IPA because, unlike traditional India pale ales, Axis has a truffle fruit characteristic, making it a great beverage for those who do not necessarily love or know much about craft beer. “With each beer, we try to relate back to the area where we’re from,” Farbstein said. “We felt

Lone Star Outdoor News Bucks over much of Texas are rutting, and many hunters, especially in the Hill Country, feel the rut started a little earlier this season. According to wildlife biologist Macy Ledbetter, the buck will identify an overhanging branch or limb, paw the debris out of the way, eat or break off vegetation, wet the limb and rub the limb with his preorbital gland (by the buck’s eyes) and also between his antlers. Of course, he will then pee on the area and walk off. The timing of the full moon may be a part of the answer. Last year, the full moon was Dec. 12, while this year it was Dec. 3. Biologists say the rut timing is set by day length and other factors, but hunters feel the moon phase adjusts the pattern to some degree. Maybe next year can confirm their theory. The full moon will be Dec. 7, four days later than this year.

Please turn to page 13

Photo by Scott Hohensee.

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Hunting the Hagerman NWR Public drawn hunt worth the extra effort By Craig Nyhus

Hunters drawn to hunt on the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge are allowed to scout before they begin their hunts. Photo by Phil Lamb.

For archery hunters without family land, a ranch or lease, the drawn hunt at the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge offers a unique opportunity — if you’re lucky enough to be drawn.

Please turn to page 17

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10

HUNTING

Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12

Old archery club hit by Harvey (P. 4) Small lakes, big crappie (P. 8)

Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 16 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

Lone Star Outdoor News

“Friends of mine who are bowhunters told me about it,” said Phil Lamb, a Dallasite who works as the development director for the Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch. “The refuge runs the hunts, and it only costs $5 to apply.” Lamb said he was told it generally took three years to get drawn. “I was drawn on my third year,” he said. “I entered in May and was notified I was drawn in June.” Hagerman requires each drawn hunter pay

FISHING

Floods in two straight years.

Two Fannin County lakes worth the trip.

T. Boone’s ranch for sale (P. 6)

Jetties, flats producing reds (P. 9)

Mesa Vista Ranch listed for $250 million.

Fish schooling in shallows.


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December 8, 2017

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HUNTING

Ducks galore in first split

Early season duck hunts along the Texas coast were good for teal, gadwall and wigeon. Photo by Robert Sloan.

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Duck hunting is all about being in the right place at the right time, and that has certainly been the case so far this season. During the early part of the Texas season, some of the best hunts are in Central Texas on the big public lakes and rivers, but for many hunters this has not been the case during the first split. Hunters around Waco and Austin have seen the season get off to a slower start, but, in Southeast Texas and on over to the middle Texas coast around Port O’Connor and down to the Laguna Madre, the action has been good. One

notable hot spot has been on the Navasota River where hunters report good numbers of mallards, pintail and gadwall. “Our hunts have been way off the mark,” said Robert Mason, who hunts on the lakes and rivers of the Hill Country. “We just never got a good push of birds. On our best hunts we had a few mallards and a couple of pintails. We did get a pretty good push of teal for about a week, but they picked up and disappeared. Hopefully we’ll get a lot of ducks in for the second split.” Public duck hunts at the J.D. Murphree Wildlife Management Area in Port Arthur on the Upper Texas coast have been better

Old archery club bouncing back after Harvey By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News

HARVEY

After Hurricane Harvey, Craig Jameson got his first look at the Buffalo Field Archery Club in Northwest Houston inside a kayak. And this was two weeks afterward. His first thought? “It’s not as bad as last year,” said Jameson, the club president. The BFAC may be the oldest archery club in Texas. It and the Brazos County Archery Club were both founded in 1948. “We don’t know which of us was founded first,” said Chris Holley, BFAC’s membership director. “So, we both claim we’re the first.” Being barely above sea level, Houston has been prone to flooding since its settlement in the Please turn to page 7

than average. From Nov. 4–12, the hunters averaged 3.46 birds per person. During that time 748 hunters harvested 2,572 ducks, along with a few geese, according to Stephen McDowell with this WMA. The area attracts good numbers of teal and gadwall, and tends to get better throughout the season. Some of the variety of ducks harvested by hunters at the J.D. Murphree WMA included 874 gadwall, 731 green-winged teal, 395 blue-winged teal, 243 shoveler, 104 wigeon, 97 scaup, 68 pintail and 26 mottled ducks. On the middle coastal counties of Wharton and Matagorda, Todd Steele with the Thunderbird

midway through the first split 267 guns had harvested 1,466 birds for an average of 5.5 birds per hunter. Going into the second split, Steele anticipates a few problems due to drought conditions. “The ducks usually stop migrating towards the end of December,” he said. “The birds we have here will be moving up and down the coast. If you’ve got water and food, you’ll have ducks. But without fresh birds moving, the ducks will become wary of hunting pressure. That’s when they will look for protected areas.” The South Zone season reopens Dec. 9. In all zones, duck season runs until Jan. 28.

Pastor bags big Starr County buck By Tony Vindell

For Lone Star Outdoor News

The Buffalo Field Archery Club, in Houston, has suffered floods in two consecutive years. Photo from Chris Holley.

Hunting Club reported excellent hunts during the first split with a good migration of big ducks early in the season, that was followed up by lots of teal and swarms of pintail. “Hurricane Harvey actually helped us with all the rain,” said Steele. “All that rain was not good for a lot of people, but we managed to make the best of a bad situation and caught a lot of water in many of our ponds. That really helped us a lot by providing the ponds with the right amount of water and food.” During the second full week, Thunderbird hunters had plenty of birds and 83 hunters shot 487 birds for a 5.9 bird average. About

Every deer hunter dreams of bagging a while-tailed buck of a lifetime, and will probably keep that dream alive for as long as they hunt. But Enrique “Kike” Gonzalez, a 52-year-old pastor from Mission, took a different approach as he recently went to his blind believing God was on his side. A couple of hours later, he downed a 19-point buck that tipped the scale at about 200 pounds from his 200-acre ranch south of Delmita, a rural community in eastern Starr County

not known for producing trophies. The ranch has a game fence on two sides and a low fence on the other two. Yet, Gonzales saw the buck and Enrique “Kike” Gonzalez, a pastor in Mission, took this 19-point other deer he buck in eastern Starr County. Photo from Enrique Gonzales. had not seen before in the ward me,” Gonzalez said. “I put seven years he has been on the down my binoculars and saw lease. the big buck behind the others “I went hunting on Monday through my riflescope. I took (Nov. 20), and at about 5 p.m. my time and shot it.” I saw several bucks coming toHe said he couldn’t believe Please turn to page 15


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December 8, 2017

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Brazen poachers kill 20-point breeder buck By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

A monster breeder buck in the 330-inch range was poached from a high-fenced ranch in view of a highway near Brackettville this October. A buck that big would definitely garner some talk in hunting circles — which is exactly what game warden Blake Satterfield is counting on. Satterfield said the giant buck, with an estimated 20 antler points, had a habit of walking the fence line near the highway, which would have put him in view of lots of travelers along Highway 131. He and other game wardens in the area were keeping an eye on the buck after he was transferred to the Bucks and Ducks Ranch, which is about 20 miles from Brackettville in Kinney County. But when Hurricane Harvey struck Houston, wardens were called away to help. And that’s when the poachers struck. The buck was shot near the front gate sometime be- Poachers shot this breeder buck near tween Oct. 13-15. The poachers took the head and ant- the front gate of the Bucks and Ducks Ranch, and left with the head and lers, Satterfield said. Satterfield believes someone traveling the highway antlers. A reward is being offered for inmay have noticed the buck along the fence. A reward formation leading to a conviction. Photo from TPWD. for any information that leads to a conviction is being offered through Operation Game Thief. Restitution for the buck would be in the $80,000 to $90,000 range. Satterfield is encouraging the hunting community to contact him with tips and information at 830-719-3713.

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Dimmit County warden receives award Dimmit County-based Texas Game Warden Eugene Fernandez was named as Texas’ SEAFWA Officer of the Year. The Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies names one officer from each of its 15 participating states. Fernandez has served Dimmit County for nine years. A team player, he has filed four felony hunt without landowner consent cases this year, completed 90 youth programs and reached more than 2,000 local youth. He provided youth hunting opportunities on 20 occasions, allowing approximately 36 youth under the age of 17 to participate in outdoor hunting and fishing opportunities. He has also provided 25 Texas Parks and Wildlife Game Warden recruiting programs. —TPWD

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December 8, 2017

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For Lone Star Outdoor News Refuge hunters seek to get to faraway places to avoid the crowds. Often with no motorized vehicles allowed, they also have to keep it light. At the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Cameron County, hunters showed up by 5 a.m. to find their spot on the 90,000-acre preserve. On the bed of each pickup truck, equipment often built from scratch is readied to transport a bagged animal. Mountain bicycles, custom-made tripods smaller and lighter than the commercial ones and an array of carriers and carts were on display, some of which are either attached to the back of a bike or hand-pushed. “I made this myself,’” A.J. Halbar said after unloading a carrier. “I used pieces of electrical conduit and put a bolt to connect it to the wheel.” The San Antonio man and his brotherin-law, Shane Zoeller of Floresville, were among the first round of hunters picked for the first of three scheduled archery hunts. Halbar said they will ride on their bikes about 3 miles to find a place to settle in and will take it from there. If they get a deer, they will ride back, hook up the carrier and transport the animal toward the parked truck. But if they get a nilgai antelope, they will quarter it as they did last year during a rifle hunt at the refuge. Zoeller said they showed up late to let everybody else find their spots, and they would start hunting either in the afternoon or the next morning. Brady Miles of Brownsville said he prefers walking when hunting with a bow and arrow. “But I think I will bring a bike tomorrow,” he said. “I walked for a while today and did not see a thing, but what if I get something?” Halbar, Zoeller and Miles were three of a group of 210 hunters randomly selected for the first hunt.

Shane Zoeller, left, and A.J. Halbar prepare for a hunt at the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. They use bikes and other equipment to haul their gear in, and hopefully haul a deer out. Photos by Tony Vindell, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

“We don’t know how many of them showed up, though,” Marion Mason, a park ranger, said. “We have three archery and seven rifle hunts this season.” Mason said a hunter is allowed to take five white-tailed deer with no more than three bucks — something the refuge started doing last year to be in line with the state, compared with a two deer limit previously. They are also allowed to bag unlimited exotics like nilgai, feral hogs and a new kind of game. “We now have fallow deer in the refuge,” Mason said. “They have been spotted on some of our cameras.” Last season, hunters took 77 deer, 47 nilgai and six hogs during the 2016-17 season, compared to 66 deer, 49 nilgai and nine hogs the season before. As the first day of hunting showed signs of a slow start, Eliaberto Gutierrez of Pasadena pulled into the hunters check-in station with a 4–point buck. “I walked about 250 yards and saw two bucks,” he said. “I bagged the bigger of the two and dragged it all the way (to his Jeep).” Gutierrez said he likes walking and has a tree climber seat he uses to carry a deer behind his back.

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December 8, 2017

Archery club floods again Continued from page 4

mid-1800s. Somehow, the archery club dodged any long-term submersion, even at its original location in Memorial Park near Buffalo Bayou, said David Allen, field director. Since the mid-’80s, the club has sat inside Addicks Reservoir, built to hold flood waters. “Until the last couple of years, there was nothing major,” Allen said. “A couple of feet of water now and then. The last three floods, though, have been pretty mindboggling.” BFAC got slammed by two storms in 2016. The first was the so-called Tax Day Flood (April 19). Some areas of Houston got 15 inches of rain in 24 hours. Memorial Day brought another 12 inches. Unlike Harvey, both floods were unexpected and quickstriking. The back-to-back floods, as well as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to release water slowly from Addicks, led to the archery club being under water for more than five months. Targets weren’t all that was lost in the unexpected deluges. BFAC lost mowers and a 4-wheeler. “We had just about recovered from those when, lo and behold, Harvey set its sights on us,” Holley said. This time, given notice, the club was ready. “Anything that could sustain water damage was taken to a landscaping company about 10 miles away,” Jameson said. “It ended up surrounded by water, but nothing got inside.” Jameson and others tried to survey damage at the archery club mere days after a slow-moving Harvey inundated Houston with more than 50 inches of rain. The city of Houston, though, blocked the road leading to the club and left constables there. It was mid-September before Jameson and the club’s vice president, Derrick George, got an up-close view of the property. Jameson’s truck got the men just past the gate. A kayak took them the rest of the

way. “There were a lot of snakes,” Jameson said. “We basically stayed where the roads were. I remember we talked about it not being as bad as last year. Our target butts are concrete. Last year, about half of them floated out.” That doesn’t mean Harvey was benign. “There are benches and stuff we still haven’t found,” Jameson said. It was October before the water receded enough for club members to walk the property. Cleanup has gone slowly. Many members have had to deal with their own flooded homes. Plus, the club is exercising caution. As Holley noted, “Wet ground and trees don’t always get along.” An arborist has been hired to access which trees must come down. Jameson said it will be early next year before the BFAC resumes normal operation. Other organizations have helped out. West Houston Archery hosted some of the club’s scheduled 3-D tournaments; the Brazos County Archery Club opened its range to BFAC members free of charge; and Delta McKenzie sold the club 30 new targets at the manufacturer’s cost. A sense of humor has also helped. On its Facebook page, the club posted that its first contest after Harvey would be a bowfishing tournament. A supposed Harvey Anger Management Shoot was also listed. And a new name for the club was proposed: Buffalo Field and Stream Archery. “You have to accept what happens and keep on going forward,” Allen said. “Houston is called the Bayou City for a reason.” The club has broached securing a new location with Houston officials. Jameson, though, doesn’t see it happening. For the most part, club members can live with that. “When it’s up and running, the club is beautiful,” Jameson said. “You can go out on a Sunday morning and see deer, coyotes and bobcats. It’s basically a game preserve — a great escape in the middle of the city.”

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FISHING

Two little lakes produce big crappie

Fannin County is the home of two lakes, Coffee Mill and Davy Crockett; both are loaded with crappie, according to anglers and catch net surveys. Photo from Dan Bennett.

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

Anglers looking for a road less traveled to some outstanding crappie fishing might want to take a trip to the Caddo National Grassland in Fannin County. In a recent post on the Denison District of Inland Fisheries, two Fannin County lakes had strong crappie showings in a catch net survey. Coffee Mill Lake came up as the winner with 123 crappie in five nets, with Davy Crockett Lake coming in at 68. Garrett Sadler, who lives in the area, has fished the lakes since he was a kid. He was introduced to both fishing spots by his father and grandfather. Sadler mainly fishes Coffee Mill because Davy Crockett is on the small side. “Unless you know about Coffee Mill you won’t go — no cell service and in the middle of nowhere,” he said. Sadler said Coffee Mill is rarely crowded. His was the only boat on the water when he fished it about a month ago. He reeled in some 18 crappie in 4 hours, with 13 keepers. Most were between 10 and 12 inches and over a pound. He recommended using live, medium shad. “There’s a neck on the northwest side with some old trees. That is where I have had the best luck,” he said.

Waders, drifters finding trout By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Even with the up and down cycle of cold fronts backed up with warming trends, the trout bite continues to be good for both waders and drifters fishing a variety of lures. Galveston guide Tim Young has been fishing both Trinity and East Galveston bays and reports Trinity is best for drifting and East Bay is producing solid trout for waders fishing a combination of top-water plugs and soft plastics. “On Trinity Bay, I’m doing best by drifting and fishing slicks and clam shell reefs,” said Young. “We have a good trout bite under the birds on Trinity. The north end is typically good this time of year for fishing the birds.” Young’s larger trout are coming while wading in East Bay. “If you can get out on East Bay with a south wind and some mullet, that’s a combination that’s tough to beat,” he said. “Wading in those conditions can be really good, especially just before a front blows in.” Young has been fishing soft plastics under the birds and while drifting over shell. His go-to lures are jerk shad and swimming shad Z-Man jigs rigged on a 3/8-ounce head. He likes the heavier jig head for added distance and a quicker fall. His best colors are natural, bad shad and pinfish. His favorite top-water is a Bill Lewis StutterStep, a 1-ounce, 5-inch long paddletail lure that’s shaped like a banana. “I’ve been catching some pretty good trout on the SutterStep,” he said. “I can walk it, wag it or do a wobble wake. It’s got a crazy action that trout haven’t seen before. I like them in black/gold, chartreuse/ silver and shad.” In Port O’Connor, the trout bite has been some of the best of the year. Bill Panto has been wading flats along Matagorda Island for the past two weeks and reports excellent catches of trout in 4 to 5 feet of water. “I’m not doing anything fancy,” Panto said. “The key is finding trout over grass and sand on a moving tide. With the falling water temperatures, the water is very clear so the trout are not holding very shallow. The best bite has been with a little bit of wind to break up the water clarity.” Panto has had success with paddletails and swim baits, including the Yum Money Minnow in pearl/red. A 5-inch Assassin saltwater Die Dapper is good on the clear flats. He’s fishing them on a 1/8-ounce jig head for a slower fall. Best colors are pumpkinseed/chartreuse belly and chartreuse/ dog. On East Matagorda Bay, waders and drifters are picking up some good trout over shell just before a front moves through. Guide Charlie Paradoski said he’s using

Waders are finding good speckled trout fishing, using both top-water plugs and soft plastics. Photo by Robert Sloan.

5-inch Shad Assassins in a variety of colors over shell in 3 to 4 feet of water. He’s fishing the jigs on 1/4-ounce heads. “It’s hard to say which color is best,” Paradoski said. “I like to start out with space guppy or the opening night pattern. But fire tiger or morning glory have been catching some pretty good trout lately. Don’t forget to slow down your retrieve

just after a cold front. That’s when wading shell and fishing a black/chartreuse Fat Boy or a pink/silver Corky Devil can get some big bites.” Capt. Tim Young (281) 460-3872 Capt. Charlie Paradoski (713) 725-2401

Please turn to page 15

Bass pros’ off-season all business Buying, selling boat each year a process By Craig Lamb

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Getting a new boat each year may be a perk for bass pros, but preparing and eventually selling the boat can be a daunting task. Photo by Craig Lamb.

Now comes the off-season that follows nine months of nonstop travel and competition for tour pros. With a clean calendar how do they spend the down time? The answer is preparing for the next season. FLW Tour pro

Carl Jocumsen of Frisco was deep into the task during November. “Everyone thinks it’s awesome to get a new boat every year, but it’s also like running a business,” he said. “Multiply everything else it takes to get that business up and running and it’s practically a full-time job.” The Australian transplant arrived here seven years ago to begin chasing his dream. Jocumsen worked his way to the top, having competed two seasons

on the Bassmaster Elite Series. Over a dozen events already are on the 2018 calendar, including FLW Tour and Bassmaster Opens. The season begins in January for another nine-month cycle of tournaments, personal appearances and scouting the lakes. Success has added to the prep time. For the first-time Jocumsen will forego a trip home for the holidays. Sponsorship budgets came available sooner to meet earlier entry fee deposit Please turn to page 25


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December 8, 2017

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Redfish bite on flats, at jetties

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For Lone Star Outdoor News Winter begins Dec. 21, but many don’t notice since the temperature is not noticeably different on most days. It’s cool shortly after a front passes, then warms up rapidly, setting the stage for a good year-round fishery for redfish. Catches of reds are good on the Galveston bays, according to guide Allen Pereyra. “We basically have two ways of catching reds right now,” Pereyra said. “One is to fish fresh cut mullet at the jetties for bull reds. The other is to fish shallow for slot reds. Right now, we’ve got schools of slot reds roaming West Bay.” Pereyra expects the schools to continue for a few weeks. “The only thing wrong with that, is that reds running in schools can be difficult to catch at times,” he said. “I’ve had them swimming around the boat and not be able to get a bite. Then there are certain times when they will hit anything.” The guide is primarily drift-fishing with soft plastics and live shrimp. “We usually have a good supply of live shrimp through December,” Pereyra said. “If I have customers that like to use soft plastics, I’ll set up drifts where we have lots of mullet moving.” Both Assassins and Down South tails are good on the bays and in the bayous. “In clearing water, I’ve been doing best with plastics in chartreuse with a glow tail,” Pereyra said. “Clear/chartreuse is also good right now. In the darker, slightly sandy water, I’ll go with red/shad, margarita, LSU and root beer colors. In shallow water, I like to rig them with a 1/8-ounce jig head. But if I’ve got a little bit of depth with a strong current, a 1/4-ounce head is best for keeping the soft plastics on bottom.” Capt. Grady Deaton has been fishing the Lower Laguna Madre, Port Isabel and Padre Island flats for 43 years. He is currently drift-fishing in about 2 feet of water. As water temperatures cool, it’s easy to see reds in

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Red drum are being landed at the jetties, with most anglers using fresh mullet for bait. The shallow flats also are producing slot reds in Galveston bays. Photos by Robert Sloan.

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gin clear tides. “It’s not unusual to find reds on shallow flats during late fall and early winter,” Deaton said. “Fishing for reds is good yearround, unless we have a hard cold front move through. Drift-fishing is the best way to cover a lot of water when I’m after slot reds.” Deaton is using Assassins and Kwigglers rigged on 1/4- and 1/8-ounce jigheads. The heavier jigs are best when long casts are required and there is a strong current. He prefers a dark green tail. “I’ll have my customers working jigs under popping corks on most days,” he said. “But if a cold front moves through and the reds go deeper, it’s usually best to use cut baits like mullet and skipjack.” For the time being, lots of bull reds in the 20- to 35-pound class are being caught at the Sabine, Galveston and Port O’Connor jetties. One of the best baits you can use is a chunk of a fresh dead mullet. Some of the best catches are coming from the end of the north Galveston jetty and the boat cuts at the Sabine jetties. Capt. Grady Deaton Capt. Allen Pereyra

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Large snapper study funded A team of university and government scientists, selected by an review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The research team, made up of 21 scientists from 12 institutions of higher learning, a state agency and a federal agency, was awarded $9.5 million in federal funds for the project through a competitive research grant process. With matching funds from the universities, the project will total $12 million. “We’ve assembled some of the best red snapper scientists around for this study,” said Greg Stunz, the project leader and a professor at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. “There are lots of constituents who want an independent abundance estimate that will be anxiously awaiting our findings.” —MASGC

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Page 10

December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained to muddy upriver; 66 degrees; 4.72’ low. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and spoons. Crappie and bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on punch bait and live worms. AMISTAD: Water murky; 72–76 degrees; 24.20’ low. Black bass are good on blue/black and red/ black spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and striper jigs. White bass are fair on white spinner baits, jigging spoons and minnows. Catfish are good on liver and cheese bait over baited holes. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 57-66 degrees; 2.08’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 61-64 degrees; 0.92’ low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, weightless flukes and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. AUSTIN: Water stained; 57-66 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on chrome lipless crankbaits and Texas rigs. Sunfish are fair to good on cut nightcrawlers. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. BASTROP: Water stained; 71-75 degrees. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 2.57’ low. Black bass are good on dark soft plastics on the bottom. Hybrid striper are good on silver slabs. White bass are good on silver slabs. Crappie are good on minnows under lights at night in 30 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on hot dogs and dough bait. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with perch. BENBROOK: Water stained; 62-66 degrees; 3.76’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot worms, Texas-rigged worms and squarebilled crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Catfish are slow. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 62-65 degrees; 1.13’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, Texas-rigged craws and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. BONHAM: Water stained; 62-65 degrees; 1.48 low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Some fish being caught around docks and cattails on Texas-rigged plastics and jigs. Crappie are good on jigs over brush piles in 12-15 feet. Catfish are good along creek channel with punch bait and prepared bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Striped bass are good on green striper jigs and shad. Redfish are fair on shad, shrimp and silver spoons. Channel catfish are good on shrimp, liver and nightcrawlers. BRIDGEPORT: Water clear, 61-64 degrees: 3.22’ low. Black bass are fair on jerkbaits, squarebilled crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows on deeper docks. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 2.94’ low. Black bass are good on yellow spinner baits, craw-colored jigs, and craw-

colored crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good off lighted docks at night. Crappie are good on Li’l Fishies and tube jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on liver and dough bait over baited holes. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 72-76 degrees; 4.42’ low. Black bass are good on lipless crankbaits, pumpkin jigs and smoke/ red flake grubs in 4-12 feet. Striped bass are good on Spoiler Shads and jigging in 20-40 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live goldfish. CADDO: Water stained; 63-67 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are slow on weightless plastics and bladed jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. Redfish are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and shad. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 71-75 degrees; 3.34’ low. Black bass are good on lipless crankbaits and stick baits over flats in 5-15 feet. Striped bass are good on Spoiler Shads and Red Fins. Crappie are fair on minnows upriver. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on live bait. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 2.06’ low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, Texasrigged craws and finesse jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and minnows. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 71-75 degrees; 24.15’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon, pumpkinseed and tequila sunrise soft plastics and spinner baits in 10-20 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white/pink tube jigs. Drum are fair on live worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp, liver and stink bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 2.11’ low. Black bass are good on black/blue soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are good on blue tube jigs and live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and liver. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 90 degrees at the hot water discharge, 72 degrees in main lake; 0.89’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics, spinner baits, and crankbaits in 6-8 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines and drop lines baited with live perch in 8-10 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 71-75 degrees; 0.59’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are fair on stink bait and live bait. COOPER: Water stained; 74-79 degrees; 1.82’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature

baits, bladed jigs and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper and white bass are fair on slabs and minnows. EAGLE MOUNTAIN: Water lightly stained; 61-65 degrees; 1.37’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, squarebilled crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows, Catfish are fair on trotlines. FAIRFIELD: Water fairly clear. Black bass are fair on weightless plastics, small plastic swimbaits on jigheads and bladed jigs along shoreline vegetation. FALCON: Water murky; 73-77 degrees; 17.68’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse/black soft plastics and creature baits in 8-20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are very good on shrimp, cut bait and stink bait up the river. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon and tequila sunrise soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live bait. FORK: Water stained; 61-65 degrees; 1.31’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, bladed jigs, football jigs and Carolina-rigged worms. White and yellow bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water off-color; 55-64 degrees; 1.05’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, Texas rigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are good on watermelon red and watermelon gold soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 0.42’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits and spinner baits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. GRANGER: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 0.57’ high. Black bass are fair on green pumpkin soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. White bass are good on slabs and spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with shrimp. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 0.86’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, fish head spins and football jigs. White bass and hybrid bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: Water off-color; 48-57 degrees; 32.2 low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on marabou jigs and live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 65-69 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are fair on soft plastic worms and crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows in 25 feet. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-

color; 58-64 degrees; 2.83’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and live shiners. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 1.11’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged worms, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 61-65 degrees: 0.35’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, lipless crankbaits and bladed jigs. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 61–65 degrees: 2.94’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. LBJ: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are very good on buzzbaits and lipless crankbaits in 5-12 feet. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies and slabs. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. Crappie are good on live minnows over brush piles. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows under crappie docks. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 1.86’ low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, flipping jigs and Texas-rigged craws along rock and shallow cover. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 1.01’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are slow. Blue catfish are fair on perch and shad. MACKENZIE: 73.8’ low. Black bass are fair on shad crankbaits, spoons and Texas rigs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. No reports on crappie. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 83-88 degrees; 3.19’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, lipless crankbaits and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MEREDITH: Water fairly clear; 47-55 degrees; 47.59’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, suspending jerkbaits and live minnows. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 84-89 degrees; 0.21’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, soft plastic swimbaits and Texasrigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 56-65 degrees; 1.07’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and squarebilled crankbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 71-75 degrees; 1.73’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and soft plastic worms. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube

jigs. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. Blue catfish are fair on shad and perch. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 57-66 degrees; 37.33’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 5865 degrees; 10.43’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs and chrome/black lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 1.14’ low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, finesse jigs and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 58–65 degrees; 1’ low. Black bass are fair to good on lipless crankbaits, drop-shot rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and tail spinners. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water murky; 68-72 degrees; 2.67’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon and chartreuse soft plastic worms. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and jigging spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 61-65 degrees; 1.96’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, plastic swimbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 1.13’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, Texas-rigged craws and football jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and punch bait. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 60-65 degrees; 2.45’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, Texasrigged worms and spinner baits. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and rod and reel. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 69-73 degrees; 2.12’ low. Black bass are good on tequila sunrise soft plastic worms, spinner baits, and crankbaits, and on watermelon/red top-waters in 20-30 feet. White bass are good on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Bream are fair on worms. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 69-73 degrees; 0.09’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on silver spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and shrimp. SPENCE: 50.65’ low. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. STAMFORD: Water stained; 54-65 degrees; 0.31’ low.

n Saltwater reports Page 11 Black bass are fair on Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and live minnows. White bass are fair on live bait and Little Georges. Blue catfish are fair on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 7175 degrees; 2.69’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows, hot dogs, and nightcrawlers. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 61-65 degrees; 1.13’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, Texas-rigged craws and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 60-64 degrees; 1.46’ high. Black bass are good on suspending jerkbaits, square-billed crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs on docks and brush piles. Striped bass are good on slabs and minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 4.61’ low. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Bream are good on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 70-74 degrees; 11.35’ low. Black bass are good on crawfish crankbaits, watermelon worms and jigs. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on white jigging spoons and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are slow. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live bait and cut bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live bait. WEATHERFORD: Water lightly stained; 61-64 degrees; 2.02’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged worms, shaky-head worms and spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs on docks. Catfish are good on trotlines. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 53-63 degrees; 21.16’ low. Black bass are slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on cheese bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 71-75 degrees; 4.54’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed lipless crankbaits, spinner baits, and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver/chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on pet spoons, slabs and hellbenders. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on liver and nightcrawlers. —TPWD


LSONews.com

Blue and channel cat action heats up

Cooler water temperatures mean a hot catfish bite in many Texas reservoirs. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez For Lone Star Outdoor News

Fishing guides are reporting good numbers of catfish across Texas as the weather turns cooler. On a Sunday trip to Lake Lavon in November, fishing guide Doug “Tex” Elliott said the fishing started out slow but picked up later in the day. His party ended up catching 10 good-sized blue cats in 1.5 hours. Elliott releases any fish over 10 pounds to help maintain the breeding population. His Lavon trips have seen success using shad while drifting in deep water where radar shows cats holding at 12-15 feet. However, he expects the fishing to only get better. This time of year, it’s possible to catch 30 to 40 fish a day, with some weighing up to 40 pounds, he said. “During the winter, shad are moving deep — that’s when they really start beefing up,” Elliott said. Lake Tawakoni, which he also fishes, will start cranking up with plenty of big cats come winter. December, January and February are prime catfish months on North Texas lakes. “The fish get a little more aggressive this time of year,” he added. In the Southwest, the catfish are active as well. Lake Amistad guide Capt. Bryan Estes said channel cats have been biting in 10 to 30 feet of water on cheese bait, corks and nightcrawlers. Most of the cats have weighed between 2-4 pounds. Estes said that there are plenty of blue cats lurking in Amistad as well. A 20-pounder caught on a rod and reel set a lake record this year. To the east, Lake Conroe catfish guide Capt. Butch Terpe reported catching 40 cats in four hours at the end of November, most of which were channel cats ranging up to 4 pounds. He fished in 20 feet of water at the edge of drop-offs, using dip bait on treble hooks and sponge hooks. Cats are also biting off creek channels and under bridges on the lake. Chicken livers, cut bait and nightcrawlers are triedand-true baits for cats. “You don’t have to use a depth finder,” he said, adding chumming the water with milo will do the trick. “This has been a good year compared to the last 10,” he said, adding that the muddy water left in the wake of Hurricane Harvey has been great for catfish. Blues are also making an Please turn to page 14

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 8, 2017

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATERFISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under the birds when the wind allows. Redfish are good in the marsh on plastics tipped with shrimp. SOUTH SABINE: Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Trout are good for waders working slow-sinkers on the Louisiana shoreline. Trout are good on the south end of the lake under birds. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on soft plastics and plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass.

TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for drifters working birds and shrimp. Redfish are good at the spillway on crabs and mullet. Trout are good over deep shell and shad. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on top-waters and soft plastics. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good in the mud and shell on MirrOlures and Corkies for waders. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs.

TEXAS CITY: Sand trout and croaker are good from the piers on fresh shrimp. Redfish are good in the holes in Moses Lake. Flounder are fair on shrimp and mullet along the edge of the channel. FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs. Redfish and black drum are fair to good in Cold Pass and San Luis pass on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on Bass Assassins, Down South Lures and Gamblers over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. Flounder are fair on Brown Cedar Flats on jigs tipped with shrimp. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Redfish are good in the holes on the north shoreline. Trout are fair on shell on soft plastics. Flounder are fair to good on soft plastics over muddy bottoms near the Intracoastal. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair to good on Corkies over soft mud in waist-deep water in San Antonio Bay. Trout are good over reefs on live shrimp. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes and the mouths of drains with live shrimp. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair on the edge of the channel on glow DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish are fair to good in the holes along the Estes Flats on mullet and shrimp. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good on the East Flats on scented plastics and mullet. Sand trout are good on shrimp in the channel. Flounder are fair on scented plastics on the edge of the Intracoastal.

CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are good in the Humble Channel on crabs and table shrimp. Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on live shrimp and DOA Shrimp. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good in mud and grass on Corkies and MirrOlures. Redfish are good in the Land Cut and on the edge of the channel on shrimp and scented plastics.

PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are fair to good on DOA Shrimp under a popping cork around grass holes. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on top-waters and plastics under rattling corks. SOUTH PADRE: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish, black drum and mangrove snapper are fair to good in the channel on shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout are good over mud bottoms along channel drop-offs on scented plastics and shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in the guts on the flats on scented plastics and live shrimp.

—TPWD


Page 12

December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER FATHER HELPS SON, BOTH PAY THE PRICE While checking deer camps, Crockett County game wardens entered a camp with several vehicles, but no people present. The wardens found two fresh deer carcasses killed by the same individual a day apart. One of the two deer was tagged incorrectly. Knowing the occupants of the camp were likely out hunting, a warden returned to the camp the next morning and encountered a hunter at the gate leaving the property. The hunter said he had to go get ice and a hunting license. He claimed he had not yet been hunting, even though he had been in camp for three days. At the camp, there were two men cleaning a freshly killed, but untagged, whitetailed deer. He began questioning the hunters about the two deer that were tagged differently; one correctly and one incorrectly. The hunter, whose license tags were on both deer, began making excuses and telling contradictory stories. The warden suspected the hunter who left to buy a license had killed the second deer and used a tag off of his father’s license. He asked the father to provide a handwriting sample. After comparison, he determined that only one of the tags was completed by the father, yet his name was on both of the tags. The father admitted that his 27-yearold son had killed a deer without a license, and he had given his son a deer tag from his license. The son returned to camp after his father had confessed. Appropriate cases were filed and the deer were seized and donated to area residents.

ROAD HUNTERS RUN BACK ACROSS STATE LINE A vehicle shining a light from a county road coming from Oklahoma into Texas was observed by a Wheeler County game warden. After the vehicle passed, the warden followed and heard two shots fired. The warden stopped the vehicle and separated the two female occupants. The females claimed no knowledge of any weapons or shooting from the road. A rifle was retrieved from the back seat with a spent cartridge still in the chamber as well as ammunition, two cans of beer, a head lamp with the red light still on and a cell phone with a text that

LICENSE NEEDS TO COME BEFORE THE SHOT At a hunting camp, a Mitchell County game warden observed an untagged spike buck in the bed of a pickup truck. After a brief interview, the subject revealed he killed the buck that morning but had not obtained a current hunting license. Appropriate charges and civil restitution have been filed. WARDEN HELPS FIND DOWNED BUCK, THEN WRITES TICKET Two trucks were parked along the roadway at Army Corps of Engineers’ public hunting land. A Morris County game warden spoke to one hunter preparing to go into the woods. The hunter said he had a buddy who just shot a deer and was not able to locate it after the shot. The warden assisted the two hunters in locating the wounded deer. Unfortunately, the buck’s inside spread was under the 13-inch antler restriction. Citations were issued.

read “Cop got us.” Adamantly denying any involvement in the shooting, the two stuck with their story of being the only two occupants of the vehicle. After further investigation, it was found that two other subjects had gotten out at some point and made the 1-mile trek back into Oklahoma. Charges of hunting from a vehicle were filed on both females and the passenger also received a public intoxication citation. The warden is working with Oklahoma Game Wardens for possible illegal hunting from the same group near the state line.

BUSY WEEKEND FOR WARDENS Houston County game wardens issued nearly 40 tickets and warnings and seized five deer the first several days of the general season for illegal bucks, improperly tagged deer, untagged deer, trespassing, harvest log violations, road/night hunting and various other violations. STARTING DUCK SEASON TOO EARLY Houston County game wardens cited an individual for hunting ducks in closed season. The man had the cleaned duck hidden in an ice chest under his groceries. The case is pending. DEER DECOY SHOT, SHOOTER FLEES A deer decoy was placed In Sabine County at night. While wardens waited, a white SUV slow-rolled to a complete stop and the driver took a shot at the decoy. Once the driver realized the deer was fake, he drove off. One warden jumped out and ran toward the vehicle yelling “Texas Game Warden” and

“Stop.” The vehicle accelerated away from him. Wardens pursued, and area police officers located the vehicle on a dead-end county road. One male and one female were detained. A single-shot .223 caliber rifle was in the back floorboard with a spent shell casing still in the rifle. The female passenger was cited and released to her mother. The male driver was arrested for evading detention and arrest with a motor vehicle, hunting deer at night, hunting deer with a light and hunting from a vehicle. SPOTLIGHTERS REPORTED, CAUGHT A report of night hunting was received by Trinity County game wardens. The witness said her neighbors had left at about 11:00 p.m. and shined her pasture on the way out. It had been raining all day so the wardens started from the neighborhood and followed the tire tracks down a dirt road about 5 miles. The wardens caught up to the vehicle and made a traffic stop.

Four guns and a spotlight were secured and the two individuals admitted to hunting for white-tailed deer from the public road. The individuals also admitted to shooting at a doe. Neither individual had a hunting license. Multiple citations were issued. WARDEN WAS A GOOD LISTENER A hunter on a Trinity County deer lease heard .22 shots that he felt were coming from the lease. No hunters were in the field at the time. A Trinity County game warden did not hear .22 shots but did hear a shot about a mile away right at dark. The warden walked into the camp after dark and watched a truck drive out into a field and pick up a deer. By time the hunters could return to camp, the warden was waiting. The buck was an illegal buck with a spread of 10 1/2 inches. Multiple citations were issued as well as civil restitution. NO LICENSE, NO DEER A resident called a Karnes County game warden notifying that a person killed a white-tailed buck and was not planning on tagging the deer. The warden found a photo of the deer on Facebook and learned the individual did not have a valid hunting license. The shooter claimed he had a license and tagged the deer until he learned the warden had already checked on him. The 10-point buck was seized.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263


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Beer for deer hunters Continued from page 1

like Axis is great symbolism because with the predominance of axis deer in the Hill Country, they’re still kind of exotic, and we felt like our IPA is exotic as well.” Since Real Ale released Axis IPA, it has quickly become its second most popular beer, trailing only the well-known Firemans #4 blonde ale. This fall, Real Ale made Axis available in cans. “Our customers were separately asking us to package the beers, and we wanted them to be able to drink at the ranch or on the lake,” Farbstein said. In addition to its availability at Real Ale Brewing Co., Axis can be found at many Texas grocery stores and liquor stores, including H-E-B, Twin Liquors and Total Wine.

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Beck, though still in the early stages, has encapsulated that desire to have a cold drink after hunting into a business model. Beck approached his friend Max Schleder, president and owner of Oasis Texas Brewing Co. in Austin, with an idea. Booner is a family name for Beck, as well as a nickname for a trophy harvest. Oasis will package the first batch of the beer, called Booner 16 Point Lager, within the next month. Beck says a website is forthcoming, as is a distribution plan for getting the beer in stores. “We brew session beers, which are lower alcohol by volume,” Schleder said. “We think this beer is a home run, and it will certainly match the flavor profile of the average deer hunter.”

December 8, 2017

Page 13

Guadalupe River fishing leases open The Canyon Reservoir Tailrace, located below Canyon Reservoir on the Guadalupe River, is considered one of the top trout fishing destinations in the United States. To help anglers access the river this winter, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has leased four access areas from private landowners starting the first week of December. From Dec. 1 through March 9, 2018, the “no fee” leases give anglers the opportunity for bank and wade-fishing — as well as put-in and take out areas for kayaks and paddling equipment — in four locations: Camp Huaco Springs: This location provides approximately 0.5 miles of bank access along alternating pools and riffles. The bank is gently sloped and rocky. Anglers can wade-fish both upstream and downstream, or fish from the bank. There is a low-water dam at the upper end of the property and a deep pool at the lower end. This site will be closed to public access Feb. 23-25, 2018 due a large children’s fishing event that will be held at the site. Whitewater Sports: This location provides 500 feet of bank access upstream of the 306 bridge crossing along the east side of the river.

The bank is rocky and lined with cypress trees. A deep pool is located just above the bridge. Anglers can wade-fish both upstream and downstream. Rio Guadalupe Resort: This location provides 950 feet of bank access upstream of fourth bridge crossing on River Road along the west side of the river. Anglers can wade-fish both upstream and downstream. Free access at this site is subject to a 10-vehicle limit. After the vehicle limit is met anglers can still access the site for a daily fee. Mountain Breeze Campground: This location provides approximately 1,000 feet of bank access along a deep pool. The bank is steeply sloped and stairs offer access to the water for wading. The Canyon Reservoir Tailrace will be stocked with thousands of rainbow trout each week from early December through late January. Access to all public access sites is open from 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset each day for angling from the banks and launching non-motorized boats, canoes, kayaks, or other floatable devices for the purpose of fishing. —TPWD


Page 14

December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Cold-water cats Continued from page 11

appearance at Conroe, with one 30-pounder being caught this year. His clients have taken blues up to 10 pounds in the last couple of months, Terpe said. Anglers should fish for blues at night to increase their chances of success. Using a trotline with cutbait or shad is great for attracting blues, he added. “I’m seeing lots of people targeting cats with cooler weather,” he said. “They’re easier to catch.” Doug Elliott Bryan Estes Butch Terpe

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December 8, 2017

Page 15

Little-known, but plenty of crappie Continued from page 8

Todd Robinson, a fish and wildlife technician for the Denison District, said the fish surveys at both lakes produced black and white crappie weighing up to 2 pounds and topping out at 15 inches. Dan Bennett, a biologist and district supervisor, said the two lakes are blessed with good habitat and consistent water levels which cultivated a thriving crappie population. Vegetation is maintained by a dependable water supply, which is important in the survival of young fish. “That just provides a lot of protection for the young crappie,” he said. In November, the crappie were holding in shallow water anywhere between 5-8 feet deep on both lakes. Most anglers throw crappie minnows and jigs to weeds at Coffee Mill, Bennett said. The watersheds are large for the relatively small lakes and full of nutrients that help support shad, a precursor to the development of a robust crappie population. So it’s no surprise that Coffee Mill continues to live up to its billing as a top Texas destination for the popular panfish. Sure, it’s remote, but that means little to no fishing pressure this time of year. Most people bypass the lake for bigger ones, leaving it mainly fished by locals. Bennett said anglers are more likely to hit the larger lakes that are closer to home until spring, when more anglers venture out to Fannin County.

Pastor’s big buck Continued from page 4

his eyes when he saw the buck, whose 19 points included a drop tine coming off the side of the left horn. Gonzalez went to get his pickup but couldn’t lift the heavy deer. He then went to the side of the usually isolated road and waved at a driver who stopped and helped him put the deer on the truck’s bed. The pastor said he did not think about taking the buck to a taxidermist, but took the advice of some friends who told him the buck was a trophy for the wall. A relatively new hunter, Gonzalez said he had seen the buck a couple of weeks earlier, but did not shoot it thinking his new gun — a .308 Ruger — wasn’t sighted for longer distances. “The deer was so much in my head and I even used it in a couple of sermons at the church,” he said. “I told the congregation I was about to go crazy but, at the time, I said some things happen for a reason.” Gonzalez, who also manages an apartment complex and has a lawn service business, went back to the lease alone on Nov. 20, hunted in the morning and took a three-hour nap in a camp trailer. “I went back to the blind believing God was on my side this time,” he said of his evening hunt. “I felt it in my heart I knew I was going to go home with something. I saw several bucks and the big one behind them. I was nervous, it was starting to get a little dark when I took the shot.” Gonzalez said he has taken a few bucks on the lease but nothing like the buck he shot and has not stopped talking about it. The ranch where Gonzalez hunts is nowhere near the socalled Texas Golden Triangle for deer hunting, or the area from Eagle Pass to Cotulla to Laredo, although some trophies have been taken in the northern parts of Starr County. But the 19-point buck he took so far this season will be one to remember for years to come.

For: Lone Star Outdoor News

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Due: 8/25/17

8/24/17 3:18 PM


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December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Last

New

First

Full

Dec 10

Dec 18

Dec 26

Jan 1

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

08 Fri 09 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu 15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri

08 Fri 09 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu

9:50 10:48 11:39 12:01 12:43 1:23 2:02

15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri

9:45 3:31 10:42 4:29 11:33 5:21 ----- 6:07 12:38 6:49 1:17 7:28 1:56 8:07 2:35 8:47 3:17 9:28 4:01 10:12 4:47 10:59 5:37 11:21 6:28 12:16 7:20 1:08 8:12 2:01

10:12 3:58 11:08 4:55 11:57 5:45 12:18 6:30 1:00 7:11 1:39 7:50 2:18 8:29 2:58 9:09 3:40 9:51 4:24 10:36 5:11 11:23 6:01 ----6:52 12:40 7:44 1:32 8:35 2:24

07:04 07:05 07:05 07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:09 07:09 07:10 07:10 07:11 07:11 07:12 07:12

05:21 05:21 05:21 05:21 05:22 05:22 05:22 05:23 05:23 05:23 05:24 05:24 05:24 05:25 05:25

11:06p 11:38a NoMoon 12:20p 12:07a 12:59p 1:05a 1:35p 2:01a 2:09p 2:56a 2:43p 3:50a 3:18p 4:43a 3:55p 5:36a 4:35p 6:28a 5:17p 7:19a 6:03p 8:07a 6:52p 8:53a 7:42p 9:37a 8:35p 10:17a 9:28p

3:37 4:35 5:26 6:13 6:55 7:34 8:13

10:18 11:13 ----12:24 1:06 1:45 2:24

4:04 5:00 5:51 6:36 7:17 7:56 8:35

07:17 07:17 07:18 07:19 07:19 07:20 07:21

2:41 8:53

3:04

9:15

07:21 05:21 4:53a

3:57p

3:23 4:07 4:53 5:43 6:34 7:26 8:18

3:46 4:30 5:17 6:07 6:58 7:49 8:41

9:57 10:42 11:29 ----12:46 1:38 2:30

07:22 07:23 07:23 07:24 07:24 07:25 07:25

4:36p 5:18p 6:03p 6:52p 7:43p 8:36p 9:30p

9:34 10:18 11:05 11:27 12:22 1:14 2:06

05:20 05:20 05:20 05:20 05:20 05:21 05:21 05:22 05:22 05:22 05:23 05:23 05:23 05:24

11:08p 11:47a NoMoon 12:29p 12:11a 1:06p 1:10a 1:41p 2:08a 2:14p 3:04a 2:47p 3:59a 3:21p 5:47a 6:40a 7:31a 8:19a 9:05a 9:48a 10:28a

San Antonio 2017 Dec

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

08 Fri 09 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu 15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri

9:57 3:43 10:54 4:41 11:45 5:33 12:08 6:19 12:50 7:01 1:30 7:41 2:09 8:20 2:48 8:59 3:29 9:41 4:13 10:25 5:00 11:12 5:49 11:33 6:40 12:28 7:32 1:21 8:25 2:13

10:25 11:20 ----12:31 1:12 1:52 2:31 3:11 3:52 4:37 5:24 6:13 7:04 7:56 8:48

4:11 5:07 5:57 6:42 7:24 8:03 8:42 9:22 10:04 10:49 11:36 12:01 12:52 1:44 2:36

07:15 07:16 07:17 07:17 07:18 07:19 07:19 07:20 07:20 07:21 07:22 07:22 07:23 07:23 07:24

05:34 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:37 05:37 05:38 05:38 05:38 05:39

11:19p 11:50a NoMoon 12:32p 12:20a 1:11p 1:18a 1:47p 2:14a 2:22p 3:08a 2:56p 4:02a 3:32p 4:55a 4:09p 5:48a 4:49p 6:40a 5:31p 7:31a 6:17p 8:19a 7:05p 9:05a 7:56p 9:49a 8:49p 10:29a 9:42p

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Dec Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

08 Fri 09 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu 15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri

10:11 3:57 11:08 4:55 11:59 5:47 12:21 6:33 1:04 7:15 1:43 7:54 2:22 8:33 3:01 9:13 3:43 9:54 4:27 10:38 5:13 11:25 6:03 11:47 6:54 12:42 7:46 1:34 8:38 2:26

10:38 11:33 ----12:44 1:26 2:05 2:44 3:24 4:06 4:50 5:37 6:27 7:18 8:10 9:01

4:24 5:21 6:11 6:56 7:37 8:16 8:55 9:35 10:17 11:02 11:49 12:15 1:06 1:58 2:50

07:43 07:44 07:44 07:45 07:46 07:47 07:47 07:48 07:49 07:49 07:50 07:50 07:51 07:51 07:52

05:34 05:34 05:34 05:34 05:34 05:34 05:35 05:35 05:35 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:37 05:37 05:38

11:26p 12:12p NoMoon 12:52p 12:30a 1:28p 1:31a 2:01p 2:29a 2:33p 3:26a 3:05p 4:22a 3:39p 5:18a 4:14p 6:12a 4:52p 7:06a 5:33p 7:57a 6:18p 8:46a 7:07p 9:31a 7:59p 10:13a 8:52p 10:52a 9:47p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 1:26 AM 3:07 AM 4:27 AM 5:19 AM 5:59 AM 6:33 AM 12:19 AM 12:42 AM 12:59 AM 1:11 AM 1:20 AM 1:31 AM 1:49 AM 2:12 AM 2:39 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 0.4L 0.2L 0.0L 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H

Time 5:06 AM 7:07 AM 9:29 AM 11:18 AM 12:41 PM 1:46 PM 7:05 AM 7:35 AM 8:05 AM 8:37 AM 9:09 AM 9:44 AM 10:20 AM 10:57 AM 11:37 AM

Time 1:01 PM 2:05 PM 3:16 PM 4:32 PM 5:47 PM 6:53 PM 2:38 PM 3:22 PM 4:00 PM 4:34 PM 5:06 PM 5:40 PM 6:17 PM 6:58 PM 7:42 PM

Height -0.3L 0.0L 0.2L 0.5L 0.6L 0.8L 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H

Time 9:01 PM 9:55 PM 10:41 PM 11:19 PM 11:51 PM

Height 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H

7:47 PM 8:28 PM 8:58 PM 9:22 PM 9:47 PM 10:18 PM 10:59 PM 11:53 PM

0.9L 0.9L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L

Time 12:54 PM 2:02 PM 3:21 PM 5:01 PM 6:21 PM 7:21 PM 2:56 PM 3:44 PM 4:24 PM 4:59 PM 5:34 PM 6:12 PM 10:25 AM

Height -0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.7L 0.8L 1.0L 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H -0.4L

Time 9:17 PM 10:01 PM 10:41 PM 11:17 PM 11:48 PM

Height 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H

8:22 PM 9:31 PM 10:25 PM 11:03 PM 11:37 PM

1.1L 1.1L 1.2L 1.2L 1.2L

6:55 PM

1.5H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 2:56 AM 4:02 AM 4:58 AM 5:40 AM 6:15 AM 6:46 AM 12:13 AM 12:30 AM 12:44 AM 1:00 AM 1:23 AM 1:50 AM 12:16 AM 10:56 AM 11:29 AM

Height 1.3L 1.1L 0.9L 0.6L 0.4L 0.2L 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2L -0.3L -0.2L

Time 5:00 AM 6:51 AM 9:11 AM 11:07 AM 12:44 PM 1:56 PM 7:16 AM 7:45 AM 8:15 AM 8:46 AM 9:19 AM 9:52 AM 2:18 AM 7:40 PM 8:18 PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.4H 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L 1.2H 1.4H 1.4H

Height -0.1L 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2L

Time 10:05 PM 8:04 AM 9:48 AM 12:02 PM 1:35 PM 3:00 PM 4:15 PM 5:03 PM 5:39 PM 6:13 PM 6:48 PM 7:25 PM 7:58 PM 8:27 PM 8:52 PM

Height 1.1H 0.7H 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

Time 1:59 PM 4:39 AM 5:25 AM 6:05 AM 6:40 AM 7:13 AM 7:46 AM 8:20 AM 8:54 AM 9:30 AM 10:05 AM 10:37 AM 11:08 AM 11:41 AM 12:18 PM

Height -0.1L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.4L 0.2L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2L -0.2L

Time 9:05 PM 6:16 AM 8:41 AM 10:45 AM 12:35 PM 1:43 PM 2:37 PM 3:25 PM 4:07 PM 4:44 PM 5:19 PM 5:53 PM 6:29 PM 7:07 PM 7:44 PM

Height 1.7H 1.0H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.5H

Height 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L 1.1H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 4:55 PM 6:03 PM 8:51 AM 9:17 AM 9:50 AM 10:25 AM 11:00 AM 11:35 AM 10:45 PM 11:45 PM

Height -0.1L 0.1L 0.6L 0.4L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L 1.1H 1.1H

1:35 2:03 2:35 3:12

-0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.3L

Time 3:10 4:33 6:01 7:10 8:21

PM PM PM PM PM

Height 0.1L 0.3L 0.4L 0.6L 0.7L

Time 10:37 11:02 11:20 11:35 11:42

PM PM PM PM PM

Height 1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.7H

Freeport Harbor Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 12:27 PM 4:15 AM 4:50 AM 5:27 AM 6:02 AM 6:32 AM 6:59 AM 7:23 AM 7:46 AM 8:12 AM 8:41 AM 9:15 AM 9:51 AM 10:28 AM 11:04 AM

Time 1:36 AM 1:54 AM 2:05 AM 2:11 AM 2:13 AM 2:13 AM 2:17 AM 2:26 AM 12:09 PM 12:40 PM 1:08 PM 12:37 AM 1:18 AM 1:44 AM 1:31 AM

Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Height 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L 0.6H

Time 3:13 PM 4:04 PM 4:48 PM 5:22 PM 8:52 AM 11:09 PM 10:41 PM 10:56 PM 11:18 PM 11:41 PM 11:50 PM 11:25 PM 11:51 PM

Height 0.0L 0.1L 0.2L 0.3L 0.2L 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H

2:04 PM

-0.3L

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Height 0.4H 0.3H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.1H

Time 4:13 PM 4:43 PM 4:59 PM 4:54 PM 8:36 AM 9:18 AM 9:58 AM 10:37 AM 11:17 AM 11:58 AM 12:40 PM 1:22 PM 2:02 PM 2:40 PM 3:14 PM

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Time 9:32 PM 10:05 PM 7:18 AM 9:31 AM 1:15 PM 3:20 PM 4:27 PM 4:50 PM 4:48 PM 5:09 PM 8:48 AM 9:12 AM 9:40 AM 7:09 PM 7:29 PM

Height 0.9H 0.9H 0.7H 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L 0.8H 0.7H

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Time 9:41 PM 10:02 PM 10:16 PM 10:34 AM 1:17 PM 2:58 PM 4:03 PM 4:55 PM 5:40 PM 6:19 PM 6:48 PM 7:06 PM 7:25 PM 7:49 PM 8:15 PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 0.8H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.1L 0.1L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.0L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 2:42 PM 3:17 PM 6:31 AM 7:02 AM 2:59 PM 4:25 PM 9:05 AM 9:37 AM 10:03 AM 10:24 AM 11:40 PM

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Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 12:29 PM 1:44 PM 4:24 AM 5:07 AM 5:47 AM 6:23 AM 6:58 AM 7:29 AM 7:59 AM 8:25 AM 12:12 AM 12:49 AM 1:23 AM 10:12 AM 10:47 AM

Time 3:13 PM 4:35 PM 5:50 PM 6:57 PM 7:54 PM 8:38 PM 9:16 PM 9:52 PM 5:35 PM 6:04 PM 6:36 PM

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0.8H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

10:33 PM 11:22 PM

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South Padre Island Time 1:33 2:55 4:37 6:36 7:54 9:14

PM PM PM PM PM PM

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Time 9:43 PM 10:12 PM 10:37 PM 10:55 PM 11:10 PM 11:20 PM

Height 1.6H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H

Rollover Pass Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Rockport

Time 1:45 AM 1:42 AM 1:46 AM 1:39 AM 12:31 AM 9:08 AM 9:32 AM 9:57 AM 10:23 AM 10:51 AM 11:23 AM 12:00 PM 12:40 PM 1:22 PM 12:21 AM

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 12:37 PM 1:41 PM 2:53 PM 5:15 AM 5:42 AM 6:13 AM 6:46 AM 7:18 AM 7:49 AM 8:20 AM 8:51 AM 9:22 AM 9:54 AM 10:27 AM 11:02 AM

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4:12 PM 5:35 PM 7:00 PM

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East Matagorda

PM PM PM PM

Time 11:33 AM 2:37 PM 5:11 PM 7:04 PM 8:28 PM 9:39 PM

Height 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 7:14 PM 8:24 PM 9:32 PM 10:39 PM 11:46 PM

Height 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.8L 0.9L

Date Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 11 Dec 12 Dec 13 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20 Dec 21 Dec 22

Time 12:30 AM 12:19 AM 12:20 AM 12:14 AM 7:41 AM 8:25 AM 12:13 AM 12:33 AM 12:53 AM 1:03 AM 10:43 AM 11:08 AM 12:07 AM 12:29 AM 12:41 AM

Time 8:48 AM 12:04 PM 7:07 PM 8:46 PM 5:08 PM 6:18 PM 8:01 PM 8:33 PM

Height 0.3H 0.2H 0.2L 0.3L 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

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5:05 PM 6:17 PM 11:57 PM

0.1L 0.2L 0.3H

9:45 PM 10:24 PM 11:03 PM

0.3L 0.3L 0.4L

Texas Coast Tides

Height 1.2H 1.0H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H -0.2L -0.4L -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L -0.4L -0.3L


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Drawn bow hunt at Hagerman NWR Continued from page 1

$50 and take a shooting proficiency test. “Cinnamon Creek Ranch held a test, and one of the Hagerman officers was there and answered questions,” Lamb said. The 11,320-acre refuge has six units, but only three are hunted each year. Once a hunter is drawn, he or she can scout at the refuge during the day. There are some hunting restrictions during the three weekends of hunting each year. “You can’t use feed or trail cameras and you have to pack in and pack out all of your gear,” Lamb said. “And you can’t set up multiple stands. If you’re in a treestand, you can put a pop-up blind below the same tree but you can’t set it up 50 yards away.” On a hunter’s selected weekend, six hours are available to set up on Thursday, along with an hour-long orientation. Deer and feral hogs are allowable. And there is a potential bonus. “If you shoot a doe or two hogs, you’re automatically back in the next year,” Lamb said. “That’s only available one time, though.” Lamb saw deer on each of his hunts. “The first day was real warm and I saw a buck, but decided to wait for something better. The next morning, a cold front arrived with winds up to 49 miles per hour,” he said. “I set up a doe decoy and had a nice, big deer approach just before sunrise.

A doe had come out about 100 yards away and the buck came out behind her. He got to 55 yards away and another young buck came out.” The big buck had three choices: Run off the other buck, pursue the live doe or approach the decoy. “He showed interest in the decoy, but chose the real live doe,” Lamb said. Kyle Warner, a seminary professor in Fort Worth, was hunting in the same unit and did manage success. “He shot a buck the first morning, 15 minutes into his hunt,” Lamb said. “He was hunting about 500 yards from me and we had exchanged phone numbers. He field dressed it, took it to the check-in, and came back that afternoon and shot a doe — so he gets to come back next year.” Hagerman NWR has been open to deer hunting since 1984, and hunters average about 40 deer each season. The refuge was established in 1946 as an overlay of the Big Mineral arm of Lake Texoma. The refuge is also home to ducks and geese that use the refuge impoundments and fields as stopover and wintering grounds. For Lamb, it was his first do-it-yourself public hunt, and although he didn’t come home with a deer, he will definitely apply again. “It was a great experience,” he said.

December 8, 2017

Page 17


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December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Terra Peters shot this axis buck while hunting with her fiancĂŠe, Sawyer Wright.

Colt James, 9, shot his first gobbler with a 9.25-inch beard with a 20 gauge at 25 yards while hunting with his dad, Jeff, in Coleman County.

Mason Conley, 14, from Mansfield, arrowed this Rio Grande tom while hunting with his father, Chris.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Roel Vela shot this 189-inch buck on the opening morning of rifle season in Starr County.

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Josh Quintero, 17, of Little Elm, took this boar at the lease he shares with his father, Pete, near Goree.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 8, 2017

NOONER RANCH D’hanis, TX

200 to 225

$8,000

226 to 250

$9,000

251 to 275

$9,500

276 to 299

$10,000

Gene Naquin

210-508-0113

www.noonerranch.com

Page 19


Page 20

December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Solution on Solution onPage Page2626

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AcrossACROSS

5. A shotgun manufacturer 5. A shotgun manufacturer 8. The wood-eating insects 8. The wood-eating 9. The easy-to-dial turret insects 11. A good crappie lake 9. The easy-to-dial turret 12. Predator on lake hindquarters of deer 11. A that goodfeeds crappie 15. Blue, green or cinnamon 12. Predator thatDec. feeds15 on hindquarters of deer 16. Flounder limit until 15. Blue, or cinnamon 17. Vertical fishinggreen presentation, ___ shot 19. State that harvests theuntil mostDec. mallards 16. Flounder limit 15 20. Quail pioneer Panhandle ranch 17. Verticalselling fishinghis presentation, ___ shot 22. A type of fishing line State that harvests the most mallards 24. The19. sprig 26. Some eat this deerhis organ 20.hunters Quail pioneer selling Panhandle ranch 27. The22. crossbow's A type ofprojectile fishing line 28. The crane you can hunt 24. The sprig 29. A safari organization 26. Some eat this deer organ 30. Used for carp hunters bait 31. One27. of the Big Five TheAfrican crossbow’s projectile 33. A favorite quail plant 28. The crane you can hunt 34. The doe in heat safariSam organization 35. Big 29. bassA lake, ____ 30. Used forfood carp bait 36. A favorite bass 31. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38.

One of the African Big Five A favorite quail plant The doe in heat Big bass lake, Sam ____ A favorite bass food A fast-flying duck Color worn by upland hunters

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1. Helps the puppy learn skills the puppy learn skills 2.1. AnHelps African game species Anspotted African exotic game species 3.2. The 4.3. Type turkeyexotic call The of spotted 5.4. A Type muleof deer organization turkey call 6. It hold the fishing line 5. A mule deer organization 7. A turkey species It holds the fishing line eggs 10.6. Avian predators of turkey 12.7. A Agoose turkeyspecies species 13. A Avian snackpredators in the deer 10. of blind turkey eggs 14. African country with new leadership 12. A goose species 16. Preparing the hide 18. A Aduck species 13. snack in the deer blind 20. Iceland the onlywith place toleadership hunt this bird 14. Africaniscountry new 21. A group of quail 16. Preparing the hide 23. A shotshell brand 18. A duckterm species 24. Another for dabbling ducks 25. A Iceland favorite is bass 20. the fly only place to hunt this bird 28. A Ashooting 21. group ofsport, quail ____ clays 32. State known for elk numbers 23. 24. 25. 28. 32.

A shotshell brand Another term for dabbling ducks A favorite bass fly A shooting sport, ____ clays State known for elk numbers

Director of sales position

Nosler hires marketing firm

IWI US, Inc., a subsidiary of Israel Weapon Industries Ltd., is seeking a director of sales.

Nosler, Inc. entered into an agreement with marketing firm M.G. Suber & Associates, LLC to represent its products in all Latin American markets.

Jobs at American Outdoor Brands

10 11

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American Outdoor Brands, whose companies include Smith & Wesson, Battenfeld Technologies and Crimson Trace, is seeking a distribution manager and a program manager at its Springfield, Missouri location.

New conservation officer at DU Ducks Unlimited hired former Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission Executive Director Nick Wiley as its new chief conservation officer.

Cupero promoted Sue Cupero has been promoted to senior director of sales for Smith & Wesson.

Arctic Ice promotes manager Arctic Ice, makers of highperformance cooler packs, promoted David White to business manager.

Public relations opening SIG SAUER seeks a candidate to oversee communications to the media, including preparation of articles, press kits, press releases and other content initiatives.

New editor at Bonnier Randy Vance has been promoted to editor-at-large of Bonnier Corp.’s fish and marine groups, with titles including Sport Fishing, Marlin, Salt Water Sportsman and Boating.

Maverick Boat building Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced that Maverick Boat Group will be building a new boat manufacturing facility in Fort Pierce that will create 100 new jobs.

New execs at Zanders Zanders Sporting Goods hired Lucas Poston as its new sales manager and promoted Danny Siegler to marketing director.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Coconut snapper with spinach endive sauté 3 tbsps. olive oil, divided 4 snapper filets 3/4 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. black pepper 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tsp. fresh ginger, peeled and grated 1/2 cup diced onion, divided 1 cup canned coconut milk 2 tbsps. fresh lime juice 1 tsp. soy sauce 1/4 tsp. hot sauce 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped 1 head Belgian endive, thin sliced 1 (10-ounce) bag spinach, washed Season fillets with salt and pepper. In large sauté pan, heat 1 tbsp. olive oil over medium-high

heat. Cook fillets 3 to 4 minutes per side until cooked through. Remove fish from skillet and keep warm. For coconut sauce, return pan to heat and cook garlic, ginger and 1/4 cup onion until tender. Add coconut milk, lime juice, soy sauce, hot sauce and bring to a boil. Lower heat and add cilantro; simmer for 5 minutes. In a separate, large skillet, heat the remaining oil over mediumhigh heat. Sauté remaining 1/4 cup onion, endive and spinach until greens are just wilted. Serve fillets with sauce over sautéed vegetables. —Florida Dept. of Agriculture

Feral hog chile verde 3 pounds boar shoulder, cut into 1-inch pieces 3 tbsps. vegetable oil 2 1/2 quarts chicken broth 2 cups yellow onion, chopped 8 garlic cloves, chopped 2 green bell peppers, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 2 Anaheim peppers, chopped 3 jalapeno peppers, seeded and diced 1 tbsp. dried oregano flakes 2 tbsps. chili powder 2 tbsps. ground cumin 1 tsp. cayenne pepper 2 cups fresh tomatillos, skin removed 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped Salt and pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add boar and brown evenly. Drain off any fat or liquid rendered during browning. Add 2 quarts chicken broth and any additional broth or water to cover meat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 2 hours or until meat is tender and breaks apart, but doesn’t fall apart, with moderate finger pressure. Drain liquid from stockpot. Add 2 cups chicken stock and all remaining ingredients except cilantro. Simmer until peppers are tender. Stir in cilantro and season with salt and pepper to taste. —Scott Leysath, sportingchef.com


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December 8, 2017

Page 21

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

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COLORADO ELK AND MULE DEER RANCH $12.5M Price reduced to $11.5M You could be hunting right now on this 5,800 ac ranch that sits in the middle of the home to the largest elk herd in North America. Remote, end of road. 45 mins SW of Trinidad CO Elevation: 6,389 – 7,543 ft Resident and migrating elk herd with exceptional trophy genes. Large mule deer, bear and turkey population. Custom log home, 3 BR, 3 1/2 Bath 2+ car garage, 2 RV pads with all utilities, beautiful views. For sale by owner. Call Paul Phillips (210) 274-9094 AFFORDABLE HUNTS Blackbuck Antelope, axis, fallow, whitetail, turkey & hogs, Crockett County, TX. Bunkhouse & Grub available. (325) 392-5823

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VEHICLES NEED A HUNTING LEASE CABIN? Move it right in! 2011 Astoria Motor Coach. Only 38,000 miles. 360 HP, Cummins engine. Decked out with everything you need, even a fireplace! You’ll be the envy of your lease. $105,900. See it in the Houston area (806) 438-3048

MISC. FOR INVENTORS\ SMALL-BIZ! Invention, idea, brand? e-mail questions to us! SaveMoneyOnPatents.com ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

REPORTER/ JOURNALIST JOB Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter at its Dallas office. Journalism degree preferred. (214) 361-2276


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PRODUCTS LOUDOUT BUCKET: Yeti’s almost 16-inch-tall bucket, a 2017 ICAST winner, will help anglers and boaters with whatever needs doing. Available in four colors, the 5-gallon injection-molded ultra durable bucket is designed for lugging, loading, hauling, or for the storage of bait or food. It features a nonslip ring so there is no slipping or sliding. It also is food safe. The Loadout Bucket has an MSRP of $39.99.

>>

S7 3-12X42 RIFLESCOPE: The S7 flagship series of riflescopes by Styrka offers hunters six models, including model ST-95020, shown (MSRP, $695.95). This riflescope provides more magnification than a standard 3-9x and the ability to adjust for parallax. Features of the S7 riflescope series include the company’s proprietary SXL-MAX multi-coating for increased light transmission and enhanced contrast and resolution for sharper, more detailed images with natural color. The waterproof riflescopes are constructed from onepiece, 30mm aircraft-grade aluminum for durability. Available in a 1-6×24, 3-12×42 and 2.5-15×50 in two configurations each, all models feature a side focus parallax adjustment, 1/4 MOA windage and elevation adjustments. An illuminated reticle is also available on four of the six models for quick acquisition of the reticle in low-light conditions.

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SEXY SHAD SPINNER BAIT: This precisely balanced hammered spinner bait by War Eagle sports a premium silicone skirt that is hand-tied to ensure correct strand orientation. It is the lure’s hammered blades that entice fish through their enhanced vibration and sporadic flashes. Available in 1/2- ounce and 3/8-ounce sizes, the spinner bait comes equipped with Sampo swivels and Mustad NeedlePoint hooks. It costs about $6.50.

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December 8, 2017

HORNET MAXXIM AIR RIFLE: GAMO Outdoor USA’s air gun, which is available in both .22- and .177-caliber configurations, is for small game hunting. The air rifle features a fluted polymer jacketed rifled steel barrel and all-weather molded stock; a “Whisper Maxxim” sound suppression technology that minimizes shooting noise; an inert gas technology that delivers consistent power for accuracy with less vibration; and a two-stage adjustable trigger that provides a crisp trigger pull for increased accuracy. The gun, which includes 3-9x40 scope and rings, costs about $150 or $160, depending on the caliber.

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Page 22

WOODY PK BOOTS: Girls with Guns Clothing, in collaboration with the Original Muck Boot Company, has introduced lightweight 3/4 season boots that are comfort-rated from 0 degrees to 65 degrees. Featuring Mossy Oak BreakUp Country camo, the boots are fully waterproof with a breathable PK mesh lining that allows the circulation of air to keep feet warm and dry. The boots’ neoprene layer provides heat retention, flexibility, impact-resistance and shock absorption while the molded outsoles reduce boot weight and offer an aggressive tread pattern designed to help hunters conquer the steepest of terrains. The boots cost about $150.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276


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December 8, 2017

Page 23

Freediving for big fish Continued from page 1

er fish. But it’s the sharks that get your attention. “The day I speared the big yellowfin there were sharks all over the place,” said Likover. “Everything is feeding on the chum from the shrimp boat. That’s what the sharks are after, not divers. But in all that action they will bump into you. The key is to look for the yellowfins that are holding deep. They will have black backs. When one comes up the trick is to get in position for a shot.” Likover got into this type of fishing in the Bahamas. He started out spearing lobster, snapper and grouper. Then he advanced to big bluewater gamefish. He first saw free divers on the Internet, made a trip with a guide, found out how wild it can be, and the rest is history. In one breath, he can dive down to about 65 feet. Some free divers make it down hundreds of feet. The big deal is holding your breath — and Likover can freedive into the depths for about 90 seconds. But some divers can do it for minutes. “When we go over we stay on the surface, and kind of out on the edge of the action,” Likeover said. “The spear gun is powered with a band. The spear is attached to a bungee cord that’s about 100 feet long. It’s hooked to a float via a

Clay Likover speared this 229-pound yellowfin tuna while free-diving in 100 feet of water. Photo from Clay Likover.

tuna clip around the cord. When the fish is speared, it takes off and fights the float. The bungee cord can stretch to about three times its length.” The float is filled very tightly with air so it won’t crush when the tuna heads to the depths. The floats are about 3-feet long and about a foot in diameter. “The bungee cord is about a half-inch in diameter,” said Likover. “When the fish is hit, it takes off and eventually tires from fighting the float and bungee.

Once we fight it up to a shallow enough depth we shoot it again. On this particular tuna, it took us about an hour to get it in the boat.” On the day Likover shot the big tuna, his group of divers put four others in the boat. He has been free-diving and spear-fishing for about five years, and his next planned fishing destinations are Mexico and Panama. What’s next? Marlin? “That would be a tough one,” he said. “But it’s possible.”

Spearing record fish off the Texas coast There is no Texas state record for a speared yellowfin tuna. The current world record (by the International Underwater Spearfishing Association) yellowfin tuna for men, held by Julian Allen-Ellis, weighed 353 pounds. It was speared on Oct. 2, 2007, off Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. The heaviest fish ever speared off the Texas Gulf coast was a goliath grouper weighing 660 pounds on July 4, 1975 by Jim Frith. The state record for a greater amberjack with a spear gun weighed 128.75 pounds. The state record for a ling with a spear gun weighed 73.75 pounds.

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Page 24

December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL FLORIDA

ARKANSAS

New state record shoal bass

Avian cholera strikes waterfowl

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission fisheries biologists certified a new state record shoal bass weighing 5.95 pounds and measuring 22.4 inches long, caught by 14-year-old angler Sheldon Grace from Headland, Alabama. Sheldon caught his shoal bass from a kayak in the Chipola River near Altha, Florida. “I fought him for about 30 minutes and then when I got him close to the kayak, the jig popped right out of his mouth,” said Sheldon. “I quickly reached into the water and grabbed him because he was the biggest I’d caught all day.” Shoal bass are one of the five black bass species in Florida. The former state record shoal bass weighed 5.2 pounds and was caught in 2016 by Jimmy Ray Tice on the Apalachicola River.

Waterfowl have been reported dead at seven localized areas in northeast and east central Arkansas. Four of these incidents included white-fronted geese and a small number of dabbling ducks. Three other incidents have included mostly snow geese. Dr. Jennifer Ballard, state wildlife veterinarian for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, says the birds all showed signs of the disease, but confirmatory testing was needed to be certain of the cause. “Avian cholera is very common in waterfowl,” Ballard said. “Snow and Ross’s geese have been reported to act as silent carriers of the bacteria that causes it.” According to Ballard, carriers can shed the bacteria into the environment, where it can wait in the water for weeks. In many cases, birds can die in a matter of hours after being exposed to the bacteria. The most recent large-scale outbreak of avian cholera in Arkansas was in 2008, when close to 1,000 snow geese were found dead.

—FWC

COLORADO

State record arctic char

HOG HUNT, MARK OS ON AN AFTERNOON ER ND SE ING LK WA WHILE PATA AND BOBBY , GUIDED BY CARLOS ZA LE VIL NS OW BR OF , CANO FRIEND’S .300 NILGAI BULL. USING HIS IS TH D TE OT SP Z, DIA THE 60-YARD SHOT. BLACKOUT, HE MADE

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One of the largest reservoirs in Colorado produced a new state record arctic char, caught by a vacationing physician from Virginia on Nov. 6. Dr. Lindsay Regali was fishing in Dillon Reservoir with her husband, Luke Newcomb, and local guide Randy Ford. Colorado Parks and Wildlife certified the fish as the new state record, weighing in at 4.15 pounds and 23.5 inches in length, breaking the previous record of 3.75 pounds and 20.5 inches, caught in Dillon Reservoir in 1994 by Marshall Brenner. —CPWD

MISSOURI

Deer harvest up Preliminary data from the Missouri Department of Conservation shows that deer hunters in Missouri harvested 191,368 deer during the November portion of fall firearms deer season, Nov. 11-21. Of the 191,368 deer harvested, 99,431 were antlered bucks, 20,148 were button bucks, and 71,789 were does. Last year, hunters checked 185,062 deer during the 2016 November portion of firearms deer season. —MDC

IOWA

Pheasant hunting incident Iowa Department of Natural Resources conservation officers responded to a hunting incident on Nov. 25. A Michigan man was hunting pheasants in Audubon County when his gun discharged hitting two members of his hunting party standing about 6 feet away. The group had completed a drive and was taking a break when the incident occurred. The man’s gun fell over, discharged, and struck the nearby hunters. The hunters were taken to the Audubon County Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. They were treated and released. —IDNR

OKLAHOMA

Pheasant numbers fair The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation released the 2017 Pheasant Season Outlook, based on crow count surveys conducted this past spring and brood count surveys in August. Pheasant sightings were up about 25 percent, but brood counts decreased, compared with survey findings from last year. Conditions were good for pheasant production across northern Oklahoma, with some lower temperatures and plenty of rainfall. —OCWC

—AGFC

NEBRASKA

Deer harvest up The preliminary deer harvest in Nebraska is 3 percent ahead of last year’s pace. From Sept. 1 through Nov. 30, there were 49,923 deer checked, compared to 48,633 in 2016. Mule deer buck harvest has increased for the fourth consecutive year to the highest on record, with 8,609 taken, compared to 8,499 in 2016. The average age of bucks was good, with 49 percent of bucks estimated at age 3 or older. The whitetail buck harvest was up 4 percent in 2017 with 26,489 adult whitetail bucks harvested compared to 25,314 in 2016. The average age of bucks declined slightly, with 33 percent of whitetail bucks estimated at age 3 or older. —NGPC

Record Rocky Mountain bighorn There may be a new state record among bighorn sheep harvested in Nebraska. Archery hunter Jason Bruce of Lockeford, California, took a massive ram on private property on Dec. 2, using archery equipment.  Todd Nordeen, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission biologist who manages Nebraska’s bighorn sheep program, said the mature ram, estimated to be 10 years old, had a gross score of 195 1/8 and netted 193 5/8. The record will become official if the score still surpasses the current record when the horns are measured again after a 60day drying period. Nebraska’s current record bighorn, harvested by Lincoln hunter Terry Bogle with a rifle in December 2015, scored 190 5/8.  Bruce won his permit by auction and was one of  two hunters awarded a Nebraska bighorn sheep permit this season. —NGPC

GEORGIA

Yamaha donates boats Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Georgia, gave four boats, four trailers and four Yamaha four-stroke outboard motors to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The Georgia DNR will use the boats to assist in search and rescue efforts in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. —Yamaha Marine Group


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 8, 2017

Page 25

Pros and boats Continued from page 8

deadlines. Securing renewals and sealing new every season based on tournament performance,” he said. “Doing that adds to the disdeals now is a must. Prepping for next year began when the sea- count.” son ended in September. That meant unloadJocumsen sold his 2017 boat and has oring from the boat enough tackle to fill the dered the new model from Bass Cat Boats. garage of an average angler. Jocumsen peeled Production began after the dozens of accessories arrived at the factory in Mounoff the logo wrapping and spent a tain Home, Arkansas. Soon he will full day detail cleaning the rig for make the daylong drive from Dalresale. las, pick it up and then begin the Jocumsen follows the approach real work. of selling his boat immediately after the season. Reasons are getting a Finalizing the wrap design is an jump on his peers, while paying off arduous chore of settling on agreements for logo placement from bow the previous season’s invoice. to stern, inside and out. And even “Bass Cat operates on a delayed on the carpet. invoice program,” he explained. “I “Every single sponsor wants like to sell my boat to close out one something different,” he said. “It’s a invoice before getting billed for the Carl Jocumsen balancing act and sometimes one of next year.” Anglers are invoiced for the discounted the biggest jobs of the off-season.” For Jocumsen the work falls into place after boat and have one year to pay it off. The consignment formula is popular with most com- Christmas, giving him time to break in the panies sponsoring anglers or guides at the engine, work out the kinks, fine-tune tackle various levels. Few tour pros receive a totally and even himself. free boat. Only then does the real job begin of going “What you hope to do is grow the discount fishing and competing in the tournaments.

Raffle tickets offer chance for free youth bowhunt The Texas Archery Club is raffling off a teen bowhunting trip just in time for the holidays. The hunting trip will take place Jan. 19-21 for deer and hogs at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge south of Lake Texoma. Raffle tickets cost $20 each and will benefit TXAA, a nonprofit group. The winners must be between the ages of 13 and 16. The trip is valued at $150 and includes meals, guides and educational activities through the Texas Youth Hunting Program. The hunt requires the use of a compound bows with a minimum draw of 40 pounds. Hunters should be able to shoot 25 yards accurately with fixed-blade broadheads on arrows. The hunter must pass an additional proficiency test using broadhead-tipped arrows and complete the online portion of the International Bowhunter Education Program. The club partnered up with the Texas Youth Hunting Program to sponsor access for six youth hunters (the youth must be accompanied by a parent or guardian). For tickets, visit texasarchery.info. Winners will be announced the week after Christmas, and will receive instructions on registration details. —Texas Archery Club

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December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK DECEMBER 2

Ducks Unlimited Carthage High School Banquet Panola County Expo Hall (903) 754-2813 ducks.org/Texas

DECEMBER 7

Dallas Safari Club DSC 100 Volunteer Party Uncle Buck’s Brewery, Grapevine (972) 980-9800 biggame.org Houston Safari Club Christmas Party The Redneck Country Club, Stafford (713) 623-8844 houstonsafariclub.org Delta Waterfowl Beaumont Banquet Courville’s (409) 718-8280 deltawaterfowl.org Ducks Unlimited Perryton Dinner Perryton VFW (806) 228-5745 ducks.org/Texas

DECEMBER 14

Dallas Woods and Waters Club Monthly Dinner Meeting Southfork Ranch, Parker (972) 394-1366 dwwcc.org Dallas Safari Club Christmas Party Longhorn Ballroom Dallas (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 26

DECEMBER 18

Texas Wildlife Association Sporting Clays Shoot Greater Houston Gun Club (210) 826-2904 texas-wildlife.org

1 8

11

JANUARY 5-14

DSC South Texas Legacy Gala Witte Museum, San Antonio (210) 826-2440 dscsouthtexas.org

JANUARY 18-20

Wild Sheep Foundation The Sheep Show Reno, Nevada (406) 450-8750 wildsheepfoundation.org

JANUARY 19-20

Deer Breeders Corp New Year’s Deer Auction Horseshoe Bay Resort (972) 289-3100 dbcdeer.com

JANUARY 20

Safari Club International Texas Hill Country Fundraiser Hill Country Shooting Sports Center texashillcountrysci.org

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5. A shotgun manufacturer [MOSSBERG] 8. The wood-eating insects [TERMITES] 9. The easy-to-dial turret [EXPOSED] 11. A good crappie lake [BARDWELL] 12. Predator that feeds on hindquarters of deer [COYOTE] 15. Blue, green or cinnamon [TEAL] 16. Flounder limit until Dec. 15 [TWO] 17. Vertical fishing presentation, ___ shot [DROP] 19. State that harvests the most mallards [ARKANSAS] 20. Quail pioneer selling his Panhandle ranch [PICKENS] 22. A type of fishing line [BRAID] 24. The sprig [PINTAIL] 26. Some hunters eat this deer organ [TONGUE] 27. The crossbow's projectile [BOLT] 28. The crane you can hunt [SANDHILL] 29. A safari organization [DSC] 30. Used for carp bait [DOUGH] 31. One of the African Big Five [LION] 33. A favorite quail plant [RAGWEED]

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Houston Boat Show NRG Center (713) 526-6361 houstonboatshows.com

JANUARY 11

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Dallas Safari Club Annual Convention & Sporting Expo Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

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1. Helps the puppy learn skills [TREATS] 2. An African game species [WILDEBEEST] 3. The spotted exotic [AXIS] 4. Type of turkey call [BOX] 5. A mule deer organization [MDF] 6. It hold the fishing line [SPOOL] 7. A turkey species [EASTERN] 10. Avian predators of turkey eggs [CROWS] 12. A goose species [CANADA] 13. A snack in the deer blind [COOKIES] 14. African country with new leadership [ZIMBABWE] 16. Preparing the hide [TANNING] 18. A duck species [MALLARD] 20. Iceland is the only place to hunt this bird [PUFFIN] 21. A group of quail [COVEY] 23. A shotshell brand [RIO] 24. Another term for dabbling ducks [PUDDLERS] 25. A favorite bass fly [CLOUSER] 28. A shooting sport, ____ clays [SPORTING] 32. State known for elk numbers [IDAHO]

Puzzle solution from Page 20


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

December 8, 2017

DALLAS SAFARI CLUB

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Page 27


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December 8, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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December 8, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  
December 8, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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