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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

October 28, 2016

Volume 13, Issue 5

Don’t be fooled

Bigger may not mean older buck By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Rusty Kimbrell operates Big Iron Ranches in Mountain Home, and issues a cautionary message to Texas deer hunters. “If you are really managing for age of the deer, be careful this season,” he said. Kimbrell said the bucks on his ranches are plumped up this year like he has seldom seen. “I know my bucks so I know how old they are,” he said. “I’m seeing 2-year-olds that look like 4-year-olds.” Like many ranchers, Kimbrell uses supplemental feed on his ranches, but said the deer are more bulky than usual this year. “I have a 2-year-old that was a small, 8-pointer last year,” he said. “Now, he’s a 150-inch 10-pointer with two kickers. I expected a good jump, but nothing like that. If someone didn’t know his age, he would guess older just because of his body size.” Kimbrell said the necks of the younger deer aren’t bulked up as much as the more mature deer, something easy to see if they are standing next to an older deer. “Their bodies are almost identical, though,” YOUNG OR OLD? The body he said. and antler size of white-tailed Kimbrell stressed he deer is up this year, and isn’t telling people what hunters wanting to shoot they should or should older deer are advised to not shoot. examine the deer’s features “Happy hunting either closely and pass on any way,” he said. “I’m perbuck that is moving. Photo fectly happy with whatby Joe Richards, for Lone ever criteria a hunter uses Star Outdoor News. to determine what deer Please turn to page 6

CONTENTS Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 16 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 17 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 20 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 24

Tuna, mahi and more biting offshore

Lion imports to continue

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

In Freeport, Capt. Mikey Roberts at Blue Fin Charters said offshore fishing has seen a lot of dolphin and blackfin

On Oct. 20, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced it is banning all trophy imports of captivebred lions into the U.S. from South Africa under the Endangered Species Act — effective immediately. The decision came DECISION: The importation of wild from FWS Director lion hides into the U.S. will continue Dan Ashe via an ar- to some degree, according to FWS, ticle he posted online. but importation of captive-bred lions “Beginning today, has been banned. Photo by Lili the United States will Sams, for Lone Star Outdoor News. not allow the import of lion trophies taken from captive lion populations in South Africa,” Ashe wrote. “Wild and wild-managed lions from South Africa, however, will continue to receive import permits.” Dallas Safari Club Executive Director Ben Carter

Please turn to page 11

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Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Tuna, kingfish, vermilion snapper, cobia, and dolphin and a few sailfish have been showing up during offshore fishing trips up and down the Texas coast recently. In Port Aransas at Dolphin Dock’s, Capt. Michael Davis said blackfin tuna have been active on longer trips and cobia have been abundant on shorter ones. A few weeks back, on a 4-hour trip, they pulled in a sailfish in 60 feet of water. “That was definitely interesting,” he said. What’s been missing at Port Aransas is an abundance of dolphin, with only a smattering being caught. Normally there would be more, but there hasn’t been as much grass this fall, Davis added.

INSIDE

Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

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HUNTING

BLUEWATER FUN: Anglers have been having success offshore, landing a variety of species. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Dove on the move

Quail myths

South Texas heats up. Page 4

Biologist discusses number of theories. Page 4

FISHING

Carp on the river

Jim’s Pier returns

Fun fishing on the Neches. Page 8

The popular fishing dock is back. . Page 8


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October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Explore your inner wildness. One of a kind trips, equipment, experiences, incredible art, fine guns and whatever you can imagine.

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

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October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HUNTING

Debunking quail myths

QUAIL STORIES: Hunters and land managers have many theories on what caused the demise of both blue and bobwhite quail. Some are true, and some are considered folklore. The good news is, populations are booming this year. Photo by Joe Richards, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

There is no magic bullet to boost the state’s quail population. Neither is there a single culprit killing them. But for the past 23 years, Robert Perez, Texas Parks and Wildlife’s quail guru, has heard a lot of stories about both issues that are more myth than fact.

In a webinar hosted this month by the Texas Wildlife Association and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Perez offered up his observations in “Coffee Shop Quail Talk: Myths and Misconceptions.” Quail populations this year are at an all-time high since TPWD started doing surveys in 1978 thanks to ample rainfall, he said. But long term, the numbers have steadily declined across the

state for decades. In response, people have been looking for a quick fix. Food plots, supplemental feed, supplemental water, predator control and penraised birds have all been tried. Perez said short-term increases in localized quail populations using these methods are little more than a bandage. Scientific research has shown these approaches to be neutral in affecting bird popula-

tions. For example, pen-raised birds don’t work because they lack the instinct to survive in the wild. They can’t identify natural food, and saturating a habitat with them could attract predators that would eat them along with wild quail, Perez said. Likewise, causes of the decline in quail have been attributed to everything from feral hogs to fire

ants and parasites. Feral hogs and fire ants are definitely a problem across Texas. Large numbers of hogs and ants have lead to the idea that they are affecting the quail population. It’s true that if hogs come across eggs, they will eat them, but only land with a high density of hogs would affect the quail locally. “They’re opportunistic feeders. So they have a pretty diverse Please turn to page 6

Dove shooting good in South Texas

MORE BIRDS: Certain areas of South Texas struggled during the opening weekend, but improved in October. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The South Texas dove season started out with a bang in some areas, and others are going out in style. Guide Robert Sanders, who is running hunts in Willacy County, Please turn to page 7

Quest for Texas hog carries on By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News The two brothers grew up in Illinois, with both entering the service and one ending up in Texas. They look and sound alike, except for the accent of one of them. Dennis Inman, after his time in the U.S. Marines and a short stint in Vietnam toward the end of the conflict, moved to Warner, New Hampshire, where he repairs heavy logging equipment, hunts, shoots one of his many guns, and raises a few turkeys and pigs. “He is a woodsman,” said Lindsey Inman of Duncanville, 14 months Dennis’ junior and a nonhunter who shot competitively when in the U.S. Army. “We call him Grizzly Inman.” Like many hunters from other parts of the country, Dennis had a longing to shoot a feral hog in Texas. On a visit through the state, a short hunt was arranged at a 670-acre ranch along the Navidad River in Lavaca County with a history of a hog problem. The ranch, owned by Melissa and Tommy Janik of Ovilla, had fewer hog sightings, though, over the past few weeks. “It’s dry out here,” Tommy Janik said. “The last several rains have missed us and the river has gone dry.” Before the evening hunt, some extra corn was spread in areas around the feeder, and Dennis took his position behind some brush and an old, rickety deer blind.

COMING TO TEXAS: Brothers Lindsey and Dennis Inman were on Dennis’ first Texas hog hunt in Lavaca County. After an opportunity without success, Dennis will have to return for another try. Photo by Craig Nyhus, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

The wait began on the warm evening. A young buck quickly found the corn, and a few other deer moved about 180 degrees away. While Dennis was watching the deer, his hunting partner noticed pigs coming into the feeder just after sunset. Two goodsized hogs, with a few piglets in tow, began to sniff around the corn. Dennis took aim, using the angle iron of the blind Please turn to page 14


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Popular African PH dies Lone Star Outdoor News Herman Coetzee, a professional big game hunter with ties to Texas, died suddenly in Africa this month near his home. Coetzee, 35, was found dead Oct. 21 at Avis Dam in Klein Windhoek, Namibia. According to Namibian media reports, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound with a hunting rifle. He was born in the Limpopo Province of South Africa, growing up in the Bushveld region. Coetzee knew his calling from an early age, according to online sources. When he was 9, Coetzee told his teacher he wanted to become a big game hunter — which he did. He was a highly experienced and qualified professional, who hunted big game for nearly half his life. At 16, he completed his professional hunting course and started guiding clients on safari in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana and Namibia. He worked for Thormahlen & Cochran Safaris from 2006-2012. He joined Chapungu-Kambako Safaris of Namibia in December 2014. Anso Thormahlen said her former employee guided many successful safaris in South Africa — and had accompanied her daughter, Liane, on a leopard hunt. “It is with great sadness that we learned of the sudden passing of our former professional hunter, Herman Coetzee.” Over the years, he touched the lives of

Photo by Lili Sams

hunters from all over the world, including Texas. David J. Sams, CEO of Lone Star Outdoor News, said Coetzee influenced several Texas hunters including his own daughter Lili, whom he guided on a safari. “He treated Lili like she was his own daughter and taught her the ways of safari hunting. He made a real hunter out of Lili on that trip. We can never forget the laughs and stories he told us. Lili looked up to him with great respect and admiration. We were truly blessed to have had Herman as our first professional hunter,” Sams said. Coetzee is survived by his wife, Jeanetta Johnston, and a 1-year-old daughter.

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Quail theories

Aging that buck Continued from page 1

they choose to take.” Dave Richards of Boerne literally wrote the book on the subject, “Observing & Evaluating Whitetails,” and said the skill of aging deer doesn’t change much, even when conditions for body size and antler growth are good. Richards has been photographing deer this fall, and said the sagging stomach common to mature bucks hasn’t occurred this year in South Texas. “The young deer’s stomachs were still straight as a board,” he said. “Body size is just one thing to look at; look at the triangulation of his face — the younger buck’s face is longer and narrower; and examine the neck, it should show fullness all the way to the brisket. And when a deer is postmature, it will look like a loose, flabby slab of meat.” Finally, Richards said, check out the hindquarters of the buck. “In a young deer, it’s pointed,” he said. “On an older buck, it gets rounded. The tougher part is when a buck gets to 8 or 9 years old, it gets pointed again.” Richards said aging rules apply in both good years and bad. “A wet year with good forage doesn’t change anything,” he said. “You are looking for all of the criteria. If one or two are missing, the deer is probably not mature.” Another tactic can cause mistakes in aging deer. “You can’t tell how old they are in August,” Richards said. “It starts happening now through January. The neck swelling doesn’t start in August.”

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Continued from page 4

NICE BUCKS: Taller grass and heavier deer makes aging bucks more difficult for hunters. These two bucks were 3 years old when this photo was taken. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Richards said there is only one way to truly age the bucks on a ranch accurately, and it requires being lucky enough to spend a lot of time looking and having several chances to hunt them. “Get as many pictures of the deer as you can,” he said. “If you can identify him at 1.5, you can follow him. And you’ll age the other deer better.” Dale Schmidt is a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department biologist based in Llano and San Saba counties. “Aging deer has always been a problem here,” Schmidt said. “During the hunting season, we collect data from deer. I’ll hang out at Miller’s Smokehouse in Llano where they get a tre-

mendous number of deer. Most of the bucks that come in there are 1 1/2 and 2 1/2.” Schmidt said some landowners have formed cooperatives and people are making more of an effort to take older deer. “Overall, in 16 years, it seems like people are getting a little better,” he said. “We see more 3 1/2-year-old bucks. If that buck’s antlers are in good shape, they are usually happy to take that deer. The hunter has spent a lot of money and it might be the last weekend they can hunt.”

diet,” he said. The newest theory is that parasites or viruses are behind the quail population’s decline. Perez said game birds and nongame birds have parasites and viruses. For example, eye worms are being looked at as a cause. Eye worms appear in quail in the rolling planes of Texas more than South Texas. Research continues on how these parasites affect quail. Some lab studies have determined that 50-100 worms could impact the health of bird. But when conditions are phenomenal like this year, the parasites aren’t having an impact like they did before. So Perez said the question is did the prevalence of eye worms go down or did it remain the same? None of the usual suspects — turkey, roadrunners, and hawks — has affected the population overall. Studies that have been done examining the content of turkeys’ and road runners’ digestive systems have found only a smattering of cases where quail were eaten. While overhunting can cause a problem, most landowners are responsible managers, he added. “There aren’t enough shotguns. There aren’t enough hunters to make an impact.” The destruction of habitat is the main reason for the decline, while many of the other “causes” fall in the myth category, Perez said. Once habitat has been established and sustained, only then would removing an abundance of predators such as raccoons, for example, help. “The most important thing people can do to increase habitat for quail is purposeful management,” he said.

Quail Season STATEWIDE OCT. 29 – FEB. 26, 2017 Daily bag limit: 15 / Possession limit: 45 —TPWD


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October 28, 2016

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South Texas dove hitting new areas Continued from page 4

said their hunts have been some of the best he’s ever seen. “The first two weekends of the season were borderline crazy,” Sanders said. “We had both whitewings and mourning doves flying around like bats out of a cave. Now, our hunters are limiting out on mostly mourning doves.” Sanders said sunflowers were the field of choice early in the season, and now most birds are feeding in milo fields. Outfitter Mike Sutton says his trips were outstanding with easy limits on whitewings and mourning doves. “It’s been some of the best we’ve ever had,” he said. “All of our hunts were in Willacy County. It’s been easy shooting with limits had by most everybody — even our first-time hunters.” Lewis Hiltpold and a group of buddies recently hunted out of Dilley and had three

Lion imports Continued from page 1

said hunting is an integral cog in the machine of conservation. “While small, Dallas Safari Club feels this decision is a step in the right direction,” Carter said. “We hope this is not just rhetorical and that the USFWS follows through and actually issues import permits.” Those opposed to the ban, including scientists, cite the revenue lion hunting produces and that captive-bred lions take pressure off the wild populations. “Humans are also depleting the wild prey that supports lions,” Ashe said, “consuming these animals and selling them as bushmeat, or wild-sourced meat. Faced with declining habitat and prey, lions are increasingly targeting livestock and people, resulting in retaliatory killing of lions.” In December of 2015, the FWS listed the African lion under the ESA, announcing that any hunter who takes an African lion on or after Jan. 22, 2016, and intends to bring it back to the United States, must obtain a special import permit under its ESA guidelines.” Captive-bred lions in South Africa have now been excluded from potential import permits. Captive-bred lion hunting has been a subject of intense debate among members of the Professional Hunters’ Association of South Africa (PHASA). Last November, PHASA passed a motion that “disassociates PHASA with the captive-bred lion industry until such a time that the industry can convince PHASA and the IUCN that the practice is beneficial to lion conservation.” Joe Betar, the executive director of the Houston Safari Club, said the organization is monitoring the situation. “Houston Safari Club is pleased that Director Ashe made a point to note that licensed, regulated hunting of wild and wild-managed lions is not a threat to lion populations and can contribute to the conservation of the species,” Betar said. “HSC will be monitoring future decisions on permit applications for countries other than South Africa.”

days of easy limits filled with a combination of whitewings and mourning doves. “This was the second season we’ve hunted out of Dilley and it was better than ever,” Hiltpold said. “We were hunting in a wide open 100-acre field covered with milkweed (dove weed). The fastest shooting was out in the middle of the field, but sitting in the shade along the edge of mesquite trees was pretty comfortable with easy limits, too.” Hiltpold said the birds were most active from 3 p.m. until sunset. Atascosa County hunters were disappointed with the number of birds around for the opener of the South Zone, but that has changed. Carlos Fernandez reports that his hunts with friends and family on their ranches in Atascosa County have been pretty good. “The birds showed up in some of our plowed fields adjacent to goat weed fields,”

he said. “The goat weed is just now opening up and dropping seeds. We’ve got one field that covers about 25 acres. At one point we had thousands of mourning doves feeding in that field from dawn till dusk. It’s provided some of the best hunts we’ve had in the past couple of years.” Two cattle tanks also have provided some classic evening shooting. During the Special White-Winged Season, numerous dove hunters showed their lack of awareness of the mourning dove limit of two birds only. Atascosa County game wardens said multiple cases were filed for exceeding the daily limit of mourning dove. One group of five hunters had 39 mourning dove seized. In the South Zone, the end of the first split of the dove season is Nov. 13. The season will resume from Dec. 17 until Jan. 23, 2017.

Photo by Robert Sloan


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

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FISHING

River carp

Hitting the shallows on the Neches By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Jeff Roberts of Tyler loves to fish for whatever is biting. Over the last month, what has been biting on the Neches River is carp. “I am an all-things fishing guy,” Roberts said. “I fly-fish, Tenkara-fish for bluegill and bass, and in the spring it’s all bass.” This fall, he stumbled into the carp. “I knew they started feeding heavier with the cooler temperatures coming,” Roberts said. “I would see them there when I was bass fishing. So I made up a mash consisting of grits, bread, corn, chili powder and some other ingredients.” Roberts combs the bank of the river, searching for holes or other attractive areas. “A week ago, the river came up a little bit, and pushed the fish into areas that weren’t underwater previously,” he said. “They were stacked in there — Please turn to page 11

HARD PULLERS: Jeff Roberts, right, likes to fish for whatever is biting. Recently, he and his 11-year-old son, Aidan, have been landing numerous good-sized carp in the shallow on the Neches River up from Lake Palestine. Photos from Jeff Roberts.

Jim’s Pier is back By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Two longtime property owners on South Padre Island hated to see Jim’s Pier go. The docks and building where fishing guides would hang out, share stories and talk to incoming customers, was in bad shape, to put it mildly. “The prior owner had lofty visions but went broke,” said Mike Boswell of Dallas. “It eventually became owned by a Dallas bank.” Boswell, who had been fishing out of Jim’s Pier since the late 1970s, wanted to save the location. “My son guided out of Jim’s when he was in high school,” he said. A company was formed by the Nancy and Ray Hunt families, called Skipjack Properties, and the company purchased Jim’s Pier from the bank 16 months ago. Once the company became the owner, they saw firsthand what condition the nostalgic place was in. “There was no way to save Jim’s Pier and the old Amberjack Restaurant,” Boswell said. “We did save the old Fisherman’s Wharf and set up the Painted Marlin restaurant and bar.” A new pier is now in place and open, with the pier and NEW, BUT OLD STANDBY: Jim’s Pier has returned to South Padre Island with new docks, a restaurant, store and boat slips. Photos from Skipjack Properties.

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Rash of thefts hit Amistad storage units

Top-water white bass, stripers

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News

The Val Verde County Sheriff’s Office is warning area residents to lock up their boat storage units tight in the wake of burglaries involving a boat, trailers and fishing equipment worth tens of thousands of dollars. A 52-year-old local resident was arrested on drug and possession of stolen property charges in connection with the burglaries, according to Chief Deputy Michael Gulledge with the Val Verde Sheriff’s Office. However, authorities don’t believe he was the main culprit, indicating others may be involved. Gulledge said boaters and anglers need to make it more difficult for thieves to gain access to the units. A $3 padlock that can be easily cut off

shouldn’t be all that stands between expensive equipment and a criminal, he pointed out. Sgt. Ryan Lowe, a sheriff’s office investigator in the case, encouraged people to use high security padlocks and take inventory of their units, including serial numbers and photos. Lowe said at least five storage units have been hit in the area. Few of the facilities in the area are gated. Some don’t have cameras, he added. “I would say that’s our Achilles’ heel over here — the lack of technology,” Lowe said. “We have elevated our presence of patrol units in that area out there.” Authorities wouldn’t identify the individual storage units that were hit, saying the investigation is ongoing. Exactly when the units were hit is also hard to say, authorities added. Most of Please turn to page 27

According to area guides, the fall top-water bite for white bass and big striped bass has begun. Guide Carey Thorn said the white bass bite on Lake Lavon has stayed good through the summer and into the fall, but the schooling activity in the shallows has started. “We’re throwing 6- to 7-inch pencil poppers early and we’re also using the Cocamoe paddletail swimbaits,” he said. “Everyone in the boat can see the schools of fish right in front of them — the fish are in 1- to 4-feet of water, even at high noon.

FALL BITE: Striped bass are hitting top-waters on Lake Texoma, and when they short-strike the top-waters, swimbaits along or just below the surface are working, according to guides. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

You can pretty much see almost every fish hit the

swimbait, and when they come up and hit that big Please turn to page 27


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October 28, 2016

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October 28, 2016

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear main lake, stained up river; 78 degrees; 2.98’ low. Black bass are fair on small spoons and wacky worms. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. AMISTAD: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 17.67’ low. Black bass are good on spooks and watermelon soft plastic worms. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and striper jigs. White bass are slow. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 71–76 degrees; 0.65’ low. Black bass are fair to good on squarebilled crankbaits, shaky heads and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are good on worms and stink bait. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, buzzbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are slow. BASTROP: Water stained; 82–86 degrees. Black bass are good on black/blue soft plastics and small spinner baits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.12’ high. Black bass are good on chrome top-waters. Hybrid striper are good on live shad in coves early and late. White bass are good on minnows and white lightnings. Crappie are good on minnows under lights at night. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and hot dogs. Yellow catfish are good on live perch. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 76–80 degrees; 1.41’ low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, hollowbody frogs, and Texas-rigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are good on rod and reel. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 77–80 degrees; 2.47’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, shallow crankbaits, jigs and Texas-rigged soft plastics. Crappie are good on brush piles with jigs. Catfish are good on cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and dark, soft plastic worms in reeds and near the jetty and dam. Striped bass are fair on silver and gold spoons and marble spinner baits near the dam. Redfish are fair on perch, shad, tilapia, and silver spoons. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp, and cut bait near the intake. Blue catfish are fair on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 76–79 degrees: 0.50’ high. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, spinner baits and poppers. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 1.36’ low. Black bass are good on dark red crankbaits and watermelon spinner baits early. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are good on small spinner baits and Li’l Fishies off lighted docks at night. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles and under lighted docks at night. Channel catfish are good on cut bait and stink bait over baited holes. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with perch. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.11’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon top-waters, pumpkinseed stick baits and chartreuse crankbaits

in 8–15 feet at first light. Striped bass are fair on swim baits and lipless crankbaits near the dam in 20–30 feet early. White bass are fair on jigs and small crankbaits in the river channel. Crappie are fair on blue/white crappie jigs and live minnows. Channel catfish are good on live bait upriver. Yellow and blue catfish are good on perch upriver. CADDO: Water stained to muddy; 77–81 degrees; 0.38’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, shad-patterned swim jigs and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on min-

nows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and punch bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms, spinner baits, and crankbaits around reed beds. Striped bass are fair on spoons and jigs near the dam, and on chicken livers and shad along the shoreline. Redfish are good on perch and tilapia near the dam. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and shad. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are good on lipless crankbaits, chartreuse stick baits on jigheads and small spinner baits off points and ledges in 12–24 feet. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs and trolling deep-running shad crankbaits in the lower end of the lake early. White bass are fair on minnows. Smallmouth bass are fair on white curly-tailed grubs on jigheads around brush in 12–20 feet early. Crappie are fair on minnows upriver. Channel catfish are good on liver and nightcrawlers. Yellow and blue catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 76–79 degrees; 1.68’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged worms, top-waters and spinner baits near shallow cover and docks White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 18.99’ low. Black bass are very good on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails, and on watermelon spinner baits in 15–30 feet. White bass are good on jigs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver and live bait. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch and goldfish. COLEMAN: Water stained; 83–87 degrees; 1.16’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and stinkbait. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 93 degrees at the hot water discharge, 78 degrees in main lake; 1.98’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits and spinner baits in 8–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on live minnows and green tube jigs near Coletoville Bridge in 8–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live perch and soap bait in 8–12 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.51’ low. Black bass

are good on pumpkinseed soft plastics, spinner baits, and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are slow. FALCON: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 30.07’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon/ white crankbaits and top-waters. Striped bass are slow. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on cut bait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed spinner baits and crankbaits. Red ear perch are good on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on live bait. FORK: Water lightly stained; 76–80 degrees; 2.17’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged soft plastics on shallow cover and docks as well as hollow-body frogs and weightless flukes near submerged grass. White and yellow bass are good on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 72–78 degrees; 0.19’ low. Black bass are fair on chrome lipless crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits, spinner baits, and soft plastics. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 83–87 degrees; 0.09’ low. Black bass are good on perch-colored spinner baits, soft plastics and top-waters early and late. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on minnows and silver spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on stink bait and shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.14’ high. Black bass are fair on perch-colored crankbaits. White bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits off points. Crappie are good on chartreuse jigs tipped with crappie nibbles over brush piles. Blue catfish are fair on fresh shad. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 76–79 degrees; 0.38’ high. Black bass are good on spinner baits, swim jigs and Texas-rigged worms. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on rod and reel. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.10’ low. Black bass are fair on black/ blue and clear/metal flake stick baits. Crappie are good on live minnows near stumps early and late. Bream are good on live worms off piers and around stumps. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with shad and perch. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-color; 73–78 degrees; 1.5’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas-rigged creature baits, drop-shot rigs and black/blue jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and live shad. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 75–79 degrees; 1.13’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, wake baits and small plastic swimbaits

on jigheads. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on prepared bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 76–80 degrees; 0.31’ high. Black bass are good on weightless flukes, hollowbody frogs and Texas-rigged creature baits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 3.31’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, bladed jigs and Texas-rigged craws. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LBJ: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.77’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails and watermelon lipless crankbaits in 10–20 feet at daylight. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs and shad swimbaits at night. White bass are fair on small spinner baits and minnows under lights at night. Crappie are good on live minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles in 10–16 feet. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live bait. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 76–79 degrees; 0.54’ low. Black bass are fair on soft plastic jerkbaits, shallow crankbaits and top-water poppers. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are good on white spinner baits and perch-colored crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on top-waters and chartreuse lipless crankbaits. White bass are good on pet spoons, hellbenders, and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 1.81’ low. Black bass are fair on hollow-body frogs, bladed jigs and spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. MEREDITH: 60.25’ low. TPWD has begun restocking the lake with walleye. Reports of black bass are rare. No reports of smallmouth bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, hollow-body frogs and bladed jigs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 71–77 degrees; 1.41’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and lipless crankbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.10’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon top-waters and shallow-running crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on shad and minnows. Yellow catfish are fair

on perch. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 35.39’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and split-shot weighted flukes. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 10.35’ low. Black bass are fair on lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 75–78 degrees; 1.60’ low. Black bass are good on finesse jigs, Texas-rigged creature baits and buzzbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 73–78 degrees; 0.00’ low. Black bass are fair to good on medium-diving, shad-pattern crankbaits, Texas rigs and dropshot rigs. Crappie are good on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on live shad and slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. PROCTOR: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 1.10’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and small spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs and white crankbaits. White bass are fair on pet spoons and minnows. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on goldfish, shrimp and shad. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 76–79 degrees; 1.15’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits and Texas-rigged worms. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.55’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, top-waters and Texas-rigged craws. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 76–79 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, spinner baits and white buzzbaits. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 2.65’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon-red soft plastic worms, crankbaits, and spinner baits, and on topwaters early and late. White bass are fair on minnows, slabs and silver spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue/ white tube jigs. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 0.26’ high. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and watermelon spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on live bait and stink bait. STAMFORD: 0.29’ low. Black bass and crappie are fair to good,

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

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but mostly undersized. White bass are fair to good on minnows and Little Georges. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 80–84 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms and chartreuse crankbaits. White bass are fair on minnows and watermelon soft plastic worms and lizards. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver and live bait. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 2.20’ low. Black bass are good on hollow-body frogs and Texas-rigged craws flipped in shallow cover. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water stained; 76–79 degrees; 0.47’ high. Black bass are fair on top-waters, soft plastic jerkbaits and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 4.20’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms, flukes and top-waters early and late. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows over baited holes. Bream are good on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp. TRAVIS: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.35’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse topwaters, pumpkinseed soft plastic worms and white crankbaits in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are good on slabs, pet spoons, and minnows. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. Hybrid striper are good on live bait. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and nightcrawlers. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 72–77 degrees; 19.25’ low. Black bass are very slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. WHITNEY: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 2.25’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and soft plastic worms and lizards. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are fair on frozen shrimp, liver, and live bait. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water stained; 4.20’ high. No report available. —TPWD


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Shallow water carp Continued from page 8

I could sight-cast to them. We get out to the river at sunup and get to the hole. If the carp are flipping or jumping, we bait the area.” The bait of choice on the hook is simple — corn. “I use a hair rig with a big piece of corn,” Roberts said. “My 11-year-old son, Aidan, uses an 8/0 hook threaded with corn all the way up the shank.” Roberts lets the corn drift in front of the cruising carp. “They suck it up,” he said. “The two of us caught 19 carp.” Along with his son, he has taken other friends to the river, and it hasn’t been the long, patient wait to begin catching fish. “Once we throw the mash and get in position, we started catching carp within five minutes,” Roberts said. “My friend’s two kids, ages 8 and 10, each caught a bunch and had a great time.” In the smaller waters like the Neches, Roberts said a small hook and a split shot is all you need. “When they bite, they take it light,” he said. “Just raise the rod and have the drag set right.” Roberts continues to try different methods to catch fish. “I’m into Tenkara fishing, it’s very simple,” he said. “And I ordered some fixedline rods from Japan to try that. I morph into whatever I have the most fun doing.”

Page 11

Going back in time By Shannon Drawe

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Photo by Jeff Roberts

Right now, it’s carp. “It’s the closest thing to a redfish you can catch in fresh water,” he said. Roberts believes the key to catching good numbers of carp is in the mix. “I think the chili powder brings them in,” he said. “I use a whole pack of it.”

Cobia, tuna offshore Continued from page 1

tuna. Kingfish seem to be on the move. “The temperature dropped a little bit but not a significant amount to run them out of the area,” Roberts added. During a recent trip fishing behind shrimp boats, clients caught 30 blackfin tuna, a dozen dolphin and half a dozen cobia. He expects yellowfin tuna to pick up as cooler weather arrives. Offshore at Galveston, anglers are seeing a lot of action with Spanish mackerel, vermillion and mangrove snapper. Brandie Sinquefield, at Williams Party Boats, said kingfish and cobia are biting about 30-50 miles out. On a recent 36-hour trip into deep water, clients caught a multitude of black fin tuna, grouper, vermilion snapper, a couple of yellowfin tuna, and a queen snapper. South Padre is seeing similar success with kingfish, cobia, dolphin and Spanish mackerel. Marty Mire, at Captain Murphy’s Fishing Charters, said they also brought in a sailfish recently as well.

Groups seek new era in fisheries management Several marine conservation groups delivered their recommendations to improve public access and enhance fisheries. The Center for Coastal Conservation, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, and seven other marine conservation and trade associations released a series of recommendations for the incoming presidential administration and new Congress, calling on leaders to improve access to public waters, create economic growth and enhance the conservation of marine fish stocks. The report, “A Vision for Marine Fisheries Management in the 21st Century: Priorities for a New Administration,” calls for an end to federal policies that have inhibited economic growth and the American tradition of recreational fishing. The Vision report highlights the economic value of recreational fishing in coastal waters. Today, 11 million American anglers fish recreationally in saltwater. From license sales to retail sales, the recreational saltwater fishing industry contributes more than $70 billion annually in economic activity and generates 455,000 jobs. However, outdated federal management policies threaten to stem this positive economic trend. “We want better fisheries management for economic reasons, but we need better management for conservation reasons,” said Whit Fosburgh, president and CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership. “Healthy

October 28, 2016

habitat and fisheries provide benefits that can be measured — like tourism spending in coastal towns — and the intangible benefits of more American families on the water, more memories made, more connections forged with our natural resources, and more voices willing to speak up for conservation.” New approaches should reflect the reality of demand for recreational access to marine fisheries, the current economic activity associated with that access, and the scientific data of the light footprint recreational access has on our marine resources, the report said. “It’s important that lawmakers and policymakers understand that commercial and recreational fishing need to be managed differently,” says Ted Venker, conservation director of the Coastal Conservation Association and chairman of the Center for Coastal Conservation’s Government Relations Committee. “The Vision report’s recommendations suggest taking a clear-eyed look at our nation’s fisheries, using modern science and technology to guide decision-making.” Additional contributors to the report include the American Sportfishing Association, CCA, Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, International Game Fish Association, National Marine Manufacturers Association, Recreational Fishing Alliance and The Billfish Foundation. —Center for Coastal Conservation

Opening the book “The Fly and The Fish,” by John Atherton, is a lot like opening a time capsule to an earlier age of fly-fishing in the United States. Atherton’s book, originally published in 1951, is written from the perspective of the author, and combines clear instructions on fly-fishing that still apply today. The book also contains reminiscences written with as much creativity as the author was known for in his successful career in art. Of course, some of the technical aspects of fly-fishing covered in the book are well out of date, as the (widespread) use of bamboo fly rods and catgut leaders are mainly things read about and not experienced in modern times. The quality of the writing, and the accuracy of Atherton’s analysis of flies and presenting flies make this part of the book timeless, and valuable in the way it confirms what we still learn today and what other books have said since publication of “The Fly and The Fish” in 1951. It’s a book that belongs on a fly-fisher’s shelf because of its place and time in the history of fly-fishing. The interesting thing about this book is that controversies discussed concerning flyfishing in the 1950s, such as fast-action fly rods, are still the topic of much debate today. Unfortunately, we will never know Atherton’s later views on the rapid modernization of fly-fishing after 1951. Atherton, who was born in 1900, died shortly after the book’s publication, in 1952. Whether you are a fan of technical books on fly-fishing, historical perspective, or creative prose from another era, “The Fly and The Fish” combines all these in one book that any fly-fisher would appreciate as part of their library collection.

Photos by Shannon Drawe, for Lone Star Outdoor News


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October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER DOGS AND HOGS OUT OF SEASON A Titus County game warden responded to a call about a commotion coming from deep within the White Oak Creek Wildlife Management Area. The hunting manager for a nearby ranch told the game warden that he could hear what sounded like multiple ATVs, dogs and a cornered wild hog in the WMA. This area of the WMA does not have an authorized ATV trail, and the season for hunting hogs with dogs was closed. After checking the entrances to the WMA and finding no vehicles, he discovered the suspects were gaining access from private property. A group of five were located and issued numerous citations for having no annual public hunting permit, hunting hogs with dogs during closed season on a WMA, Illegal operation of an ATV on a WMA – operating an ATV off of designated trails. TARGETING DOVE NO ACCIDENT Prior to the South Zone dove season opener, game wardens responded to a call about hunters shooting doves in closed season. The wardens made their way to a field where hunters were and noticed seven freshly killed whitewinged and mourning dove behind one of the hunter’s trucks. As the wardens approached the subjects, one of them turned around and was holding a bird. Another quickly said the birds flew in front of the clay target skeet they were shooting at and that’s how they got shot. After talking with the subjects,

ONLY A FEW MISTAKES During the opening week in the Central Zone and the first two weekends of the Special Whitewing season, Bexar County wardens worked to keep up with the crowds. All three of Texas’ dove hunting zones cross through Bexar County, which creates new excitement and opportunity for each opening day. During the Labor Day holiday weekend,

three of them admitted to shooting the doves intentionally and apologized. Multiple cases filed and restitution is pending. BIRDBRAINED SHOOTERS While out checking fisherman ahead of the South Zone dove season, game wardens heard what sounded like shotgun blasts close by. As the wardens worked their way toward the sound of the blasts, they noticed two individuals riding in the back of a truck while trying to shoot birds. The wardens quickly made contact with the pair and noticed a freshly killed mourning dove and a common nighthawk. The wardens educated the subjects on the rules and regulations of hunting migratory game birds in closed season, hunting a protected species, hunting with unplugged shotguns, no hunting licenses and shooting from a vehicle. Multiple citations and civil restitution is pending.

Bexar County game wardens contacted more than 300 people in county fields. Several citations and warnings were issued, but by far, the public was in compliance. Most importantly, wardens reported zero hunting accidents over the Labor Day weekend, which turned out to be five days of dove hunting.

FISHING FOR A SUSPECT A flyer in a store window in Omaha that read “Sulphur River Catfish for Sale” caught the attention of a game warden, who called the number on the ad and set up a time and place for a buy. The suspect was asking $5 per pound for the catfish, which were filleted and frozen. Dressed in civilian clothes, the warden met with the seller and identified himself to the subject. The man said that he was going to call back the number from the call earlier in the morning to see if it was a Texas Parks and Wildlife number, but never got around to it. The man did not have the required licenses to catch and sell catfish. LAWBREAKERS ON THE LOOSE Wharton County was full of hunters for opening weekend in the South Zone, however, the number of birds was down for the first time in over a decade. Wharton County game wardens welcomed the help of wardens in neighboring counties. Even with the birds scattered, 50 cases

were filed for a variety of game law violations, including: no hunter education certification, hunting with unplugged shotguns, no state migratory game bird endorsement, shooting from public roadway, shooting onto private property and harvesting over the daily limit. All cases are pending. DOVE OVERKILL Atascosa County game wardens checked several dove hunters during the Special Whitewing season. Multiple cases were filed for no hunting license, exceeding the daily limit of mourning dove and other violations. A total of 39 mourning dove were seized from five hunters who did not follow the two mourning dove per person regulation.

field, the wardens located three chairs, a hunting bucket and over 100 empty shotgun shells. Next to the bucket, wardens found two mourning dove and a white-winged dove that were obviously left from a prior evening hunt. The wardens made a visit to the hunting camp house on the property and although no hunters were present, they did find two hunting vests containing dove and quail feathers and the carcasses of recently harvested birds in a trash bin at a cleaning station. After sorting through the carcasses and matching up wings, a total of 29 mourning dove, three whitewings and three bobwhite quail were counted. Several suspects were later interviewed and charges are pending for waste of game, no hunting license, exceeding the daily bag limit of mourning dove and hunting quail in closed season. BAITING BLUNDER Game wardens teamed up in La Salle County for the opening weekend of dove season and discovered several baited fields that resulted in 36 citations and 11 warnings, along with confiscation of 490 dove, one bobwhite quail, one killdeer and one snipe.

GROUP CHARGED WITH WASTE OF GAME Live Oak County game wardens were patrolling for dove hunters in the Special Whitewing Area when they located a recently hunted field. While walking the

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263

Waterfowlers gearing up Lone Star Outdoor News Duck and goose seasons begin soon, and Texas hunters are hoping for a good migration through the state. With good numbers of water sources for the ducks in most of Texas, scouting will be a key as the birds will have more choices of where to land and where to feed. The forecast for the numbers of birds are near record highs in the Central Flyway, but as hunters know, that doesn’t always mean the birds will find their way into the state. Previous warm winters to the north have kept many ducks north of the border, and hunters hope for freezing temperatures, snow and ice-covered ponds in the flyway’s northern states. Reports from Canada have indicated that there is a good crop of young snow geese and white-fronted geese on the way. Juvenile birds are more easily fooled by decoy spreads, making successful hunts more likely.

Photo by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News

2016-2017 Duck Seasons YOUTH-ONLY High Plains Mallard Management Unit Oct. 22 - 23, 2016 North Zone Nov. 5 - 6, 2016

North Zone Nov. 12 - 27, 2016 Dec. 3, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017 South Zone Nov. 5 - 27, 2016 Dec. 10, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017

South Zone Oct. 29 - 30, 2016

“DUSKY” DUCK High Plains Mallard Management Unit Nov. 7, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017

REGULAR SEASON High Plains Mallard Management Unit Oct. 29 - 30, 2016 Nov. 4, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017

North Zone Nov. 17 - 27, 2016 Dec. 3, 2015 - Jan. 29, 2017 South Zone Nov. 10 - 27, 2016 Dec. 10, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017

2016-2017 Goose Seasons BAG LIMITS Duck: 6 birds May include no more than: • 5 mallards (only two may be hens) • 3 wood ducks • 3 scaup • 2 redheads • 2 pintail • 2 canvasback • 1 “dusky” duck (including mottled duck, • Mexican-like duck, black duck and their hybrids)

LIGHT AND DARK GEESE West Zone Nov. 5, 2016 - Feb. 5, 2017 East Zone Nov. 5, 2016 - Jan. 29, 2017 LIGHT GEESE (CONSERVATION ORDER) West Zone Feb. 6 - Mar. 19, 2017 East Zone Jan. 30 - Mar. 19, 2017

BAG LIMITS West Zone Dark Geese 5 birds No more than 2 whitefronted geese Light Geese 20 birds in the aggregate Conservation Order Light Geese 20 birds in the aggregate

East Zone Dark Geese 5 birds No more than 2 White-fronted geese Light Geese 20 birds in the aggregate Conservation Order Light Geese 20 birds in the aggregate

*See TPWD for more information


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

Page 13

SPI fishing spot Continued from page 8

restaurant offering beautiful views of the bay. “The new pier is 120 yards to the north,” Boswell said. “And we’re going to build a kid’s fishing pier.” The pier is being operated by Tex-Mex Cruises, the same group that runs the Osprey Cruises. “They have one boat going out per day,” Boswell said. “We’re going to beef up the headboats and entertainment boats going out.” And the guides are trickling back. “They hang out at the Painted Marlin,” Boswell said. “That’s where to find them.” Other improvement include boat slips, some with boat lifts; Jim’s Store, where customers can buy bait, drinks, lures, fishing apparel and marine gasoline; boat trailer parking and a boat ramp. At the old location, a building that housed a realty office still stands, and has been reconditioned and is now the headquarters for Property Owners Who Care-SPI. “We are reinventing the image of South Padre Island as more than a spring break place,” Boswell said. “We want to improve the look and attitude of the island.” The old building where the guides would hang out, though, is gone. “It’s now a big, beautiful lawn,” Boswell said. “We may use it for tournament parking, a pavilion or parking for the trucks and trailers of fishermen. Parking can be a nightmare down here on a busy weekend.”

Photos from Skipjack Property

Black bears spotted in Northeast Texas Wildlife biologists are advising hunters, ranchers and rural residents in Northeast Texas of a handful of confirmed black bear sightings recently. At least four sightings have been documented on game trail cameras between June and late August in Bowie, Red River and Smith counties. Wildlife biologists with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department confirmed the sightings and speculate the bears, which appear to be young males, are looking to establish their own new home ranges and likely dispersed from Oklahoma or Arkansas where bear numbers have increased in recent years. This is the first confirmed presence of black bears in East Texas since September 2011. Breeding black bear populations have been absent from this region for almost 100 years, but bears from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana occasionally wander into East Texas. “Once these bears figure out there’s no opportunity for companionship over here they will likely retreat,” says Dave Holdermann, a nongame wildlife biologist with TPWD in Tyler. According to Holdermann, bears are normally shy and not aggressive to humans. But if a bear regularly visits a ranch or deer stand, people should try to scare it with rocks, a slingshot or air horn. Hunters are encouraged to study their game carefully to avoid mistaking a bear for a large feral hog or other legal game animal. It is against the law to kill a black bear in Texas, with penalties of up to $10,000, added civil restitution fines, jail time and loss of all hunting privileges. —TPWD

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DRAW WEIGHT 160 LBS

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POWER STROKE 13.5”

KINETIC ENERGY 109 (FT LBS) OVERALL WEIGHT 7.0 LBS


Page 14

October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Seeking first Texas hog Continued from page 4

TAKING THE SHOT: Dennis Inman had a good rest on the angler iron supporting an old deer blind, but the feral hog he fired at wasn’t recovered. Photo by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News.

as a rest, and fired. The lead hog reared up, turned and ran in a different direction from the others into thick brush. “I think I gave him a pretty good whack,” Dennis said. No blood was found in the tall grass where the hog had stood, and a short search before dark and another in the morning came up empty. “That was an easy 100-yard shot,” Dennis said. “That’s pretty disappointing. It was fun to see the hogs and watch their behavior, though.” Dennis shared the different hunting methods in the northeast. “It’s so wooded with only a few open areas, you pretty much have to stalk the deer from the ground,” he said. “You can be really close to a deer and not get a shot.” Earlier in the day, he tried that method to find a hog, with no luck. “I did walk right up to a really nice buck, though,” he said. In New Hampshire, Dennis refreshingly said hunters rarely speak of a deer’s score. “No one asks about that,” he said. “They just want to know what the deer weighed, and once in a while they will ask how many points it had. Even the deer contests are based on weight.” His short quest for a Texas hog, albeit unsuccessful, has him longing for more. It may become an annual trip.

IRS proposed rule changes for family farms

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The Exotic Wildlife Association and the Texas Farm Bureau joined in an effort to stop new IRS proposed rules that could affect family farms. The IRS has proposed changes to the way business assets would be valued for estate tax purposes when they are part of a familyowned partnership, LLC or corporation. These proposed rules will make it much more difficult for families to pass businesses on to the next generation of owners. Farmers and ranchers who operate in a family-owned partnership, LLC or corporation would lose a valuable estate planning tool that could result in increased estate taxes. Under current rules, the value of inherited family business assets can be discounted because of the following: Lack of Marketability: Current rules allow the value of assets to be reduced because heirs can’t easily sell their share of the

family business. An example is a person who inherits part of a farm and would find it difficult to find a buyer who wants to be in the business partnership. Minority Discount: Currently, asset values can be reduced if heirs don’t have control over their share of the business. An example is a person who inherits less than half of a farm and can’t unilaterally make business decisions. How assets are valued makes a dramatic difference for gift and estate tax purposes. IRS proposed regulations under Section 2704 eliminate or greatly reduce the discounts for lack of control and lack of marketability for “family related entities” and will discourage families from continuing to operate and build their family businesses and pass them on to future generations. —EWA

Two refuges add hunting opportunities

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Two National Wildlife Refuge Areas located in Texas have opened up new big game and migratory bird hunting opportunities this month. Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge is offering expanded migratory game bird hunting. The refuge is already open to migratory game bird hunting and sport fishing. Buffalo Lake National Wildlife Refuge opened to big game hunting for the first time. The refuge is already open to upland game hunting. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the agency has expanded fishing and hunting opportunities on 13 refuges throughout the Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System. The final rule also modified existing refuge-specific regulations on more than 70 other refuges and wetland management districts. This includes migratory bird, upland game and big game hunting, and sport fishing. Visit www.fws.gov/refuges/hunting for more information on specific hunting rules.

TO H ILITY ELL AND BACK RELIAB

—FWS

Follow the Mumme’s Inc. Facebook page for info on the latest items and special sales!


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

Page 15

New bass tournament taking place at Sam Rayburn to benefit Warrior’s Weekend The inaugural Keith Combs Sam Rayburn Slam bass fishing tournament is slated to get under way Oct. 29 out of Cassel Boykin Park on Sam Rayburn. The Sam Rayburn Slam is an open team tournament with over 135 percent payout, with a first prize of $10,000 based on a 100-team field. It will also feature additional youth and college team prizes. The main objective of the tournament is to bring awareness and to raise funds for Warrior’s Weekend. Warrior’s Weekend is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the support of U.S. military veterans with an emphasis on those wounded in the fight against terrorism. In conjunction with the event, there will be a raffle which will include a 70-quart Pelican cooler overflowing with products from Strike King, Owner, Seaguar, Shimano and Tackle Addict, along with a Minn Kota trolling motor and Power Tackle rods. Raffle tickets are one for $10 or three for $20 at http://wp.me/P6TxH1-fa. Combs notes that there will also be an auction including guided fishing packages with him, and other Elite pros such as James Niggemeyer, Greg West, Darold Gleason and Clark Rheem. The auction will also feature two VIP tickets to the Professional Bull Riders Iron Cowboy to be held at AT&T Stadium in 2017. The auctions are ongoing at https://www.facebook.com/KeithCombsFishing/. All proceeds from the raffle and auction will benefit Warrior’s Weekend. —Catalyst Marketing

Photo by Gary Tramontina, B.A.S.S.

Brokaw to receive sportsman award Park Cities Quail will honor legendary news anchor, author, and outdoorsman Tom Brokaw as the 2017 recipient of the T. Boone Pickens Lifetime Sportsman Award. The award to be presented on March 2, 2017 at the 11th Annual Dinner and Auction at the Frontiers of Flight Museum in Dallas. Brokaw grew up in South Dakota, and his love of the outdoors and hunting dogs grew out of a childhood spent pheasant hunting on the plains. This passion would only grow, and he even scheduled college courses to accommodate hunting season. Although he has traveled the world fly-fishing and wingshooting, he and his Labrador, ‘Red,’ return to his home state every autumn for pheasant season. —Park Cities Quail

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For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2016 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

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Page 16

October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Redfish are good in the marsh on weedless soft plastics. Trout are fair to good under slicks and birds on top-waters and soft plastics. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Bull redfish are good at the jetty on crabs and table shrimp. BOLIVAR: Trout, bull redfish, black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. Bull redfish and sharks have been taken on the beach near Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Redfish are good on the north shoreline on gold spoons and small top-waters. Redfish are good in the marsh on shrimp. Trout are fair to good around the wells on live bait and plastics. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good over reefs while working slicks with soft plastics. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Redfish are good in the marsh on natural baits and scented plastics. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Bull redfish are good in the surf and at San Luis Pass on crabs and mullet. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetties on shrimp and crabs. Trout are good over reefs in Christmas Bay on live shrimp. TEXAS CITY: Bull redfish are good in the channel on crabs and mullet. Sand trout and Gulf trout are good in the channel on shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in Moses Lake on crabs and shrimp. FREEPORT: Bull redfish are good on live bait and crabs on Surfside Beach. Black drum and redfish are good on the reefs in Bastrop Bay. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are good in Lake Austin on shrimp and top-waters. Trout are fair to good over mud while wading with scented baits. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good on live shrimp and top-waters in Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and Shell Island.

LSONews.com

Registration open for Texas Team Trail tourneys

PORT O’CONNOR: Bull redfish are good in the surf and at the jetty on cracked blue crabs. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes with live shrimp and top-waters. Trout are good on live bait over reefs in San Antonio Bay. ROCKPORT: Redfish are fair to good on mullet near Traylor Island. Trout are fair around Mud Island and Allyn’s Bight on small top-waters and soft plastics under corks. Redfish are fair to good in Copano Bay on the reefs and in the bayous. PORT ARANSAS: Bull redfish are good at the jetty on table shrimp and crabs. Redfish are good on the flats around Pelican Island on scented plastics and shrimp. Offshore is good for amberjack, kingfish, tuna and dolphin. CORPUS CHRISTI: Bull redfish are good in the channels on crabs and table shrimp. Redfish are good on the shallow flats on gold spoons and small top-waters. Bull redfish are good in the Packery Channel on crabs, mullet and shrimp. BAFFIN BAY: Redfish are fair to good at Yarborough on gold spoons and top-waters. Redfish are good around the spoils on scented baits and small topwaters. Trout are fair to good on top-waters along the shorelines. PORT MANSFIELD: Redfish are good while drifting potholes on top-waters and soft plastics under a popping cork. Trout are good on top-waters over sand and grass. Offshore is good for kingfish, ling and dolphin. SOUTH PADRE: Trout, redfish and snook are fair to good on the flats on live shrimp under a popping cork. Bull redfish are good at the jetty on natural baits. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good while drifting sand and grass flats on live and artificial shrimp and scented plastics under popping corks. Redfish are good on the flats and beginning to school in larger concentrations with higher tides. —TPWD

The Texas Team Trail presented by Cabela’s is taking registrations for the 2017 season, which includes stops at some of the most popular tournament bass lakes in Texas. The regular season will kick off Jan. 28, 2017, at Sam Rayburn Reservoir. Last year’s Sam Rayburn tournament set an all-time record for registered teams at a TXTT event. The following month, the TXTT will return to Toledo Bend Reservoir, which produced a 35-pound winning bag at the 2016 TXTT event on the lake. After a three-year hiatus, TXTT will return to Belton Lake in March. The regular season will wrap up at Lake Texoma. —TXTT

Crappie champions At Crappie Anglers of Texas’ 9th Annual Texas State Crappie Championship Tournament, held on Lake Lewisville Oct. 14-15, 31 teams competed for more than $22,000 in cash and prizes. Teams competed in the amateur division (Division 2) or the semi-pro division (Division 1) and weighed in their seven best crappie each day of the tournament. In Division 1, Jerry Hancock of McKinney and James Pegram of Blue Ridge topped the field with their two-day total weighing 18.37 pounds. Wes Belcher of Denton and Brian Carter of Scurry finished second with 17.55 pounds, followed by Chris Waters of Denton and Larry Middleton of Boyd with 16.90 pounds. Waters and Middleton also brought in the largest crappie of the event at 2.08 pounds. In an unusual twist, the Division 2 anglers brought in the higher weights. The team of Clay Gann of Hideaway and Todd and Langdon Froebe of LIndale won first place with 19.85 pounds. Second place was claimed by Alec Dyer of Keller and Bill Mouw of Burleson with 18.82 pounds. Finishing third was the team of John Zoski of Trenton and Truston Hibdon of Randolph with 16.94 pounds. At CAT’s annual award banquet, the team of Paul O’Bier/George Nelon won the Anglers of the Year honor in Division 1, and Clay Gann/ Todd and Langdon Froebe won the award in Division 2. —CAT


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

Page 17

HEROES

Trey Tijerina, 6, of Harlingen, with his very first dove bagged in San Perlita on opening day.

Rick Jones, of Grapevine, shot this buck with a bow and arrow on Oct. 8 while on a Texas Hunters for Heroes veteran’s hunt in Kendall County.

Bud Parks, of Garland, caught a 16-pound redfish in Venice, La., while fishing with friends and Fish-On guide service.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@ lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Haylee Powell, 7, of Dallas, caught this bluegill with a cricket. She caught all of her fish using live bait from the surrounding grass near the pond. The fish was caught from the family’s private pond in McCulloch County with a bobber and hook.

Sean Bates, of Boerne, caught this redfish in Venice, La. The 48inch fish had a 26-inch girth. Bates caught his prize on a 4-inch sea shad with chartreuse tail, popping-cork style.


Page 18

October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

New

First

Full

Last

Oct. 30

Nov. 7

Nov. 14

Nov. 21

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Oct./Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Oct./Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu

4:05 4:44 5:26 6:10 6:57 7:47 8:39

10:15 10:55 11:37 11:55 12:46 1:35 2:27

4:26 5:06 5:48 6:32 7:20 8:10 9:02

10:37 11:16 11:58 12:21 1:09 1:59 2:50

04 Fri

9:32 3:19

9:56

3:44

07:46 06:33 11:49a 10:29p

05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

10:25 11:18 11:09 11:59 12:22 1:08 1:54

10:49 11:42 11:34 ----12:47 1:34 2:21

4:37 5:30 5:22 6:12 7:00 7:47 8:34

07:47 07:48 06:49 06:50 06:51 06:52 06:53

3:59 10:09 4:38 10:49 5:20 11:31 6:04 11:49 6:51 12:40 7:41 1:30 8:33 2:21 9:26 3:14 10:19 4:07 11:12 4:59 11:03 4:51 11:53 5:41 12:16 6:29 1:02 7:15 1:48 8:02

4:20 5:00 5:42 6:27 7:14 8:04 8:57 9:50 10:43 11:37 11:28 ----12:42 1:28 2:15

10:31 11:11 11:53 12:15 1:03 1:53 2:45 3:38 4:31 5:24 5:16 6:06 6:54 7:41 8:28

07:31 06:37 07:31 06:37 07:32 06:36 07:33 06:35 07:34 06:34 07:35 06:33 07:35 06:32 07:36 06:32 07:37 06:31 07:38 06:30 06:39 05:30 06:39 05:29 06:40 05:28 06:41 05:28 06:42 05:27

5:39a 5:47p 6:31a 6:21p 7:23a 6:56p 8:15a 7:33p 9:07a 8:12p 9:58a 8:54p 10:49a 9:40p 11:38a 10:28p 12:25p 11:20p 1:10p NoMoon 12:54p NoMoon 1:36p 12:12a 2:17p 1:12a 2:59p 2:13a 3:41p 3:17a

4:13 5:05 4:57 5:47 6:35 7:21 8:08

07:40 07:41 07:42 07:43 07:44 07:45 07:46

06:39 06:38 06:38 06:37 06:36 06:35 06:34 06:32 06:31 05:31 05:30 05:29 05:28 05:28

5:46a 6:39a 7:32a 8:25a 9:18a 10:10a 11:00a

5:52p 6:25p 6:59p 7:35p 8:13p 8:55p 9:40p

12:36p 11:21p 1:21p NoMoon 1:04p NoMoon 1:45p 12:14a 2:25p 1:15a 3:05p 2:18a 3:46p 3:23a

San Antonio

Amarillo

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Oct./Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Oct./Nov. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

4:11 10:22 4:51 11:02 5:33 11:43 6:17 12:06 7:04 12:53 7:54 1:42 8:45 2:33 9:38 3:26 10:32 4:19 11:24 5:12 11:16 5:03 ----- 5:53 12:28 6:41 1:15 7:28 2:01 8:14

4:33 10:43 5:12 11:23 5:54 12:05 6:39 12:28 7:27 1:15 8:17 2:05 9:09 2:57 10:02 3:50 10:56 4:44 11:49 5:37 11:41 5:28 12:06 6:19 12:54 7:07 1:41 7:54 2:27 8:41

07:43 07:43 07:44 07:45 07:46 07:46 07:47 07:48 07:49 07:50 06:50 06:51 06:52 06:53 06:54

06:50 06:50 06:49 06:48 06:47 06:46 06:46 06:45 06:44 06:43 05:43 05:42 05:41 05:41 05:40

5:52a 6:00p 6:44a 6:34p 7:36a 7:10p 8:27a 7:47p 9:19a 8:26p 10:11a 9:08p 11:01a 9:53p 11:50a 10:42p 12:37p 11:34p 1:22p NoMoon 1:06p NoMoon 1:48p 12:26a 2:30p 1:25a 3:11p 2:27a 3:53p 3:30a

4:25 10:35 5:04 11:15 5:46 11:57 6:30 12:19 7:17 1:06 8:07 1:55 8:59 2:47 9:52 3:40 10:45 4:33 11:38 5:25 11:29 5:17 ----- 6:07 12:42 6:55 1:28 7:41 2:14 8:28

4:46 5:26 6:08 6:52 7:40 8:30 9:22 10:16 11:09 ----11:54 12:19 1:08 1:54 2:41

10:57 11:37 12:19 12:41 1:29 2:19 3:11 4:04 4:57 5:50 5:42 6:32 7:20 8:07 8:54

08:04 06:56 08:05 06:55 08:06 06:54 08:07 06:53 08:08 06:52 08:09 06:51 08:09 06:50 08:10 06:49 08:11 06:48 08:12 06:47 07:13 05:47 07:14 05:46 07:15 05:45 07:17 05:44 07:18 05:43

6:07a 6:12p 7:01a 6:44p 7:55a 7:17p 8:49a 7:52p 9:43a 8:30p 10:35a 9:11p 11:26a 9:56p 12:15p 10:44p 1:02p 11:37p 1:46p NoMoon 1:28p NoMoon 2:09p 12:32a 2:48p 1:34a 3:27p 2:38a 4:06p 3:44a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Time 2:50 AM 3:07 AM 3:21 AM 3:32 AM 3:39 AM 3:44 AM 12:00 AM 12:44 AM 1:51 AM 1:41 PM 2:43 PM 5:34 AM 5:34 AM 6:02 AM 12:19 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.4L 1.5L 1.5L 0.3L 0.4L 1.2L 1.0L 0.7L 1.7H

Time 9:04 AM 9:28 AM 9:56 AM 10:26 AM 10:59 AM 11:35 AM 3:48 AM 3:53 AM 3:56 AM 10:09 PM 10:53 PM 8:01 AM 10:49 AM 12:09 PM 6:37 AM

Height 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.7H 1.7H 1.2H 1.3H 1.5H 0.4L

Time 3:50 PM 4:30 PM 5:08 PM 5:44 PM 6:23 PM 7:06 PM 12:14 PM 12:57 PM 1:45 PM

Height 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L

Time 9:17 PM 9:51 PM 10:22 PM 10:53 PM 11:24 PM

Height 1.0L 1.1L 1.2L 1.3L 1.4L

7:57 PM 8:59 PM 10:09 PM

1.7H 1.7H 1.7H

3:48 4:53 5:54 1:12

0.5L 0.5L 0.6L 1.7H

11:25 PM 11:53 PM

1.7H 1.7H

6:51 PM

0.8L

PM PM PM PM

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 3:01 AM 3:34 AM 3:56 AM 3:51 AM 3:55 AM 12:35 AM 1:31 AM 2:19 AM 1:38 PM 1:25 PM 2:12 PM 5:47 AM 5:38 AM 6:04 AM 12:03 AM

Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5L 1.5L 1.5L 0.4L 0.5L 0.6L 1.3L 1.0L 0.8L 1.7H

Time 9:01 AM 9:36 AM 10:11 AM 10:43 AM 11:13 AM 4:14 AM 4:30 AM 4:32 AM 10:13 PM 9:59 PM 10:45 PM 8:26 AM 10:55 AM 12:31 PM 6:37 AM

Height 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.4L 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.9H 1.9H 1.8H 1.4H 1.4H 1.6H 0.5L

Time 4:08 PM 4:49 PM 5:27 PM 6:07 PM 6:56 PM 11:43 AM 12:14 PM 12:52 PM

Height 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 0.3L 0.3L 0.4L

Time 9:57 PM 10:47 PM 11:22 PM 11:55 PM

Height 1.2L 1.3L 1.3L 1.4L

7:56 PM 8:48 PM 9:31 PM

2.0H 2.0H 2.0H

3:21 5:04 6:03 1:45

0.7L 0.8L 0.9L 1.8H

11:22 PM 11:47 PM

1.8H 1.7H

6:54 PM

1.1L

Height 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.7L 1.1L 1.0L 1.4H 1.4H

Time 9:26 AM 9:47 AM 10:14 AM 6:43 PM 7:45 PM 9:13 PM 10:02 PM 10:44 PM 11:24 PM 11:00 PM 11:26 PM 9:53 AM 11:27 AM 6:56 AM 7:06 AM

Height 0.8L 0.8L 0.7L 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.2H 1.2H 0.9L 0.7L

Time 4:21 PM 5:15 PM 5:59 PM

Height 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H

Time 11:01 PM 11:57 PM

Height 1.3L 1.3L

4:43 PM 6:03 PM 12:40 PM 1:45 PM

0.8L 0.8L 1.3H 1.4H

11:47 PM

1.5H

6:59 PM 7:58 PM

0.9L 1.0L

Height 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.5L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.5L 0.6L 1.2L 1.0L 1.7H

Time 9:01 AM 9:23 AM 9:44 AM 10:06 AM 3:02 AM 7:26 PM 8:17 PM 9:09 PM 10:02 PM 9:49 PM 10:31 PM 11:06 PM 10:17 AM 11:47 AM 6:39 AM

Height 0.8L 0.6L 0.5L 0.5L 1.5H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 1.9H 1.3H 1.5H 0.7L

Time 3:39 PM 4:27 PM 5:12 PM 5:55 PM 10:30 AM

Height 1.8H 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 0.4L

Time 9:59 PM 10:50 PM 11:45 PM

Height 1.2L 1.3L 1.4L

6:40 PM

2.0H

4:24 PM 5:48 PM 1:00 PM

0.8L 0.9L 1.7H

11:37 PM

1.8H

7:07 PM

1.0L

Height 0.9L 1.1L 1.2L 1.3L 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H

Time 5:37 AM 5:38 AM 5:45 AM 5:58 AM 2:35 PM 3:00 PM 3:36 PM 4:21 PM 5:15 PM 5:18 PM 6:32 PM 7:50 PM 10:13 AM 10:34 AM 10:57 AM

Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.4L 0.4L 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L

Time 1:14 PM 1:42 PM 2:05 PM 2:20 PM

Height 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L 0.3L

Time 8:21 PM 9:26 PM 10:30 PM

Height 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H

PM PM PM PM

Time 2:30 AM 2:36 AM 2:16 AM 10:51 AM 11:30 AM 12:09 PM 12:51 PM 1:40 PM 2:40 PM 2:37 PM 3:33 PM 6:39 AM 6:46 AM 12:08 AM 12:28 AM

Freeport Harbor Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Time 2:17 AM 2:33 AM 2:48 AM 3:00 AM 12:54 AM 10:56 AM 11:27 AM 12:04 PM 12:46 PM 12:38 PM 1:41 PM 2:58 PM 6:28 AM 6:24 AM 12:05 AM

Time 12:39 AM 1:23 AM 2:03 AM 2:41 AM 6:17 AM 6:35 AM 4:11 AM 4:32 AM 4:20 AM 3:01 AM 3:12 AM 3:18 AM 3:21 AM 3:30 AM 3:42 AM

Time 11:37 AM 11:54 AM 12:12 PM 12:33 PM 1:01 PM 1:36 PM 2:19 PM 3:07 PM 3:59 PM 3:51 PM 4:42 PM 5:31 PM 6:17 PM 7:02 PM 9:07 AM

Height 0.9L 0.8L 0.8L 0.7L 0.7L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.6L 0.7L 0.7L 0.8L 0.9L 0.8L

Time

Height

Time

Height

Time 3:28 AM 3:29 AM 3:39 AM 3:54 AM 4:15 AM 4:42 AM 5:12 AM 5:45 AM 6:20 AM 5:52 AM 6:15 AM 4:32 AM 3:23 AM 2:44 AM 2:12 AM

Height 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H

Time 11:17 AM 12:10 PM 12:56 PM 1:39 PM 2:22 PM 3:05 PM 3:49 PM 4:33 PM 5:17 PM 5:00 PM 5:40 PM 6:17 PM 6:47 PM 9:27 AM 9:56 AM

Height 0.5L 0.5L 0.5L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.5L

Time

Height

Time

Height

Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 0.6L 0.6L 0.5L 0.5L 0.5L 0.5L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L 1.3L 1.1L 0.8L

Time 8:18 AM 8:43 AM 9:09 AM 6:02 PM 6:50 PM 7:39 PM 8:31 PM 9:22 PM 10:11 PM 9:53 PM 10:27 PM 10:55 PM 9:49 AM 11:48 AM 1:13 PM

Height 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 1.4L 1.2L 0.8L

Height 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.1L 0.1L 0.4H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

12:30 PM

0.5H

7:00 PM

0.5L

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Time 1:52 AM 1:54 AM 1:47 AM 9:35 AM 10:04 AM 10:36 AM 11:11 AM 11:51 AM 12:36 PM 12:29 PM 1:30 PM 2:41 PM 5:59 AM 5:58 AM 6:18 AM

Height 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 2.3H 2.3H 2.3H 2.2H 2.2H 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H 2.0H 1.4H 1.6H 1.9H

Time 3:29 PM 4:24 PM 5:14 PM

Height 2.0H 2.1H 2.2H

Time 9:31 PM 10:34 PM

Height 1.4L 1.6L

4:00 PM 5:20 PM 6:41 PM

0.9L 1.1L 1.4L

11:16 PM 1:32 PM 11:43 PM

1.9H 1.8H 1.8H

Time 8:20 AM 8:47 AM 9:13 AM 6:17 PM 7:05 PM 7:55 PM 8:45 PM 9:35 PM 10:20 PM 9:58 PM 10:28 PM 10:51 PM 9:03 AM 11:26 AM 1:01 PM

Height 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 2.1H 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H 2.0H 1.4H 1.5H 1.7H

Time 3:37 PM 4:35 PM 5:27 PM

Height 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H

Time 9:28 PM 10:35 PM

Height 1.5L 1.6L

3:46 PM 5:09 PM 6:33 PM

1.0L 1.1L 1.3L

11:08 PM 11:18 PM 11:23 PM

1.8H 1.7H 1.6H

Time 10:42 AM 10:53 AM 11:02 AM 11:24 AM 10:32 PM

Height 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.4H

Time 4:40 PM 8:13 PM 8:58 PM 9:36 PM

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 11:06 PM 11:17 PM 11:23 PM

Height 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L

2:46 3:10 3:40 3:18 4:37 5:42 7:05 6:49 9:08

0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L

12:22 PM 12:57 PM 2:37 PM

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H

6:13 PM 6:47 PM 9:36 PM

0.2L 0.2L 0.3L

South Padre Island

Rollover Pass Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Height 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Rockport

Time 3:45 AM 3:03 AM 2:19 AM 2:19 AM 1:32 AM 12:31 AM 1:00 AM 1:42 AM 2:25 AM 2:05 AM 2:40 AM 3:09 AM 3:28 AM 3:05 AM 1:37 AM

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Time 1:35 AM 1:34 AM 1:22 AM 9:39 AM 10:06 AM 10:35 AM 11:07 AM 11:44 AM 12:27 PM 12:18 PM 1:18 PM 2:28 PM 6:03 AM 5:50 AM 6:08 AM

East Matagorda

1:58 PM 3:40 PM 5:05 PM

1.0H 1.1H 1.2H

9:04 PM 10:12 PM 11:17 PM

0.6L 0.7L 0.9L

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Time 1:33 AM 1:45 AM 4:48 AM 2:41 AM 11:53 AM 12:41 PM 12:16 AM 12:53 AM 1:23 AM 1:54 AM 1:27 AM 2:40 AM 12:32 AM 12:51 AM 12:20 AM

PM PM PM PM PM PM AM AM AM

Texas Coast Tides

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11

Date Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 9 Nov 10 Nov 11


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

Page 19

NOAA Fisheries changes management rules NOAA Fisheries updated the guidelines it and the regional fishery management councils use for developing fishery management plans for the nation’s federal marine fisheries. The revised guidelines address many of the recommendations by American Sportfishing Association and others in the recreational fishing community. They include: • • • •

Allowing changes to catch limits to be gradually phased in over up to three years, as long as overfishing is prevented. Increasing latitude, based on the biology of the fish stock, in setting timelines for rebuilding programs. Providing flexibility for better managing data-limited stocks while adhering to conservation requirements. Allowing for greater stability in fishing regulations through guidance on considering multiple years when determining overfishing status.

The association indicated it will continue to push for other measures such as providing limited exemptions for annual catch limits, allowing use of alternative management approaches in recreational fisheries and establishing a process for examining allocations. --American Sportfishing Association

Two Highland Lakes to be lowered Anglers who fish lakes LBJ and Austin may want to mark their calendars, as the two lakes will be drawn down for about six weeks in early 2017. The Lower Colorado River Authority will lower the two to give lakeside property owners an opportunity to repair and maintain docks, retaining walls and other shoreline property. The drawdown also will aid in curbing the growth of nuisance aquatic vegetation such as hydrilla and Eurasian water milfoil. “It’s been years since we’ve lowered any of the Highland Lakes,” said John Hofmann, LCRA executive vice president. “Property owners need to maintain their boat docks and perform other maintenance, and I’m pleased our water supplies have been replenished enough that a drawdown is possible. Our lakes are nearly full, and conditions in the basin are better than they have been in several years.” Lake LBJ: LCRA will lower Lake LBJ about 4 feet from about Jan. 2, 2017, to Feb. 13, 2017. Water released from Lake LBJ for the drawdown will be captured and held downstream in Lake Travis until it is needed by customers. To refill Lake LBJ, water will be moved downstream from Lake Buchanan beginning about Feb. 10, 2017. The water to refill Lake LBJ is equivalent to about 1.07 feet in Lake Buchanan. Lake Austin: At the City of Austin’s request, LCRA will lower Lake Austin about 10 feet during that same time period. LCRA will not actively lower Lake Austin, but instead will allow levels to gradually fall by not sending water downstream from Lake Travis. To refill Lake Austin, water will be moved downstream from Lake Travis beginning about Feb. 9, 2017. The water to refill Lake Austin is equivalent to about 8 inches of water in Lake Travis. The city said the drawdown would provide an opportunity to stay ahead of nuisance vegetation growth on Lake Austin, allow property owners to assess and repair bulkheads and boat docks, and allow a City of Austin fire station to maintain its boat ramp. —LCRA

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Page 20

October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Solution on Page page27 27

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LSONews.com

Nammo acquires Berger Bullets Berger Bullets has joined the Nammo Group, joining an family of ammunition and components brands — SK, Vitavouri and Lapua.

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Styrka hires sales manager

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Across

2. Popular frog lure ACROSS 5. A camo brand, ____ Country Popularlake frog lure 9. A Hill2. Country 11. A duck 5. species A camo brand, ____ Country 13. Also called a dogfish 9. A to Hill 14. Referred asCountry the deerlake capital of Texas 16. Top-water lure good for stripers, Pencil ______ 11. A duck species 19. Chairs the TPW Commission Also lake called a dogfish 21. Ellis13. County good for crappie 23. TPWD a mottled duck a ____ duck 14. calls Referred to as the deer capital of Texas 25. Relative of the redfish 16. Top-water lureby good forPro stripers, 26. Company purchased Bass 29. Popular Pencil dark goose ______ 30. Animal moving into East Texas from Arkansas, 19. Chairs the TPW Commission Louisiana 34. Type of Ellis shot County illegal for goose 21. lake good hunting for crappie 36. Illegal taking of game 23. TPWD a mottled 37. A hunting and calls fishing retailer duck a ____ duck 38. A crossbow brand 25. Relative of the redfish 26. Company purchased by Bass Pro 29. Popular dark goose 30. Animal moving into East Texas from Arkansas, Louisiana

Down

1.DOWN A good bass lure 2. A male aoudad A good bass lure 3. 1. Central Texas lake good for smallmouth 4. 2. Maximum number of shotshells in gun while A male aoudad hunting ducks Central Texas lake good for smallmouth 6. 3. The linesider 7. 4. Crane callednumber the ribeye of the skyin gun while Maximum of shotshells 8. It can run 55 mph hunting ducks 9. A mule deer organization 10. 6. AnThe African game animal linesider 12. A snapper species Crane called thetown ribeye of the sky 15. 7. A coastal fishing 16. 8. New blaze color It can runcamo 55 mph 17. A cooler brand A mule deer 18. 9. A favorite food organization of deer, birds 20.10. County with new CWD check stations An African game animal 22. Saltwater catfish not wanted in the boat A snapper species 24.12. Area within ranch where no one hunts 26.15. Texas/Louisiana border A coastal fishing town lake 27. Another name for the wigeon New lake blazeknown camo for color 28.16. Texas white bass 31.17. A trout species A cooler brand 18. A favorite food of deer, birds 20. County with new CWD check stations

34. Type of shot illegal for goose hunting

22. Saltwater catfish not wanted in the boat

36. Illegal taking of game

24. Area within ranch where no one hunts

37. A hunting and fishing retailer

26. Texas/Louisiana border lake

38. A crossbow brand

27. Another name for the wigeon 28. Texas lake known for white bass 31. A trout species 32. An outboard brand 33. A quail species 35. Horns are popular in Asia

Nature’s Calling

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

New director of suppressor organization American Suppressor Association hired Owen Miller as its director of outreach.

GSM acquires HME

Brad Gross was named the national sales manager of optics manufacturer Styrka.

Huron Capital Partners’ Texasbased hunting accessories platform, Good Sportsman Marketing (GSM), has acquired HME Products, LLC.

Koch sales manager at Real Avid

ScentLok hires new president

Real Avid hired John Koch, formerly of Do-All Outdoors, as national sales manager.

ScentLok Technologies named Aaron Ambur, formerly of Cabela’s, to the position of president.

New VP at Daniel Defense

Daniel Defense expanding

Patrick Kisgen was named vice president of sales at Daniel Defense.

An $18.5 million expansion at Daniel Defense in Georgia will create 75 new jobs. The new expansion is set to be finished late summer of 2017.

Agency hired by wader manufacturer ProSport Outdoors, a manufacturer of waders, hired F-3 Media as its digital marketing agency of record.

New VP at Simms Simms Fishing Products named Al Perkinson, formerly of Costa, to executive vice president of marketing.

Leupold looking for social media strategist Leupold & Stevens, Inc., is seeking an experienced social media strategist to join its global marketing team in its Beaverton, Oregon headquarters.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Herb-broiled king mackerel steaks 4 small mackerel steaks 1/4 cup margarine or butter, softened 1 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley 1 tbsp. thinly sliced green onion, including tops 1/2 tsp. chopped fresh tar ragon (or 1/4 teaspoon dried) 1/2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme (or 1/4 teaspoon dried) 1 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 1/8 tsp. paprika

Place fillets in greased broiler-safe pan, without rack, skin-side down. In small bowl blend together all other ingredients. Spread over fillets. Broil about 4 inches from heat until fish flakes with a fork, about 8 to 10 minutes. Baste once or twice during cooking with pan juices. —fishwatch.gov

Huevos rancheros with venison chile sauce 1/2 pound ground venison 2 tbsps. chopped onion 1 14-1/2 ounce can of tomatoes, drained 4 drops Tabasco or hot sauce 1 tsp. salt 1 can of mild chili beans, drained 4 eggs Corn tortillas Olive oil Shredded Mexican blend cheese Sour cream Avocado slices Cook onion and venison until brown. Add tomatoes, Tabasco and salt. Cook for another

minute. Finally, add chili beans. Turn heat to low and simmer sauce for 10 minutes. While sauce is simmering, in a separate skillet heat 2 tbsps. olive oil to medium heat. Add corn tortillas one at a time, flipping after 30 seconds to cook both sides. Using the same skillet, fry eggs on one side in remaining olive oil until egg whites are mostly cooked through, but yolks are still runny. Place each egg on cooked tortillas. Layer tortillas and eggs with chili sauce. Garnish with cheese, sour cream and avocado slices. —Ohio DNR


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

October 28, 2016

Page 21


Page 22

October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

PRODUCTS HUNTRESS PACK: This pack by ALPS OutdoorZ is for her. It is designed with shoulder straps, a padded waist belt and a lightweight frame that accommodate a woman’s figure. The pack is constructed from brushed Realtree Xtra fabric to keep a hunter quiet and concealed in the field while its vented back keeps her cool all day long. The pack offers 2,200 cubic inches of space for a hunter’s essential gear: a drop-down weapon pocket securely carries most compound bows or rifles; the front pocket organizes calls and other accessories; and lower side mesh pockets keep water bottles handy. The Huntress, which costs about $120, also includes lashing straps so that additional gear can be strapped onto the pack.

COMPACTPRO CAMERA: This is a highly portable thermal imaging camera for smartphones, to include iPhone and Android models. Seek Thermal’s camera offers a 320x240 highly sensitive thermal sensor and a 32-degree field of view. The camera can capture infrared images in outdoor conditions — day or night — at distances up to about 300 yards away. Other features include a color display and a 300-lumen LED flashlight. The camera has a rechargeable lithium battery with a runtime of 10-plus hours and comes with a USB cable and microSD card. The MSRP is $449.

>>

(844) 733-4328 thermal.com

>>

(800) 344-2577 alpsoutdoorz.com FISH STALKER SHIRT: Under Armour’s short-sleeve fishing shirt offers a fuller cut for increased comfort, mesh-backed vents across its back for strategic ventilation, and a “moisture transport system” that wicks sweat from the body. The Fish Stalker, which won a 2016 ICAST best-in-class award in the Lifestyle Apparel category, is made from a smooth woven breathable fabric that offers UPF protection against the sun and an anti-odor technology that prevents the growth of odor-causing microbes. The fabric also contains stain-release materials that help repel blood, guts and dirt. Available in five colors in sizes small to 3XL, the shirt costs about $60.

>>

(888) 727-6687 underarmour.com

LONG TAIL FLIPPY FLOPPY LURE: Squidnation had added this long tail marauder squid with longer tentacles to its Flippy Floppy Line. This soft lure, which was awarded ICAST 2016’s best of show in its category, offers a daisy chain of squids constructed with overbuilt coated wire. It is for serious offshore anglers who want a soft lure that can hold up against such big fish as tuna, marlin, sailfish, dolphin and wahoo. It is rigged with 275-pound test line and a 300-pound Marlin Coast Lock swivel. The Long Tail Flippy Floppy Daisy Chains are composed of four 9-inch Rubber Long Tail Mauler Squids, eight 6-inch Fat Daddy Squids and one 5-inch bird. Available in several colors, the soft lure sells for about $100.

TURKINATOR KNIFE: Bubba Blade worked with hunters and the National Wild Turkey Federation to perfect its boning knife. The Turkinator, which can be used to fillet any type of fowl or game, features a stainless steel razor sharp blade and a no-slip handle coated with a nonstick surface that is bonded with titanium to prevent rusting and pitting. The company says this hunting knife will hold up in harsh saltwater environments. The knife costs about $50 or about $60 for the limited edition Mossy Oak Break-Up Country model.

>>

(844) 486-7285

>>

(410) 873-3282 squidnation.com

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October 28, 2016

Page 23

NATIONAL Five hunters score during first segment of Arkansas elk hunt Five of the eight permitted hunters connected with their targets during the first segment of the 2016 Arkansas elk season. Two of the five were youth hunters. Both shot their elk on Oct. 1, the first day of the two-day youth hunt. Pierce Moss, a 15-year-old from Stuttgart, harvested a 6x9 bull on Gene Rush Wildlife Management Area in Newton County. Olivia Hasley, a 13-year-old from Redfield, also took a 5x6 bull on Bearcat Hollow WMA in Searcy County. The adult hunters began their hunt Monday, Oct. 3. The biggest bull, and perhaps the biggest since modern elk hunting began in Arkansas, came on Oct. 6, when Doug Young of Malvern shot a 6x7 bull that gross scored 361 inches. The last elk hunt of the 2016 season will take place Oct. 29-Nov. 4. Twenty-four hunters have drawn permits for that hunt. —AGFC

Maryland poachers arrested

EHD strikes South Dakota deer South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks has received nearly 1,200 reports of dead whitetailed deer likely due to epizootic hemorrhagic disease. Reports of deer loss have been documented in 38 counties, with EHD confirmed in 17 counties through laboratory testing. In response, GFP is removing all remaining antlerless licenses from 11 hunting units and voluntary refunds will be offered to individuals who have already received a deer license for the units. The disease seems to be most prevalent in central and southeastern South Dakota. —SDGFP

Rhode keeps on winning At the ISSF World Cup final in Rome, Italy, Kim Rhode, the six-time Olympic medalist, sealed the victory with a perfect score of 16 hits in the gold medal match in Women’s Skeet. Rhode defeated Wei Meng of China in the gold medal match. —USA Shooting

Two poachers in Maryland have been charged with 73 counts of illegal hunting, and if convicted could face fines of $50,000 each, plus jail time. According to Maryland Natural Resources Police, John Dimingo Gallano IV, 20, of Pasadena, and Christopher Michael Johnson, 20, of Halethorpe, went out between the hours of 1 and 5 a.m. on Oct. 18, 2015, and killed eight deer from a vehicle while using a spotlight. The carcasses of a 9-point buck and three 4-point bucks were dumped in Pasadena neighborhoods. —MDNR

Oklahoma surplus property auction online Bidding is open in the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s surplus property auction, being conducted on the Internet. Potential bidders can see the list of auction items and photos through the link at www.wildlifedepartment.com/outdoor-news/odwc-auction. Vehicles in the auction include 21 pickups and a utility van, along with some boats and four-wheelers. Several lots of merchandise are also up for bid, including law enforcement equipment, automotive parts and an Army-style tent. Bids will be accepted until at least 10 a.m. on Nov 2. —ODWC

Columbian white-tailed deer downlisted The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners celebrated the downlisting of the Columbian white-tailed deer from endangered to threatened in Washington and Oregon. The combined efforts of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, states of Washington and Oregon, conservation groups, volunteers and the Service have reduced threats and secured populations of deer. The Columbian white-tailed deer is one of 16 unique subpopulations in the United States. It is the only subspecies of white-tailed deer found west of the Cascade mountain range. The Columbian white-tailed deer was listed in 1967 due to habitat loss and modification by human activities. There are two populations of Columbian white-tailed deer: The Lower Columbia River population, which is found in Wahkiakum, Cowlitz and Clark counties in Washington, and Clatsop and Columbia counties in Oregon. The Lower Columbia River population is now being downlisted to threatened, going from about 450 deer in 1967 to more than 900 individuals today. The Douglas County population in the Umpqua River Basin of Oregon was removed from the endangered species list in 2003 due to recovery. —FWS

INTERNATIONAL Team’s black marlin tops at Los Cabos At the 18th annual Los Cabos Billfish tournament, the fleet of 37 boats released a total of 95 video-verified billfish: 56 blues, 36 stripes and three blacks. Team Pangalisa reeled in a first place overall victory, thanks to a 378-pound black marlin caught by John Domanic on day two. Team members Mike Hennessy, Gonzalo Castillo, John Domanic, Phillip Davis and Alfredo Castillo earned $84,650 for their efforts and an invitation to the 2017 Offshore World Championship. Last year’s Los Cabos Billfish Tournament winner, team Reel Energy, came in a close second overall with a 370-pound blue caught by Brian Walley on the first day, earning $58,400.

ON HIS FIRST AOUDAD HUN T IN THE DAVIS MOUNTAINS, COLE FINDLEY, 15, OF FLINT, TOOK THIS G REAT FREE-RANGE, 34-INCH AOU DAD WHILE HUNTI NG WITH ROWDY MCBRIDE AN D HIS FATHER, ALLEN. COLE TOOK THE RA M WITH ONE SH OT AT 204 YARD S.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

—Los Cabos Billfish Tournament

Big payouts at Bisbee’s tournament The Bisbee’s Los Cabos Offshore Tournament, presented by Orca Coolers, has grown into a world-class event that showcases top angling skills and serious prize money. At the 2016 edition, a total of 108 teams competed for more than $772,000, with several teams earning impressive payouts for their fish. Angler Rick Daab and his veteran crew aboard Wild Hooker earned the biggest share of the overall pot after landing the largest marlin, a 450-pound black, earning $263,951. Mike Maier and his Go Naked Team brought in a 391-pound blue marlin to capture second place and $235,034. Team NiceRide and angler Deno Merziotis won $8,505 after landing the third-heaviest marlin, a 366-pound blue. The two game fish categories—tuna and dorado—proved lucrative as well. Francisco Rochin and his Sea Fever teammates are sharing a tournament record payout in the dorado division. The team’s 32.4-pound dorado was worth $93,230. Brian Parker and the Sin Duda crew brought in a 283-pound yellowfin that paid out $57,955 for the overall heaviest tuna. In the Release Division, the Sea Angel released four blues and one striped marlin, good for 1,300 points. That effort won the Texas family team $50,830 in prize money. —Bisbee’s

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October 28, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

STARTED HUNTING LABS One black male. WILL HUNT THIS YEAR. PROSPECT RETRIEVERS Facebook/Prospect-Retrievers (903) 272-0032

NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219 GUIDED WATERFOWL Day Hunts Parris, TX.  www.RedLegOutfitters.com (903) 517-5889

SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996

HUNTING CAMPER FOR SALE 10 foot. 1990, Slide-in Camper. Queen Bed, Full Kitchen and Bath. $2,500 (210) 452-2382 (210) 863-6590

LAST MINUTE CAPE BUFFALO HUNT Any size bull, $10,000. Includes daily rates for 7-day hunt Must be taken before the end of November, 2016 For more information, contact Wimpie Knox, Lion Creek Safaris LKNOX200@GMAIL.COM

TROPHY AND MANAGEMENT WHITETAIL HUNTS

Cabin and processing facility on site. Predator and fishing opportunities. Kids and wives always welcome. Call Garrett Wiatrek Email wbarranches@yahoo.com www.wbarranchhunts.com (830) 391-0375

OWN YOUR OWN DEER LEASE 80 acres, Shelby County CR 4688 Near Tinson Barn, electricity, water and septic $2,200 per acre (903) 520-5423 ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

SEEKING HUNTING PROPERTY Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is looking for hunting property to continue its mission of creating hunters for a lifetime by providing hunting experiences for those that have the passion but lack the opportunity. All hunting rights sought, house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276

YOUTH HUNT SPECIAL 1 Cull Buck 1 Doe 1 Javelina or Turkey Limited Hunts - $1,795.00 www.VRanchTexas.com (830) 900-2240

CLINTON, ARKANSAS 210 acres with house, cabin, Turkeys Deer, Hogs, Bears All offers welcome (501) 412-6621

FISHING CHARTER FISHING Port Mansfield Shallow water, wade and fly fishing specialist Capt. Steve Ellis (956) 492-8472

SABINE LAKE FISHING Trout, flounder, reds. Captain Randy’s Guide Service running multiple boats. Check for specials at www.fishsabine.com (409) 719-6067

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS (956) 551-1965

DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does. Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

TROPHY WHITETAIL HUNTS “May kill buck of lifetime “ $ 700 - 2 DAYS Wife or child 1/2 price South TX- Brackettville Web site www.b-jranch.com E-mail: Huntsbj@gmail.com (830) 563-2658

SOUTH TEXAS TROPHY HUNTS Management hunts also. Maverick County. Native, mature herd. Quality, comfortable lodging. Txdiamondcranch.com (713) 516-2954

DISCOUNT TROPHY WHITETAIL AND EXOTIC HUNTS In the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Trophy Whitetail, American Mufflon, Fallow, Blackbuck, Axis and Sika. Budget hunts or meat hunts. Email AlpineRanch2016@gmail.com or Call  (469) 243-8388

WORLD CLASS RED STAGS $4,000-$26,000 90 Miles Southwest of Dallas (214) 616-6822

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! dickyn@lagovistalodge.com (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296 TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES  Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044 PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

SALES POSITION ENTRY LEVEL SALES Lone Star Outdoor News is looking for an entry-level sales person for its growing advertising business. Position will be based in its Dallas office. Must have hunting and fishing experience. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

VEHICLES HUNTING FOR TRUCKS? New Ford and used trucks below. 2014 Ford F-150 STX SuperCrew Cab 4x2 5.0L V8 Automatic, Running Boards Ingot Silver Metallic 14,768 Miles Stock # EKF18577 2013 Ford F-150 Lariat SuperCrew Cab 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost Automatic Leather Ingot Silver Metallic 18,493 Miles Stock #DKF93180 2014 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew Cab 4x4 3.5L V6 Ecoboost 4X4 Automatic Leather Color, Ingot Silver Metallic Interior, steel gray 20,795 Miles Stock #EKD03236 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Crew Cab 5.3L V8 4X4 Automatic Leather Exterior Color, Sunset Orange Metallic Interior Color, Cocoa/dune 28,969 Miles Stock #FG206612 2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT Crew Cab 4x2 5.3L V8 Automatic Leather 20 Alloy Wheel Silver Ice Metallic 71,289 Miles Stock #DG160973 Call Bobby I’m in the DFW area (214) 632-7963


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October 28, 2016

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October 28, 2016

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DATEBOOK OCTOBER 29

Ducks Unlimited CastAway Cup Fishing Tournament Harborwalk Marina, West Galveston Bay (832) 230 – 0243 ducks.org/texas

NOVEMBER 2

Coastal Conservation Association Brush Country Banquet Alice Knights of Columbus Hall (361) 296-4037 ccatexas.org Houston Safari Club Monthly Meeting Norris Conference Center (832) 804-8959 houstonsafariclub.org

NOVEMBER 4

Hunter’s BBQ Antler Oaks Lodge, Bandera (830) 796-3280 banderatex.com/events Duval County Whitetail Deer Seminar Garza Party Barn (361) 256-4591 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Fishing with a Ranger Inks Lake State Park (512) 793-4689 tpwd.texas.gov Coleman County Deer Festival BBQ Bill Franklin Center (325) 625-2163 colemantexas.org

NOVEMBER 3

NOVEMBER 5

Ducks Unlimited Waco Dinner The Phoenix Ballroom (254) 313 - 2625 ducks.org/texas

Eldorado Game Association Annual Game Dinner Schleicher County Civic Center (325) 650-9553 eldoradogame.org

Coastal Conservation Association Guadalupe Valley Banquet The Venue, Cuero (361) 275-9464 ccatexas.org Ducks Unlimited Denton Dinner Roberts Banquet Hall, Krum (817) 368-1300 ducks.org/texas Cotulla, La Salle County Chamber of Commerce Hunters Appreciation Dinner A.B. Alexander Convention Center, Cotulla (830) 879-2326 cotullachamber.com

Greater Boerne Chamber of Commerce Wild Game Dinner Kendall County Youth Agriculture & Equestrian Center (830) 249-8000 visitboerne.org

NOVEMBER 7

Bee County Wildlife Association Hunters Welcome Lunch Bee County Expo Center (361) 362-0430

SQUARE 1 CONTAINERS, LLC 20Ft/40Ft Used Containers Modifications Available Hunting Camps Construction Offices

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NOVEMBER 9

Coastal Conservation Association An Evening With Texas Game Wardens The Kessler Theater, Dallas (214) 563-3122 ccatexas.org Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation Evening benefiting Operation Game Thief The Kessler Theater, Dallas texasgameon.org

NOVEMBER 10

NOVEMBER 17

Coastal Conservation Association Hays County Banquet Wimberley VFW Hall (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Ducks Unlimited Weatherford Dinner Parker County Sheriff’s Posse (817) 239-4482 ducks.org/texas

Ducks Unlimited Aggieland Dinner Brazos County Expo Complex, Bryan (903) 987-4235 ducks.org/texas

Ducks Unlimited Colorado County Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, Columbus (361) 815-1150 ducks.org/texas

Dallas Woods and Waters Club Monthly Meeting Texas Land & Cattle, Richardson (214) 394-5250 dwwcc.org

Whitetails Unlimited Blackland Prairie Deer Camp I.O.O.F. Event Center, Corsicana (318) 374-9078 whitetailsunlimited.com

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Renaissance Dallas Richardson Hotel (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

Ducks Unlimited Tyler Dinner Harvey Hall Convention Center (903) 570-5124 ducks.org/texas

NOVEMBER 11

NOVEMBER 19

NOVEMBER 16

DECEMBER 1

DSC Conservation Society An Evening Behind the Frontline Park City Club (972) 980-9800 dscconservationsociety.org Texas Wildlife Association Dallas Members Social Javier’s (800) 839-9453 texas-wildlife.org

National Wild Turkey Federation West Texas Hunting Heritage Banquet Elks Lodge, Hereford, (620) 339-9026 nwtf.org Ducks Unlimited Liberty County Fun Shoot Clay Mounds, West of Trinity River (936) 776-1859 Ducks.org/texas


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Weller steps outside the fire for woman-owned business By Autumn Bernhard

For Lone Star Outdoor News Janelle Weller found herself “in the fire,” but she didn’t let that end her experience in the feeder business. Instead, she decided to start her own business, Crossfire Feeders & Supply. “I was in the fire, literally, when Crossfire Feeders started,” she said. “But as Isaiah 43 says, I was put through fire but won’t smell like smoke in the end.” Weller formed Crossfire Feeders in 2011 after splitting ways with her previous business partner of more than 12 years. “It has been a struggle trying to take something that was already branded and turn it into my own identity,” she said. To help with that, Weller purchased equipment and inventory that gave her the ability to start a galvanized line in April. “I feel like this new line is a ticket, a blessing, for me to expand and try to get my feet really under me,” she said. Her first business venture involved working with feeders for deer, exotics, turkey and quail. Her recent acquisition adds fish, pets and livestock to that list. “Our original line is steel and large feeders,” she said. “The galvanized is very different, yet complements what I was already doing.” The galvanized feeders are manufactured in Ingram and the steel feeders in Uvalde. Each location gets the sheets delivered and then builds feeders to order. There are only a handful of workers at each shop. “The importance of who and how hard they work for me is really a cool thing,”

she said. “I couldn’t do it without the guys that I have.” The company has a dealer base across the state and tries to do most everything through them. Even though Weller hopes to expand her business over state lines, she keeps the same mindset she had from day one of business. “I never want to lose sight of the one feeder buyer,” she said. “That’s going to build our business just as much as a land owner who wants ten. Whether it’s a ranch owner or a lessee, I hope we have products that apply to them.” Another thing Weller hopes sets her feeders apart from others is the price tag. “There’s some really high-end feeders that I think are outrageous and then there’s some really low-end feeders that are scarily cheap,” she said. “I think we are a complement across the board. They are well put together, well-done, but just not knockpeoples’-heads-off expensive.” Weller manages and oversees everything involved in the company, but her work has given her the ability to work at home and spend more time with her three kids. “We all work really hard, but then make time to play on the weekends,” she said. “I love saltwater fishing, enjoy going hunting and outside. I really just enjoy being out with my kids and husband.” Weller’s ultimate goal is to “grow the brand because that’s what it’s all about.” “I think we have really good products that we can always expand upon,” she said. “Either by making better or changing up where it appeals to the consumer.”

BUILDING FEEDERS: Janelle Weller has been in the feeder business for more than 15 years, making large, steel feeders and now the new galvanized versions. Her business, Crossfire Feeders, manufactures feeders in Uvalde and Ingram and has a dealer base across Texas. Photo from Crossfire Feeders.

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on page 27

Storage unit thefts Continued from page 8

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on Craigslist, eBay and the various fishing forums,” one angler wrote. “Some of this stuff is supposedly in Mexico,” Gulledge said. Authorities said the boat has not been recovered, but two of the stolen trailers were located in Del Rio. “I think this is somebody who caught on to a good opportunity,” added Lowe, who encouraged those with storage units to remain vigilant. Anyone with information about the burglaries should call the Val Verde Sheriff’s Office at (830) 774-7513.

Sandies, stripers on top Continued from page 8

they have been finding the October fall pattern of shallow-water stripers hitting pencil poppers and swimbaits along the surface. “The water temperatures have dropped a few degrees and we have been seeing more and more striped bass, and some big ones,” Carey said. “There is nothing more exciting than having a hungry striper attack your top-water plug.” Sarge Kellam and his 92-year-old friend, Mike, fished with guide Chris

Carey on a recent trip, and the stripers were found at first light. The anglers were casting big plugs at the shallow banks. “When we got on those fish, that top-water action was the biggest thrill we have had in a long time,” he said. “Mike was as excited as a new, young fisherman with every fish he caught.” Carey Thorn (469) 528-0210 Striper Express Guide Service (903) 328-6911

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23. TPWD calls a mottled duck a ____ duck [DUSKY] 25. Relative of the redfish [CROAKER] 26. Company purchased by Bass Pro [CABELAS] 29. Popular dark goose [CANADA] 30. Animal moving into East Texas from Arkansas, Louisiana [BEAR] 34. Type of shot illegal for goose hunting [LEAD] 36. Illegal taking of game [POACHING] 37. A hunting and fishing retailer [ACADEMY]

22. Saltwater catfish not wanted in the boat [HARDHEAD] 24. Area within ranch where no one hunts [SANCTUARY]

2. Popular frog lure [RIBBIT] 5. A camo brand, ____ Country [BRUSH] 9. A Hill Country lake [MEDINA] 11. A duck species [MALLARD] 13. Also called a dogfish [BOWFIN] 14. Referred to as the deer capital of Texas [LLANO] 16. Top-water lure good for stripers, Pencil ______ [POPPER] 19. Chairs the TPW Commission [FRIEDKIN] 21. Ellis County lake good for crappie [BARDWELL]

Dealers Wanted

info@ScentKapture.com

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the cases were reported in September. At least one fishing forum was abuzz with discussion about the burglaries. Texas Fishing Forum posts discussed thieves targeting bass tackle, rods, electronics and anything that could be easily transported. Another posted a photo of a red Skeeter boat with a Yamaha motor that had been stolen. Authorities said the boat was valued at around $65,000. “A number of guys who fish tourneys have lost everything. While insurance will help a lot of guys out, some will be out of their gear. Please keep your eye out for stuff

7-inch pencil popper, you can definitely see that. Anglers are still having luck with the normal, summer patterns. Curly-tailed grubs and silver spoons are working on lakes Lavon and Tawakoni, while spoons have been the lure of choice for Richland Chambers hybrids and white bass. On Lake Texoma, the guides at Striper Express Guide Service fish primarily with lures, and according to owner Bill Carey,

1

Puzzle solution from Page 20

1. A good bass lure [JIG] 2. A male aoudad [RAM] 3. Central Texas lake good for smallmouth [BELTON] 4. Maximum number of shotshells in gun while hunting ducks [THREE] 6. The linesider [SNOOK] 7. Crane called the ribeye of the sky [SANDHILL] 8. It can run 55 mph [PRONGHORN] 9. A mule deer organization [MDF] 10. An African game animal [WILDEBEEST] 12. A snapper species [MANGROVE] 15. A coastal fishing town [SEADRIFT] 16. New blaze camo color [PINK] 17. A cooler brand [PELICAN] 18. A favorite food of deer, birds [RAGWEED] 20. County with new CWD check stations [MEDINA]

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October 28, 2016

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October 28, 2016 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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