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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

September 9, 2016

Volume 13, Issue 2

Find the food for dove

Opening weekend reports all over the board By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News When conditions are different from the normal hot and dry dove opener in the North Zone, the normal haunts may be void of birds and the hunters are left with mostly a social activity. Some hunters are more determined and more mobile, and improvise. Britton Schweitzer of Weatherford hunted near Rising Star in Eastland County on opening day, and was quickly looking for another area. “We started out at a place we have been going to for years,” he said. “There was a lack of a food supply. There were very few birds.” Schweitzer got on the phone and found an afternoon hunt near Putnam in Callahan County, about 22 miles away. “We hunted over sunflowers and there were thousands of birds there,” he said. “We had a five-person limit in no time.” Reports of great hunts came from the San Angelo area, according to outfitters Kris SMALL PACKAGE: Shammy, an English cocker spaniel, retrieves a dove for owner, M. Lance Phillips, during the opening weekend of dove season. Phillips said the small dog is very good at finding downed birds in tough cover. Photos by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Bass bite improving in South Texas

CONTENTS Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 22 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 30 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 32 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 33

Please turn to page 25

Caution when crossing fences By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News

Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 36 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 37

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

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Photo by Joe Richards

By Jillian Mock

After replenishing rains, South Texas anglers experienced increased bass activity on lakes Falcon, Amistad and Choke Canyon. The lakes all had been struggling with low water levels. Please turn to page 14

INSIDE

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

For Lone Star Outdoor News

HUNTING

As the hunting season gets underway in Texas, hunting incident reports and a Texas A&M University study examining a period of more than 30 years make one thing clear: Don’t tangle with fences while hunting. Records aren’t kept of non-firearm injuries sustained while crossing fences, including cuts, scrapes, broken shoulders, legs and wrists, not to mention all of the torn shirts and jeans. Numerous deaths have resulted over the years from hunters sim- TAKE CARE: Crossing a fence while hunting can be a dangerous activity, risking ply trying to get from scrapes, cuts, broken bones and ripped jeans. When crossing with a firearm, it Please turn to page 35

Hunting friends

Teal hunters ready

College freshmen meet, share passion. Page 4

Birds arriving in some areas. Page 7

can be fatal. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

FISHING

Richard M. Hart

Three times

Well-known angler, record holder dies. Page 9

Bass pros visit Texas lakes in 2017. Page 8


September 9, 2016

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September 9, 2016

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September 9, 2016

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HUNTING

Down and dirty for pigs By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Carlos Fernandez has been hunting feral hogs for more than 30 years on three South Texas ranches used for his family cattle operation. “Pigs are nothing but trouble,” he said while loading up a plastic gallon jug with a special concoction of corn and strawberry soda. “I lay awake at night trying to figure out how to keep their numbers under control. Fortunately,

they are fun to hunt, just like deer, but they can tear up the fences and root up acres of land.” Fernandez definitely has the edge on pigs – he’s gone 100 percent nocturnal. “We used to see them in broad daylight years ago,” he said. “The ranch hands would see pigs, tell me where they were and I’d set up to kill them. But all that’s changed. They may look stupid, but wild pigs are some of the smartest animals you’ll ever

hunt. They learn fast, which is why you have to always try to outsmart them.” One edge Fernandez employs is jugs of fermented corn that have been soaked in strawberry soda. The drill is Please turn to page 6 HOG IDEAS: Landowners and hunters constantly try new methods to remove feral hogs from their property, including bait mixtures and night-vision gear. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

New hunting friends By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Reynolds Walker and Austin Owens, longtime friends from Boerne, are now both freshmen at Baylor University in Waco. At the orientation week called Baylor Line Camp, they met Charles Larkham of Austin and discovered they had something in common with their new friend. They all loved to hunt and fish. Less than two weeks into their college experience, the opportunity to go on a dove hunt about 20 minutes away from the school came. The youngsters and their dads sprung into action. Owens’ dad showed up at the Axtell ranch with shotguns and ammo, while Walker’s father brought a bag full of fishing lures, along with shotguns and shells. After leading the Baylor football team onto the field for their first game of the season, a tradition for freshmen students, at midnight the trio headed to Axtell to hunt and fish with Lone Star Outdoor News. All morning and into the afternoon, the three friends took advantage of

SHARED PASSION: Austin Owens and Charles Larkham met at orientation before beginning their freshman year at Baylor University. They found their mutual interest in hunting and fishing, and did both together after their first week of college. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

the two fishing ponds on the property, using both conventional tackle and flies, and each caught several bass, with a few good 3- to 4-pounders mixed in. “Charles caught the most fish,” Owens said. The young men weren’t dressed like fly-fishermen, though. “It’s pretty cool to see guys in the typical college uniform of jeans and square-toed cowboy boots standing and fly-fishing from a kayak,” said David J. Sams. Late in the afternoon, the 20-minute trek was made to the dove field, a cornfield bordering a large roost that had produced on opening day. The birds, though, had apparently moved on and the hunting was slow. Each young man bagged a few birds, though. “We could have shot better and had a few more,” Walker said. Back at headquarters, they feasted on dove, some duck left over from last season, axis steaks and sausage, and the adults were winding down. A junior student also was present at the hunt and the group was huddled in a corner, discussing college life. Baylor has a spring fraternity rush, but events in the fall help freshmen make the connections to the group of their choice. The hunting and fishing day drew the new students away from college, but college drew them back. In what seemed like a few minutes, they were packing and leaving. “Why are you leaving,” the dads Please turn to page 21

School dominates FFA wildlife competition By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News A Future Farmers of America team from a smallish school topped the state in the FFA wildlife competition in May. On September 1, The Hunt Store hosted a fundraiser to help raise scholarship funds for team members. Ingram Tom Moore High School in Kerr County, a 3A school, won the state competition this year with team members Mae Knaggs, Jordan Ulan-

day, and Hunter Nebgen. Don Harris is the school advisor, and said the FFA tradition at the school is the reason for the team’s success. “We have good kids, that’s the main thing,” Harris said. “It’s a pretty good model that the prior good students set, and the new ones buy into it.” The school has won the title more times than any other school in the state. “We have brothers and sisters following each other in the

program,” Harris said. “We have great administrators that support the program — and the community support has been unreal — it is kind of overwhelming.” In the wildlife competition, students are tested on identification of plants, grasses and how to utilize them, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department regulations, hunter and boater safety, biological facts on any of the game animals in Texas, and each contest has a plot of land staked out where the kids are given a Please turn to page 29

CHAMPS: Mae Knaggs, Jordan Ulanday and Hunter Nebgen were members of the statewinning Ingram Tom Moore High School FFA team. Photo by Don Harris.


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Duck, goose numbers hold steady Lone Star Outdoor News The first bluewinged teal sightings have occurred in Texas, with plenty of time for more to arrive before the early teal season beginning September 10. Overall, ducks and geese are doing well, but some groups caution that while the numbers are good, the habitat trends are on the decline. WILL THEY COME? Duck numbers are well above long-term averages. Texas huntTeal hunters may ers will wait and see when they move into the state. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor not notice, but News. there may be fewer of the blue-winged Scott Yaich. teal arriving than last year, as they saw the Habitat conditions were described as largest decline from 2015 numbers, falling generally poorer than last year. The total 22 percent to 6.69 million birds. The num- pond estimate for the U.S. and Canada ber is still 34 percent above the long-term combined were 5.0 million, 21 percent beaverage, though. low the 2015 estimate of 6.3 million and Ducks Unlimited chose the positive ap- similar to the long-term average of 5.2 milproach in response to the U.S. Fish and lion. Wildlife Service report on 2016 Trends in Delta Waterfowl chose a more cautious Duck Breeding Populations, based on sur- approach to the numbers, focusing more veys conducted in May and early June, on lower pond counts in the breeding arnoting the total duck populations were eas. estimated at 48.4 million breeding ducks, “Pintails and bluewings didn’t find the 38 percent above the 1955-2015 long-term seasonal and temporary wetlands they average. Last year’s estimate was 49.5 mil- prefer for breeding, so much of the populion birds. lation did not settle in the prairies,” said “In light of the dry conditions that were Dr. Frank Rohwer, Delta Waterfowl’s presiobserved across much of the northern dent. “When pintails overfly the prairies, breeding grounds during the survey pe- production is always down.” riod, it is reassuring to see that the breedDelta’s response noted that pond counts ing population counts were little changed dropped 30 percent in the North-Central from last year,” said DU Chief Scientist Please turn to page 29

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Try mixture for East Texas food plots Hog tips Now is the time to plant food plots for white-tailed deer — and a mixture of plants, including cowpeas, works well, if you’re in a part of the state that gets 35 inches of rain per year. Dr. Billy Higginbotham, AgriLife Extension wildlife specialist in Overton, has a food plot combination proven to attract whitetails and keep them hooked through the hunting season and beyond. “The combination of winterhardy oats, iron and clay cowpeas and arrowleaf clover works well in any area that receives 35 inches or more of rainfall each year, specifically in East Texas,” Higginbotham said. “Cowpeas

grow quickly when planted in September when moisture is available. Sprouts are an immediate attractor for deer.” Higginbotham’s strategy is to establish numerous small plots edged by cover so deer will use them during legal hunting hours. He also sets aside at least 1 acre for every 100 acres of habitat in cool season food plots as sanctuary plots that are never hunted. “It’s good to rotate food plots each hunting season but I also recommend having a few food plots where deer can feed and are never pressured,” he said. The cowpeas will be grazed out and/or die back at the first frost, but by then the oats will be established.

“Of all the small grains, deer prefer oats when given a choice,” Higginbotham said. The arrowleaf clover will emerge in the spring and last until early June. By then, springplanted warm-season food plots should be established and able to carry deer through the summer. To establish plots, shred and disk the area to be planted, Higginbotham said. In a clean-disked seedbed, broadcast the oats and peas at a seeding rate of 40 pounds per acre each and cover to a depth of 1 inch. “It is very difficult to disk lightly enough without burying these seeds too deep,” Higginbotham said. “Consider devising a drag

out of cattle panels or old tires so the seed can be covered to the correct depth.” Arrowleaf clover seed would then be broadcast at 10 pounds per acre and lightly dragged in. “The cowpea-oat-arrowleaf clover-combination has proved to provide early deer hunting opportunities for youth-only and archery seasons when established in early September,” Higginbotham said. “The combination then provides a constant supply of forage for deer into early summer.” —AgriLife Extension Service

HALOOPTICS.COM

Continued from page 4

Photo by Robert Sloan

simple, but one that pigs are suckers for. Once the jugs have set out in the sun for a few days, the corn takes on a very nasty smell. When the sweet red soda is added, the jug is hung from a tree limb and a few tiny holes are poked in the bottom. “It’s a slow drip of a concoction that pigs love to eat and wallow in,” Fernandez said. “I hang them up so that the smell will blow with the wind into the brush where the pigs are bedded down. I’ll be in a nearby tree stand with my bow. When they come in, I’ll get an easy shot at maybe 15 yards. Since I’m shooting a bow, they don’t always spook and run out of sight. That’s when I can pick off another one.” Fernandez rarely hunts pigs with a gun. “A gun will spook them and they’ll become very wary,” he said. “With a bow I can slowly eliminate numbers of them, at night, before they even know what’s going on. And it’s a good way to keep friends and family loaded up with fresh pork.” Cody Bell III runs a family ranch in the Hill Country between Burnet and Lampasas. It’s been used to raise cattle and for deer hunting over the past 40 years. But about 20 years ago wild pigs showed up, and ever since he’s been at war with them. “Without a doubt they are way smarter than deer,” Bell said. “I’ve tried hunting them with guns and bows. But that didn’t work out too well. What has worked out real well is to go after them with night-vision gear and suppressed guns.” The trick is knowing where the pigs are moving and when they are feeding. “I do a whole lot of scouting during daylight hours,” Bell said. “And at night, I’ll set up in open areas and listen for them. When I find an area they like I put out plenty of corn. Soured corn is the best.” Bell said these steps are only part of the game. “Once I think I’ve got them located, I’ll set up a makeshift blind with wooden pallets and brush,” he said. “After that, it’s a waiting game. It’s really exciting to be sitting there in pitch-black darkness and hear them come in. With the night-vision gear I can see everything, let them relax and then open up on them with a suppressed gun. In that situation, they are surprised but often don’t know where to run. That’s when I can really get some payback.” Feral hogs are unprotected, exotic, nongame animals and may be taken by any means or methods at any time of year. There are no seasons or bag limits, however a hunting license and landowner permission are required to hunt them.


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September 9, 2016

Waterfowlers gearing up for teal

The Lone Star Chapter of Ducks Unlimited Llano, TX

8th Annual Sportsman Banquet FAST FLYERS: Blue-winged teal have arrived in the coastal prairies, and hunters hope they will stay throughout the 16-day teal-only season that begins September 10. Photo by Joe Richards. 29 71

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Teal hunting may be somewhat predictable along the Texas coast and in the rice prairies. But it is anything but in North and Central Texas. “Our ponds are looking good, the teal are enjoying them,” said Daniel Kubecka with Run N Gun Adventures in Bay City. On September 2, Kubecka was observing increasing numbers, and by the 5th, they were starting to get thick on some of the properties the outfitter hunts. Near Katy and Garwood, the birds are being spotted as well. “I saw a group of 50 in one area and about 200 near Eagle Lake,” posted a member of the Texas Kayak Fishermen forum. “Last year, it was three days into the season before we saw any.” Birdwatchers also are spotting the early migrating ducks in West Texas and in the Panhandle.

Fattonybirds posted on the American Birding Association website that he saw bluewings near Smyer in Hockley County, and other birders responded with similar sightings. In North Texas, teal were tougher to spot. Many dove hunters keep their eyes open, looking for groups moving from pond to pond. One bass fisherman near Dallas reported getting buzzed by a group of teal just after daylight, but the dove hunters in North and Central Texas contacted by Lone Star Outdoor News said they weren’t seeing any groups, but they weren’t overly surprised. “Teal hunting is hit-or-miss a lot of the time up here,” one hunter said. “Seeing them now doesn’t mean they will be here next week, and not seeing them doesn’t mean they won’t be here next week.” The Texas teal-only season runs from September 10-25. The daily bag limit is six birds.

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FISHING

Blue marlin and mercury contamination By Mark England Lone Star Outdoor News When pastor Erny McDonough feeds the poor in Port O’Connor, he’s thankful that he can easily feed the multitudes thanks to the generosity of anglers. After the Poco Bueno billfish tournament, his church, Fisherman’s Chapel, received two blue marlin weighing a combined 953

pounds, as Lone Star Outdoor News reported in its Aug. 12th issue. Church members labored to turn the behemoths into hundreds of meals. These days, though, feeding the hungry can get complicated what with things like government warnings. Last week, reader Mark Luedke wrote LSON: “Apparently the author nor the

pastor are aware of a fish consumption advisory for blue marlin in the Gulf of Mexico due to mercury contamination.” A Texas Department of State Health Services’ advisory targets larger saltwater predators such as king mackerel, swordfish, sharks and, as mentioned, blue marlin. The advisory warns women of childbearing age and children under 12 years of age not to eat the

fish because of mercury contamination. The advisory singles out blue marlin, though. “When tested, the unsafe levels for mercury were more than 18 times our department guidelines,” said Christine Mann, a TDSHS spokeswoman. “That’s a very high level of mercury accumulated in the tissue tested. For that reason, the advisory (for blue

marlin) was put in effect for everyone.” Mann said the consumption advisory had been in effect since 2012. The state’s primary concern is people regularly eating blue marlin. “A blue marlin is a big fish,” Mann said. “Just one family consuming that would be exposed to unsafe levels of mercury.” Consumed regularly, fish high Please turn to page 18

Female anglers shine offshore With decorated boats, dressed up captains, and all-women teams there to fish and have fun, the Texas Women Anglers Tournament is an annual highlight in Port Aransas. With 49 boats, 66 billfish caught and $430,000 in cash pots awarded, the event in Port Aransas was a big success, according to organizers. The women-only fishing tournament began in 1980 to raise funds for the Womens’ Shelter of South Texas. Anglers at the event are known for their festive attire and decorated boats. The billfish caught included 18 white marlin, four blue marlin and 44 sailfish. Results: Overall Winner: Standaman with 710 points Second Place Overall: Rebecca with 614.75 points Dorado: Marilyn Atkins on the Mojo – 25.65 pounds Tuna: Rebecca Ramming on the Rebecca – 9.75 pounds Wahoo: Emily Petty on the Vanquish – 34.45 pounds Sailfish: Sharon Smith, Laura Smith, & Heidi Cluck on the Standaman– 6 releases White Marlin: Debbie Tucker & Catherine Carr on the Mojo – 2 releases Blue Marlin: Kathleen Wyatt on the Doc Holiday– 1 release Best Dressed Captain: Aaron Belcher on the Fin Stalker Best Decorated Boat: 1. Wired Up (Port Aransas) 2. Rebecca (Port Aransas) 3. Big Torch (Freeport) —Texas Women Anglers Tournament

BEST DRESSED: The Wired Up team won the top award for Best Decorated Boat at the Texas Women Anglers Tournament. Photo by Richard McBlane..

Pro tips for saltwater soft plastics By Robert Sloan

Lone Star Outdoor News

For Lone Star Outdoor News If ever there was a lure that is here to stay, it’s a soft plastic jig. Why? Because reds, trout and even flounder will eat them 24-7. But the crazy thing about a soft plastic tail is that most guides along the Texas coast have their own set of confidence colors that keeps them busy at the fish cleaning tables. Capt. Charlie Paradoski has been guiding on East and West Matagorda DECISIONS: Anglers bays for years. He’s considpursuing saltwater ered to be one of the best fish on soft plastics at catching trout and reds. consider many factors “I’ve got a few go-to colto decide which plastic they will put on their jig ors that work pretty well,” head. Photo by Robert Paradoski said. “But if one doesn’t produce in a hurry Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Three Bassmaster events coming to Texas

Please turn to page 20

What was the Toyota Texas Bass Classic is now a part of the Bassmaster Elite Series, meaning that Texas will host three big fishing tournaments in 2017. FLW anglers, though, will be left on the sidelines in the event that combined Bassmaster and FLW pros in what had previously been deemed the world championship of bass fishing. This summer, BASSfest was held at Lake Texoma. In 2017, the two events will be combined into the Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest, to be held on Sam Rayburn Reservoir May 17-21. “Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest will combine the best features of the Toyota Texas Bass Classic and our own BASSfest tournament — both of which have become immensely popular among anglers and fishing fans,” said B.A.S.S. CEO Bruce Akin. “Texas Fest will host a special Fan Appreciation Day offering anglers and their families opportunities to meet, greet and learn from the world’s best professional anglers.” Please turn to page 17


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Avid angler, Hall of Famer Dick Hart dies

September 9, 2016

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LEGEND LOST: Fishing out of his Kingfisher boat, Dick Hart fished nearly every week of the year. He landed 24 largemouth bass weighing more than 10 pounds over his lifetime. Below, Hart smiles after showing one of the thousands of bass he has landed. Photos by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

By: Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame, National Freshwater Fisheries Hall of Fame member and world-record holder Richard M. “Dick” Hart died August 26 at his Dallas home. He was 86. An avid fishermen, Hart estimated he has caught 24 largemouth bass weighing more than 10 pounds, as he told Lone Star Outdoor News in an October, 2015 article headlined, “Big bass baron.” His most recent double-digit bass was landed in June of 2015. “He took a real interest in our newspaper,” said Lone Star Outdoor News CEO David J. Sams, who fished with Hart several times in both Canada and locally. “He helped raise money for Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation through his fishing discussion group. He was a true friend and mentor.” Hart also presented the paper with lists of story ideas. “I would received hand-written lists of items he would like to see in the paper,” said LSON Executive Editor Craig Nyhus. “We used a good number of them. And if we wrote something he disagreed with, we would get a note about that, too.” Sams was occasionally invited to fish with Hart at the Coon Creek Club, where Hart was a member. “He would sit in his Kingfisher boat and point out exactly where a big fish was going to bite,” Sams said. “He was usually right. Mr. Hart would help anyone in the fishing industry, whether helping fill a remote lodge in Canada with paying customers or sending money to guides wiped out by hurricanes. If he saw a need, he would help out and never ask for anything in return.” Hart was known to many Texas anglers for his fundraising efforts. He helped raise $2 million to build the Hart-Morris Conservation Center at the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens. Johnny Morris of Bass Pro Shops was a major donor and friend. Hart fished in Canada, Alaska, Brazil, Central America, Mexico and all over the United States. He caught numerous trophy fish, including two International Game Fish Association records. At Nuyukuk Lake in Alaska, he caught a 6 1/4-pound Dolly Varden on a 8-pound tippet, and he

landed a record coho salmon in 1987. The Dolly Varden record stood for five years. Hart was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and grew up in Little Rock, Arkansas. He served in the Air Force as a judge advocate during the Korean War. In 1956, he moved to Texas, where he joined the trust department at First National Bank in Dallas. He became bank president in 1977. First National later became part of the holding company InterFirst Corp. Hart became InterFirst’s executive vice president for overall trust operations and its chief administrative officer. He retired in 1987. He reentered banking in 1989 as chairman of the trust committee for Bank One Texas, which became JPMorgan Chase & Co. He retired again in 1994. Hart’s civic accomplishments included being the chairman of the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas; the chairman of the Board of Trustees of Baylor College of Dentistry; president of the Circle Ten Council, Boy Scouts of America; and board chairman of the Baylor University Medical Center Foundation. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Bass Fishing Hall of Fame and the Board of the Friends of the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center. He received the Lone Star Legend award from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Hart is survived by his wife, Gloria; a son, Richard “Rick” Hart Jr. of Richardson; two daughters, Melinda Ramsey and Suzanna Reed, both of Dallas; a brother, James F. Hart of Clovis, New Mexico; six grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear; 84–88 degrees; 3.49’ low. Black bass are fair early on Carolina rigs, jigs and deepdiving crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on juglines. AMISTAD: Water murky; 88–92 degrees; 21.37’ low. Black bass are good on soft plastics, jigs, crankbaits, and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Catfish are fair on shrimp, chicken livers and nightcrawlers over baited holes in 15–45 feet. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 85–89 degrees; 1.41’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters and Texas rigs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on worms and stink bait. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.51’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, hollow-body frogs and weightless Senkos. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BASTROP: Water murky; 86–90 degrees. Black bass are fair on chartreuse/white spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers and shrimp. BELTON: Water murky; 84– 88 degrees; 2.35’ high. Black bass are good on top-waters. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs on the bottom. White bass are good trolling lipless crankbaits. Crappie are excellent on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on Vienna sausages. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.45’ low. Black bass are fair on hollowbody frogs, Texas-rigged creature baits and swim jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 1.73’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged soft plastics and jigs on docks, and top-waters are effective early. Crappie are slow. Catfish are excellent on cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are good on liver and shad off points near the pier. Redfish are slow. Channel catfish are fair on liver, cut bait and cheese bait near the dam. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 82–86 degrees: 0.50’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are good on jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.93’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits over brush piles and on chartreuse

top-waters. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and minnows at night. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on cut bait and live bait over baited holes. BUCHANAN: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 0.27’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon lipless crankbaits, perch-colored top-waters, and watermelon/red soft plastic worms early. Striped bass are good on green striper jigs and live bait at first light. White bass are fair on pet spoons and slabs. Crappie are fair on live minnows and chartreuse crappie jigs. Channel catfish are good on liver and minnows. CADDO: Water stained to muddy; 83–86 degrees; 0.90’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are good on chicken livers and shad along the shoreline. Redfish are good down-rigging silver and gold spoons and live bait along the crappie wall and the dam. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver and shad. CANYON LAKE: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 0.80’ high. Black bass are fair to good on chartreuse crankbaits, watermelon top-waters and Texas-rigged red flake worms along break lines and ledges early and late. Striped bass are fair trolling watermelon crankbaits off main points. Smallmouth bass are fair on white grubs early. Channel catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are fair on topwaters, white buzzbaits and Texas-rigged worms near docks and shallow cover. White bass are good on slabs and topwaters. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. CHOKE CANYON: Water murky; 85–89 degrees; 18.72’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. COLEMAN: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 1.24’ low. Black bass are fair on black/ blue spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Hybrid striper are fair on green striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel catfish are good on blood bait, nightcrawlers and liver. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 99 degrees at the hot water discharge, 85 degrees in main lake; 1.10’ low. Black bass to 5 pounds are good on crankbaits and soft plastics in 8–10 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and tube jigs in

8–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on droplines baited with live perch and cut bait in 8–10 feet. CONROE: Water murky; 85– 89 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers, liver and shrimp. FALCON: Water murky; 88–92 degrees; 32.11’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on stink bait and live bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on green pumpkin Carolina-rigged soft plastics and crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and cut shad. FORK: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 1.36’ low. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, white buzzbaits and Texasrigged worms in 10–15’. White and yellow bass are good on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.95’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless Senkos and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water murky. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and live bait. GRANBURY: Water murky; 88–92 degrees; 0.02’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits, soft plastics and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and shrimp. GRANGER: Water murky; 87–91 degrees; 4.40’ high. All species are slow. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 1.67’ high. Black bass are good on top-waters in yellow frog, shadpattern shallow crankbaits and shaky heads near boat docks. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.17’ high. Black bass are good on live minnows from piers. Crappie are good on live minnows. Bream are good on live worms from piers and over grassy areas. Channel and blue catfish are good on juglines baited with cut shad and bream. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-color; 85–90 degrees; 1.45’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early and late, midday switching to crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and live shad.

JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.48’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water stained; 82–85 degrees: 2.91’ high. Black bass are fair on hollow-body frogs, top-waters and wake baits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 82–86 degrees: 1.85’ low. Black bass are slow on buzzbaits, flipping jigs and bladed jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.81’ low. Black bass are fair on perch-colored spinner baits and crankbaits, and on pumpkinseed soft plastics early and late. Striped bass are fair on live bait and Li’l Fishies early. White bass are fair on live minnows. Crappie are good on white crappie jigs and live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp and dipbait. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 82–85 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, weightless Senkos and topwaters. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 86–90 degrees. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are good but small on pet spoons and troll tubes. White bass are good on troll tubes and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are fair on shad. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.67’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 85–88 degrees; 0.80’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. NASWORTHY: 84–89 degrees; 1.12’ low. Black bass are fair to good on buzzbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water murky; 86–90 degrees; 1.91’ high. All species are slow. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 86–90 degrees; 35.85’ low. Black bass are fair to good

on top-waters early and late, midday switching to Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 11.04’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and chatterbaits. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs in the shallows. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.82’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, spinner baits and black buzzbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 84–90 degrees; 0.1’ low. Black bass are fair to good on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs, medium-running, shad-pattern crankbaits and Carolina rigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. White bass are fair to good on Little Georges. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water murky; 85– 89 degrees; 0.68’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are good on slabs and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.76’ low. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, spinner baits and buzz frogs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. RAY ROBERTS: Water stained; 82–85 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are fair on Carolina-rigged Flukes, swimjigs and top-water walking baits. White bass are fair on

slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.40’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, shaky head worms and topwaters. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 22

murky; 85–89 degrees; 0.85’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Crappie are good on minnows over brush piles. Bream are good on nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait and cut bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 87–91 degrees; 8.46’ high. All species are slow. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 85–89 degrees; 2.38’ high. All species are slow. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 1.15’ low. Black bass are good on hollowbody frogs, black buzzbaits and Texas-rigged creature baits. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water stained; 81– 85 degrees; 1.16’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, medium-diving crankbaits and shaky head worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water murky; 85–89 degrees; 1.67’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse top-waters and redbug soft plastic worms early and late. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are good on slab spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows. Bream are good on crickets and nightcrawlers in 4–10 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with shrimp and nightcrawlers. TRAVIS: Water murky; 86–90 degrees; 0.27’ high. All species are slow. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on live bait. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on minnows and stinkbait. WHITNEY: Water murky; 86– 90 degrees; 1.64’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon lipless crankbaits, spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait.

—TPWD


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September 9, 2016

Please join us in conservation, education and protecting hunters’ rights.

Next DSC Convention January 5-8, 2017 biggame.org

G R E A T E S T H U N T E R S C O N V E N T I O N O N T H E P L A N E T TM

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September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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GAME WARDEN BLOTTER MAN COULDN’T PASS UP BUCK IN VELVET An individual reported shot a white-tailed buck in July. Sabine County Game Warden Doug Williams investigated and obtained a search warrant. Executing the warrant with Sabine County Game Warden Henry Alvarado and Shelby County Game Warden Anthony King, a velvet set of antlers measuring 115 inches, a cooler a meat and another set of antlers of an illegal buck measuring less than 13 inches wide were seized. The subject admitted shooting the deer while hog hunting, saying he couldn’t pass on a buck with velvet antlers. The man was arrested and several citations were issued. MAN’S SHOOTING STORY DIDN’T ADD UP A landowner reported hearing two gunshots near the highway and reported the incident to Tyler County Game Warden Brandon Mosley. The complainant also gave a description of the vehicle suspects’ vehicle. Mosley notified dispatch and requested a deputy attempt to cut the subjects’ vehicle off in the next town. The deputies made contact with the vehicle at a convenience store several miles up the road. The warden interviewed the subjects and one of the subjects admitted to shooting in the creek from the highway at the location. A Ruger .204 the subject claimed he had fired at the creek was seized. Concerned that the subject was deceptive and that there was more to the story, Mosley returned to the scene and met with the complain-

he must immediately place his weapon down. Both subjects were issued citations for prohibited act of unlawfully carrying a firearm on public lands.

TRESPASSERS WORRIED TRAIL CAMERA WOULD TAKE THEIR PIC While hog hunting, a hunting lease member observed two individuals riding an ATV down a shooting lane. The incident was reported to Tyler County Game Warden Brandon Mosley. The complainant said he approached the individuals and escorted them off the lease, but then noticed a missing trail camera. Mosley followed the violators’ ATV tracks down a county road, which led to

ant. He found a spent casing along the roadway and tire tracks that did not line up with the subject’s story. Further, the landowner said he had observed several deer in the field throughout the evening prior to hearing the shots fired. Mosley then interviewed the subject again. After several minutes of questioning, the subject confessed to shooting at the deer from a county highway. The subject was charged with hunting white-tailed deer in a closed season. WHILE FISHING WITH FAMILY, WARDEN WATCHES GILL-NETTERS Bexar County Game Warden Jon Balderas was fishing with his family at Braunig Lake when he noticed four men from a distance working a gill net in a cove. Balderas contacted Bexar County Game Warden Roland Fuentes to inform him of what was going on. After Fuentes arrived, both wardens watched the men continue to work the net.

a house about a mile away. Initially, the subject denied taking the camera, but finally came clean during the interview. The subject advised they were concerned their picture was taken and decided to take the camera. The subject took Mosley to where the camera had been dumped. Charges for theft and trespassing are pending.

Fuentes made contact with the subjects and quickly recovered the illegal equipment. Cases pending. WANTED MAN SELLING ROADSIDE SHRIMP Travis County Game Warden Chris Sanchez received a tip that someone was selling Gulf shrimp roadside in Dripping Springs. Upon contact, it was determined the subject did not have the required retail truck dealers license, was flagged for violent tendencies and was wanted out of Aransas County on a second-degree felony warrant. With the information provided, Sanchez educated the subject on the requirements to sell aquatic products, placed the subject in custody and transported him to the Hays County jail. WARDENS FACE MAN WITH PISTOL Along the San Gabriel River, Williamson County Game Wardens Turk Jones, Theron Oatman

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and Joel Campos noticed three trucks parked with fishing gear in the trucks, and later observed flashlights coming their way up the trail. Campos turned on his flashlight and identified himself as a State game warden. Two males kept walking toward Campos and the right hand of one of them was not visible. Campos then observed the subject holding a pistol. Campos immediately took action and drew his service pistol and told him to drop the gun. The subject said he was putting it on the back of the truck. Jones patted down the men for weapons for officer safety and their safety. The two subjects said they had family and friends down at the river fishing and one of the friends also had a pistol on him. Oatman ran a record check on individuals and it was for personal defense. Campos made it an educational experience, and informed the men whenever a police officer identifies himself

GROUP KILLS ONE GATOR, CAPTURES ANOTHER A report of alligators killed in the Trinity River was made to Freestone County Game Warden Samuel Anderson. During his investigation, Anderson received confessions from all parties involved regarding the killing of one alligator and the live-capture of another. One of the subjects gave the warden the location where the alligator that had been shot, and Anderson found the remains. Anderson also obtained information on an alligator that was killed in August of 2015. MISSING MAN FOUND DEAD AT HUNTING LEASE Tyler County Game Wardens Roy Eddins and Brandon Mosley assisted Tyler County Sherriff’s Department with a multi-agency search for a Hardin County elderly gentleman after he was reported missing. The man’s body was recovered on a hunting lease in south Tyler County.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263

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September 9, 2016

ALL-NEW CARHARTT HUNT GEAR. Three generations of Cabana men stand proud. Each hunter ready to carry the torch of tradition through any rugged condition. These are the moments that guide every stitch of our gear.

THE CABANA FAMILY Hudson, Michigan

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September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Largemouth down south Continued from page 1

“The lake has come up about 2 foot in the last week and a half,” said John Adami of Broken Braid Guide Service on Falcon Lake. “They’re releasing water too at the same time so it’s kind of equaling out but we are on a slow rise.” On Falcon, Adami has found bass around the river channel and hardwoods, points, and foundations in 8 to 10 feet of water. He’s also been catching good fish around the dam and in the Big and Little Tigers area and the better fish he’s reeled in he found in 7 to 10 feet of water. Texas rigs and crankbaits in a shad pattern have been his go-to baits. Turbidity, though, has been an issue after the recent deluge. “The lake is really, really dirty,” Adami said. “There are some coves and pockets where it clears up, but the upper end of the lake looks like a big glass of chocolate milk because of the water coming in from the Rio Grande and Salado.” Even with the water clarity issue, Adami said the August and early September bite on Falcon has been the best in the last few years. Lake Amistad also also seen rising water levels over the last couple of weeks, but the bass bite hasn’t started to pick up. “On a scale from 1 to 10, I would probably give it a 5 for Lake Amistad,” said bass fishing guide and FLW pro Kurt Dove. “Over the last two and a half weeks, the lake has come up almost 3 1/2 feet so things are changing significantly.” For anglers in the area, Dove said most of the fish are being caught on top-waters early in the day and around the edges of the hydrilla in the 20-foot range. “It’s also possible to contact some fish in the pond weed… with crankbaits, slim jig, or spinner baits now that the rising water has submerged those grass beds,” Dove said.

Dove recommended fishing Amistad early in the morning all the way up to around noon and then the last hour of the day. The guide expects the top-water bite to pick up in September on Amistad. Dove emphasized it will be important for anglers to concentrate on following the migration of the bait fish and keeping an eye out for schooling fish along the water surface. According to guide Charles Whited, August was actually a good fishing month across most of the South and Central Texas lakes he visits. On Lake Bastrop, he had already seen a lot of schooling fish, a trend he expects to improve in September and October. On lakes LBJ and Canyon, he has been using different approaches. “On LBJ, I fish the grass early, then I go up under the boat docks and start skipping with a fluke or wacky worm — anything resembling a birch, green pumpkin, or watermelon candy color. On Canyon Lake, there isn’t much shade so I use a Carolina rig and a Texas rig, trying to get down to 18-plus feet.” Whited thinks Choke Canyon, which has remained very low, will resurge this month. “It is actually getting better,” he said. “It was 24-feet low and they caught about 5 foot of water. That lake could turn back on really, really fast because there’s not a lot of pressure down there right now.” Each of the guides were encouraged by the August rains. “We’ve had more rain in August than we’ve had around here in 10 years,” Dove said. “It’s going to be a really good year.” NICE TRIO: Guide John Adami has been putting customers on big bass at Falcon Lake. Photo from John Adami.

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September 9, 2016

Page 15

2016 CCA / TEXAS FORD DEALERS / TILSON HOME CORP / CAPITAL FARM CREDIT STATE OF TEXAS ANGLERS’ RODEO (STAR)

SCHOLARSHIP DIVISIONS – LEADER BOARD AS OF: 08/28/16

STARKIDS SCHOLARSHIP DIVISION (ages 6 – 10 ONLY) - $50,000 SCHOLARSHIP FISH SPECIES FLOUNDER

SHEEPSHEAD

GAFFTOP

LEADER 5 LBS. 8 OZS. MIA GUERRA (10) OF SAN ANTONIO, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 8 LBS. 12 OZS. RYLAN BASCI (7) OF LEAGUE CITY, TX WEST END MARINA 6 LBS. 5 OZS. ASHTON SUMRALL (8) OF ORANGE, TX SPORTSMAN’S SUPPLY

1ST RUNNER UP 5 LBS. 1 OZ. KATHRYN BURDA (8) OF CORPUS CHRISTI, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 8 LBS. 1 OZ. BAILEY GAUDET (9) OF BAYTOWN, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 7 OZS. BELLA BARTRAM (8) OF PORTLAND, TX SEAWORTHY MARINE

* DENOTES NEW FOR THE WEEK 2NDRUNNER UP 4 LBS. 15 OZS. CHANDER TRIPATHI (10) OF AUSTIN, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 7 LBS. 9 OZS. KIMBER ADAMS (8) OF CROSBY, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 7 OZS. NOLAN MAYBERRY (8) OF LOS FRESNOS, TX SO.SHORE BAIT & TACKLE

3RDRUNNER UP 4 LBS. 7 OZS. HALEY NICAR (10) OF LAKE JACKSON, TX WOODY’S SPORTS CENTER 7 LBS. 5 OZS. TANNER MOSER (10) OF BAYTOWN, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 0 OZS. ADDISON TULLOS (8) OF LUMBERTON, TX SPORTSMAN’S SUPPLY

4TH RUNNER UP 3 LBS. 15 OZS. NOAH FONG (10) OF HOUSTON, TX PELICAN REST 6 LBS. 9 OZS. CAYMIN NOLAN (8) OF KEMAH, TX MARBURGER’S 4 LBS. 14 OZS. CALEB RATCLIFFE (10) OF WEBSTER, TX MARBURGER’S

ACADEMY SPORTS & OUTDOORS STARTEENS SCHOLARSHIP TROUT DIVISION (ages 11 – 17 ONLY) 6 LB. MIN. – $25,000 SCHOLARSHIP

CCA STAR wraps up

FISH SPECIES SPECKLED TROUT Upper Coast (6lb. min.) SPECKLED TROUT Middle Coast (6lb. min.) SPECKLED TROUT Lower Coast (6lb. min.)

LEADER 7 LBS. 9 OZS. DAWSON HEINICKE (15) OF CYPRESS, TX MARBURGER’S 6 LBS. 14 OZS. SYDNEY GREAVES (16) OF PALACIOS, TX

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-MATA

7 LBS. 9 OZS. MITCH LYSSY (17) OF FALLS CITY, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE

1ST RUNNER UP 7 LBS. 8 OZS. DYLAN BALCH (15) OF LIBERTY, TX STINGAREE MARINA 6 LBS. 14 OZS. DAYNE MACHA (11) OF WALLIS, TX CANEY CREEK MARINA 7 LBS. 3 OZS. BLAKE JANYSEK (17) OF KARNES CITY, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE

2ND RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 15 OZS. CADE TYRA (16) OF DICKINSON, TX PELICAN REST MARINA 6 LBS. 11 OZS. * JAMIE SIFFORD (16) OF CORPUS CHRISTI, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 6 LBS. 12 OZS FEDERICO CAPPADONA (12) OF LINN, TX SO.SHORE BAIT & TACKLE

3RD RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 14 OZS. CONNER GARY (16) OF PEARLAND, TX PELICAN REST MARINA 6 LBS. 10 OZS. JACOB GUTHMAN (16) OF EAST BERNARD, TX

4TH RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 12 OZS. BLAKE SCHAUB (12) OF DICKINSON, TX GYB BAIT & TACKLE 6 LBS. 9 OZS. AVERY KUBECKA (14) OF PALACIOS, TX

NONE

NONE

3RDRUNNER UP 4 LBS. 13 OZS. WELDON WEST (11) OF CORPUS CHRISTI, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 7 LBS. 2 OZS. TYLER ZARELLA (17) OF LEAGUE CITY, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 2 OZS. BILLY FLORES (13) OF LOS FRESNOS, TX SO.SHORE BAIT & TACKLE

4TH RUNNER UP 4 LBS. 5 OZS. JACK KUESER (15) OF HOUSTON, TX PELICAN REST MARINA 7 LBS. 0 OZS. * CHASE BOURGEOIS (12) OF LEAGUE CITY, TX MARBURGER’S 4 LBS. 13 OZS. BO STOBART (14) OF WINNIE, TX STINGAREE MARINA

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-MATA

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-MATA

STARTEENS SCHOLARSHIP INSHORE DIVISION (ages 11 – 17 ONLY) – $25,000 SCHOLARSHIP FISH SPECIES FLOUNDER

SHEEPSHEAD

GAFFTOP

LEADER 5 LBS. 8 OZS. * DEVIN WILLIAMS (15) OF ANGLETON, TX SURFSIDE MARINA 10 LBS. 2 OZS. NICK BELL (13) OF BAYTOWN, TX GYB BAIT & TACKLE 6 LBS. 5 OZS. JORDAN SANDOW (17) OF KINGWOOD, TX SPORTSMAN’S SUPPLY

1st RUNNER UP 5 LBS. 3 OZS. CADE DUGI (16) OF ADKINS, TX WOODY’S SPORTS CENTER 9 LBS. 14 OZS. BECKA KNIGHT (12) OF ROCKWELL, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 9 OZS. TY MUNSCH (13) OF PORT BOLIVAR STINGAREE MARINA

2NDRUNNER UP 5 LBS. 0 OZS. THOMAS FISHER, JR. (14) OF BUDA, TX

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-PM

7 LBS. 8 OZS. BEN IBARRA (16) OF BAYTOWN, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 3 OZS. BLAKE FAILS (15) OF LAKE JACKSON, TX SURFSIDE MARINA

REVISED 8/29/16

The wait is over for those hoping to win a scholarship or a boat in the CCA STAR Tournament. For one young angler, a last minute sign-up before he went fishing with his dad and Matagorda guide Trey Prye would have paid off. “Little Jack caught this near 8-pounder Sunday that would have won him a scholarship, only he wasn’t entered,” Prye said. “It was still a beautiful fish that made a great memory for him and his dad.” For others, the summer-long event may pay for a college education or provide a new boat, motor and trailer to a lucky angler. The results aren’t completely final as several polygraphs are pending.

2016 CCA / TEXAS FORD DEALERS / TILSON HOME CORP / CAPITAL FARM CREDIT STATE OF TEXAS ANGLERS’ RODEO (STAR) LEADER BOARD AS OF: 08/21/16 DENOTES NEW FOR THE WEEK FISH SPECIES SPECKLED TROUT Upper Coast (8lb. min.) SPECKLED TROUT Middle Coast (8lb. min.) SPECKLED TROUT Lower Coast (8lb. min.) FISH SPECIES KINGFISH (30 lb. min.) DORADO (20 lb. min.) LING (COBIA) (50 lb. min.) FISH SPECIES FLOUNDER

SHEEPSHEAD

GAFFTOP

LEADER 9 LBS. 9 OZS. DEAN HALEWYN OF ALVIN, TX GYB BAIT & TACKLE 9 LBS. 1 OZ. THAD REICHERT OF CATSPRING, TX CANEY CREEK MARINA 9 LBS. 1 OZ. JAMES B VAUGHAN OF RUNGE, TX

1ST RUNNER UP 9 LBS. 7 OZS. TIM BARTA OF KATY, TX SURFSIDE MARINA 8 LBS. 14 OZS. DAVID BAROS OF EL CAMPO, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA 9 LBS. 1 OZ. ROBERT TREVINO OF SAN JUAN, TX SOUTH SHORE B & T

2ND RUNNER UP 9 LBS. 0 OZS. RYAN WASAFF OF HOUSTON, TX WEST END MARINA 8 LBS. 13 OZS. CODY VACEK OF EL CAMPO, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA 9 LBS. O OZS. JOSE L. FLORES OF BROWNSVILLE, TX SOUTH SHORE B & T

3RD RUNNER UP 8 LBS. 14 OZS. TANIA BALCH OF LIBERTY, TX STINGAREE MARINA 8 LBS. 13 OZS. WILLIAM BODUNGEN OF LOUIS, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA 8 LBS. 15 OZS. CHAD COOLEY OF RAYMONDVILLE, TX HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-PM

4TH RUNNER UP 8 LBS. 8 OZS. GEORGE MILBURN OF BOLIVAR, TX STINGAREE MARINA 8 LBS. 12 OZS. SHAWN HICKL OF LOUISE, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA 8 LBS. 11 OZS. COBY YOUNG OF HELOTES, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE

LEADER 62 LBS. 13 OZS. MATTHEW BRONSTEIN OF HOUSTON, TX SURFSIDE MARINA 24 LBS. 11 OZS. SHANE HUFF OF CANYON LAKE, TX WOODY’S SPORTS CENTER 63 LBS. 2 OZS. HUNTER REED OF NASSAU BAY, TX SURFSIDE MARINA LEADER 6 LBS. 13 OZS. PAUL GREGORY OF BRAZORIA, TX CANEY CREEK MARINA 10 LBS. 5 OZS. JERRY MILLS OF HOUSTON, TX MARBURGER’S 7 LBS. 8 OZS. TROY SUMRALL III OF ORANGE, TX SPORTSMAN’S SUPPLY

1ST RUNNER UP 59 LBS. 10 OZS. GINGER KACAL OF EL CAMPO, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA 23 LBS. 15 OZS. KOLBY SCOTT OF ARANSAS PASS, TX

2ND RUNNER UP 57 LBS. 11 OZS. COOPER FORD OF WESLACO, TX SOUTH SHORE B & T 21 LBS. 2 OZS. CURTIS LUCHAK OF FREEPORT, TX SURFSIDE MARINA NONE

3RD RUNNER UP 54 LBS. 7 OZS. KYLE STEWART OF MONTGOMERY, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA NONE

4TH RUNNER UP 53 LBS. 6 OZS. JOHN M. BEST OF LA PORTE, TX SURFSIDE MARINA NONE

NONE

NONE

2ND RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 5 OZS. JOSHUA DELPH OF RICHMOND, TX MARBURGER’S 8 LBS. 5 OZS. ANDREW RINCON OF HOUSTON, TX GYB BAIT & TACKLE 6 LBS. 1 OZ. TODD CORPORON OF HUTTO, TX HARBOR B & T- MATA

3RD RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 1 OZ. CHARLOTTE LITTLE OF SAN ANTONIO, TX ROY’S BAIT & TACKLE 8 LBS. 1 OZ. REGINALD CROOK OF PASADENA, TX MARBURGER’S 6 LBS. 0 OZS. DERIK YEAGER OF VIDOR, TX STINGAREE MARINA

4TH RUNNER UP 5 LBS. 8 OZS.

3RD WINNER NONE

4TH WINNER NONE

5TH WINNER NONE

NONE

NONE

NONE

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-PM

TEXAS FORD DEALERS REDFISH DIVISION TRUCK/BOAT PACKAGE

BOAT PACKAGE

1ST WINNER

JEFF MYERS OF HOUSTON, TX

TAG TA 816 Caught 6/10/16 PELICAN REST MARINA NONE

WOODY’S SPORTS CENTER

60 LBS. 7 OZS. TRAVIS HILD OF LAVERNIA, TX

HARBOR BAIT & TACKLE-PM

1ST RUNNER UP 6 LBS. 6 OZS. KENNETH LESCHBER OF ARANSAS PASS, TX

WOODY’S SPORTS CENTER

9 LBS. 10 OZS. RODOLFO IBARRA, SR. OF DAYTON, TX MARBURGER’S 6 LBS. 11 OZS. DARREN GUERNSEY OF LUMBERTON, TX SPORTSMANS SUPPLY 2ND WINNER MICHAEL W. BOYER OF SAN ANTONIO, TX TAG TA847 Caught 7/30/16

PATTI STRIMPLE GILMORE

OF PORT BOLIVAR, TX STINGAREE MARINA 8 LBS. 1 OZS. JENNIFER WILSON OF BAYTOWN, TX MARBURGER’S 5 LBS. 15 OZS. * CHRIS MURRAY OF CANYON LAKE, TX

TERRY’S SEAWORTHY MARINE

TERRY’S SEAWORTHY MARINE

NONE

7 TAGGED REDFISH HAVE BEEN CAUGHT – 2 WINNERS, 5 INELIGIBLE…Winners will be in order of the date caught!

REVISED 8/29/16


Page 16

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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Double-digit bass over Labor Day By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

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Jeff Kolter of Wylie has been fishing Lake Lavon since 1976 with his dad. Finally, on September 3, he caught his biggest bass and his first double-digit bass. “My dad took me out as a kid in his two-man boat,” he said. “I’ve been a regular out there for years.” On the morning of September 3, the 52-year-old Kolter headed out, but wasn’t having much luck. “I was just goofing around and I hadn’t caught any fish,” he said. “At about 11 a.m., I went to a hole I’ve fished all my life. I put on a blue power worm.” On Kolter’s first cast, the fish hit. “She came up and jumped and I thought, ‘Oh, my God,’” he said. Once the fish was landed, Kolter weighed the bass on a digital scale. The scale showed 10.4 pounds. “I wanted to take it to a certified scale, but I was too Photo from Jeff Kolter scared I was going to kill it,” he said. “I was alone, so I eased over to the bank where some people were bank-fishing, had someone take my picture and I let her go.” Ironically, the lake Kolter fishes most is Lake Fork. “I have a place there and fish it 98 percent of the time,” he said. “I have a hard time catching big fish there, though. I did catch a 10.2-pounder, and in January a 9.8-pounder.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Pros to make three trips to Texas Continued from page 8

The Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest will including a catch, weigh and immediate release format. The Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest will continue to follow the rules established in the Toyota Texas Bass Classic, including the use of on-boat marshals for weighing fish and the allowance of one fish over a designated size per angler to be brought in each day for public display and subsequent return to the lake. Anglers outside of the Elite Series, including FLW Tour anglers who competed in the Toyota Texas Bass Classic, won’t be allowed to compete. “All competitors must qualify for the series through the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens or the B.A.S.S. Nation, and anglers

More leased river access areas open Anglers targeting prized Guadalupe bass now have greater access to prime fishing along three Central Texas rivers, thanks to temporary leased access agreements between private landowners and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The leased access sites are located on the lower Colorado, Llano and San Marcos rivers and were made possible with funding through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program. These rivers are known for their excellent Guadalupe bass fishing and, in particular, the lower Colorado between Austin and LaGrange is considered by many to be the preeminent trophy fishery for this species. The world-record Guadalupe bass (3.71 pounds) was caught here in March 2014. The leases provide anglers with access between 30 minutes before daylight and 30 minutes after dusk. Anglers will be able to use the properties for bank fishing and to launch nonmotorized watercraft such as rafts, kayaks and canoes for the purpose of fishing.

who are already on the Elite Series must requalify each year by maintaining enough points throughout the season. FLW anglers who do not meet the Bassmaster elite series requirements will not be able to participate,” a B.A.S.S. spokeperson said. The winner of the Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest will receive an automatic berth in the 2018 Bassmaster Classic. The 2017 Bassmaster Classic will be held on Lake Conroe March 24-26. For the first time, two Elite Series events will be held before the Classic in 2017. An Elite Series event will take place on Toledo Bend Reservoir April 6-9, with the host city being Many, Louisiana.

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Quin, Rouse take Houston Team Championship Randy Quin and Mark Rouse totaled 26.58 pounds in the two-day, 2016 Houston Team Championship hosted by Anglers Quest. The team led the event at Houston County Lake after landing 13.65 pounds on the first day. The team won $3,995. Dean Coleman and Jimmy Emmons Jr. finished in second place with 22.93 pounds, winning $1,590. Sandro Alfaro and James Chandler followed in third with 21.87 pounds, and Chandler’s 5.01-pound bass was the biggest of the event. —Anglers Quest

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Eating marlin not recommended Continued from page 8

Photo by Kerri Nel

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in mercury can prove harmful, particularly to children and pregnant women, she added, leading in some cases to liver damage, vision and hearing loss and other injuries of the brain and central nervous system. McDonough said he appreciates the concern, but he noted the church’s distribution process limits an individual’s exposure. “We distribute it in small quantities to numerous people,” he said. “Each package has maybe two pounds in it. This is a lot of work for our small church. Last Sunday, we had 33 people. It’s not something that we would be doing if we thought we were hurting people, I can assure you that.” Blue marlin, and similar pelagic species, are high on the list of mercury-contaminated fish for a couple of reasons, said Greg Stunz, director of the Center for Sportfish Science and Conservation at Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi. “Blue marlin are very long-lived and they’re at the top of the food chain,” Stunz said. “It’s a process of bioaccumulation. They get all the contaminants from everything they eat. And they pretty much stay there. They don’t work their way out of the fish’s system. “You don’t see mahi mahi on the advisory list. They don’t have time to accumulate all those toxins before they die. Blue marlin live for about 30 years.” Despite recommending people not eat blue marlin, the state hasn’t waded into trying to ban consumption of the fish. “There are anglers who catch it for sport,” TDSHS’ Mann said. “Typically, a possession ban would discourage people from fishing, which is not something we want to do.” Pastor McDonough said he’s checked with fish and wildlife officials regarding the seafood his church distributes to the poor. “They say if you buy a quality brand of tuna, it will have mercury content in it higher than fresh marlin,” he said. “That’s what they tell me.” Research shows that it depends on the tuna eaten. The Food and Drug Admninstration lists blue marlin as having slightly more mercury contamination than canned tuna, usually a combination of skipjack and yellowfin tuna, .458 ppm to .354 ppm. Albacore tuna is just below blue marlin. However, bigeye tuna, frequently served in sashimi or sushi dishes, contains more mercury contamination, .689 ppm. Interestingly, the last FDA advisory regarding fish associated with high mercury levels omitted blue marlin. Instead, it listed tilefish from the Gulf of Mexico, shark, swordfish and king mackerel. Stunz said he doesn’t eat blue marlin, and mercury contamination is just one of the reasons. “It doesn’t taste that good,” he said. “Plus, there are other fishes like spotted seatrout that can better handle the mortality from fishing and obviously are not as contaminated.”


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September 9, 2016

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Fishing jigheads and plastics Continued from page 8

I’ll switch colors. The main thing to remember is to let the fish tell you what they want. Once you have the right color dialed in, you’ll catch plenty of fish.” Three of his top colors include plum/chartreuse, roach and morning glory, which is black with glitter. “I like the morning glory color a lot,” Paradoski said. “It’s a good producer in just about any type of water.” For decades, Capt. Jim West has been putting customers on trout and reds on East Galveston and Trinity bays. “One of my top producing tails is clear with some sort of metal flake,” West said. “I don’t like them to be bright, but sort of transparent. Drab green is another very good color. In stained water I’ll go with a black/chartreuse or limetreuse tail. “The water here on East Bay can vary in color from day to day. When it’s trout green the transparent/metal flake tails are pretty good. But if I’m in off-colored, deeper water the darker shades are best.” On the Lower Laguna Madre, guide Paul Johnson is on the water a lot throughout the year. That water is shallow and clear most of the time — a situation that can perplex many anglers who are more comfortable fishing slightly clear to sandy tides. “With all the clear water here, the chicken on a chain is a good all-around color,” Johnson said. “It’s produced a lot of fish in 3 to 4 feet of clear water. That particular jig has a char-

treuse tail, and dark green body with glitter. If that’s not getting bites I’ll put on a white/chartreuse tail.” All three of these pros agreed the color of a lead head jig is not a big issue. A plain lead head is the hands-down favorite. West said in darker water, he might switch over to a red or maybe a chartreuse head for a little more flash. The weight of a jig head, though, is important. All three like the 1/8-ounce jig. West said a 1/16-ounce lead head is even better, especially when you’re fishing shallow, like 2- to 4-feet deep. “The longer you can keep a jig in the strike zone the better your chances are for getting a bite,” West said. “About the only time I’ll use a 1/4-ounce jig is when I’ve got lots of current, or I’m drift-fishing. Most fishermen who use the heavier jig heads are looking for distance. But, a lot of the time, that can be fixed by keeping the reel full of line.”

Another important feature is the action of the lure’s tail. “A rat tail is a favorite,” Paradoski said. “But a paddle tail is good when you need more vibration. Plus, you can fish a paddle tail with either a jerk or steady retrieve. Most of the time I’ll fish a rat-tailed jig with short jerks.” Paradoski said the main thing is to let the fish show you what works. “If they’re hitting a jig on a steady retrieve, stick with that,” he said. “If not, try something different until you establish a pattern.” Line weight is important. The guides agreed that heavier line will kill the action of a jig. West prefers 14-pound monofilament. Paradoski goes with 30-pound braid with the diameter of 8-pound mono, and he rigs a 25-pound-test monofilament leader connected to the braided line with a tiny barrel swivel.

CHOICES: An array of soft plastics fill tackle boxes of saltwater anglers, each hoping to land a nice trout like this one caught by guide Charlie Paradoski. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

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Friends, fishing and hunting Continued from page 4

asked. They described the event for a certain fraternity and why they wanted to go. Was it the fraternity connections that drew them back? Girls? No one knew, but the dads, glad to have a day with their sons, were sad to see them leave. “That’s college,” one of them said. “At least we got to spend the day with them,” Sams said to the dads. “They were three fine young men, all incredibly polite and mature.” HUNTING TOGETHER: Friends Reynolds Walker and Charles Larkham talk about one of the dove taken shortly after they started college. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Baker, Smith win night tourney At the Texas Tournament Zone Lake Travis Tuesday Night Tournament on August 30, Chris Baker and Jared Smith topped the field with a 5-fish bag weighing 18.72 pounds. Finishing second was the team of Phil Warren and Brian Mater with 12.94 pounds, followed by Greg Stevens and Brandon Feltner with 12.65 pounds. —TTZ

September 9, 2016

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TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are good under slicks and birds on soft plastics. Redfish are good under rafts of shad on top-waters. Redfish are good in the marsh on small top-waters. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Trout are good at the rigs on live mullet. BOLIVAR: Trout are good on the outgoing tide at Rollover Pass on soft plastics and mullet. Redfish are good in the marsh with higher tides. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on soft plastics. Redfish are good along the north shoreline on gold spoons and scented plastics with high tides. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good on the south shoreline on top-waters and soft plastics. Trout are fair to good on the shell adjacent to the channel on live bait. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good along the channel on soft plastics and croakers. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Offshore is good for kingfish, ling and dolphin. Tarpon have been cruising the beachfront. TEXAS CITY: Trout are fair to good on the reefs and in the channel on live shrimp and croakers. Redfish and sand trout are fair to good in Moses Lake and Dickinson Bayou on shrimp. FREEPORT: Trout are good at San Luis Pass on shrimp, top-waters and soft plastics. Trout, redfish, sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Trout are good in the surf. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over mid-bay reefs and shell and mud humps. Trout and redfish are good over mud on live croakers and soft plastics. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair over sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish

and black drum are fair to good at Shell Island on live shrimp. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are good at the jetty on live bait. Trout and redfish are fair to good on top-waters and live bait over sand, grass and shell in San Antonio Bay. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes with live shrimp and small top-waters. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair over grass while drifting with live shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish are good on piggy perch and shrimp around Mud Island and Estes Flats. PORT ARANSAS: Trout, redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp and croakers. Offshore is good for dolphin, ling, kingfish and tuna. CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are good in Oso Bay for waders tossing top-waters. Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on piggy perch, artificial and live shrimp. Redfish are good in the potholes on shrimp and piggies. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and soft plastics around deep rocks and grass. Trout are fair to good on soft plastics under a popping cork on the grass in the Land Cut. Redfish have been found on the flats with higher tides. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are good on top-waters on the edge of the channel and around sand and grass. Redfish are good on the sand on small top-waters and Gulps. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are good while drifting sand and grass potholes on soft plastics. Redfish are good on the flats in South Bay on live bait and plastics. Snook are good in the Ship Channel on artificial and live shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout are good on sand and grass on artificial shrimp and top-waters. Redfish are good on the Gas Well Flats on shrimp under a cork and small top-waters. —TPWD

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Pro-Bass Camp completes Young anglers learn techniques from pros

JUST LIKE THE PROS: At the Pro-Bass Camp at Lake Amistad, young anglers competed in a pro-style tournament on the final day of camp. Photo by Pro Bass Camp.

Years ago, pro angler Kurt Dove was fishing with Chase Kemp, who started the Donald R. Kemp Youth Hunt Club in Las Cruses, New Mexico, and the idea came for a camp designed for the young angler who aspires to be successful on the tournament trails. Dove brought in professional anglers for instruction, obtained tackle donations for the campers’ use and envisioned a tournament at the end of camp to compete for trophies, prizes and bragging rights.

Now in its fifth year, this year’s camp took place on Lake Amistad. The camp set an attendance record, as 27 campers from 12-18 spent a week fishing with and learning from 14 instructors that included some of the most well-known professional anglers and guides in the industry. Youngsters came from Alabama, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Texas. Instructors included 1998 Bassmaster Classic champion and Major League Fishing angler Please turn to page 24


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September 9, 2016

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Learning from the pros Continued from page 22

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Denny Brauer, Elite Series champion and three-time Toyota Texas Bass Classic champion Keith Combs, FLW Tour and MLF Select angler Kurt Dove, former Elite Series pro and full-time guide Matt Reed, and Bassmaster Open champion Dave Mansue. “Some of these kids have been attending for the past three years, and I’ve seen them get better and better each year,” said Combs, who has taken part in the week-long camp for four years. “Even with my hectic schedule, it’s worth it to spend a few more days away from home working with the campers.” Not all of the campers are experienced anglers. For Barrett Dodson from Houston, the camp was the first time he had fished for bass out of a boat. “I struggled at first, but by the last day I was catching quite a few bass,” he said. “I learned how to Texas-rig a soft plastic and I also learned how to fish a drop shot. I’ve watched some of these pros on TV, so it was awesome to get the chance to hang out with them and learn the techniques that they use.” Another camper, Mason McGill, set the record for the biggest bass caught in the history of the camp when he landed a 6.2-pound largemouth while fishing with Denny Brauer. Brauer, who retired from full-time tournament competition following the 2012 season and lives in Del Rio, has served as an instructor all five years. “I look back to when I started fishing, and I’m kind of envious that opportunities like this didn’t exist,” he said. “These kids are so consumed with bass fishing and I’m shocked at how good they are at such a young age.” Following each day of on-the-water instruction, campers listened to detailed seminars conducted by the instructors that included topics ranging from using electronics to fishing jigs. Finally, the camp week concluded with a tournament on Lake Amistad where the 27 youth, decked out in pro angler-like fishing shirts, competed for $3,500 in college scholarships. This summer, 16-year-old Brady Harp from Birmingham, Alabama won the tournament with three bass weighing 7.55 pounds. Harp is entering his junior year of high school and plans on using his $1,500 scholarship toward attending the University of Alabama, where he hopes to fish on the university’s fishing team. “The two biggest highlights of my year are Christmas and Pro-Bass Camp,” Harp said. Dove said students like Harp are why he started the camp. “Many of these youth are coming back year after year, so you can see their progression as anglers and the impact that we are having on their fishing,” he said. “This week of intense fishing and instruction is keeping them involved in the sport, and they’re going home and practicing what they learned here.” —Pro Bass Camp


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September 9, 2016

Camo ice cream Lone Star Outdoor News Texas hunters have spotted a new addition in the ice cream department of grocery stores, camouflage containers of ice cream. Blue Bell, based in Brenham, introduced Camo ‘n Cream, what it described as, “a colorful combination of three great tasting ice cream flavors in a camouflage pattern — pistachio almond, milk chocolate and cream cheese swirled together in one carton.” Photo from Blue Bell “We are having a little fun with this flavor,” said Carl Breed, director of marketing for Blue Bell. “You see the camo design on everything these days, so we thought why not create an ice cream flavor that looks camouflage?” Less than a year ago, Blue Bell ice cream returned to the shelves after a listeria crisis shut production down for seven months. Camo ‘n Cream is available in limited quantities in the half-gallon and pint sizes.

Dove hunts in session Continued from page 1

Kallina of La Media Lodge and Greg Simons of Wildlife Systems; in Haskell County with Justin Hill of Ranger Creek; in Uvalde County near Sabinal, where members of the Texas Dove Hunters Association had excellent hunts; and at Muddy Waters Outfitters near Wichita Falls. In the Central Zone near Sealy, many hunters shot limits of dove, but near Waller and Brookshire, normally hot spots, the opening weekend hunting was slow. According to reports from some areas that usually have predictable openers, the dove had moved on. Landowners said the birds were there, but started leaving about a week before the opener. A group of hunters north of Breckenridge had a slow hunt where limits on opening day were common, and friends in Comanche County usually hunt a large roost on the edge of Deleon every opening afternoon, and landowner Mark Nowlin postponed the hunt for a lack of birds. In southern Ellis County, Brent Kerrington of Dallas had good hunts on a new lease, as long as the hunters were in the right spot. Like many areas of North Texas, though, the tall ragweed and other vegetation made finding birds difficult. “We were across from a large sunflower field that had been harvested,” he said. “The birds worked over the trees and down a pipeline.” How well hunters did depended on where they were, with half of the group getting limits. “The birds weren’t following a certain pattern,” Kerrington said. “If you were in one spot where they had been coming over, the next birds were just as likely to go over a different spot.”

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Page 25


Page 26

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Capt. Thomas finds home on Texas waters

EXPERIENCED AND FUN: Capt. Dewitt Thomas worked in the newspaper business before becoming a fishing guide. A New Jersey native, he has been guiding full-time out of Port Isabel for 34 years. Photo by Erich Schlegel, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

By Autumn Bernhard

For Lone Star Outdoor News Don’t let the New Jersey accent fool you, Capt. Dewitt Thomas knows about fishing Texas waters after more than 50 years of experience. And his ability to please customers keeps them coming back. “I have been in Texas a really long time but I cannot lose that Jersey accent,” Thomas said. “But after 54 years, it’s not that bad anymore.” Thomas was born and raised in Newton, New Jersey, where he did a lot of “water work” including trapping and running ski boats at resorts over summers. “I didn’t start fishing until I came down here in 1962,” he said. “I did shrimping for a couple of years and then went to school again.” After graduating, Thomas and his late wife moved to Corpus Christi where he worked in the newspaper industry for eight years. “I would work at the paper and then go fishing every weekend,” he said. “I would go offshore, inshore, whatever it took. I personally love to fish, so when possible I fish as much as I can.” After the couple got tired of living in Corpus, they relocated to Brownsville. “I started fishing part-time commercially there,” Thomas said. “I would work five days at the newspaper and on weekends from April to October I would come out to White Sands and take two trips out on Saturday and two trips out on Sunday.” Thomas quit working in the print sales business after his first wife passed away in 1980. In 1982, he remarried and started fishing and guiding full-time. “I ran two boats: a 21-foot Mako and a bay boat,” he said. “I would go out in the morning when it was calmer to do the Gulf. When I would come back in my wife would have the bay boat in the water ready and I would go out again. I have been solid, constantly fishing since then.” Thomas stopped offshore fishing when he sold his Mako in 2004. He currently resides in Port Isabel and runs private charters out of the R & R Hi-Way Bait Stand and Marina year-round. “People pick their launch and return time, but I give suggestions based on when the fishing is better,” he said. “I fish the bay only from the south jetties in Port Isabel and at times up to Port Mansfield. I go wherever the people want in that range.” Thomas typically fishes for “a little bit of everything” 10 to 15 miles out, depending on the water conditions. Clients only need to bring their fishing licenses and food. “All guides do the same thing I do: they go out, catch fish and come back,” Thomas said. “My plus is getting along well with the folks. I like to work with people. People are the biggest asset in the business, not the fish you put in the box. “Some guys are just natural fisher people but not people people,” he said. “They will come in with big boxes of fish every trip, but they don’t get many referrals. You have to balance between safety, pleasing the people and then catching the fish.” Capt. Dewitt Thomas Custom Sports Fishing (956) 551-1965 Customsportsanglers.com


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Page 27

HEROES

Steve Trull of Austin harvested this red sheep with his Champion Arms .300 Win Mag at the Champion Ranch in Brady.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE Tristan Tijerina made the shot on this black bear at the San Carlos Apache Reservation. The shot was 215 yards with his .280 Rem. He asked for the trip for his birthday gift.

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Colton Wayne landed this Pacific sailfish while fishing at the Tropic Star Lodge in Panama.

DOVE SEASON DATES North Zone

Sep. 1 - Nov. 13 Dec. 17 - Jan. 1

Central Zone

Sep. 1 - Nov. 6 Dec. 17 - Jan. 8

South Zone

Sep. 23 - Nov. 13 Dec. 17 - Jan. 23

Special White-winged Dove Area

Sep. 3, 4, 10, 11; Sep. 23 - Nov. 9 Dec. 17 - Jan. 23 *See TPWD for more details.

Dove Bag Limits:

North Central & South Zones Bag Limit: 15, no more than 2 white-tipped dove Special White-winged Dove Area – Regular Season Bag Limit: 15, no more than 2 white-tipped dove Special White-winged zone – Special Season Bag Limit: 15, no more than 2 mourning and 2 whitetipped dove *Possession limit is 3 times the daily bag limit

Julia De La Fuente caught her first keeper bass at Falcon Lake while fishing with her parents in August.

Philip Pacific, 9, of McKinney, made a 143-yard shot on this wild boar, his first big game harvest.


Page 28

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

U.S. Army training Tanzanian rangers Tanzania’s park and game reserve rangers are teamed with members of the U.S. Army’s 403rd Civil Affairs Battalion, a component of Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, and North Carolina National Guard, conducting antipoaching training from July to September at Rungwa Game Reserve, Tanzania. “We are here for these two months to train Rungwa Park rangers in field craft to improve their ability to track, capture and arrest illegal poachers in the Rungwa game reserve,” said Capt. Michael Wilson, 403rd CA BN team leader. “Tanzania has the second highest concentration of African elephants on the continent. Their population has been halved in the past 10 years.” The training involved teaching field techniques like first aid and movements to increase the rangers’ abilities to catch poachers. In addition, Army soldiers taught the rangers skills that are used on the battlefield to acclimate them to the threats they may encounter in the wild. “The goal for this training mission was to train 20 to 40 rangers in field craft,” Wilson said. “As an instructor in part of the counter illicit trade training team, I conducted medical training, intelligence training, a full (spectrum) of training activities.” The rangers were also taught small unit tactics and were described as enthusiastic about learning by the Army commander. Domina Mgelwa, a Rungwa Game Reserve game officer, said learning from the U.S. Army soldiers has been beneficial to adapting to the poachers tactics and methods. “We think [U.S. Soldiers] are more experienced in the field and they have more techniques which are important for us,” Mgelwa said. “Time changes and techniques change, so we need some new knowledge and techniques.”

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8/24/16 1:57 PM

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission approved new rules establishing chronic wasting disease zones and restricting live deer movement authorized under permits to or from properties within those areas. The commission also adopted regulations banning importation of certain deer carcass parts from states where the disease has been detected and restricting carcass movement from CWD zones within Texas. Hunters will be allowed to transport (from the zones) boned or packaged venison, cut quarters with the brain stem and spinal tissue removed, caped hides with skull not attached, the skull plate with antlers attached and cleaned of all soft tissue or finished taxidermy products. Hunters wishing to preserve a head for mounting can obtain a waiver to transport the skinned or unskinned head of a susceptible species to a taxidermist, provided all brain material, soft tissue, spinal column and any unused portions of the head are disposed of in a landfill in Texas permitted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The new rules shrink the current CWD zones in Culberson, El Paso, Hudspeth and Reeves counties based on the department’s CWD surveillance efforts over the past four hunting seasons, establishes a new CZ and SZ in the western Panhandle around Hartley County and creates a SZ in portions of Bandera, Medina and Uvalde counties. —TPWD


LSONews.com

FFA champs Continued from page 4

scenario and whether the habitat is sufficient for a particular game animal, and suggested improvements. “They age deer jawbones, identify pelts, skulls, feathers and tracks,” Harris said. At the state contest, for the first time, a female, Mae Knaggs, had the top score in the wildlife competition. Ulandey finished fourth and Nebgen ninth. “Her sister finished second the year before,” Harris said. The program has helped lead students into wildlife and hunting-related fields, Harris said. “We’ve had four graduates who studied wildlife at Texas A&M-Kingsville, and two more are still studying there,” he said. “We have one TWPD biologist and others are working for private game ranches. In Ag, when I grew up, it was all sheep and goats. Now, in the Hill Country, it’s game ranches.” The fundraiser was sponsored by The Hunt Store, Priefert, the Texas Deer Association and area ranches. “It helps raise some scholarship money for these kids,” Harris said. “And it gives other kids incentive to get involved when they see what these kids have done.”

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Page 29

Ducks are coming Continued from page 5

United States, which covers the Dakotas and Eastern Montana. Pond counts fell 16 percent in Prairie Canada. It’s the first time since 2007 that May pond counts fell below the long-term average. “Wetland conditions are not very good compared to recent years,” Rohwer said. “I think duck production will be down. We have high numbers of ducks sharing fewer ponds. Ducks just don’t do as well when they’re crowded.” Overall, mallard, gadwall and wigeon numbers were up. Shovelers dropped by 10 percent, but are still well above long-term averages. Scaup increased 14 percent and are at the longterm average. Canvasbacks declined by 3 percent, but are 26 percent above the long-term average, while redheads jumped 8 percent to 1.29 million. BLUEBILLS UP: Scaup numbers have increased 14 percent this year, and most species are well above long-term averages. Photos by Joe Richards.

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Sept. 16

Sept. 23

Sept. 30

Aug. 8

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu

----- 6:04 12:38 6:51 1:25 7:37 2:11 8:24 2:57 9:10 3:44 9:58 4:33 10:46

12:16 1:03 1:50 2:37 3:24 4:11 5:00

16 Fri

5:24 11:37

5:51

-----

17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

6:18 12:05 7:16 1:02 8:16 2:02 9:19 3:05 10:22 4:08 11:23 5:09 ----- 6:07

6:45 7:43 8:44 9:47 10:51 11:52 12:21

12:32 1:29 2:30 3:33 4:36 5:38 6:36

----- 5:58 12:33 6:45 1:19 7:32 2:05 8:18 2:51 9:05 3:39 9:52 4:27 10:41 5:18 11:32 6:12 12:02 7:10 12:56 8:11 1:57 9:13 2:59 10:16 4:02 11:17 5:03 ----- 6:02

12:10 12:57 1:44 2:31 3:18 4:05 4:54 5:45 6:39 7:37 8:38 9:41 10:45 11:46 12:16

6:22 7:09 7:57 8:44 9:31 10:19 11:07 11:58 12:26 1:24 2:24 3:27 4:30 5:32 6:30

07:02 07:02 07:03 07:03 07:04 07:04 07:05 07:05 07:06 07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:08 07:09

07:34 07:33 07:31 07:30 07:29 07:28 07:26 07:25 07:24 07:23 07:21 07:20 07:19 07:18 07:16

2:09p 12:17a 3:00p 1:02a 3:49p 1:51a 4:37p 2:45a 5:23p 3:42a 6:08p 4:43a 6:52p 5:45a 7:34p 6:50a 8:17p 7:55a 9:01p 9:01a 9:46p 10:07a 10:34p 11:13a 11:25p 12:18p NoMoon 1:20p 12:19a 2:18p

6:28 7:15 8:03 8:50 9:37 10:24 11:13

07:06 07:07 07:07 07:08 07:09 07:09 07:10

07:41 07:40 07:38 07:37 07:36 07:34 07:33

2:21p 12:18a 3:11p 1:02a 4:00p 1:52a 4:48p 2:45a 5:33p 3:43a 6:17p 4:45a 7:00p 5:49a

07:10 07:32 7:41p 07:11 07:12 07:12 07:13 07:13 07:14 07:15

07:30 07:29 07:28 07:26 07:25 07:24 07:22

6:54a

8:23p 8:01a 9:05p 9:08a 9:49p 10:16a 10:36p 11:23a 11:26p 12:29p NoMoon 1:32p 12:19a 2:30p

San Antonio 2016 Sept.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

----- 6:10 12:45 6:57 1:31 7:44 2:17 8:30 3:04 9:17 3:51 10:04 4:40 10:53 5:31 11:44 6:25 12:11 7:22 1:09 8:23 2:09 9:26 3:11 10:29 4:14 11:30 5:16 12:04 6:14

12:22 6:34 1:10 7:22 1:57 8:09 2:43 8:56 3:30 9:43 4:18 10:31 5:06 11:20 5:58 ----6:52 12:38 7:50 1:36 8:51 2:37 9:54 3:40 10:57 4:43 11:59 5:44 12:28 6:42

07:14 07:15 07:15 07:16 07:16 07:17 07:17 07:18 07:18 07:19 07:19 07:20 07:20 07:21 07:21

07:46 07:45 07:44 07:42 07:41 07:40 07:39 07:37 07:36 07:35 07:34 07:33 07:31 07:30 07:29

2:21p 12:30a 3:12p 1:16a 4:01p 2:05a 4:49p 2:59a 5:35p 3:56a 6:20p 4:56a 7:04p 5:59a 7:47p 7:03a 8:30p 8:08a 9:14p 9:14a 10:00p 10:20a 10:48p 11:26a 11:39p 12:30p NoMoon 1:32p 12:33a 2:30p

Amarillo

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Sept. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

09 Fri 10 Sat 11 Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Sun 19 Mon 20 Tue 21 Wed 22 Thu 23 Fri

12:12 6:24 12:59 7:11 1:45 7:57 2:31 8:44 3:17 9:31 4:05 10:18 4:53 11:07 5:44 11:58 6:38 12:25 7:36 1:22 8:36 2:23 9:39 3:25 10:42 4:28 11:43 5:29 12:18 6:28

12:36 1:23 2:10 2:57 3:44 4:31 5:20 6:11 7:05 8:03 9:04 10:07 11:11 ----12:42

6:48 7:35 8:23 9:10 9:57 10:45 11:33 ----12:52 1:50 2:50 3:53 4:56 5:58 6:56

07:25 07:26 07:26 07:27 07:28 07:28 07:29 07:30 07:31 07:31 07:32 07:33 07:33 07:34 07:35

08:02 08:01 08:00 07:58 07:57 07:55 07:54 07:52 07:51 07:49 07:48 07:47 07:45 07:44 07:42

2:47p 12:34a 3:37p 1:18a 4:26p 2:07a 5:13p 3:02a 5:58p 4:00a 6:41p 5:03a 7:22p 6:08a 8:02p 7:14a 8:43p 8:22a 9:24p 9:31a 10:07p 10:39a 10:52p 11:48a 11:42p 12:55p NoMoon 1:58p 12:35a 2:56p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Time 12:16 AM 1:19 AM 1:58 AM 2:27 AM 2:52 AM 3:16 AM 3:40 AM 4:05 AM 4:31 AM 4:58 AM 5:27 AM 12:30 AM 1:26 AM 2:37 AM 4:24 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.1L 1.4L 1.5L 1.6L

Time 4:25 PM 5:22 PM 6:15 PM 8:01 AM 8:10 AM 8:35 AM 9:08 AM 9:46 AM 10:28 AM 11:14 AM 12:03 PM 5:56 AM 6:28 AM 7:04 AM 7:58 AM

Height 0.4L 0.4L 0.3L 1.5L 1.4L 1.2L 1.1L 0.9L 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.7H

Time

11:39 AM 12:51 PM 1:52 PM 2:49 PM 3:46 PM 4:45 PM 5:48 PM 6:57 PM 12:57 PM 1:55 PM 2:58 PM 4:05 PM

Height

1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 2.0H 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L

Time

Height

7:05 PM 7:52 PM 8:38 PM 9:23 PM 10:08 PM 10:53 PM 11:40 PM

0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L

8:13 PM 9:40 PM 11:12 PM

1.9H 1.9H 1.9H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 4:04 PM 12:39 AM 1:29 AM 2:17 AM 3:03 AM 3:41 AM 4:12 AM 4:37 AM 4:56 AM 5:08 AM 12:09 AM 1:03 AM 2:02 AM 2:56 AM 3:56 AM

Height 0.5L 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.9H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.0L 1.2L 1.4L 1.5L 1.6L

Time

Height

5:26 PM 7:13 AM 7:25 AM 7:53 AM 8:30 AM 9:18 AM 10:07 AM 10:49 AM 11:31 AM 5:23 AM 5:45 AM 6:14 AM 7:00 AM 8:17 AM

0.5L 1.5L 1.5L 1.4L 1.3L 1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H

Time 6:02 PM 8:06 AM 8:25 AM 8:45 AM 9:00 AM 8:38 AM 8:52 AM 9:31 AM 10:25 AM 5:27 AM 5:47 AM 6:03 AM 11:33 PM

Height 0.6L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.2L 1.1L 1.0L 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.7H

5:23 PM

0.6L

Time 9:38 AM 10:50 AM 12:27 PM 1:41 PM 3:15 PM 4:24 PM 5:17 PM 6:16 PM 12:17 PM 1:10 PM 2:07 PM 3:02 PM 4:02 PM

Height 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L

Time

Height

6:29 PM 7:14 PM 7:57 PM 8:46 PM 9:43 PM 10:35 PM 11:22 PM

0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.7L 0.8L

7:40 PM 8:52 PM 9:53 PM 11:00 PM

2.0H 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H

Time 1:17 AM 1:58 AM 2:32 AM 3:01 AM 3:26 AM 3:48 AM 4:12 AM 4:38 AM 5:03 AM 12:23 AM 1:34 AM 3:02 AM 2:52 PM 4:09 PM 12:51 AM

Height 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 1.0L 1.1L 1.3L 0.6L 0.6L 1.8H

Time 10:28 AM 11:18 AM 12:23 PM 1:17 PM 2:07 PM 3:03 PM 4:08 PM 5:16 PM 11:22 AM 12:18 PM 1:24 PM

Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 0.8L 0.7L 0.7L

Time

Height

6:53 PM 7:34 PM 8:11 PM 8:49 PM 9:33 PM 10:28 PM 11:26 PM

0.6L 0.6L 0.5L 0.6L 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L

6:22 PM 7:48 PM 9:58 PM

1.7H 1.6H 1.7H

Freeport Harbor Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Time 3:47 PM 1:04 AM 1:49 AM 2:24 AM 2:55 AM 3:22 AM 3:48 AM 4:13 AM 4:37 AM 5:00 AM 12:00 AM 1:11 AM 2:51 AM 2:30 PM 3:45 PM

Time 7:26 AM 7:24 AM 7:10 AM 7:22 AM 7:41 AM 12:15 AM 1:04 AM 1:50 AM 2:36 AM 3:23 AM 4:18 AM 5:36 AM 12:44 AM 3:17 AM 4:57 AM

Time 6:11 PM 7:15 PM 8:18 PM 9:16 PM 10:08 PM 10:54 PM 11:37 PM 11:50 AM 6:33 AM 5:50 AM 5:14 AM 2:49 PM 3:49 PM 4:55 PM 6:06 PM

Height 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.5L 0.6L 0.9L 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H 0.5L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L

Time 9:37 AM 10:23 AM 11:12 AM 12:02 PM 12:57 PM 2:01 PM 3:24 PM 12:04 AM 12:33 AM 12:39 AM 6:13 AM 6:21 AM 6:53 AM 7:40 AM 8:38 AM

Height 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4L 0.4L 0.5L 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H

Time 7:27 PM 8:18 PM 9:08 PM 9:57 PM 10:43 PM 11:26 PM

Height 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L

8:01 7:03 6:29 3:21 4:19 5:16 6:12 7:08

0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L

Height 1.9H 2.0H 2.0H 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H 2.0H 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.8L 2.0L 0.5L 0.5L

Time 3:26 PM 4:30 PM 5:31 PM 6:27 PM 7:20 PM 8:58 AM 9:11 AM 9:34 AM 10:04 AM 10:40 AM 11:22 AM 4:33 AM 4:17 AM 11:36 PM

Height 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.5L 0.4L 1.6L 1.5L 1.3L 1.1L 1.0L 0.8L 2.0H 2.0H 2.5H

Height 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L

Time 3:18 PM 4:20 PM 5:22 PM 6:19 PM 7:14 PM 8:42 AM 8:54 AM 9:18 AM 9:49 AM 10:27 AM 11:11 AM 4:12 AM 10:07 PM 11:40 PM

Height 0.5L 0.5L 0.5L 0.4L 0.4L 1.5L 1.4L 1.1L 0.9L 0.6L 0.4L 1.4H 1.9H 1.9H

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 6:59 PM 7:16 PM 7:36 PM 10:08 AM 10:37 AM 10:52 AM 10:39 AM 10:56 AM 11:23 AM 1:57 AM 5:16 AM 3:41 AM 3:53 AM 4:11 PM 6:26 PM

Height 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.3H 0.3L 0.4L 0.0L 0.0L

AM AM AM PM PM PM PM PM

Time

4:39 PM 12:23 PM 1:06 PM 1:55 PM

Time

11:26 AM 1:08 PM 2:20 PM

Height

1.0H 0.8L 0.7L 0.6L

Height

0.5L 0.4L 0.4L

Time

6:46 PM 9:40 PM

Time

5:18 PM 7:55 PM

Height

1.0H 1.0H

Height

0.5H 0.5H

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Time 12:26 AM 1:26 AM 2:05 AM 2:35 AM 3:02 AM 3:25 AM 3:46 AM 4:03 AM 4:17 AM 4:27 AM 4:33 AM 12:43 AM 2:12 AM 2:07 PM 3:16 PM

Time

12:33 PM 1:55 PM 3:10 PM 4:24 PM 5:40 PM 7:01 PM 12:11 PM 1:05 PM

Height

1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 2.1H 2.2H 2.3H 0.7L 0.6L

Time

Height

8:10 PM 9:00 PM 9:50 PM 10:43 PM 11:39 PM

0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.2L 1.5L

8:31 PM 10:06 PM

2.4H 2.4H

South Padre Island Height 0.4L 1.8H 1.8H 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.0L 1.2L 1.4L 0.2L 0.2L

Time

Height

4:50 PM 5:49 PM 6:44 PM 9:48 AM 9:42 AM 9:47 AM 10:02 AM 10:27 AM 11:00 AM 5:21 AM 5:40 AM 5:54 AM 11:15 PM

0.4L 0.3L 0.3L 1.4L 1.3L 1.2L 1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 2.1H

Time 8:00 PM 9:19 PM 10:25 PM 11:23 PM 1:11 PM 7:54 AM 8:00 AM 8:05 AM 8:12 AM 8:19 AM 8:26 AM 8:35 AM 5:04 PM 6:09 PM 7:36 PM

Height 0.3L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 1.1L 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L

Time

12:02 PM 1:18 PM 2:26 PM 3:31 PM 4:37 PM 5:45 PM 11:40 AM 12:28 PM 1:24 PM

Height

1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L

Time

Height

7:36 PM 8:25 PM 9:15 PM 10:06 PM 11:01 PM

0.3L 0.3L 0.4L 0.5L 0.7L

6:58 PM 8:17 PM 9:44 PM

2.0H 2.0H 2.0H

Rollover Pass Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Height 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.7L 0.8L 1.0L 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Rockport

Time 5:51 AM 6:15 AM 6:55 AM 7:35 AM 8:09 AM 8:28 AM 8:36 AM 8:30 AM 12:17 AM 12:57 AM 1:36 AM 5:14 AM 5:15 AM 5:18 AM 5:49 AM

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Time 12:40 AM 1:39 AM 2:15 AM 2:43 AM 3:08 AM 3:29 AM 3:47 AM 4:00 AM 4:10 AM 4:16 AM 4:17 AM 12:51 AM 12:57 PM 1:59 PM 3:08 PM

Time

12:10 PM 1:38 PM 2:57 PM 4:14 PM 5:33 PM 6:57 PM 12:01 PM

Height

1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 0.2L

Time

Height

8:06 PM 8:59 PM 9:52 PM 0:46 PM 11:45 PM

0.5L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L 1.1L

8:28 PM

1.8H

East Matagorda Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 0.2L 0.3L 0.4L 0.6L 0.8L 0.9L 1.1L 1.4H 1.4H 1.5H

Time

3:50 1:36 1:59 2:19 2:36 2:58 3:30 4:12

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height

1.2H 1.0L 0.9L 0.8L 0.6L 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L

Time

5:13 PM 6:25 PM 7:33 PM 8:40 PM 9:49 PM 11:05 PM

Height

1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Time 2:43 AM 4:09 AM 4:56 AM 5:32 AM 6:09 AM 7:08 AM 8:13 AM 8:47 AM 5:50 AM 4:53 AM 3:08 AM 12:28 AM 1:03 AM 1:36 AM 2:12 AM

Time

12:21 PM 12:57 PM 1:30 PM 2:09 PM 5:14 PM 5:56 PM 7:57 PM 1:29 PM 5:44 AM 6:18 AM

Height

0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.1L 0.4H 0.4H

Time

Height

8:14 PM 10:22 PM 10:41 PM 10:57 PM 11:20 PM 11:48 PM

0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L

2:58 PM 3:30 PM

0.1L 0.0L

Texas Coast Tides

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23

Date Sept 9 Sept 10 Sept 11 Sept 12 Sept 13 Sept 14 Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 17 Sept 18 Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Page 31


Page 32

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Nosler sales manager

Solution 37 SolutionononPage Page

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The California Department of Fish and Wildlife is accepting applications for Fish and Game warden cadets until October 17.

17

18 19 22

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New rep group for Steel Will Knives

24

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1. 5. 8. 10. 12. 15. 16. 18. 20. 21. 22. 25. 26. 31. 33. 34. 35. 36. 39. 40. 41. 42.

Used in lures to attract fish ACROSS An often-angry furbearer Mottle5.ducks don't do this An often-angry furbearer A duck 8. organization Mottle ducks don’t do this Deer hunters like the wind in their ____ 10. A duck A favorite catchorganization of bank-fishermen 12. species Deer hunters like the wind in their ____ A trout 15.hunters A favorite of bank-fishermen Some eatcatch this duck organ A good food plots 16. grain A troutinspecies The18. young gobbler Some hunters eat this duck organ Popular or grain hollow-body 20. Asoft good in food lure plots Good to carry while dove hunting 21. The young gobbler Type of sight 22. softLaw or hollow-body lure Stars of Popular Lone Star 25.ducks Good do to carry whilealarmed dove hunting Some this when 26. Typemethod of sight A catfishing The31. male goose Stars of Lone Star Law An offshore target 33. Some ducks do this when alarmed Many huntedmethod these September 1 34.Texans A catfishing Follows the leader 35. The male goose A group of pups An offshore bobber, target strike _____ The36. fly-fisherman's 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44.

Many Texans hunted these September 1 Follows the leader A group of pups The fly-fisherman’s bobber, strike _____ A Hill Country lake Bag that carries the arrows

44

Down

1.DOWN A fundraising method at banquets 2. Inportant in catfish bait 3. 1. The young turkey A fundraising method at banquets 4. 2. Preserve memories the hunt Inportant in catfishofbait 5. Popular Texas striper lake The young turkey 6. 3. A safari organization Preserve thedeer hunt 7. 4. Shows the memories distance toofthe Popular Texas striper 9. 5. Dove hunters don't like lake to hunt in the ____ 11. 6. A bass species A safari organization 13. 7. A coastal fishing organization Shows the distance to the deer 14. 9. Animal theto hide Dove mount hunterswithout don’t like hunt in the ____ 17.11. A Texas deer organization A bass species 19. Hosts Lone Star Outdoor News' Wild Game 13. A coastal fishing organization Supper, ____ Gallery Animal 23.14. The purplemount gamewithout bird the hide A Texas species deer organization 24.17. A salmon 26.19. Popular coastal fishing town, PortWild _________ Hosts Lone Star Outdoor News’ Game 27. A bullet maker Supper, ____ Gallery 28.23. Helps puppy learn The the purple game birdskills 29. Powers new type of bow A salmon species 30.24. A shark species Popular fishing town, Port _________ 32.26. East Texascoastal lake, Bob ____ 27. 28. 29. 30. 32. 33. 37. 38. 40.

Steel Will Knives hired Rogers Sports Marketing to represent them throughout the southern United States.

Firearms online at Cabela’s

39

40

Across

Nosler, Inc. appointed Darrick Wyllie as senior manager of North American sales.

Warden openings

14

16

LSONews.com

A bullet maker Helps the puppy learn skills Powers new type of bow A shark species East Texas lake, Bob ____ The bighorn species lives in Texas Good lake for bowfin Popular Texas town for dove hunters Large group of animals

Cabela’s Incorporated announced that customers may now order new firearms online and have them shipped for free to a Cabela’s store in the United States for purchase.

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

Vista acquires Camp Chef Vista Outdoor Inc. has acquired Camp Chef (Logan Outdoor Products, LLC and Peak Trades, LLC), a provider of outdoor cooking solutions.

Baschieri & Pellagri ammo in U.S. Kelly Sorensen was hired by Baschieri & Pellagri USA as vice president of sales and marketing. The company is a European shotshell manufacturer.

NSSA seeks director of skeet The National Skeet Shooting Association is accepting applications for the position of director of skeet, to be located in San Antonio, Texas.

NSSF advisory council adds Burt New director at Ryan Burt has joined the Naaquatic resources tional Shooting Sports Foundation’s center Retail Advisory Council. Burt is the CEO of Calibers Shooting Sports Centers, based in Albuquerque.

DU directors of the year Scott James of Braselton, Georgia

Dr. Kenneth Ostrand has been selected as the new director of the San Marcos Aquatic Resources Center, located in San Marcos, Texas.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

King mackerel steaks with citrus butter 4 (6-ounce) king mackerel steaks 1 cup flour, lightly seasoned with salt and pepper Olive oil for cooking Sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

Nature’s Calling

was named Ducks Unlimited’s Director of the Year and Adam DeHaan was named the Director of Development of the Year.

Citrus butter 1/2 stick unsalted butter, room temperature 1 tsp. orange zest, chopped fine 1 tsp. lime zest, chopped fine 1 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped fine (Mix all ingredients into a small bowl and stir to combine)

Preheat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Lightly dredge each fillet in the seasoned flour. Add the olive oil to the preheated sauté pan. Carefully add the coated fillets to the sauté pan. Cook fillets for 3 to 4 minutes on each side until completely cooked throughout. Remove cooked fillets from pan and serve with green beans and citrus butter. —Florida Department of Agriculture

Spicy raspberry dove poppers Boneless dove breasts Large jalapeno peppers 1 large onion Provolone cheese 1 pound hickory smoked bacon, slices cut in half Raspberry walnut dressing Cayenne pepper Slice the peppers into thin slices. Remove the seeds and veins. Cut the onion into pieces about half the size of a single breast. Cut the cheese into slices about the same size as a single breast. Wrap one breast, pepper, onion and cheese slice

with a piece of bacon. Place in large bowl. Continue until all the breasts are wrapped. Pour the dressing over the poppers. Cover and refrigerate 2 hours. Place the poppers on a foil-lined baking sheet. Bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes. While poppers are cooking, in a bowl, mix together 3 parts brown sugar with 1 part cayenne pepper. Sprinkle on the sugar/pepper mix. Bake another 15-20 minutes or until bacon is done. —backwoodsbound.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Page 33

DATEBOOK SEPTEMBER 9

Permian Basin Sporting Clay Classic Jake’s Guns, Midland (800) 277-1647

SEPTEMBER 9-10

International Federation of Fly Fishers Texas Council Expo Grapevine texascoucilifff.com Shallow Stalker Boat Owner’s Tournament South Padre Island (956) 943-1551 baysidemarineonline.com

SEPTEMBER 10

Lee County Wildlife Association Outdoor Extravaganza Giddings High School (979) 540-2744 Ducks Unlimited Shelby County Dinner Windham Civic Center, Center (936) 488-0512 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 10-11

Texas Gun and Knife Show Hill Country Youth Event Center, Kerrville texasgunandknifeshows.com

SEPTEMBER 13

Ducks Unlimited Garland-Mesquite Dinner Southern Junction, Rockwall (214) 724-7265 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 15

Ducks Unlimited Katy/Brookshire Dinner Beckendorff Farms (713) 858-7669 ducks.org/Texas

Coastal Conservation Association Beeville/Redfish Bay Fish Fry May Ranch, Beeville (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

SEPTEMBER 17

Ducks Unlimited Lake Ray Roberts Dinner McClain’s RV, Sanger (972) 489-7122 ducks.org/Texas Scholastic Clay Target Program Annual Banquet Grapevine Concourse Event Facility allenshootingteam.com

SEPTEMBER 22

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Bent Tree Country Club (972) 980-9800 biggame.org Ducks Unlimited Paris Dinner Paris Elk’s Lodge (903) 784-2333 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 23

Ducks Unlimited Arlington Dinner Cholula Porch at Globe Life Park (214) 455-0940 ducks.org/Texas Operation Game Thief Clay Stoppers Shootout National Shooting Center, San Antonio (512) 389-4381 ogttx.org

SEPTEMBER 23-25

Southwest International Boat Show South Shore Harbour Marina on Clear Lake (713) 552-1055 southwestinternationalboatshow.com

SEPTEMBER 24

Uvalde Convention & Visitors Bureau Dove Expo Oasis Outback (830) 278-4115 visituvalde.com King Ranch Fiesta De Paloma King Ranch Saddle Shop (800) 282-5464 Krsaddleshop.com

SEPTEMBER 28

Ducks Unlimited Oyster Creek Banquet Brae Burn Country Club, Houston (832) 541-8550 ducks.org/Texas

SEPTEMBER 29

Delta Waterfowl Lone Star Chapter Banquet Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison (972) 881-8000 deltawaterfowl.org Ducks Unlimited Midland Dinner Midland Country Club (432) 978-0012 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 1

Coleman County Chamber of Commerce Fiesta de la Paloma (325) 625-2163 colemantexas.org

OCTOBER 4

Ducks Unlimited NE Tarrant County Dinner Colleyville Community Center (817) 360-5611

OCTOBER 5

Delta Waterfowl Katy Prairie Chapter Banquet Midway Barbeque, Katy (281) 221-1360 deltawaterfowl.org Lone Star Outdoor News Wild Game Supper Beretta Gallery (214) 361-2276 lsonews.com Ducks Unlimited Llano Sportsman Banquet John L. Kuykendall Event Center (512) 755-9770 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 6

Mule Deer Foundation Lubbock Banquet Four Bar K (307) 421-5692 muledeer.org Delta Waterfowl Heart of Texas Banquet Georgetown Community Center (512) 653-6267 deltawaterfowl.org Ducks Unlimited Lake Grapevine Dinner Grapevine Concourse Event Center (214) 675-0550 ducks.org/Texas Ducks Unlimited TAMUK Banquet Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Center (361) 593-3954 ducks.org/Texas

OCTOBER 7-8

Texas Trappers and Fur Hunters Association Fall Rendezvous Brown County Fairgrounds (817) 847-7562 txtrappers.com


Page 34

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL Youngster wins fly-fishing title

Offshore monument expanded

Maxine McCormick, 12, of San Francisco, California won the medal in this year’s World Championships of Fly Casting. McCormick tied her own coach, Chris Korich, in the event, with both earning top honors. More than 65 athletes from 15 countries met to determine who the best fly-caster in the world is, with young McCormick winning the “fly-casting trout accuracy” event, casting to small rings floating in a pool.

By presidential proclamation, the Northwest Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, known as Papahanaumokuakea, has been expanded out to 200 miles, or the limits of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone, creating the world’s largest marine protected area. Created in 2006, the monument had a boundary extending 50 miles. All commercial resource extraction activities including commercial fishing, oil exploration and mineral extraction are prohibited in the expanded areas. Noncommercial fishing, such as recreational fishing and resources for Native Hawaiian cultural practices, are permitted in the expanded area.

—World Championship of Fly Casting

Bass Pro hires former MDC director ON HIS FIRST AXIS HUNT IN JUNE AT JOSH UA CREEK RANC H, TREY CARROLL OF FORT WOR TH AND HIS GUIDE, BILLY TORKILDESON , COVERED SEVERAL MILES BEFOR E SETTLING IN A GROUND BLIND WITH A VIEW DOWN A NARROW ROA D. THE AXIS MADE TWO B GIVING HIM A RIEF APPEAR N OPPORTUN ANCES BEFOR ITY FOR THE SAVAGE .270 E 90-YARD SHO . T WITH HIS

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Defender Outdoors

14535 Industrial Park Aubrey, TX 76227 (877) 300-5417 defenderoutdoors.com

Bob Ziehmer has been named senior director of conservation for Bass Pro Shops and lead director of the Johnny Morris Foundation. Ziehmer served as the director for the Missouri Department of Conservation. Ziehmer was also the recipient of Bass Pro Shops Conservation Partner of the Year Award in 2011. —Bass Pro Shops

Explosive devices on trail cameras The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Kentucky State Police Post 10 have issued a warning that IEDs have been found in Harlan County. The advisory warns that some of the rigged trail cameras were found abandoned on paths in rural areas. These IEDs were designed to explode when a person inserted batteries into the trail camera, while others were set to explode by a trip wire leading to the trail cameras. The first IED explosion happened in May. Mark Sawaf was arrested in June, and during an attempt to have Sawaf find the remaining devices, he attempted to escape and was fatally shot.

—Staff report

Law banning trophy importations struck down On July 8, Conservation Force, the Garden State Taxidermist Association, a New Jersey taxidermist, and five New Jersey-based hunters sued the state to compel an end to New Jersey’s ban on the import, possession, export, transport, and processing of hunting trophies of the African “Big Four” (elephant, leopard, lion, and rhinoceros). The plaintiffs alleged the state’s ban was preempted by the Endangered Species Act. On August 29, Judge Freda Wolfson of the U.S. District Court in Trenton entered an order and judgment against the State of New Jersey. The order prohibits the enforcement of the ban against activities authorized by federal law, regulation or permit. —Conservation Force

Oklahoma, Choctaw Nation agree on —Staff report hunting, fishing Group caught exceeding compact Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Choctaw bag limits Nation Chief Gary Batton have signed a huntAfter receiving complaints regarding a group of Wisconsin fishermen exceeding the daily bag limit of walleye on Lake Erie, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources charged 25 individuals. Officers discovered that nearly all of the walleye had been cut into chunks in an attempt to disguise how many fish had been kept. More than 500 pounds of walleye meat was seized, and 46 citations were issued.

—ODNR

Study examines doe movement A recently completed cooperative study between the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Auburn University, and Brosnan Forest will help researchers and hunters better understand doe deer movements, behavior, and response to hunting pressure during the breeding season. Jeff Sullivan’s three-year study involved capturing does and equipping them with GPS collars. Results showed that does typically increased movement rate, probability of activity, and likelihood of being out of their seasonal home range as their dates of conception approached. Additionally, about half of the females made an excursion and temporarily left their home ranges around their conception dates. Does also changed their behavior based on hunting pressure, showing the capacity to recognize and respond to localized threats posed by deer hunters in the immediate area around deer stands, food plots and feeders. —SCDNR

ing and fishing compact, which will allow the tribe to buy hunting and fishing licenses at a bulk rate. The agreement grants the Choctaw Nation the ability to purchase at least 50,000 annual hunting and fishing licenses at $2 each for its resident citizens. In addition, the Choctaw Nation will pay a lump sum of $200,000 and an administrative cost payment of $75,000 to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation each year that the three-year compact is in effect. “This compact provides the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation with additional funds for wildlife conservation through federal grants and ensures the Choctaw Nation will adopt the state season lengths and bag limits on their trust lands,” said ODWC Director Richard Hatcher. —ODWC

INTERNATIONAL Large reindeer group dies in storm More than 300 reindeer were killed by a lightning strike in Norway. The animals were huddled together on the Hardangervidda plateau during a storm. Officials counted 323 reindeer dead in total, including 70 calves, according to the Norwegian Environment Agency. NEA spokesman Kjartan Knutsen, told The Associated Press that reindeer often stick together during poor weather, occasionally leading to group casualties from lightning. — Norwegian Environment Agency


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Crossing fences carefully

September 9, 2016

Page 35

Want to shoot with a game warden?

Continued from page 1

one side of a fence to the other, the last Texas fatality coming six years ago. A 69-year-old man died in 2010 while hunting dove in Hamilton County when his loaded shotgun discharged as he crossed a fence. The shotgun’s muzzle was pointed toward his chest. “The two most common hunting accidents are swinging on game outside of your safe zone and the unsafe handling of guns,” said Steve Hall, who heads Hunter Education for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “Accidents involving fences are more sporadic. My sense is what usually happens is people try to cross a fence with a loaded firearm. If they had unloaded their firearms, the incidents wouldn’t have taken place. That’s the correct way to do it.” TPWD’s hunting incident reports show five accidents involving hunters crossing fences in the last six years and the one fatality. The last such accident happened on Aug. 15, 2015. A 9-year-old boy hunting feral hogs shot himself in the foot with a rifle while crossing a fence in Chambers County. Fences, though, can bite you even when you’re not crossing them. A 36-year-old man hunting dove in Johnson County was shot in the leg by a shotgun in 2012 after propping it against a fence. His dog knocked the shotgun over and it discharged. That year was the only one in the last 10 years with more than one fence-related hunting acci-

dent. In December 2012, a man hunting dove in Presidio County also rested his shotgun against a fence. The shotgun fell as he crossed the fence, and the man was shot in the hand. Hall sees fence-related hunting accidents as needless. “We teach people how to cross individually or with another person, but in all cases the firearm is unloaded first,” he said. When two people cross a fence, one should hold the firearms until the other passes over, Hall said. A solitary person should first put his firearm over the fence, “two fence posts away,” before crossing himself. “Unload it, with the muzzle pointed away from you,” Hall said. “Stick the muzzle in a hat if you don’t want it to get dirty. Cross the fence and come back and get it. It’s all moot, though, in that we teach people to unload a firearm before crossing a fence, even ones where they’re passing the firearm over to someone else.” The Texas A&M study — done by its Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences — studied Texas hunting accidents from 1966-1997. It discovered that age played a prominent role in fencerelated hunting accidents with 47 percent involving people 23 years old or younger. And 33 percent involved those 17 years old or younger. Fence-related hunting accidents accounted for 12 percent of inci-

dents involving the discharge of a firearm over the period of the study. However, the study found that such accidents declined steadily after Texas began requiring hunters to take hunter education courses. From 1966 to 1971, before hunter education was implemented in Texas, there were 29 fence-related hunting accidents for an average of almost six per year. During the 15 years that taking a hunter education course was voluntary, 1972-1987, there were 38 fence-related hunting accidents or more than two per year. That was cut in half after hunter education was made mandatory in 1988. From then until 1997, the last year included in the study, there were 10 fence-related hunting accidents or slightly more than one per year. That number has continued to drop. For the last 10 years in Texas, there have been seven fence-related hunting accidents. “I think there are probably a couple factors involved,” said A&M professor Ronald Kaiser, who coauthored the study. “Certainly hunter education, but there may also be a decline in the number of hunters relative to the population.” Some hunters are taking additional steps to avoid injuries when crossing a fence. The Fence Devil by Tamer Outdoors separates the fence wires and is described as the first ‘no climb” barbed wire fence crossing tool.

AFFORDABLE, COMFORTABLE AND SECLUDED 20 CONCRETE BENCHES 100, 200 AND 300 YARD TARGETS RIFLE AND HANDGUN SHOOTING ONE HOUR EAST OF DALLAS ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS THE GUN RANGE FOR THE SERIOUS SHOOTER

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Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News

Interested in a warm-up the morning of the day the South Zone dove season opens? The last Operation Game Thief ClayStoppers shoot of the year will be at the National Shooting Complex in San Antonio, on Friday, September 23. Participants should arrive at 7:30 a.m. OGT shoots benefit Texas game wardens in the unending battle against poachers by rewarding tips leading to convictions and providing equipment. Four-person teams may enter for $800 per team, and individual participants shoot for $250 each. Youth teams of four (age 17 and under) are $400. Shooters must provide their own shells, but receive a steak and shrimp lunch (provided by Jim’s Frontier Restaurant), a goodie bag, a chance to shoot against a Texas game warden in the “Game Warden Challenge,” an opportunity to participate in a 15-gun raffle, a 5-gun raffle, a drawing for a Kawasaki Mule donated by the San Antonio Chapter of Quail Coalition and Alamo Cycle Plex and the right to show your support for game law enforcement by bidding on the live auction. The auction will include a Glock .40 caliber pistol actually carried on duty by a Texas game warden with the warden crest on the slide and housed in a wood and glass presentation case. For entry information, go to www.ogttx.org or contact Lori Brock at (512) 389-4381. And remember, put this number in your smartphone to report illegal hunting or fishing activities, call (800) 792-GAME (4263). —Operation Game Thief


Page 36

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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>>

RETRACTABLE FLY BOX: Boomerang Tool Company won the 2016 ICAST award in the fly-fishing accessory category for its clever little fly box. The two-sided waterproof fly box holds up to 170 flies: 85 on each side. It has slotted foam for easy fly insertion and removal. It also has a small retractable gear tether that comes with an easy-to-use carabiner or convenient belt clip. The retractor features a Kevlar cord that extends 24 inches and can hold up to 4 ounces. The retractor and fly box cost about $25.

OTM MATCH GRADE AMMUNITION: Sig Sauer has expanded its Match Grade Elite Performance Ammunition line for rifles with the addition of a 168-grain .308 Winchester load. Featuring a 168-grain Sierra MatchKing bullet, this Open Tip Match round has a muzzle velocity of 2,700 fps with a muzzle energy of 2,719 ft.-lbs. The ammunition is designed for precision autoloading platforms as well as bolt action rifles. The temperature-stable propellant in this cartridge delivers consistent muzzle velocity in all weather conditions, and premium-quality primers ensure minimum velocity variations. The ammunition is electromechanically monitored for geometric conformity and charge weight consistency. The MSRP is $36.25 for a box of 20. (603) 610-3456 sigammo.com

(817) 225-0310 sightmark.com

(909) 923-7800 boomerangtool.com

REDHEAD CAMO DOVE VEST: Designed for dove hunting, Bass Pro Shops’ lightweight men’s vest is built for durability and comfort. The vest has a partial mesh front and back for breathability and a zip front. A hunter can securely stow his shells, calls and other gear in two spacious lower accessory pockets with security flaps. The vest’s large blood-proof game bag will store a hunter’s haul with no mess. It costs about $30.

>>

(800) 227-7776 basspro.com

SQUARE 1 CONTAINERS, LLC 20Ft/40Ft Used Containers Modifications Available Hunting Camps Construction Offices

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WOLFHOUND PRISMATIC SIGHT: Sightmark’s optic was built with speed and agility in mind. The Wolfhound 3x24 magnified sight (shown) is for close-range hunting; there also is a 6x44 model for long-range objectives. The sight, which is designed for 55 gr. and 52 gr. loads, features a 7.5 MOA horseshoe duplex reticle with a five-position red and green illumination, 100-yard parallax settings, and ultrafine .5 MOA subtension lines for improved target acquisition. This optic can be used in extreme situations between -40 degrees to 160 degrees. Other features include durable prism glass systems and adjustable diopters designed to render razor-sharp image quality. The Wolfhound 3x24 Prismatic Sight costs about $320.

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LEGEND GLASS RODS: Anglers appreciate the design, balance and technology of St. Croix’ Legend series rods, which won the 2016 ICAST award in the freshwater rod category. The 100-percent linear S-Glass rods utilize IPC tooling technology, are extremely lightweight, and make casting, retrieving and fighting fish a breeze. The rods feature Fuji K Series concept tangle free guides with Alconite rings and a Kigan hook-keeper. Three of the four models have a Fuji ECS reel seat while the other features the Fuji PSS-SD palming reel seat providing the comfort anglers seek while fishing deep-diving crankbaits. The rods cost about $250. (800) 826-7042 stcroixrods.com

>>


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

Page 37

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING

SEEKING HUNTING PROPERTY Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is looking for hunting property to continue its mission of creating hunters for a lifetime by providing hunting experiences for those that have the passion but lack the opportunity. All hunting rights sought, house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276

TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189 STARTED HUNTING LABS One yellow female. One black male. WILL HUNT THIS YEAR. PROSPECT RETRIEVERS Facebook/Prospect-Retrievers (903) 272-0032

YOUTH HUNT SPECIAL 1 Cull Buck 1 Doe 1 Javelina or Turkey Limited Hunts - $1,795.00 www.VRanchTexas.com (830) 900-2240

NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444

CLINTON, ARKANSAS 210 acres with house, cabin, Turkeys Deer, Hogs, Bears All offers welcome (501) 412-6621

HUNTING PROPERTIES Briggs Freeman Sotherby’s International Realty Johnny W. Purselley listing broker 17 years experience jpurselley@briggsfreeman.com or (817) 793-9274

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does. Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

HUNTING ON THE RIO GRANDE White Wing and Dove / Texasdovehunt.com (956) 542-2223 SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996

TROPHY WHITETAIL HUNTS “May kill buck of lifetime “ $ 700 - 2 DAYS Wife or child  1/2 price South TX-  Brackettville Web site www.b-jranch.com E-mail: Huntsbj@gmail.com 830-563-2658

503.44 ACRE REAL CO. NEAR KERRVILLE Axis/Whitetail Deer, 2 mobiles Prop. #25 www.hillcountryrealestate.net PIONEER REAL ESTATE Shirley Shandley, Broker

TROPHY SOUTH TEXAS DEER Management hunts available. Maverick County. Native, mature herd. Quality, comfortable lodging. Txdiamondcranch.com (713) 516-2954

(830) 232-6422 191.31 ACRES NEAR LEAKEY, REAL CO. 4/3 Country House Prop. #6 www.hillcountryrealestate.net PIONEER REAL ESTATE Shirley Shandley, Broker (830) 232-6422

POETRY SHOOTING CLUB 700 Yard Range

HUNTING LEASE 1,200 acres near Uvalde Lodge, exotics (830) 278-9325 (210) 241-5241 Quail Hunting Preserve Bird Dog Facility Youth Doe Hunts Dove-Duck-Varmint Close to Dallas poetryshootingclub.com (214) 728-2755

HUNTERS & CAMPERS

ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

2010 Keystone Outback 270BH located North San Antonio Great condition, 30 ft. with slide out, NEW trailer tires. 17K Call 210-243-1462

for additional details and photos.

WORLD CLASS RED STAGS $4,000-$26,000

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

90 Miles Southwest of Dallas (214) 616-6822

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page

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1. Used in lures to attract fish [RATTLES] 5. An often-angry furbearer [BADGER] 8. Mottle ducks don't do this [MIGRATE] 10. A duck organization [DU] 12. Deer hunters like the wind in their ____ [FACE] 15. A favorite catch of bank-fishermen [BLUEGILL] 16. A trout species [CUTTHROAT]

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1. A fundraising method at banquets [RAFFLE] 2. Inportant in catfish bait [SMELL] 3. The young turkey [POULT] 4. Preserve memories of the hunt [CAMERA] 5. Popular Texas striper lake [BUCHANAN] 6. A safari organization [DSC] 7. Shows the distance to the deer

Puzzle solution from Page 32

FISHING CHARTER FISHING Port Mansfield Shallow water, wade and fly fishing specialist Capt. Steve Ellis (956) 492-8472 SABINE LAKE FISHING Trout, flounder, reds. Captain Randy’s Guide Service running multiple boats. Check for specials at www.fishsabine.com (409) 719-6067

TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296 dickyn@lagovistalodge.com

DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044 PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

JOBS JOURNALIST WANTED Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter for a full-time position at its Dallas office. Journalism degree required. Candidates must have a passion for hunting and fishing and experience with both. Experience with social media, web, Adobe and InDesign a plus. Join our team and write about the Texas outdoors. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM ENTRY LEVEL SALES Lone Star Outdoor News is looking for an entry-level sales person for its growing advertising business. Position will be based in its Dallas office. Must have hunting and fishing experience. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

VEHICLES HUNTING FOR TRUCKS? New Ford and used trucks below. 2014 Ford F-150 STX SuperCrew Cab 4x2 5.0L V8 Automatic, Running Boards Ingot Silver Metallic 14,768 Miles Stock # EKF18577 2013 Ford F-150 Lariat SuperCrew Cab 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost Automatic Leather Ingot Silver Metallic 18,493 Miles Stock #DKF93180 2014 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew Cab 4x4 3.5L V6 Ecoboost 4X4 Automatic Leather Color, Ingot Silver Metallic Interior, steel gray 20,795 Miles Stock #EKD03236 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Crew Cab 5.3L V8 4X4 Automatic Leather Exterior Color, Sunset Orange Metallic Interior Color, Cocoa/dune 28,969 Miles Stock #FG206612 2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT Crew Cab 4x2 5.3L V8 Automatic Leather 20 Alloy Wheel Silver Ice Metallic 71,289 Miles Stock #DG160973 Call Bobby I’m in the DFW area (214) 632-7963


Page 38

September 9, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

September 9, 2016

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Page 39


Page 40

September 9, 2016

The Shootin’ Shop, Abilene (325) 232-7501

WebyShops Webyshops.com

Coyote Armory, Menard (325) 396-5551

Alpine Shooting Range, Fort Worth (817) 484-0775 Star Arms, Stephenville (254) 965-9099

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Carter’s Country, Houston, Spring, Pasadena carter’scountry.net Wheeler’s Feed & Outfitters, Boerne (830) 249-2656

LSONews.com

McBride’s Guns, Austin (512) 472-3532

Burdette and Son, College Station (979) 695-2807

Glick Twins, Pharr (956) 787-4291

United Ag of El Campo (979) 543-9305

Weakley Watson, Brownwood (325) 646-2200

September 09, 2016 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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