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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

November 11, 2016

Volume 13, Issue 6

Damp deer opener for some

GRAY SKIES: It was a muddy mess for many Texas hunters during the opening weekend of the general season. Some great bucks were taken, while other hunters saw mostly young bucks and does coming out in the open. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Vinnie Prejean watched a few years ago as his son, Braeden, shot his first buck on a hunt with the Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation. A nonhunter

at the time, the experience intrigued him. Now the father and son from Little Elm are hunting for the second year on a Throckmorton County lease with some friends. Last year, Braeden took his buck, and Vinnie took his first feral

hog. On opening weekend this season, it was Vinnie’s turn to take the shot. He downed his first buck on opening morning, and followed with a doe that evening. “I walked in on the doe in the

evening,” he said. As usual, opening weekend was met with success for some, checking out the deer for others, and dealing with rain and mud for many more. After an abnormally dry October, one hunter described a

muddy mess in Stephens County, and in Mitchell County, Bittercreek on the Texas Hunting Forum wrote he skipped the Sunday hunt. “I didn’t want to tear up my roads,” he wrote. “But the rain is a good thing.” Please turn to page 19

Channel, blue cats on a good bite

CONTENTS Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 11 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 20 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 22 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 24

South Zone dove hunting might change

Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 26 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 28

By Craig Nyhus

Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 30

Lone Star Outdoor News

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At Lake Tawakoni, guide Larry Thomas said channel catfish are expected to remain strong until December. Right now they can be found in 25-30 feet of water. Thomas said baited holes and

The future is bright for South Texas dove hunters who prefer to hunt in the month of September. At the Service Regulations Committee meeting, made up of regional directors and the assistant director of the Migratory Bird Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the federal frameworks were set for the 2017-2018 seasons. “In the Special White-winged and the South Zones, we received the opportunity to expand the Special White-winged area to include the entire South Zone,” said Dave Morrison, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department small game director. “The same restrictions on harvest of mourning dove will stay in place.” What the change means is all South Zone hunters

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By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Anglers and guides are reporting successful catfishing on Texas lakes this fall.

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RELIABLE CATCH: Catfish are cooperating for anglers this month, with drift-fishing, baiting holes and tossing punch bait into moderate depths providing the most success. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

HUNTING

FISHING

South Texas ducks

Tagging deer

Blue crabs for reds

Rice fields holding most birds. Page 4

Could it go online? Bulls favor for bait. Page 8 Page 4

Catch-and-release on Devils

Changes proposed for portion of river. Page 8


November 11, 2016

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November 11, 2016

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November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HUNTING

Too warm, but plenty of quail By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

NO LACK OF COVEYS: Hunters and their dogs found quail during the season opener, but the warm temperatures kept some at home. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

The quail season opener showed promise, but warm temperatures limited hunting in many areas. Despite temperatures hovering around 90 degrees, the Matador Wildlife Management Area near the Texas panhandle was a bright spot on opening weekend with 625 quail harvested by 172 hunters. “They’re all telling me it’s really good,” said Diana

Mayo, a Matador WMA worker. “It was better than opening weekend last year.” A weak cool front that rolled in on Oct. 31 helped scenting conditions, according to the Matador WMA’s Facebook page. But the warm temperatures had many worried about rattlesnakes, and hunters were cautioned to vaccinate their dogs against rattlesnake venom. One hunter posted that a dog was bitten in Hemphill County. “Lots of hunters are concerned about the snakes,” Mayo confirmed. Please turn to page 27

Marking territory time

Bucks are beginning to exhibit behavior suggesting the rut is near in parts of Texas, including making scrapes and rubbing their scent in the brush to make their presence known. Photos by Joe Richards, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

No tags? Maybe someday By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Ducks best in rice in South Zone

Lone Star Outdoor News

Imagine a paperless deer hunting season — no tags, not even a license in a wallet or purse. Everything needed to hunt and report the harvest is conveniently located on a smart phone. Sound like a distant, technological dream? Well, it’s happening right now in the state of Alabama. Other states, such as Texas, have similar technology that could do the job. But hunters in the Lone Star State will have to keep on dreaming for now. Alabama implemented technology in a big way this deer season. The state went from being one of the few to not have any type of game reporting system — such as paper tags, check stations or online system — to being on the cutting edge. Right now it allows game check and harvest records to be completed via a mobile app, and license information to be stored on a phone as a photograph Please turn to page 14

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The South Zone duck season opener was as expected — hit or miss. If you happened to be in the right field, with lots of water, there was no shortage of teal and pintails. Some areas of the coastal marsh provided excellent hunts. Hunters in the J.D. Murphree Wildlife Management Area in Port Arthur had some excellent shoots in the Salt Bayou and Keith Lake units, according to Jerry Norris who has been hunting there for decades. “Those two areas have lots of water and that’s the key,” Norris said. “A lot of the birds taken opening FUN IN THE DUCK BLIND: weekend were teal, gray ducks and a Kennedy, Faith and few pintail.” Grace Vaughan enjoyed Some of the best hunts were on a duck hunt near China the Lavaca River just above the town during the youth-only weekend in Texas’ North of Port Lavaca. Hunters there colZone. They saw good lected easy limits of teal. And if you numbers of teal and happened to be on a flooded field in pintail. Photo by Kenny the Garwood area, goose hunts were Vaughan.

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November 11, 2016

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Info on trophy imports may go to Human Society Hunters who have imported any wildlife specimen into the U.S. may want to take notice. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed that it may provide such information to Humane Society International. On Nov. 1, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a notice in the Federal Register announcing that information related to records for the import and export of all wildlife specimens to and from the United States may be disclosed to HSI, based on Freedom of Information Act requests. The notice informs submitters of such information of their ability to object to disclosure. The information potentially includes the identity of any U.S. and foreign importers and exporters of hunting trophies for the years 2002 through 2010, 2013 and 2014, and the declared value of the trophy. In response to four FOIA requests made in 2014 and 2015, FWS previously released some information but refused to disclose

other information. Earlier this year, HSI sued to obtain the withheld information, and later, FWS informed the court that it is obligated to notify the submitters of the requested information of the fact that their information is the subject of a FOIA request and that the FWS may decide to release the information. The notice informs those who are the subject of HSI’s request that the FWS will presume that anyone who does not object within the time-period allotted for responses has no objection to the disclosure of his or her information. Submitters will have until Nov. 22 to send their written responses to the FWS’ Office of Law Enforcement Freedom of Information office at lawenforcement@fws.gov. The Document Citation is 81 FR 75838. —Staff report

Shikar-Safari International Wildlife Officer of the Year Michael Boone received the 37th annual Wildlife Officer of the Year award from the Shikar-Safari Foundation. Boone has been a Texas game warden for 24 years, and is stationed in Hardin County in East Texas. Boone was on the frontline during the floods of 2016, performing numerous rescues in raging waters. He also made eight poaching cases involving shooting from county roadways and was recognized internationally for his efforts after two whooping cranes were shot, locating the violator, who has since been convicted, with 24 hours. Boone also has been featured on the TV show, Lone Star Law. —TPWD

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November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

The DIY route for deer blinds

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2017 Texas Conservation Hall of Fame inductees

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Cody Bell III started his go-cheap deer blinds years ago. He showed up at his ranch with a stack of old wood from a junk pile and a sack full of nails. “The guys I hunt with thought I had lost it,” said Bell, who has hunted Hill Country deer for years. “I wanted to hunt from a blind that was basically invisible, cheap to build and would last at least a few years. Plus, it’s maintenance-free.” His blind, dubbed the Hilton, cost about $25. It took about three hours to nail together, a few cans of spray paint and has lasted for years. “It was simple,” Bell said. “I found a few big oak trees that formed a triangle, framed out a floor around them with some old two-by-fours I had found on the ranch, then put up the walls. It’s big enough for two hunters. I could actually sleep in it. Plus, it was about 8 feet off the ground and mixed into the canopy of the trees. We’ve shot a lot of deer out of that blind.” When it comes to an odd-looking blind, a Walt Simmons creation will be tough to beat. The base of the blind is some sort INGENUITY: Walt Simmons noticed deer passing by an old combine, and decided to construct an elevated blind above it. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News. of corn combine farm machine. The top part is a mix of old two-by-fours and zero to build, is practically invisible and one heck of some painted sheets of plywood. “I’ve hunted deer for years in Arkansas and East Tex- blind to hunt from. “I got the idea from a ranch hand in Lampasas. as,” Simmons said. “In one particular field I hunted Mine is sort of like what he hunted from, but a little in Texas, there was this old combine. The deer would bigger,” Jaap said. “It’s made with four wooden crates walk right by it all the time. So I figured I’d build it up into an elevated blind. It didn’t cost a dime and has that you can pick up anywhere. Find the right place and they are free and well-weathered. I lined the first kept my freezer full of venison for many seasons.” Another blind was built by Ron Jaap. It too, cost one up against an old cedar tree. I connected each

Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation has selected the honorees for the 2017 Texas Conservation Hall of Fame. Tio Kleberg and Fred Bryant are being honored for their accomplishments at the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute. Wales Madden Jr. is being honored for a lifetime of philanthropy, much of which has benefitted Palo Duro Canyon. The Operation Game Thief program is also being recognized for supporting Texas game wardens for more than 35 years. Bryant is the Leroy G. Denman Jr., endowed director of the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. The institute’s mission is to provide science-based information for enhancing the conservation and management of wildlife. Kleberg grew up on the King Ranch, working with and learning from the best land managers, geneticists, and wildlife biologists of the time. He has served as trustee of the Caesar Kleberg Foundation for Wildlife Conservation for 37 years and is also a founding member of the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Wales Madden Jr. is a longtime Amarillo civic leader and businessman. An avid outdoorsman, his lifelong passion for Palo Duro Canyon has led to many philanthropic accomplishments, including leading the fundraising effort for the Palo Duro amphitheater, which was dedicated in 1966. In more recent years, Mr. Madden has been involved in other projects to enhance his beloved Palo Duro Canyon, including the Mack Dick Pavilion and Canoñcita Ranch. Operation Game Thief, Texas’ wildlife crime-stoppers program, allows concerned citizens to be actively involved in ending poaching of Texas’ fish and wildlife resources. The program was launched in 1981 as a result of laws passed by the 67th Legislature to help curtail poaching. Over the last 10 years, OGT has provided over $600,000 in grants to TPWD for the purchase of specialized and technologically advanced equipment for Texas game wardens. Combined with enhanced statutory penalties for poaching and trespassing, OGT’s efforts have resulted in a substantial reduction in the numbers of poaching incidents in Texas. The 2017 inductees will be honored at the Texas Conservation Hall of Fame dinner and concert at ACL Live at Moody Theatre in Austin on April 6, 2017. —TPWF

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November 11, 2016

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November 11, 2016

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FISHING

Slinging blue crabs for bull reds By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Blaine Favre traveled from his Huntsville home to Port O’Connor with his two son for one reason — his sons wanted to catch bull redfish. Right now the water temperature is about 74 degrees along the Texas coast and catches of bull reds are still excellent. “They wanted to catch big fish, and that’s what they did,” Blaine said. “We had a blast.” What was unusual was the bait they used. Typically, a hunk of a fresh caught mullet is best. But one of the go-to baits for Capt. Curtiss Cash is a live blue crab. Right now he’s averaging anywhere from 10 to 40 bulls per trip.

“Catching that many fish is a workout for me and the fishermen,” said Cash, who runs Low Tide Guide Service. “The good catches of bull reds should last through the end of November.” Most folks have used fresh dead mullet to catch bull reds, or even shrimp or Spanish sardines. But Cash prefers to use live or fresh dead cracked crabs. “Live crabs catch a lot more reds than any other bait I’ve used,” he said. “Lately we’ve been catching bull reds up to about 48-inches long. A fish that big will weigh close to 38 pounds. I’ve been doing best while fishing near the jetties in Port O’Connor. I’ve found some really big schools of reds in water that’s 25- to 40-feet deep. The spot Please turn to page 16

CRUNCHY TREAT: A live blue crab is the favorite bait of Port O’Connor Capt. Curtiss Cash for catching bull redfish in the fall. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Walleye, bluegill stocked at Lake Meredith By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Lake Meredith may be on its way back. The Panhandle reservoir formed by Sanford Dam on the Canadian River at Sanford was once known for its numbers of bass and walleye, but a combination of drought and golden algae blooms sealed its fate. Lake levels were at nearCOMING BACK: Lake Meredith in record lows when the blooms the Texas Panhandle was a prime came. fishery before years of drought “The lake probably had and several golden algae blooms. three golden algae blooms Now, the lake depth and water from 2011-2013, and it killed quality have improved, and biolomost of the fish,” said Texas gists, including John Clayton, beParks and Wildlife Departlow, have been stocking walleye ment biologist John Clayton. and bluegill. Photo by TPWD.

The rains returned, though, the water conditions improved, and stocking efforts are underway. “In April, right around 3 million walleye fry were stocked,” Clayton said. “In October, we stocked about 24,000 bluegill.” Clayton said stockings of other fish are being delayed. “We don’t want to stock too fast and we don’t want the walleye fry to have a lot of competition,” he said. “We do plan to put smallmouth bass back in Meredith, but our hatchery wasn’t able to produce any this summer. We’re hopeful we can get them in next summer.” Anglers may recall the lake being listed as “empty” before the rains returned a few years ago. “It wasn’t empty,” Clayton said. “The listing is called ‘below dead pool,’ meaning the lake is so low that officials can’t pump water out of the lake.” Fishermen shouldn’t fret that Meredith is still listed as 64.980-feet below full pool, since the lake rarely nears its Please turn to page 16

Proposed catch-and-release on Devils River By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Many Texas anglers want to make the trip down the Devils River with a canoe, whether for a few days or a week or more. With improved access and launching areas, more and more are making the trip, prompting fisheries personnel to suggest catch-and-release only areas along the river for largemouth and smallmouth bass. “Smallmouth bass are on the increase in the river,” said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Director of Information and Regulations Ken Kurzawski. “The overall size of the largemouth bass is down slightly.” Kurzawski said the department has been talking to riverside landowners and outfitters on the river about the increased traffic and fishing pressure on the river. “The pressure has increased over the

last 10 to 15 years,” he said. “In 2013, we began requiring access permits from any TPWD property. In the first year, we had 780 permits. This year, we expect at least 1,300.” The proposal made to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission on Nov. 1 would designate an area of the river as catch-and-release only for the two species. “What we are proposing in January (of 2017) is to institute catch-andrelease for largemouth and smallmouth bass on the Devils from Baker’s Crossing to Big Satan Creek, a distance of 38 miles,” he said. “This is where the river becomes wider and more lake-like, it is the downstream boundary of the State Natural Area.” If the commission agrees, the formal proposal would be made at the January, 2017 commission meeting, and then opened for public comment to potentially take effect on Sept. 1, 2017. INCREASED PRESSURE: Biologists are proposing catch-and-release only regulations for largemouth and smallmouth bass in a 38-mile stretch of the Devils River. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.


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Texas angler gets two wins in one month It was quite a month of fishing for Travis Lamb of Seguin. First, he won the Rudy’s Redfish Series event at Houma, Louisiana Oct. 6-8, fishing with partner James Schroeder, and the team won $40,000. Later in the month, he and his fishing partner, Britt Ordes, of Slidell, Louisiana, weighed a two-day, four-fish limit that totaled 35.04 pounds to win the 2016 IFA Redfish Tour Championship presented by Cabela’s on Oct. 21 at Hopedale, Louisiana. “We were fishing shallow water marsh ponds near Delacroix and pretty close (about 30 minutes) to the launch site,” Lamb said. “We would sight-fish when we could, and we threw popping corks with Gulp when we couldn’t.” Lamb has been fishing redfish tournaments since 2008, and Ordes for nearly as long. It was their first team win. “The weather definitely affected our fishing pattern,” Ordes said. “We knew we were on

good fish but not sure we would be able to catch them. The north winds made them difficult to see in dirty, shallow water.” The team took home more than $45,000 in winnings, including a fully rigged 220 Ranger Bahia with a 150-horsepower Yamaha outboard. “It feels really great to win this event,” said Ordes. “Travis and I have multiple topfive finishes on the IFA, but this is our first win.” Second-place finishers Mike Taylor, of Swansboro, North Carolina, and John Roberts, of Greenville, North Carolina, brought in 33.49 pounds to win $28,463. Third-place finishers Paul Dufrene, of Cut Off, Louisiana, and Nicky Savoie, of Lockport, Louisiana, weighed in 32.78 pounds to win $2,514. For Lamb, between the two wins, he took home around $40,000. “It was a good October,” he said.

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained upriver; 74 degrees; 3.32’ low. Black bass are good on black buzzbaits at first light and last light and baby bass wacky worms with chartreuse tips fished around grass. Spoons are catching schooling bass all day in 25–50 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on juglines baited with goldfish, perch or minnows. AMISTAD: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 17.44’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse top-waters, spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on top-waters and large jerkbaits. White bass are slow. Catfish are fair on cheese bait, shrimp and nightcrawlers. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 71–76 degrees; 0.8’ low. Black bass are fair to good on shaky heads, jigs and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 0.85’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless flukes and Carolina-rigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on prepared bait. BASTROP: Water stained; 80–84 degrees. Black bass are very good on chartreuse spinner baits, crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp and blood bait. BELTON: Water stained; 79–83 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are good on spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are very good on minnows in 20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on dough bait and shrimp. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 72–75 degrees; 1.76’ low. Black bass are fair on wacky-rigged worms, square-billed crankbaits and Texas-rigged stick baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 70–73 degrees; 2.77’ low. Black bass are good on buzzbaits, crankbaits, jigs and Texas-rigged soft plastics. Crappie are good on brush piles with jigs. Catfish are good on cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are good on liver and shad near the pier and at Dead Tree Point. Redfish are good downrigging spoons near the jetty and dam. Channel catfish are excellent on liver, shrimp, cut bait, and cheese bait near the dam. Blue catfish are good on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 68–75 degrees: 0.60’ high. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, buzzbaits and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 1.57’ low. Black bass are fair on junebug worms, frogs, and crankbaits around rocks and over brush piles in 10–15 feet. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on jigs and minnows off lighted docks at night. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers over baited holes in 12–20 feet.

BUCHANAN: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.15’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits, lipless crankbaits and crankbaits in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are good on top-waters and plastic swim baits near Lighthouse Point at daylight. Crappie are good on pink or chartreuse jigs and live minnows. Channel catfish are good on liver and cheese bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on live shad. CADDO: Water stained to muddy; 72–25 degrees; 0.30’ high. Black bass are fair on weightless stick baits, buzzbaits, Texas-rigged craws and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits near the dam. Striped bass are slow. Redfish are fair on live bait and downrigging spoons near the crappie wall. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on liver, shrimp, cheese bait and shad. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 79–83 degrees; 0.11’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon stick baits on wacky rigs, drop-shot rigs, and Texas-rigged pumpkin worms along main lake bluffs. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits over humps. Smallmouth bass are fair on pumpkin jigs and smoke grubs in 12–25 feet early. Crappie are fair on minnows and crappie jigs upriver. Channel catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 1.86’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged worms, square-billed crankbaits and spinner baits near shallow cover and docks. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 19.21’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastic worms and lizards over grass in 8–15 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 1.35’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 90 degrees at the hot water discharge, 78 degrees in main lake; 2.33’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits and spinner baits in 8–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows and green tube jigs near Coletoville Bridge in 8–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live perch and soap bait in 8–12 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.86’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon lipless crank-

baits, spinner baits and topwaters. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are fair on stink bait and nightcrawlers. FALCON: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 30.18’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits in creeks. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are very good on cut bait and frozen shrimp. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on shad patterned top-waters and lipless crankbaits early. Red ear perch are good on worms in 3–10 feet. Channel and blue catfish are slow. FORK: Water lightly stained; 73– 75 degrees; 2.48’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged, weightless flukes near submerged grass and top-waters. White and yellow bass are good on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 72–76 degrees; 0.52’ low. Black bass are fair on chrome, shallowrunning crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and live bait. GRANBURY: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits off points. Striped bass are fair on slab spoons. White bass are fair on minnows and white spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. GRANGER: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.23’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse jigs over brush piles in 4–15 feet. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits and on juglines baited with fresh shad. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 69–73 degrees; 0.41’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, shallow crankbaits and top-waters. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: 31.15’ low. Black bass are fair on medium-running crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 0.13’ low. Black bass are good on black/ blue and black/red wacky worms, crankbaits and buzzbaits. Crappie are good on live minnows early. Bream are good on live worms near the islands. Channel and blue catfish are slow. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 73–77 degrees; 1.55’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas-rigged creature baits, drop-shot rigs and black/blue jigs.

Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and live shad. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 1.35’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless stick baits, spinner baits and buzzbaits. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 72–75 degrees: 0.09’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless flukes, top-waters and Texas-rigged worms. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and punch bait. LAVON: Water stained; 72–75 degrees: 3.74’ low. Black bass are fair on black buzzbaits, spinner baits and Texas-rigged craws. White bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and rod and reel. LBJ: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.79’ low. Black bass are good on white spinner baits, swim baits and watermelon stick baits off creek points early. Striped bass are good on jigs at night. Crappie are fair on watermelon crappie jigs and live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on minnows and liver. Yellow and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with perch. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 70–73 degrees; 0.68’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, spinner baits and square-billed crankbaits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.50’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with shad. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 2.16’ low. Black bass are fair on hollow-body frogs, top-waters and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MEREDITH: 60.48’ low. Reports of black bass are rare. No reports of smallmouth bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.17’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, hollow-body frogs and bladed jigs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 71–75 degrees; 1.34’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and lipless crankbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.30’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits. White bass are fair on white jigs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 73–76 degrees; 35.66’ low. Black bass

are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and split-shot weighted flukes. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 72–75 degrees; 15.39’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 1.8’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water offcolor; 73–76 degrees; 0.05’ low. Black bass are fair to good on chrome lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are good on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on live shad and slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. PROCTOR: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 1.27’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon/black soft plastic worms. Striped bass are good on silver striper jigs. White bass are good on watermelon spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and shad. Yellow catfish are good on live bait. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 1.36’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, spinner baits and wake baits. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 70–73 degrees; 0.60’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines.

RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 1.06’ low. Black bass are good on swim jigs, spinner baits and top-waters. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 3.01’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse topwaters, soft plastic worms and crankbaits early. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on live minnows. Bream are fair on worms. Catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 0.02’ high. Black bass are fair on perch-colored crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and liver. STAMFORD: 0.47’ low. Black bass and crappie are fair to good, but mostly undersized. White bass are fair to good on minnows and bladed spoons. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait.

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 11

STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 78–82 degrees; 0.12’ high. Black bass are good on crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows, hot dogs and stink bait. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 70–74 degrees; 2.43’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws flipped in shallow cover and docks. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. TEXOMA: Water stained; 63–74 degrees; 0.59’ high. Black bass are good on top-waters, soft plastic jerkbaits and hard jerkbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 79–83 degrees; 4.41’ low. Black bass are good on redbug soft plastic worms, and on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and spinner baits off points. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and nightcrawlers. TRAVIS: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.99’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms, top-waters and crankbaits in 8–15 feet. Striped bass are fair on white grubs and chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on chrome jigging spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and fresh cut bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse/ black lipless crankbaits and shadcolored crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows near the dam. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and shrimp. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 69–74 degrees; 19.46’ low. Black bass are very slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. WHITNEY: Water stained; 79–83 degrees; 2.49’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon red spinner baits, crankbaits and top-waters early and late. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait.

—TPWD


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Inland Fisheries department receives Sport Fish Restoration award The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Inland Fisheries Division was recognized by the American Fisheries Society, which awarded the division the 2016 Sport Fish Restoration Outstanding Project Award. The award recognized TPWD’s river initiative. Since 2010, the project’s conservation action has included restoring 9,300 acres of habitat over 200 miles of rivers, providing guidance to landowners and workshops attended by 2,000 landowners, securing seven river access leases, and expanding access to 49 miles of Texas Hill Country rivers. The American Fisheries Society is funded from revenues from excise taxes on fishing tackle, boats and motors. In 2015, the excise taxes totaled $17.3 million. —Staff report

Crochet takes Central Open Cliff Crochet of Pierre Part, Louisiana, cashed in on his homewaters advantage to claim his first B.A.S.S. victory at the Atchafalaya Basin in Louisiana. Sitting in seventh place after the second day of competition Friday, Crochet rallied with an 18-pound, 4-ounce limit for a total of 46 pounds, 6 ounces to win the Bassmaster Central Open. He earned a $45,000 Skeeter ZX200/Yamaha VF200LA rig and $6,741 in cash, and a berth in the 2017 GEICO Bassmaster Classic. Crochet’s key bait for the tournament was a creature bait that he punched through mats with a 1 1/2-ounce weight. Greg Hackney of Gonzales, La., retained second place with 42 pounds, 4 ounces. “I basically caught everything off of cypress trees,” he said. “The area I fished had a lot of logs and big stumps, but I didn’t catch any fish off of those. Every fish came off a green tree.” Cody Bird of Granbury was the top Texan in the field, finishing third with 42 pounds, 2 ounces. —B.A.S.S.

LoneOStar Outdoor News

November 11, 2016

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad on soft plastics. Redfish are good in the marsh with high tides. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Flounder are fair at the mouths of the bayous on a falling tide. BOLIVAR: Trout are good on the south shoreline on soft plastics and top-waters. Trout, black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. A few birds are beginning to work. TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on soft plastics. Redfish are good on live bait around the reefs and in the marsh. Tides are above normal. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout and large Gulf trout are good for drifters working deep shell on plastics and fresh shrimp. Redfish are good in the marsh and out the mouths of drains on the falling tide. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Trout and redfish are fair to good in Bastrop Bay on live shrimp. TEXAS CITY: Redfish are fair to good in Moses Lake on crabs and shrimp. Gulf trout are good in the channel on fresh shrimp. FREEPORT: Redfish are fair to good on the reefs in Chocolate Bay on live shrimp. Bull redfish are fair to good around Surfside and at the Quintana jetty on crabs, shrimp and mullet. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are good on the shorelines on small top-waters and dark plastics. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good on live shrimp in Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and at Shell Island. Trout and redfish are good in the Colo-

rado River on shrimp. PORT O’CONNOR: Redfish are good in the back lakes on shrimp and mullet. Bull redfish are good at the jetty on crabs, mullet and shad. Trout are good on the reefs in San Antonio Bay on live shrimp. ROCKPORT: Redfish are good on mullet on the Estes Flats and around Mud Island. Bull redfish are good in the Lydia Ann Channel on mullet and crabs. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good on East Flats on top-waters and scented plastics. Bull redfish are good at the jetty and on the beachfront on natural baits. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are good on the beachfront on mullet and shrimp. Trout are fair for waders working mud and grass on small top-waters, Corkies and scented plastics. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and plum plastics around rocks and grass. Redfish are fair to good in knee–deep water on small Super Spooks, She Pups and SkitterWalks. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on top-waters and soft plastics under a popping cork. Trout are fair to good on the shoreline on small Super Spooks and Corkies. Bull reds are good at East Cut on crabs. SOUTH PADRE: Trout, redfish and snook are fair to good in South Bay and Mexiquita Flats. Tarpon and snook are fair on DOA Shrimp at the jetty. Redfish are schooling in large pods. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good while drifting sand and grass flats on artificial and live shrimp, and scented plastics under popping corks. Trout and redfish are fair to good while drifting deep sand and grass on scented plastics and shrimp under rattling corks. —TPWD


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November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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GAME WARDEN BLOTTER FUZZY MATH Texas game wardens were checking dove hunters in a field on the Concho and McCulloch County line when they came upon a man standing behind a truck next to a pile of birds. The individual was in possession of 35 dove. The man informed wardens that only 12 were his and the rest belonged to the rest of the hunters in the field. Another man approached and claimed 15 of the birds. After contacting the other five hunters and learning that none of them had any birds on the tailgate of the truck, the warden returned to talk to the two men who did claim birds. The man that claimed the 15 birds admitted to taking the other eight dove. Chargers for exceeding the daily bag limit were filed, and resources were seized and donated to a needy family. The case and restitution is pending. REGRETTING IT AFTER SUNSET A Coleman County game warden was patrolling for dove hunters when he heard a group shoot well after sunset, the end of the legal hunting day for migratory game birds. The warden was able to get within 10 yards of the hunters undetected and watched them continue to shoot after sunset. The warden also discovered the hunters were over the daily bag limit as well. Cases were filed for over the limit and shooting past sunset. LOTS OF LINE LINKED TO MEXICO Cameron County game wardens removed more than five miles of

TOO MANY DOVE ALOFT SHOWED THEM THE WAY Game wardens on patrol in Duval County came across two hunters in a field and noticed a relatively high amount of dove flying in the area compared to elsewhere in the county. One warden found milo scattered along the road and in the field. While interviewing the hunters, the game wardens discovered an unplugged shotgun as well as a woodpecker and Inca dove that the hunters admitted to shooting. The hunters also admitted

illegal long line from the Gulf of Mexico. Game wardens say fishing fleets from Mexico entering the Texas waters have posed a significant threat to wildlife such as sharks, red snappers, red drum and other forms of marine life. BLOCKED BOAT CALL LEADS TO CHARGES Bowie County game wardens were called about a truck and trailer blocking a boat ramp. A warden responded and located the vehicle. A boat returned to the ramp and was loaded onto the trailer. A warden made contact and found a shocking device still connected to wires. Wardens then searched the boat and truck. Two flathead catfish were returned to the water, and a four bar telephone, wires, dip nets, drill, voltage meter, and spot light were seized as potential evidence. Wardens also allegedly found drugs and a pistol in the vehicle. The two suspects are accused of fishing

to hunting that location earlier that morning and getting their limit, but continued to adamantly deny placing the milo on the road and field. The wardens went back to the camp to collect the dove from the morning hunt. Wardens also contacted the landowner, who admitted scattering the milo on about 400 acres on his property a couple of days earlier. Multiple citations were issued.

violations and drug charges. A TELLING RESPONSE A Concho County game warden made contact with a dove hunter who had quit hunting 30 minutes before sunset and had killed 14 dove, one shy of a daily bag limit. Curious to why he had stopped at 14 the warden asked how many he had killed that morning. The man told him “three” and immediately realized the mistake he had made, admitting to harvesting 17 for the day. Charges were filed for exceeding the daily bag limit; two birds were seized and donated to a needy family. Case and restitution is pending. A HARD DAY’S NIGHT A Willacy County game warden patrolling the Port Mansfield area issued 14 citations. They included possession of undersized trout, over the daily bag limit of trout and no fishing license. Forty-six

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spotted sea trout were seized throughout the night and into the early morning. The case and restitution are pending. REDFISH THIEF CAUGHT RED-HANDED Following up on a complaint regarding anglers taking over the limit of redfish, a Nueces County game warden set up surveillance at Packery Channel. The warden apprehended one individual with 10 redfish over the daily bag limit. Citations were issued and the case is pending. SHOCK AND AWE A woman and two men were charged with possession of a fish shocker in Comanche County. A boat with three people approached a dock, and a woman got off and a man handed her a cooler, which appeared to be heavy. A game warden stopped the woman in the parking lot and asked to check the cooler. She refused so the warden

waited to ask the men what was in the cooler. They told the warden they didn’t know anything about a cooler or its contents. The warden checked the cooler to find an ancient hand-cranked fish shocker. All three were charged with possession of a fish shocker within 1/2 mile of public water and the woman was charged for failure to allow inspection. PRONGHORNS DOWN, CITATIONS UP A pickup racing down a country road led to the discovery of two pronghorns taken on a ranch. Dallam County game wardens followed the vehicle to a farm where a father and two sons had shot a pronghorn. After the initial check and a possible permit violation, wardens saw a second pronghorn in a wheat field approximately 150 yards away from the first pronghorn that the hunters and landowner were ignoring. After a quick interview, a juvenile admitted to shooting both pronghorn. A citation was written for exceeding the annual bag limit and a warning for hunting without a valid permit. Charges and civil restitution for a 60-inch pronghorn are pending. The meat was donated to a needy family in Dalhart.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

November 11, 2016

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November 11, 2016

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or screen shot. Texas has launched a similar game app, but is using it on a limited basis. This year Texas required eastern turkey harvests to be reported using the My Texas Hunt Harvest app or online. Still, paper tagging remained a requirement. Texas officials said there are no definitive plans to require the app or online reporting for other game animals such as deer. However, it can be used to report deer and other game on a voluntary basis. In Alabama, the state agency decided to go to a mandatory reporting system in order to give biologists the best information possible on deer and turkey harvests. The impact of hunting and outdoor related activities adds an estimated $3.88 billion to the state’s economy, with deer and turkey hunting being the driving force behind that number. Alabama plans on using the data to fine-tune their hunting seasons. “It’s kind of something we’ve been building on,” said Chris Lewis, assistant chief of law enforcement for Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. The reporting had been voluntary, but wasn’t successful. Lewis said Alabama’s app, called the Pocket Ranger, is simple and allows hunters to report their game “as fast as you can click a button.” The app is also designed to allow hunters to log in and complete their harvest info even without phone service. Once the hunter moves back within range, the information that was stored on the app is reported automatically. Hunters have 48 hours to report their harvest and will receive an email confirmation. “It makes it a lot easier for hunters,” Lewis said. “It’s exciting.” Hunters are using the app now for bow hunting season. Another benefit of the app is that deer harvesting information is reported to a database that is updated frequently. The information is accessible to the public, showing a statewide total and a breakdown of harvests by county. Of course, if someone doesn’t have a smart phone, Alabama has an online and phone reporting system. However, those who don’t use the app must keep a paper copy of their harvest with them or be ticketed by law enforcement. Fred Harders, assistant director of Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries said having an app eliminates the cost of tags — something Alabama never used. The biggest expense right now is allowing people to use the phone to call in their harvest. Each phone call costs money. Eventually, they hope to make everything digital In Texas, hunting and fishing is big business as well, with outdoorsmen spending

$4.1 billion, according to 2011 figures. While Texas may not be as far along as Alabama, there are those who are excited about the possibilities technology brings. Alan Cain, whitetail deer program leader for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, believes Texas will build on its app. “Ultimately, the big game program would like to move to mandatory reporting and no tag,” he said. “It seems logical to move in that direction. It could potentially save the state a lot of money.” Texas could save money on mailing out surveys, for example. That money could be put back into conservation and research for game and wildlife. Besides saving money, Cain believes Texas would benefit greatly from the data provided through more accurate numbers. The Texas app also keeps a record of a hunter’s harvests. Cain said his son enjoyed using the app to discuss a previous hunt. Part of the issue is getting the word out to Texas hunters about the app. For example, the app isn’t on TPWD’s main Web page, but will come up in a search. Jason Hardin, upland game bird specialist with TPWD, said the eastern turkey reporting was a good trial run for the app. Hunters reported under 200 turkeys in 2016, with the app being the most popular way of reporting. An online reporting system was also available. Check stations were eliminated. “The app got good reviews,” Hardin said. The only thing hunters seemed worried about was that the app would divulge where their best hunting spots were. But as Hardin pointed out, hunters had 24 hours to report eastern turkey. They were given a confirmation number when they reported. A game warden working the area would get the same confirmation number through his own app tied to the hunter’s license. Like Cain, Hardin thinks the app could be expanded into use with deer hunting, such as the Managed Lands Deer Program. Steve Lightfoot, a spokesperson with TPWD, said it would be more difficult for Texas to use the technology than some states because of the large number of hunters and the different aspects of hunting each game animal. For it to work for 650,000 hunters would be a challenge, he said. However, Lightfoot thinks Texas is moving closer to where Alabama is. “I know from our standpoint eliminating the tag would be a benefit to a lot of folks,” Lightfoot said. But as Cain pointed out, it will take time and support from hunters, advisory groups and law enforcement to make it more than a dream.


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Authorities offer tips on deterring boat and fishing equipment thieves By Matthew Costa

For Lone Star Outdoor News Just because the weather is finally beginning to cool down in Texas doesn’t mean thieves are in hibernation. Thievery doesn’t have a season. A case in point is the recent rash of boat storage unit thefts near Lake Amistad in Del Rio. Less activity on the lake could mean more opportunity for criminals. But marina owners, law enforcement officials and insurers say there are plenty of ways that anglers and boaters can protect their property: Look for secure marinas or storage areas How well protected is your marina exactly? Knowing which ones offer the most security should be your number one priority when choosing where to either dry dock or park in the water. Start with a marina that offers 24-hour surveillance and gate protection such as the marinas at Lake Ray Hubbard. “We try to keep nonmembers from getting in,” said Frank Cortez, manager of Harbor Bay Marina in Rockwall. “We also walk the docks daily, but I recommend anyone who owns a boat to come out every so often and check it out. If we see anything wrong, we contact the individual.” Use more than one good lock The more locks a thief sees, the better the chance he will move on. Use the best locks you can afford. Lock the trailer tongue, outboard engine, and put a chain around the trailer wheels on your boat. Propeller locks take minimal effort

to install, but can go a long way in deterring thieves according to Denton County Game Warden Stormy McCuistion. “Putting on a master lock isn’t going to work,” he said. “(A propeller lock) costs a little money, but it’ll save you some heartache in the end.” Employ common sense practices The best way to turn someone with bad intentions away is by simply never giving them the opportunity. That’s why you should always remember to lock your equipment, whether that is the boat itself or your gear. “The best thing to do is to lock them up and either lock your equipment on the boat or just take it with you,” McCuistion said. “If they want it bad enough though, they’ll get it.” It may be easy to leave equipment on a boat in the winter months thinking there’s a smaller likelihood of potential theft, but if a criminal wants your property, do your best to make it as difficult as possible. Make your trailer impossible to move without you. If you have a trailer, another idea is to make sure to remove one wheel and place it in a secure area while putting a lock on the other, according to Capt. Jim Moody of the Collin County Sheriff’s department. Check out new anti-theft technology Devices that send alerts to your cell phone, take photos/video, provide tracking, or kill the motor if your boat moves from its virtual boundary can stop a thief in his or her tracks. Once a boat is gone, one boat insurer’s study found that only 1 in 10 vessels are ever fully recovered.

November 11, 2016

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Bulls on crabs

Fish stocking at Meredith

Continued from page 8

Continued from page 8

BIG BULL: Garrett Favre landed this bull red near the Port O’Connor jetty using a live blue crab for bait. Photo by Blaine Favre.

that’s holding the most reds is right off the ship channel.” The only problem with using live crabs is finding them. One way is to locate a bait camp that keeps a good supply on hand. In the Port O’Connor area, the Sea Drift bait camps sell a lot of crabs. Another option is to set out a few traps. The water temperature is still unseasonably warm, so blue crabs are still fairly easy to catch. Keep in mind that a blue crab has to be at least 5 inches wide to keep, however 5 percent of the crabs you have in possession can be smaller and used for bait. Check the Texas Parks and Wildlife regulations handbook for a clarification on bait crab rules.

Cash uses a Mustad 9/0 circle hook with live crabs. Most of the time he’ll use a Carolina rig with both live and dead crabs. The leader is 30-pound monofilament line that’s connected to the 60-pound test line via a barrel swivel. A slip weight of 4 to 8 ounces is used depending on the current. Hooking a live crab can be done by pushing the hook through the tip of a spine, or by plucking one of the legs off and slipping the hook through the hole that’s left. “Most of the time a 4- to 5-inch live crab is best,” says Cash. “But with the larger ones I’ll often pull the carapace off and use a whole fresh dead crab.”

capacity. For reference, the lake is 34 feet higher than it was in October of 2013. “Meredith is now 64 percent full,” Clayton said. “The lake has never been completely full, although it got close in the 1970s and in 1993.” While few fish survived the low period, one species managed to pull through. “The channel catfish population has been outstanding — they weren’t wiped out by the golden algae,” Clayton said. Other species didn’t make it. “After the blooms and the low water levels, we couldn’t electrofish because the salinities were so high,” Clayton said. “In our surveys, we didn’t catch any largemouth or walleye.” In October, electrofishing efforts did show a few largemouth bass made it, and one walleye was observed but not caught. “I presume those fish went upriver and got in a deep hole,” Clayton said. Officials are hoping the golden algae blooms don’t return, and the lake returns to its former status as a prime fishery. The lake record largemouth is 12.25 pounds (March, 2001), the record smallmouth is 7.93 pounds (March, 1998) and the walleye record is 11.88 pounds (February, 1990). “A few of the walleye stocked may reach minimum size (12 inches) by the end of next summer,” Clayton said. “But you’re probably looking at the summer of 2018 for most of them to reach minimum size.” Clayton hopes the walleye return, along with the people who catch them. “When people heard we were stocking them, most of the questions I received were the same,” Clayton said. “They ask, “‘What’s a walleye?’”

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DIY deer blinds Continued from page 6

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IN HIDING: Crates or pallets can be used to put together a simple but effective blind. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

crate in kind of a half-moon shape with short 2x4 braces. Then I brushed up the outside with cedar limbs. Inside I’ve got two fold-up chairs. Two of us can hunt that blind and be absolutely invisible. I’ve had deer walk right by me and never know I was there.” Another option for a quick brush blind is to nail up 2x4 stringers around a few old scrub oaks. That’s a type of deer blind that Ricky Cerrato has used for years. “It’s a type of ground blind that is easy to construct, easy to brush and I can even place a plastic camouflage tarp on top for protection from rain,” Cerrato said. “The key is that I can build several of these blinds around the ranch that I hunt on. If one spot doesn’t produce I simply relocate to another throw-down blind. I’m not the kind of hunter that likes to sit in a big, cushy blind. I’d rather rough it a little bit. Plus, I never know what’s going to step out of the brush, and most of the time deer, pigs and turkeys don’t ever know I’m there until it’s too late.”

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White-winged opportunities Continued from page 1

will be able to hunt during the first two weekends in September. “It’s a pretty big deal,” Morrison said. Combined with a change to be available for the 20182019 season, it can be even a bigger deal. “They will be allowing us to open the South Zone season as early as Sept. 14 (the first Saturday after Sept. 14),” Morrison said. “Combined with the Special White-winged expansion that allows four days on weekends in the first two weekends of September, it would allow South Texas hunters to hunt each weekend during the month.” Changes to the 20172018 season will have to

MORE DOVE DAYS; Potential changes could allow South Texas dove hunters to pursue white-winged dove during all September weekends by 2018. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

go through the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission regulatory process and be

approved before mentation.

imple-

Game Warden of the Year award John (Jason) McFall was the inaugural recipient of the Game Warden of the Year award from the Texas Game Warden Association. McFall has been a game warden for 28 years, and is stationed in Kleberg County. “He is well-respected by ranchers, guides, county attorneys and judges,” said TPWD Executive Director Carter Smith. “He knows the brush country and the Lower Laguna Madre backward and forward, and is very active with giving back to the community, especially with FFA and 4H clubs.” McFall also arranged to construct a few floating cabins on the LLM where wardens could rest and temporarily get out of the hot sun. —TPWD


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Page 19

Muddy deer opener Continued from page 1

Aaron Gage has four children, and he hunted opening weekend with his two youngest on a friend’s ranch in Ellis County. “My youngest son, Brandon, had shot a pig with a .223 but this was his first time to use his .243,” Aaron said. The low percentage chance of rain in the forecast didn’t pan out. “It was muddy and gross,” Aaron said. “We were in the blind for a while and nothing really showed up except a few does. Then everything disappeared and we thought about leaving. The buck showed up all by himself looking for a bite of corn.” Brandon made a good shot, the buck didn’t go far, and the father who makes hunting a family affair was quite proud. “All four of our kids have really taken to hunting,” Aaron said. “The oldest are 15 and 18 and we adopted Brandon and Julie before they were 2 years old. Julie, the youngest, is 8 years old and isn’t quite ready yet. It’s

FIRST DEER: Brandon Gage, 9, took this buck during the opening weekend in Ellis County. Photo by Aaron Gage.

hard for her to see through the scope appropriately, and the pigs don’t stand still long enough for her to get a shot.” South Texas hunters saw increased deer movement with cooler temperatures.

Gary Guerrieri from Pennsylvania was especially happy with the opener, as he shot a 25-inch-wide buck with 203 inches of antler in Frio County.

Cats on the prowl Continued from page 1

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For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2016 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

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punch bait are his keys to success. Blue catfish are starting to come on strong as well, he said. He uses fresh shad or carp to catch blues. On Nov. 6 during a fishing trip, clients pulled in a 35- and 42-pound blue catfish. At Richland Chambers Reservoir near Corsicana, guide Bob Holmes said he approaches catfish a couple of different ways. He likes to fish under roosting cormorants, or water turkeys, as they are called. He also uses baited spots. Recent rains have made catfishing better and more difficult at the same time, he said. More rain meant more vegetation and brush near the shoreline. So Holmes fishes it like a seawall on windy days by backing way up. Punch bait and shad are his baits of choice. Farther south, catfishing is seeing resurgence after heavy rains in September, said Charles Dewey, a certified weigh station operator for Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Guadalupe River fishing for cats has been good from Lake Dunlap to Lake Wood, he said, adding that some nice blue cats in the 12to 40-pound range have been reported. Guides and anglers have reported catching cats off wind-blown points and in coves. Channel cats are in 5-8 feet of water, with the bigger blue cats being caught while drift-fishing in 15-20 feet of water. At Lake Calaveras, catfishing has picked up and they are in fall feeding mode, Dewey said.

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November 11, 2016

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HEROES

Harold Byrd, of Dallas, took a European mouflon sheep during a hunting trip in the Czech Republic.

Ricardo De La Fuente, of Crystal City, caught a 7-pound and 4-pound bass at Falcon Lake while fishing with his two sons Rick and Alex.

Bill Hughs, of Sachse, caught this 13-pound redfish while fishing with Rod Benders Charters in Venice, Louisiana.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@ lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Emerson Kirksey Hankamer, 12, of Houston, caught a 28-inch redfish during a father-son fly-fishing trip in Rockport.

Noah Lencioni, 15, harvested this 8-point white-tailed buck on Oct. 29 during the early Youth-Only Season in Cooke County. He harvested the buck offhand at 70 yards with a .243 Ruger American rifle equipped with a Leupold 3-9x40 scope.


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November 11, 2016

Page 21

NATIONAL Professor in IGFA HOF A Virginia Institute of Marine Science professor was inducted into the Fishing Hall of Fame of the International Game Fish Association. John Graves is chancellor professor and chairman of fisheries science at VIMS in Gloucester Point. His induction is based largely on his billfish research. Graves’ research led to the use of circle hooks for billfish, which VIMS says sharply increased the survival rate of marlin, swordfish and sailfish in the catch-and-release fishery. His genetic research also enabled federal fisheries officials to distinguish between legally fished Pacific blue marlin and illegally fished Atlantic blue marlin. —IGFA

Fisheries numbers in NOAA Fisheries released its Fisheries of the United States, 2015 report, giving a profile of the nation’s fishing and seafood by the numbers. The numbers reflect a jump in domestic seafood consumption to 15.5 pounds per person, up by nearly a full pound. Aquaculture figures for 2015 are not yet available. In 2014, aquaculture generated 608 million pounds of seafood valued at $1.3 billion. This equates to 20 percent of the value and 6 percent of the volume of total U.S. production of fishery products. U.S. recreational anglers took more than 60 million trips in 2015 and caught more than 350 million fish, 57 percent of which were released. The total recreational harvest was estimated at 151 million fish weighing 188 million pounds. Commercial fishermen landed 9.7 billion pounds of seafood valued at $5.2 billion in 2015. —NOAA

Wholesaler awards announced Each year, at the Annual Meeting of the National Association of Sporting Goods Wholesalers, NASGW awards the top optics, accessory, ammunition and firearms manufacturers as determined by industry wholesalers. The 2016 Leadership Award recipients: Optics Manufacturer of the Year:
Leupold & Stevens, Inc.
 Accessory Manufacturer of the Year:
Birchwood Casey & Magpul
 Ammunition Manufacturer of the Year:
Hornady Manufacturing

 Firearms Manufacturer of the Year:
Sturm, Ruger and Company, Inc.

 Importer of the Year:
Aguila Ammunition Inovator of the Year:
Sturm, Ruger and Company, Inc. —NASBW

NH moose hunters successful In the New Hampshire 2016 moose season, 52 hunters took a moose during the nine-day season that ended Oct. 23. A total of 72 permits were issued, a success rate of 72 percent. The breakdown of the harvest this year was 45 bulls and seven cows. —NH Fish and Game

Two winners of NOAA conservation award Two individuals will receive the 2016 Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award on Dec. 12. Lynda V. Mapes has been an environmental reporter with the Seattle Times since 1997. She earned acclaim for a newspaper series, and 2013 book, about the removal of Washington State’s Elwha Dam, which is considered the most extraordinary fish habitat conservation project in U.S. history. She helped the public understand about removing dams and restoring habitat for threatened and endangered salmon. Paul Dest has served since 2001 as the director of the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve in southern Maine. In 2015, the Wells

Reserve became Maine’s first fully solar-powered nonprofit. For more than 30 years, Dest has worked on protecting New England’s rivers and coastlines. —NOAA

Property protects mule deer migration A new wildlife habitat management area that helps secure one of the country’s most critical mule deer migration routes was acquired by the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission. The new Luke Lynch Wildlife Habitat Management Area, located along the western front of the Wind River Range north of Pinedale, will be managed to conserve mule deer migration and preserve open space for big game winter range habitat. It is named to honor Luke Lynch, who was The Conservation Fund’s Wyoming state director and had helped conserve this portion of the migration corridor, before his untimely death in 2015. The Conservation Fund purchased the 364acre Fremont Lake property on the open market in April 2015, protecting it from subdivision and development, which could have cut off the crucial migration pathway. Researchers at the University of Wyoming had identified the Fremont Lake Bottleneck property as the most threatened portion in this internationally significant biannual Red Desert to Hoback Mule Deer Migration. —Conservation Fund

Man dies after tree stand fall Robert Jankowski, a 56-year-old Michigan resident, was found by family members when he didn’t return home after an afternoon hunt, according to the Mason County Sheriff’s Department. Police say Jankowski had been bowhunting and fell from the stand. He was not secured by a harness and was pronounced dead at the scene. —Mason County

DAVIS BRIMA GER, 11, OF NEW BRAU NFELS, SHOT HIS FIR ST PRONGHORN ON A HUNT IN HUDSPETH COUNTY WITH HIS FATH ER, DAVID. AFTER A GOOD STALK, DAVIS MADE THE 100-YAR D SHOT WITH HIS .25 -06.

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Anglers team up with agency for habitat, weigh-in facility Fifteen new habitat sites were constructed and placed in Beaver Lake from the trees removed for the construction of a new weighin facility. Most branches from the large elm, maple and cedar trees were up to 15 feet long, so the brush piles created will be substantial additions to the fish attractors on Beaver Lake, said Jon Stein, AGFC fisheries biologist for northwest Arkansas. The facility will offer tanks for anglers to keep their fish in while they wait to weigh in. Water from the lake will be pumped into the tanks and an air blower will aerate them to ensure fish stay as healthy as possible during any weigh-ins. In all, anglers contributed $32,500 worth of in-kind donations to the project and the AGFC contributed $41,250 of funding. This was enough matching money to secure $221,250 from federal grants to bring the total project cost to $295,000. —AGFC

Louisiana duck zones changing this season New duck hunting zones in Louisiana will go into effect beginning in November. The season opens Nov. 5 with youth waterfowl weekend in the coast and west zones. Larry Reynolds, LDWF Waterfowl Program manager, said the zones expanded from two to three back in 2012. The boundaries of those zones are being modified to better fit the desires of rice growers and hunters in particular parts of the state. Zones can be changed every five years. These new boundaries will remain in effect through the 2020-21 waterfowl hunting seasons. —LDWF

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Nov. 14

Nov. 21

Nov. 29

Dec. 7

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 Wed 24 Thu 25 Fri

11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu

1:54 2:41 3:32 4:27 5:28 6:33 7:39

18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 Wed 24 Thu 25 Fri

1:48 8:02 2:36 8:49 3:26 9:40 4:21 10:36 5:22 11:37 6:27 12:12 7:33 1:18 8:39 2:24 9:41 3:27 10:37 4:24 11:28 5:16 ----- 6:02 12:33 6:44 1:12 7:22 1:49 8:00

2:15 8:28 3:03 9:17 3:55 10:09 4:51 11:06 5:52 ----6:57 12:42 8:03 1:48 9:08 2:53 10:08 3:54 11:03 4:50 11:52 5:40 12:13 6:25 12:54 7:05 1:33 7:44 2:10 8:21

06:42 05:27 06:43 05:26 06:44 05:26 06:45 05:25 06:45 05:25 06:46 05:24 06:47 05:24 06:48 05:24 06:49 05:23 06:50 05:23 06:50 05:23 06:51 05:22 06:52 05:22 06:53 05:22 06:54 05:21

3:41p 3:17a 4:24p 4:22a 5:10p 5:30a 6:00p 6:38a 6:54p 7:46a 7:51p 8:52a 8:52p 9:53a 9:53p 10:49a 10:54p 11:39a 11:52p 12:24p NoMoon 1:04p 12:49a 1:41p 1:43a 2:16p 2:35a 2:50p 3:27a 3:23p

8:08 8:55 9:46 10:42 11:43 12:17 1:24

2:21 8:34 3:09 9:23 4:00 10:15 4:57 11:12 5:58 ----7:03 12:48 8:09 1:54

06:53 06:54 06:55 06:56 06:57 06:58 06:58

8:45 2:30

9:13

2:59

06:59 05:24 9:54p 11:01a

9:46 10:43 11:34 ----12:38 1:17 1:55

10:14 11:09 11:58 12:19 1:00 1:39 2:16

4:00 4:56 5:46 6:30 7:11 7:50 8:27

07:00 07:01 07:02 07:03 07:04 07:05 07:06

3:33 4:30 5:22 6:08 6:49 7:28 8:06

05:28 05:27 05:26 05:26 05:25 05:25 05:24 05:23 05:23 05:22 05:22 05:22 05:21 05:21

3:46p 3:23a 4:28p 4:30a 5:13p 5:38a 6:01p 6:48a 6:54p 7:57a 7:52p 9:04a 8:52p 10:05a 10:55p 11:50a 11:55p 12:34p NoMoon 1:13p 12:52a 1:49p 1:48a 2:22p 2:42a 2:55p 3:34a 3:27p

San Antonio 2016 Nov.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 Wed 24 Thu 25 Fri

2:01 8:14 2:48 9:02 3:39 9:53 4:34 10:49 5:34 11:50 6:39 12:24 7:46 1:31 8:51 2:37 9:53 3:40 10:50 4:37 11:40 5:28 12:03 6:14 12:45 6:56 1:24 7:35 2:02 8:12

2:27 8:41 3:16 9:29 4:07 10:21 5:03 11:18 6:05 ----7:10 12:54 8:16 2:01 9:20 3:06 10:20 4:07 11:15 5:02 ----- 5:52 12:26 6:37 1:07 7:18 1:46 7:56 2:23 8:34

06:54 06:54 06:55 06:56 06:57 06:58 06:59 06:59 07:00 07:01 07:02 07:03 07:04 07:05 07:05

05:40 05:40 05:39 05:39 05:38 05:38 05:37 05:37 05:37 05:36 05:36 05:36 05:35 05:35 05:35

3:53p 3:30a 4:37p 4:35a 5:24p 5:42a 6:13p 6:51a 7:07p 7:59a 8:05p 9:04a 9:06p 10:06a 10:07p 11:01a 11:07p 11:51a NoMoon 12:36p 12:06a 1:17p 1:02a 1:54p 1:56a 2:29p 2:48a 3:03p 3:40a 3:36p

Amarillo

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 Wed 24 Thu 25 Fri

2:14 8:28 3:02 9:15 3:52 10:06 4:47 11:02 5:48 ----6:53 12:37 7:59 1:44 9:05 2:50 10:07 3:53 11:03 4:50 11:54 5:42 12:16 6:28 12:59 7:10 1:38 7:48 2:15 8:26

2:41 3:29 4:21 5:17 6:18 7:23 8:29 9:34 10:34 11:29 ----12:39 1:20 1:59 2:36

8:54 9:43 10:35 11:32 12:03 1:08 2:14 3:19 4:20 5:16 6:06 6:51 7:31 8:10 8:47

07:18 05:43 07:19 05:43 07:20 05:42 07:21 05:41 07:22 05:40 07:23 05:40 07:24 05:39 07:25 05:39 07:26 05:38 07:27 05:38 07:28 05:37 07:29 05:37 07:30 05:36 07:31 05:36 07:32 05:36

4:06p 3:44a 4:47p 4:52a 5:31p 6:02a 6:18p 7:13a 7:11p 8:23a 8:08p 9:30a 9:08p 10:31a 10:11p 11:26a 11:13p 12:15p NoMoon 12:58p 12:13a 1:36p 1:12a 2:11p 2:08a 2:43p 3:03a 3:15p 3:56a 3:47p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Time 12:19 AM 12:46 AM 1:14 AM 1:44 AM 2:17 AM 2:51 AM 3:27 AM 12:09 AM 1:38 AM 4:00 AM 5:16 AM 5:53 AM 6:21 AM 12:11 AM 12:36 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.4L 1.3L 1.2L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 1.5H 1.4H

Time 6:37 AM 7:16 AM 7:58 AM 8:42 AM 9:29 AM 10:18 AM 11:09 AM 4:06 AM 4:51 AM 6:31 AM 9:06 AM 10:56 AM 12:18 PM 6:46 AM 7:09 AM

Height 0.4L 0.1L -0.2L -0.4L -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L 1.5H 1.4H 1.2H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H 0.4L 0.2L

Time 1:12 PM 2:10 PM 3:05 PM 4:00 PM 4:56 PM 5:55 PM 6:58 PM 12:03 PM 1:02 PM 2:05 PM 3:15 PM 4:27 PM 5:37 PM 1:22 PM 2:14 PM

Height 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 1.9H -0.3L -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 1.3H 1.4H

Time 6:51 PM 7:43 PM 8:34 PM 9:23 PM 10:12 PM 11:05 PM

Height 0.8L 0.9L 1.0L 1.1L 1.2L 1.3L

8:06 PM 9:14 PM 10:15 PM 11:03 PM 11:41 PM

1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H

6:36 PM 7:25 PM

0.8L 0.9L

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 12:03 AM 12:20 AM 12:48 AM 1:25 AM 2:11 AM 2:58 AM 3:38 AM 1:10 AM 2:05 AM 3:12 AM 5:18 AM 5:51 AM 6:16 AM 6:38 AM 12:25 AM

Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.4L 1.3L 1.2L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.5L 1.5H

Time 6:37 AM 7:16 AM 8:03 AM 8:56 AM 9:45 AM 10:33 AM 11:22 AM 4:15 AM 4:55 AM 7:13 AM 9:09 AM 10:50 AM 12:05 PM 1:10 PM 6:59 AM

Height 0.5L 0.2L 0.0L -0.2L -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L 1.6H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.4H 0.3L

Time 1:45 PM 2:52 PM 3:44 PM 4:32 PM 5:24 PM 6:27 PM 7:27 PM 12:17 PM 1:13 PM 2:04 PM 2:58 PM 4:28 PM 5:47 PM 6:33 PM 2:19 PM

Height 1.8H 2.0H 2.1H 2.2H 2.2H 2.2H 2.1H -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.0L 1.5H

Time 6:54 PM 7:55 PM 9:08 PM 10:06 PM 10:57 PM 11:58 PM

Height 1.1L 1.2L 1.3L 1.4L 1.4L 1.5L

8:16 PM 9:01 PM 9:48 PM 10:36 PM 1:19 PM 11:55 PM

2.0H 1.9H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H

7:19 PM

1.1L

Height 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.4H 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.3L 0.5L 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 1.2H 1.1H

Time 7:06 AM 7:32 AM 8:12 AM 9:04 AM 6:24 PM 7:49 PM 8:50 PM 9:39 PM 10:25 PM 11:08 PM 9:33 AM 11:20 AM 12:56 PM 7:13 AM 7:41 AM

Height 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 0.5L 0.4L

Time 1:45 PM 2:57 PM 4:10 PM 5:14 PM

Height 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H

Time 7:58 PM 9:23 PM 10:41 PM

Height 1.0 L 1.2L 1.3L

Time 12:28 AM 12:48 AM 1:05 AM 1:24 AM 10:01 AM 10:56 AM 11:50 AM 12:54 PM 2:07 PM 3:16 PM 5:53 AM 6:18 AM 6:46 AM 12:03 AM 12:12 AM

:31 PM 5:50 PM 6:51 PM 2:06 PM 3:19 PM

0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 1.2H 1.2H

11:41 PM 11:57 PM

1.3H 1.2H

7:45 PM 8:49 PM

1.0L 1.1L

Height 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H -0.2L -0.2L 0.0L 0.1L 0.4L 1.2L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.4L

Time 6:39 AM 7:05 AM 7:39 AM 8:18 AM 9:02 AM 6:12 PM 7:14 PM 8:15 PM 9:11 PM 9:57 PM 7:56 AM 10:04 AM 11:49 AM 1:08 PM 2:08 PM

Height 0.7L 0.5L 0.2L 0.0L -0.1L 2.3H 2.2H 2.1H 2.0H 1.8H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.5H 1.6H

Time 1:00 PM 2:06 PM 3:08 PM 4:09 PM 5:10 PM

Height 1.7H 2.0H 2.1H 2.3H 2.3H

Time 7:07 PM 8:21 PM 9:35 PM 10:52 PM

Height 1.0L 1.1L 1.3L 1.4L

3:04 PM 4:31 PM 5:52 PM 7:05 PM 8:11 PM

0.6L 0.8L 0.9L 1.1L 1.2L

10:32 PM 11:00 PM 11:22 PM 11:42 PM

1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H

Height 1.2H 1.2H 1.0L 1.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.1L 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H

Time 10:57 AM 11:21 AM 4:06 AM 4:21 AM 10:08 PM 11:27 PM

Height 0.5L 0.3L 1.2H 1.2H 1.5H 1.5H

Time 5:05 PM 6:23 PM 11:50 AM 12:24 PM

Height 1.2H 1.3H 0.1L 0.0L

Time 11:17 PM

Height 0.9L

7:36 PM 8:50 PM

1.4H 1.5H

3:43 PM 4:52 PM 6:07 PM 7:18 PM 9:41 AM 10:08 AM 10:39 AM 11:11 AM

-0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L

Freeport Harbor Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Time 12:05 AM 12:31 AM 12:55 AM 1:17 AM 1:35 AM 9:49 AM 10:40 AM 11:35 AM 12:35 PM 1:44 PM 5:23 AM 5:41 AM 6:06 AM 6:32 AM 6:58 AM

Time 3:42 AM 3:54 AM 12:22 AM 1:31 AM 1:04 PM 1:51 PM 2:43 PM 12:40 AM 1:37 AM 2:19 AM 2:47 AM 3:03 AM 3:03 AM 2:59 AM 3:00 AM

Time 9:07 AM 9:24 AM 9:56 AM 11:26 PM

Height 0.8L 0.7L 0.5L 1.3H

12:22 PM 1:20 PM 2:19 PM 3:17 PM 4:12 PM 4:59 PM 5:36 PM 10:36 AM 9:51 AM 9:43 AM

0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.4L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L

Time 2:12 AM 1:46 AM 1:33 AM 1:41 AM 2:08 AM 2:50 AM 3:41 AM 4:36 AM 5:34 AM 6:31 AM 7:30 AM 8:39 AM 1:31 AM 1:07 AM 1:03 AM

Height 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 9:56 AM 10:37 AM 11:21 AM 12:09 PM 12:59 PM 1:50 PM 2:41 PM 3:30 PM 4:14 PM 4:53 PM 5:22 PM 5:41 PM 7:41 AM 8:53 AM 9:42 AM

Height 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.4L 0.3L 0.3L

Height 0.8L 0.6L 0.3L 0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.2L 0.5L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.4L

Time 1:13 PM 2:24 PM 3:29 PM 4:31 PM 5:32 PM 6:32 PM 7:29 PM 8:22 PM 9:09 PM 9:47 PM 10:17 PM 9:10 AM 11:25 AM 12:57 PM 2:05 PM

Height 0.8L 0.5L 0.1L -0.1L -0.3L -0.4L -0.3L -0.2L 0.1L 0.4L 0.7L 1.2L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.5H 0.5H 0.0L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time

Height

11:34 PM

1.2H

3:08 PM

0.7H

Time

Height

Time

5:53 PM

Time

Height

0.7L

Height

10:34 AM 1:40 PM

0.4H 0.4H

5:44 PM 5:12 PM

0.3L 0.3L

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Time 6:18 AM 6:47 AM 7:22 AM 8:02 AM 8:46 AM 9:32 AM 10:22 AM 11:14 AM 12:08 PM 1:07 PM 2:13 PM 5:17 AM 5:29 AM 5:52 AM 6:19 AM

Height 1.9H 2.1H 2.4H 2.5H 2.6H 2.5H 2.4H 2.2H 2.0H 1.8H 1.7H 1.1H 1.2H 1.4H 1.6H

Time 6:41 PM 8:01 PM 9:27 PM

Height 1.4L 1.6L 1.8L

Time 11:43 PM 11:48 PM 11:44 PM

Height 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H

3:26 4:47 6:10 7:35

0.7L 0.9L 1.1L 1.2L

10:39 10:55 11:03 11:00

1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H

Time 1:01 PM 2:19 PM 3:29 PM 4:36 PM 5:40 PM 6:43 PM 7:42 PM 8:35 PM 9:18 PM 9:51 PM 10:14 PM 8:57 AM 11:24 AM 1:05 PM 2:19 PM

Height 1.7H 1.9H 2.0H 2.1H 2.1H 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H 2.0H 1.9H 1.8H 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H

Time 6:33 PM 7:59 PM

Height 1.3L 1.4L

Time 11:23 PM 11:21 PM

Height 1.6H 1.5H

3:13 4:29 5:52 7:19

0.9L 1.2L 1.3L 1.4L

10:31 10:42 10:46 10:39

1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H

Time 9:08 AM 9:18 AM 9:33 AM 10:00 AM 10:32 AM 11:12 AM 1:08 PM 12:01 AM

Height 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.5H

Time 2:37 PM 6:39 PM 7:38 PM

Height 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 9:36 PM 9:57 PM 9:55 PM

Height 0.3L 0.3L 0.4L

11:38 PM

0.5H

3:04 4:04 6:18 6:47 7:22 8:48

0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L

11:37 AM 12:19 PM 4:05 PM 4:46 PM

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H

5:57 6:16 6:37 9:22

0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L

PM PM PM PM

PM PM PM PM

South Padre Island

Rollover Pass Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Height 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 0.4L 0.3L 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Rockport

Time 1:37 AM 12:25 AM 12:02 AM 10:38 AM 11:28 AM 12:10 AM 1:02 AM 1:49 AM 2:19 AM 2:17 AM 2:12 AM 2:18 AM 2:20 AM 1:28 AM 12:55 AM

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Time 6:08 AM 6:37 AM 7:14 AM 7:55 AM 8:40 AM 9:28 AM 10:18 AM 11:11 AM 12:05 PM 1:03 PM 2:05 PM 5:11 AM 5:27 AM 5:54 AM 6:23 AM

PM PM PM PM

PM PM PM PM

East Matagorda

1:21 4:23 6:10 7:41

PM PM PM PM

0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H

8:24 PM 9:23 PM 10:17 PM 11:08 PM

0.5L 0.7L 0.8L 1.0L

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Time 12:20 AM 12:17 AM 12:38 AM 1:01 AM 12:26 AM 12:16 AM 12:24 AM 2:00 PM 2:30 PM 12:27 AM 12:50 AM 12:03 AM 12:09 AM 12:30 AM 12:47 AM

PM PM AM AM AM AM

PM PM PM PM

Texas Coast Tides

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25

Date Nov 11 Nov 12 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 18 Nov 19 Nov 20 Nov 21 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 24 Nov 25


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Where’s the meat? Texas won’t be one of the states where Arby’s restaurants intends to roll out a venison sandwich just in time for deer hunting season. The specialty sandwich will be offered at 17 Arby’s restaurants across America, each within “heavy deer hunting areas” in the states of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia, according to a news release. Apparently, Texas doesn’t count as one of those areas. Emily Lazaroff Edelman, a spokeswoman for the restaurant chain, said it’s hard to say when or if Texans would see the sandwich at their local Arby’s. “Arby’s is going to see how it goes,” she said, adding it that if the test release goes well, it could become available nationally. In an Arby’s news release, the company pointed out that there are 20 million hunters across America, so the restaurant decided to come out with a venison sandwich in November. Arby’s venison comes from free-range farmed red deer in New Zealand. The sandwich’s release coincides with a national advertising campaign – It’s Meats Season – to celebrate the start of hunting season with hunters across the country. A description is the closest Texas hunters will get to the sandwich for now: venison marinated in garlic, salt and pepper, cooked for three hours, topped with onions and a juniper berry sauce, served on a toasted bun. The restaurant rolled out the new sandwiches on Nov. 1 in Nashville, Tennessee. According to The Tennessean, the first store sold out of the new sandwiches on the first day, selling 250 in a few hours. — Staff report

Cabela’s expands westward Cabela’s announced construction will begin this year on a new store in El Paso. The store will join the new West Towne Marketplace development located off Exit 8 of Interstate 10 near Paseo del Norte. River Oaks Properties is the developer of the open-air retail center. Cabela’s anticipates a fall 2017 opening. It will become the seventh Cabela’s location in Texas, joining Fort Worth, Buda, Allen, Waco, Lubbock and League City. The store will offer a 360-degree wildlife-display feature, dozens of museum-quality taxidermy mounts, vintage outdoor photos and memorabilia, and a regionally specific theme and habitat feature. Additionally, the store will include an archery and firearm tech room and indoor archery range. Cabela’s expects to employ approximately 125 full-time, part-time and seasonal employees at the store.

November 11, 2016

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—Cabela’s

Fish surveys testing for disease Members from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Tyler north fisheries management team assisted U.S. Fish and Wildlife staff from the Southwestern Fish Health Unit in Dexter, New Mexico, with the collection of fish samples from Lake Fork as part of the National Wild Fish Health Survey, which monitors pathogens and diseases in wild fish. Samples were taken from largemouth bass, redear sunfish, bluegill, longear sunfish, channel catfish, gizzard shad, bowfin, freshwater drum and black crappie. Similar collections are being done this year at Lake Texoma and Lake Amistad. Kevin Storey, district supervisor of the Tyler north fisheries district, said the survey is apparently to see if diseases, viruses and pathogens that have shown up in hatcheries, are present in wild fish populations. Whirling disease and an Asian tapeworm are of concern, he said. Samples at Lake Texoma have been taken in the past, but new funding has allowed sampling at Lake Fork and Lake Amistad. —TPWD

Winners of Big Time Texas Hunts The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department announced the 14 winners of this year’s Big Time Texas Hunts selected at random from entries in the drawing. All told, hunters bought over 79,000 Big Time Texas Hunt entries during this year’s sales period, which ran May 15-Oct. 15. More than $737,000 in gross sales were generated and proceeds from the drawing go to support wildlife research, habitat management and public hunting. This year’s winner of the Texas Grand Slam hunting package, Ed Bredemeyer of San Antonio, is making plans for four separate guided hunts for the state’s top four premier big game species – desert bighorn sheep, white-tailed deer, pronghorn and mule deer. “I told my wife this is the gift that keeps on giving, kind of like the jelly of the month club,” said Bredemeyer, who noted he has been entering the Big Time Texas Hunts for about 10 years. “I bought chances in other categories, too. I’ve been involved with hunting and conservation for years and the way I see it, if it’s good for wildlife, it’s good for me. I like supporting the people that support

wildlife.” Winners: • Texas Grand Slam – Ed Bredemeyer, San Antonio • Ultimate Mule Deer Hunt – Stephen Howard, Houston • Premium Buck Hunt – Dennis Koehler, Adkins • Exotic Safari – Gary Clark, Childress Whitetail Bonanza: • Timothy Ramsey, Spring • John Hamilton, Bandera • William Hoermann, Driftwood • David Sirmon, Amarillo • Thomas Harris, Boerne • Harold Louvier, New Iberia, La. Big Time Bird Hunt – Patrick Haley, Porter Gator Hunt – William Smith II, Midland Texas Waterfowl Hunt – John Nicholson, Rockwall Wild Hog Adventure – Tanner Davis, Austin —TPWD

Page 23

NOVEMBER 19-20 KERRVILLE HIll Country Youth Event Center New Large Building, Same Location

Decemeber 10-11 AMARILLO Amarillo Civic Center

2017

January 14-15 ABILENE Abilene Civic Center


Page 24

November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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PRODUCTS TACTICAL FLUOROCARBON LINE: This ICAST 2016 award-winning line by P-Line is a strong and durable premium Japanese fluorocarbon that is formulated to be virtually invisible in the water. That increased invisibility will help anglers fool the big fish. The abrasion-resistant line also offers improved casting, thanks to its smoothness, a fast sink rate, and serious knot strength. Available later this fall in 200-yard spools in 6- to 20-lb. test, the line will sell for about $20 to $30.

DELTA VEST: Heybo Outdoors’ vest will help shield hunters from winter’s bitter winds and frigid weather. Designed to maximize comfort and versatility on the field, the zippered vest features moisture-wicking polyfleece and an elastic waistband for a better fit. The vest offers plenty of storage for a hunter’s myriad small gear, including one inner pocket, a vertical exterior pocket on the left chest, and two exterior zippered call pockets. Available in black, brown, Realtree Max-5 camo (shown) and Mossy Oak Bottomland camo, the vest costs about $80. It comes in sizes ranging from small to 3XL.

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3D SUICIDE DUCK: Savage Gear’s specialty lure is for those big hungry bass, pike and muskie that crave succulent ducklings. This lure, which won ICAST 2016’s best of show award in the hard lure category, mimics a fleeing duckling. It features spinning webbed feet that throw water in all directions and is rigged with both top and bottom hooks so that anglers can customize the bait for any fishing situation. The little ducky comes in two sizes (4 1/4-inch long and 6-inch long) and three colors (baby black bird, wood duckling and yellow ducking). It costs about $17 to about $20, depending on size.

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ADVENTURER CASE: Pelican’s sleek and slim iPhone case, which is tested to military specifications, promises to withstand the most extreme of conditions. This dual-layer case utilizes an impact-dispersing high performance composite that absorbs the impact and disperses the shock away from an outdoorsman’s phone in a fall. The case also offers a nonslip grip. Available in four colors (clear, clear gray, clear teal and clear pink), the Adventurer case for the iPhone 7 costs about $40. Additional sizes are available for other iPhone models.

DEER BLOCK: This highly palatable attractant by Purina Mills, Quick Draw is formulated with proprietary flavorings and scents to attract deer, elk and other game year-round. The 20-pound block also can be used to supplement poor quality forage or native habitats. The blocks, which can be placed in areas such as near water sources where game managers want to attract and hold big game, cost about $15 each. (800) 227-8941 purinamills.com

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

November 11, 2016

Page 25


Page 26

November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Solution on Page page30 30

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6 8 9 11

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ELEY ammo coming to U.S.

15 16

CSF seeks federal relations coordinator The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation is seeking applicants for a federal relations coordinator to assist with the organization’s policy outreach efforts on Capitol Hill and through engagement with federal agencies.

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LSONews.com

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40 41 42

Across

1. Bassmaster ACROSS Angler of the Year 6. The flat fish 1. Bassmaster Angler of the Year 7. A game bird in Texas 6. The flatmanufacturer fish 8. A rangefinder 9. Helps7.you see the A game birddeer in Texas 11. Thought to be bad luck on the boat 8. A rangefinder manufacturer 13. A newborn elk 15. The main fin on a fish 9. Helps you see the deer 17. The African hunting trip 11. Thought fighting to be bad luck on the boat 19. The pheasant's weapon 13. wildlife A newborn 20. Where hangelk out 21. To remove ammo 15. Thethe main fin on a fish 24. Blue, green or cinnamon 17. An 25. It holds the African bullets hunting trip 27. The19. damThe builder pheasant’s fighting weapon 31. Saltwater fish with spots 20. Where wildlife hang out 35. The male turkey 36. Stars of To Lone Star the Lawammo 21. remove 37. The male mallard 24. Blue, green or cinnamon 39. A good item in the deer blind 25. It theline bullets 40. It holds theholds fishing 41. Sneaking updam on game 27. The builder

43

Down

1.DOWN A shark species 2. 1. Often wornspecies by duck hunters A shark 3. A name for the bobber Often by duck 4. 2. What to worn do when you hunters miss the shot 5. 3. These mayforlead to the fish A name theyou bobber 6. The white-________ goose What to do when you miss the shot 7. 4. Sign of the run 8. 5. AnThese African game may leadanimal you to the fish 10. A cooler brand 6. The white-________ goose 12. The new hunter or fisherman Sign of the run skill 13. 7. The fly-fisherman's 14. 8. Type of net with weights An African game animalat the bottom 16. Hunting with a bird's help A cooler 18.10. The deer's brand mating period 19.12. A type of trap The new hunter or fisherman 22. Yellow, black or chocolate The fly-fisherman’s skill 23.13. It holds the boat in place 25.14. Texas known for walleye fishing Type lake of net with weights at the bottom 26. When the fish lay their eggs Hunting with hunter a bird’sorhelp 28.16. Helps the new fisherman The deer’s mating period 29.18. A grouse species 30.19. Bottom boat A typeofofthe trap

31. Saltwater fish with spots

22. Yellow, black or chocolate

35. The male turkey

23. It holds the boat in place

36. Stars of Lone Star Law

25. Texas lake known for walleye fishing

37. The male mallard

26. When the fish lay their eggs

39. A good item in the deer blind

28. Helps the new hunter or fisherman

40. It holds the fishing line

29. A grouse species

41. Sneaking up on game

30. Bottom of the boat

42. A size of choke

32. Back of the boat

43. A favorite hangout for bass Down

33. Deer hunter carries this in his pocket 34. Keep in the hunting backpack 38. River separating Texas, Oklahoma

Nature’s Calling

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

ELEY is proud to announce the hiring of Coltin Weber as the North America key account manager. Weber will be working to help build the ammunition brand in the United States.

Weaver to run Rinehart 100 shoots David Weaver has been named as the new Rinehart Targets R100 coordinator, in charge of shoots offering 100 unique 3D Rinehart Targets at some of the top archery courses in America.

NEMO Arms relocates NEMO Arms, creators of the first viable semiautomatic .300 Win Mag, AR patterned rifle, has relocated to Nampa, Idaho.

Federal hits the mark for Pheasants Forever

in support of Pheasants Forever, an upland habitat conservation organization. The program began in 1998.

Turkey Federation has official decoy and call The National Wild Turkey Federation entered a new long-term partnership with Plano Synergy. Avian-X and Zink Calls are the official turkey decoy and call of the NWTF, respectively.

Pepsi, Casey’s donate to Pheasants Forever Casey’s General Store and Pepsi are donating to Pheasants Forever’s wildlife habitat conservation mission for every bottle of Pepsi sold in Casey’s General Store locations until Dec. 31.

Gerber begins 24-7 manufacturing Gerber has brought on a third shift at its Portland, Oregon manufacturing plant, expanding operations to 24-7.

Work Sharp hits 1 million sharpeners Work Sharp recently produced its millionth sharpener. The company introduced the WS3000 Woodworking Tool Sharpener 10 years ago.

Federal Premium sold more than 50 million shotgun shells

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Sautéed semi-boneless quail 4 semi-boneless quail, thawed Salt and pepper 4 tbsps. butter, softened 2 sprigs fresh thyme Heat a medium sauté pan over high heat. Season the quail with salt and pepper and add the butter to the pan, followed by the quail, breast side down. Cook the quail, without moving them, for about 4-5 minutes, then carefully flip the quail and baste very well with melted

butter, spooning the butter over the breasts. Cook the second side for an additional 4-5 minutes, or until the quail is firm and tender. Once cooked, add the thyme to the pan and let it sizzle. Baste the quail with the thyme-scented butter a few times and remove from the pan to a plate, pouring the drippings over the quail. Rest for 5-10 minutes. —Texas Quail Farms

Fish cakes 1 pound white-fleshed fish fillets, cooked and flaked 1 large egg 1 small yellow onion, minced 1 tbsp. lemon juice 2 tbsps. prepared yellow mustard 1 tsp. dried parsley flakes 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. coarse ground black pepper 1/2 cup cornflakes crumbs, divided Vegetable oil for frying Place a large skillet on mediumhigh heat and add enough oil to just cover the bottom. In a

mixing bowl, combine fish, egg, onion, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, salt and pepper and stir together thoroughly. Add half the cornflakes to the mixture and gently toss together. Separate the mix into fourths and form each into a round patty. Roll each patty in remaining cornflakes to coat the outside. Place patties in the hot oil and fry both sides until crisp and browned to your liking. —Arizona Game and Fish Department


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Ducks in South Texas Continued from page 4

better than expected. Kenny Vaughan and his three children hunted in the North Zone during the weekend Youth Season. The group hunted west of Beaumont, near China. “We were covered up with teal and pintail,” Vaughan said. “At one point we had more than a thousand birds in the field, maybe twice that. About 70 percent were teal and the rest pintails with a few spoonbills mixed in. Teal were flying everywhere and the kids had lots of long shots. My daughters Faith and Grace each made great wing shots on fast-flying teal. My son Kennedy busted ’em on the water.” Vaughan says the pintail numbers are incredible. “Pintails would drop out if the sky in groups of 50 to 100 birds so fast we thought they were high-flying jets a few times,” he said. “I sat like a good dad, calling birds and shots as they COMING IN: South Texas hunters enjoyed the opening weekend, with some fired away doing their best to catch hunters reporting good numbers of teal, pintail and some gadwall. Photo by up with those fast-flying birds.” Lone Star Outdoor News. The birds weren’t decoying well, but flew over the spread to take a look. those birds wanted to be on flooded fields.” “The birds wanted to be in the rice stubble, not Hunters along the middle Texas coast that dethe open water,” Vaughan said. “I think maybe if pend on a huge migration of redheads had fewer we had stayed late the pintail would have worked birds to shoot at, but some did well. a little better.” Guide Derek Dick, of Port O’Connor, had one Guide Tobin Copeland with the Red Bluff Praiof his best opening weekends with a variety of rie Hunting Club near Garwood said they hunt species. opening day on 80- to 90-acre fields. The good news again this year is that much of “We have thousands of pintails on our flooded the remaining waterfowl habitat across the state fields,” Copeland said. “We’ve also got a ton of appears to be in prime condition thanks to an geese, as well. Most are specklebellies, but we’ve abundance of rainfall over the last two years. got a few snows in with them. We had a tough “Weather patterns, especially significant cold time getting the birds to decoy. We tried everyfronts, can have great impact on migration timthing from calling, no calling, moving the deing,” said Kevin Kraai, TPWD waterfowl program coys around – you name it. Plus it was 85 degrees coordinator. with no wind. We ended up with enough geese to make it interesting. But it was clear that all

November 11, 2016

Page 27

Lots of quail Continued from page 4

TIRED DOGS: Warm weather shortened the time hunters and their dogs could be out during the opening weekend, but the quail numbers were reported as good. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

On the Texas Hunting Forum, three hunters without dogs killed 35 birds in Cottle County over the opening weekend. “Lost count of the coveys. Never seen so many birds in my life,” posted TX Hunter. To the southwest, Travis Smith, area biologist at Black Gap WMA, which is outside Big Bend Nation Park, reported a good quail population. Twenty-three groups of hunters brought in 77 blue quail on opening weekend. “Most of the hunters I’ve talked to are pleased. They’re finding plenty of birds,” he said. “It’s very good this year. We’ve had two years of rain.” However, more rain also created more cover for the birds, which makes them more difficult for hunters to spot quail, he said. Curt Brockmann has been hunting Black Gap for 30 years and said the heat was the limiting factor. Otherwise, the quail opener was better

than last year, he said. “We hunted three days — got a total of 38 birds. It was so hot in the afternoons, they weren’t moving. Mornings, late evening were real good,” Brockmann said. They harvested blue quail without dogs. By the third day of the opener, the quail were pretty wild or they would flush far ahead of the hunters, he added. Several hunters posting on the Texas Hunting Forum reported lots of quail in South Texas, including several 40-bird coveys in McMullen County. But hunting conditions were tough with the heat. Like others on the forum, Arandy, who hunted in Howard County, summed up the verdict of the quail opener. “Not going back until it cools off,” he wrote. “A good frost would help some, a good freeze would be better, and a little snow would be great.”


Page 28

November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

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SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996

TROPHY WHITETAIL HUNTS “May kill buck of lifetime “ $ 700 - 2 DAYS Wife or child 1/2 price South TX- Brackettville Web site www.b-jranch.com E-mail: Huntsbj@gmail.com (830) 563-2658

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Cabin and processing facility on site. Predator and fishing opportunities. Kids and wives always welcome. Call Garrett Wiatrek Email wbarranches@yahoo.com www.wbarranchhunts.com (830) 391-0375

TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

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SEEKING HUNTING PROPERTY Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is looking for hunting property to continue its mission of creating hunters for a lifetime by providing hunting experiences for those that have the passion but lack the opportunity. All hunting rights sought, house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276

WORLD CLASS RED STAGS $4,000-$26,000 90 Miles Southwest of Dallas (214) 616-6822

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GUIDED WATERFOWL Day Hunts Parris, TX.  www.RedLegOutfitters.com (903) 517-5889

DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! dickyn@lagovistalodge.com (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296

CHARTER FISHING Port Mansfield Shallow water, wade and fly fishing specialist Capt. Steve Ellis (956) 492-8472

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS (956) 551-1965

SALES POSITION ENTRY LEVEL SALES Lone Star Outdoor News is looking for an entry-level sales person for its growing advertising business. Position will be based in its Dallas office. Must have hunting and fishing experience. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM

VEHICLES HUNTING FOR TRUCKS? New Ford and used trucks below. 2014 Ford F-150 STX SuperCrew Cab 4x2 5.0L V8 Automatic, Running Boards Ingot Silver Metallic 14,768 Miles Stock # EKF18577

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

RANCH CONSTRUCTION All types of Building, Dirt Work, Welding, Fencing, Design, Maintenance, etc… Contact us today for a free quote. AlpineRanch2016@gmail.com (972) 207-0996

AOUDAD HUNTING WEST TEXAS $2,000/ Gun Shot Guarantee (210) 827-6694

FISHING TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044

SABINE LAKE FISHING Trout, flounder, reds. Captain Randy’s Guide Service running multiple boats. Check for specials at www.fishsabine.com (409) 719-6067

PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2013 Ford F-150 Lariat SuperCrew Cab 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost Automatic Leather Ingot Silver Metallic 18,493 Miles Stock #DKF93180 2014 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew Cab 4x4 3.5L V6 Ecoboost 4X4 Automatic Leather Color, Ingot Silver Metallic Interior, steel gray 20,795 Miles Stock #EKD03236 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Crew Cab 5.3L V8 4X4 Automatic Leather Exterior Color, Sunset Orange Metallic Interior Color, Cocoa/dune 28,969 Miles Stock #FG206612 2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT Crew Cab 4x2 5.3L V8 Automatic Leather 20 Alloy Wheel Silver Ice Metallic 71,289 Miles Stock #DG160973 Call Bobby I’m in the DFW area (214) 632-7963


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

November 11, 2016

Page 29

Austin firm acquires Lew’s An affiliate of Peak Rock Capital, an Austin-based private equity firm, has acquired Do Outdoors, Inc., the parent company of Lew’s Fishing. Headquartered in Springfield, Missouri, Lew’s supplies rods, reels, combos, and related fishing accessories, including its proprietary Super Low Profile reel platform. Peak Rock Capital’s portfolio includes brands in the food and beverage industry and home improvement consumer goods sector. Peak Rock also claims Hunters Specialties, which makes game calls, scent control products and game attractants, among its investments.

WORLD’S FINEST AND SAFEST AIRBOATS

Proud SuPPorterS of

—Peak Rock Capital

Lone Star Law regular promoted Texas Game Warden Ellis Powell, formerly stationed for 12 1/2 years in Newton County and a regular on the TV series, “Lone Star Law,” has been promoted to assistant chief in the Wildlife enforcement section at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in Austin. Powell will oversee the Operation Game Thief program with program coordinator Lewis Rather in addition to serving as the state administrator of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact for Texas.

www.americanairboats.com

—OGT

800.241.6390 • fax: 409.988.0111 • 108 E. Lutcher Drive • Orange, TX 77632


Page 30

November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on page 30

1 4

NOVEMBER 16

Texas Wildlife Association Dallas Members Social Javier’s (800) 839-9453 texas-wildlife.org

NOVEMBER 17

Coastal Conservation Association Hays County Banquet Wimberley VFW Hall (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Ducks Unlimited Weatherford Dinner Parker County Sheriff’s Posse (817) 239-4482 ducks.org/texas Ducks Unlimited Colorado County Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, Columbus (361) 815-1150 ducks.org/texas Whitetails Unlimited Blackland Prairie Deer Camp I.O.O.F. Event Center, Corsicana (318) 374-9078 whitetailsunlimited.com Ducks Unlimited Tyler Dinner Harvey Hall Convention Center (903) 570-5124 ducks.org/texas

NOVEMBER 19

National Wild Turkey Federation West Texas Hunting Heritage Banquet Elks Lodge, Hereford (620) 339-9026 nwtf.org

Mule Deer Foundation Amarillo Chapter Banquet (806) 679-3983 muledeer.org

NOVEMBER 19-20

Texas Gun and Knife Show Kerrville, Hill Country Youth Event Center (830) 285-0575 Texasgunandknifeshows.com

NOVEMBER 26

Kimble County Chamber of Commerce Wild Game Dinner Stevenson Center, Junction (325) 446-3190

DECEMBER 2

Quail Coalition Rita Blanca Banquet Rita Blanca Coliseum, Dalhart quailcoalition.org

DECEMBER 3-5

Texas Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Marriott Rivercenter, San Antonio (512) 499-0466 texasfarmbureau.org

DECEMBER 5

Dallas Safari Club Bag N Tag DSC Office (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

DECEMBER 8

Dallas Safari Club DSC 100 Meeting DSC Office (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

(FULL, PARTIAL, AND/OR CONSULTATION CAPABILITIES) › Expert Witness › Personnel Recruitment and Management (Ex: ranch manager, livestock manager, wildlife biologist, caretakers, support staff, etc.) › Strategic Planning, Budgeting and Accounting (Livestock, Agriculture, Wildlife, Fisheries) › Livestock, Crop, and Equipment Procurement and Marketing (Ex: cattle, crops, tractors, hunting) › Property Maintenance and Management (Structures, Roads, Brush Manipulation, Grassland Restoration, etc.) › Lease Development, Management, and Administration (Livestock, Agriculture, Fishing, Hunting, etc.) › Wildlife and Fisheries Restoration, Development,

and Management

• • • • •

Population Surveys – Wildlife and Fisheries Harvest Recommendations and Population Management Strategies Habitat Management Plans – Wildlife and Fisheries Mapping and Design – Terrestrial and Aquatic Management of Texas Parks and Wildlife Permits - Wildlife and Fisheries

Call Justin Bryan for more information: jbryan@hallandhall.com | 325.260.5883 WWW.HALLANDHALL.COM SALES | AUCTIONS | FINANCE | APPRAISALS | MANAGEMENT

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1. Bassmaster Angler of the Year [SWINDLE] 6. The flat fish [FLOUNDER] 7. A game bird in Texas [RAIL] 8. A rangefinder manufacturer [NIKON] 9. Helps you see the deer [BINOCULARS] 11. Thought to be bad luck on the boat [BANANA] 13. A newborn elk [CALF] 15. The main fin on a fish [DORSAL] 17. The African hunting trip [SAFARI] 19. The pheasant's fighting weapon [SPURS] 20. Where wildlife hang out [HABITAT] 21. To remove the ammo [UNLOAD] 24. Blue, green or cinnamon [TEAL] 25. It holds the bullets [MAGAZINE] 27. The dam builder [BEAVER] 31. Saltwater fish with spots [REDFISH] 35. The male turkey [TOM] 36. Stars of Lone Star Law [WARDENS] 37. The male mallard [GREENHEAD] 39. A good item in the deer blind [WATER] 40. It holds the fishing line [REEL] 41. Sneaking up on game [STALKING]

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1. A shark species [SANDBAR] 2. Often worn by duck hunters [WADERS] 3. A name for the bobber [CORK] 4. What to do when you miss the shot [RELOAD] 5. These may lead you to the fish [GULLS] 6. The white-________ goose [FRONTED] 7. Sign of the run [RUBS] 8. An African game animal [NYALA] 10. A cooler brand [ICEHOLE] 12. The new hunter or fisherman [NOVICE] 13. The fly-fisherman's skill [CASTING] 14. Type of net with weights at the bottom [SEINE] 16. Hunting with a bird's help [FALCONRY] 18. The deer's mating period [RUT] 19. A type of trap [SNARE] 22. Yellow, black or chocolate [LAB] 23. It holds the boat in place [ANCHOR] 25. Texas lake known for walleye fishing [MEREDITH] 26. When the fish lay their eggs [SPAWN] 28. Helps the new hunter or fisherman [MENTOR] 29. A grouse species [SAGE]

JOE KLUTSCH MASTER GUIDE

KODIAK ISLAND & ALASKA PENINSULA BROWN BEAR

MOOSE

MOUNTAIN GOAT

SITK A DEER

BRISTOL BAY FISHING SPECIALIZING IN FAMILY GROUPS SALMON & FRESH WATER SPECIES

PHONE: (907) 246-3030  FAX: (907) 246-3050 P.O. Box 313  King Salmon, Alaska 99613 joeklutsch@gmail.com  www.katmaiguideservice.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

November 11, 2016

ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT . . .

VP SERIES PISTOLS Heckler & Koch VP pistols are packed with the essential features you need in a reliable and accurate handgun. And they come from the world renowned company that pioneered the first striker fired and polymer pistols more than forty years ago.

VP9 (9 mm) and VP40 (.40 S&W) pistols have easy to change backstraps and side panels for a personalized fit.

VP pistols use HK’s ergonomic handgun grip design that includes changeable backstraps and side panels — accommodating all hand sizes. Only HK handguns have such a personalized grip. All at a remarkable price and backed by Heckler & Koch’s legendary German quality and an exceptional lifetime warranty. Available in 9 mm and .40 caliber — Standard, Flat Dark Earth, and Tactical (threaded barrel) models.

VP Standard Model 9 mm or .40 S&W

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VP Grey Model 9 mm

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XTREME GUNS & AMMO 1110 Hwy 90 East STE C Richmond, TX 77406 832-363-3783

Page 31


Page 32

November 11, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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November 11, 2016 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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