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HUNTING

Deer, dove and ducks

texas Annual 2016

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HUNTING ANNUAL INSIDE

Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

August 12, 2016

Volume 12, Issue 24

Bugs of summer

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News From the middle Texas Coast down to the Texas/Mexico border, sit miles upon miles of gin-clear flats, and on those flats there are plenty of reds that are an absolute blast to catch on a fly. There are dozens of flies designed specifically to catch reds. But the big question is this – which flies catch the most reds? Capt. Tom Horbey is a longtime fly fishing guide out of Port O’Connor, located on the middle Texas coast. He’s been polling fly-fishers on the shallow flats for decades and has one big claim to fame — his custommade spoon fly. “I began making them several years ago because the commercially made spoon flies would not hold up very well,” Horbey said as he polled his skiff across a backwater, grassy flat. “Reds are aggressive fish. That’s why a 1/8-gold or copper spoon has

WATCHING AND CASTING: Fly-anglers love the late summer, a prime time for casting their favorite fly to shallow-water redfish on the flats or in backwater ponds. Angler Victor Randazzo recently polled his skiff while Sterling Cash threw a bend back fly. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

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Crank for hot water bass

CONTENTS Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 16 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 20 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 25 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

By Robert Sloan

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Getting cranked up to crank down for bass on Texas lakes is not as easy as it sounds when it’s hot enough to scramble eggs on the boat ramp. But anglers know August is the month to tie on a crankbait and go deep for largemouth bass. Sam Rayburn guide Will Kirkpatrick said crankbaits rule on this sprawling East Texas reservoir that is host to thousands of tournament anglers each year. And a whole lot of those

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News fishermen are working deep-running cranks to place in the money. “One of the best structures you can fish on Rayburn are extended points,” said Kirkpatrick, who has been putting anglers on Rayburn bass for over 42 years. “The best points have drains on both sides. The narrow drains are best, and you want them to be located in 8- to 14-feet of DIVING DOWN: Dennis Lala of Victoria has been water. This is the type of fishing for more than 60 years, and one of his late summer structure that favorite lures in summer is a crankbait fished

For Texas game wardens, hearing of Texas hunters looking for a deer lease getting scammed is an annual occurrence. Most of the scammers use the Internet, specifically Craig’s List, to get money from Texas hunters. Jacob Powell was one such victim. “I had a deer lease fall through and was on the lookout for another,” he said. “We found one in Stonewall County on Craig’s List and went to look at it.” The person showed the group the place for more than three hours. “He knew every inch of the place,” Jacob said. “He had document for us to sign and we each paid him $2,000 — we had been saving up for it. It was supposed to begin on September 1.” When the group wanted to go to the

in 8 to 16 feet. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Please turn to page 9 Star Outdoor News.

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Watch out for hunting lease scams

HUNTING

Pronghorn numbers good in Trans Pecos

Olympic shooters medal

Survey shows good survival from relocation. Page 4

Ginny Thrasher won the first gold medal of the Rio Olympics. Page 4

FISHING

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Preacher feeds the hungry

State record shark

Pastor Erny accepts, cleans and distributes big tournament fish. Page 8

Jason Armstrong lands 155.9-pound finetooth shark in tourney. Page 8


August 12, 2016

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FINANCING TEXAS FOR 100 YEARS

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August 12, 2016

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August 12, 2016

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HUNTING

Pronghorn relocations working Lone Star Outdoor News Since 2011, researchers at the Borderlands Research Institute at Sul Ross State University have been working to restore the population of pronghorn across the Trans-Pecos region. The animals have responded, and their numbers are up to more than 5,000, from their historic low of about 2,000. Pronghorn have been relocated from the Texas Panhandle, where populations are more abundant. Relocations occurred in 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2016. Survival of the transplanted animals was low in 2011 (20 percent), but was significantly better in 2013 (80 percent), and 2014 (70 percent). The pronghorn have been moved into four quadrants in each direction from Marfa, and each quadrant is managed independently. The decline in numbers was the result of several factors, including land fragmentation from fencing and brush encroachment onto native grasslands. The drought caused the pronghorn numbers to hit rock bottom. “It came to a head in 2011 with one of the worst droughts in the history of the region,” Dr. Whitney Gann, a researcher at BRI, said. Gann has been involved in the pronghorn relocations since 2011, and presented the results at the Trans-Pecos Wildlife Conference in Alpine last week. “Over the five years, we have decreased the time taken in the relocations and minimized mortalities in transportation,” she said. “And we’ve gone from using several release sites to just one in each translocation. They just grouped together again anyway.” The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department aerial survey of pronghorn was completed on August 2,

RECOVERY: After several relocations of pronghorn from the Texas Panhandle to four areas near Marfa in the Trans Pecos, the animals are responding well, according to researchers. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

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Endless possibilities at Cactus Coatings

Air gunner wins first gold in Rio

By Autumn Bernhard

Lone Star Outdoor News

For Lone Star Outdoor News When Matthew Gillespie clocks out from his regular job, at a parts house, his work has just begun. Every day from five to midnight, he can be found with his father, Mike, in a hot shop filling customers’ orders and making memories at Cactus Coatings. After finding out a buddy was selling the business, Matthew decided painting and hydrographics (a 3-D decorating process also know as hydro dipping) would be a new adventure for him and his dad. “Last year he came to me and said, ‘Let’s buy this place because we can do it,’” Mike said. “Here we are now and we’re too deep into it to stop anytime soon.” Although the previous owner taught Matthew everything he knew, the father-son duo has noticed a big learning curve since opening their doors in January. “A lot of things are still just trial and error,” Matthew said. “It’s always a challenge because there’s lots of room for things to go wrong. But you just have to learn from it, move on and correct it next time.” The family owned and operated business prides themselves on Please turn to page 7

FROM GUNS TO BOWS: Matthew Gillespie can coat just about anything out of the shop in Fredericksburg, using the 3-D decorating process known as hydrographics. Photo by Autumn Bernhard, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

American teenager Virginia Thrasher won the first gold medal of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 6, beating two Chinese Olympic champions to clinch the women’s 10m air rifle event. The 19-year-old American edged out China’s Du Li, gold in Athens in 2004, with an Olympic-record score of 208. Defending Olympic champion Yi Siling, also of China, took the bronze medal. “It’s just an intense feeling of pride for my country,” Thrasher said. “I’m so happy WORLD’S BEST: Virginia Thrasher, at age 19, was to be here, I was just try- the first athlete to receive a gold medal at the Rio ing to shoot the best that I Olympics. She won the 10m air rifle competition. Photo by USA Shooting. could.” As a freshman at West Virwon the bronze medal. Competginia University, Thrasher earned five medals at the 2015 ing against Spain’s Fatima Galvez, USA Shooting National Champi- the two finished the 15-target onships. During the NCAA Rifle round tied with 13 each. In the Championships, she became the shoot-off, Cogdell-Unrein won, first freshman rifle shooter ever claiming her second Olympic to win both individual titles in air bronze. “You can’t compare an Olympic and smallbore while leading WVU shoot-off to any other,” Cogdellto their fourth-straight NCAA team title. Three weeks later, she Unrein said. “The pressure is unwent to Olympic Team Trials and like anything. You want it so bad.” Australia’s Catherine Skinner won the Three-Position event. In Women’s Trap on August 7, defeated New Zealand’s Natalie American Corey Cogdell-Unrein Rooney in the gold medal match.


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Hunting lease scams Continued from page 1

lease before the beginning date, the “agent” said some guys were still on there. “Right before September 1, he called and said we couldn’t go out because the previous guys wouldn’t leave and he had to call the sheriff on them,” Jacob said. That sounded fishy to Jacob, who called the sheriff. “They hadn’t heard of it,” Jacob said. His next call was to his cousin, Jeff Powell, a Texas Game Warden in Ellis County who is a regular on the Animal Planet television show, Lone Star Law. “We start getting last-minute Craig’s List scams this time of year,” Powell said. “There is such a high demand for deer leases, people get taken advantage of.” Powell described the typical scam that gets Texans anxious to get on a deer lease to open up their wallets. “They use property they are familiar with,” Powell said. “They have photos, fake lease documents, and we’ve even had them put their own lock on the gate and show the property. They post it on Craig’s List for an hour or two and get 10 calls. People hand over the money.” Powell said he has made three such cases over the past five years, and that most other game wardens have had similar experiences. “In one case in West Texas, a guy posted the lease openings in the major cities for some property near Sweetwater,” he said. “He scammed dozens of people for more than $30,000 in a few months. People were still calling him, offering to give him money.” Powell said the scammers target properties where the landowner isn’t around. “The scammers have photos, documents and access,” he said. “There are already five or six locks on the gate, what’s one more?” Two cases drew the warden’s ire. “A guy brought his kids out, saw the lease and signed documents,” Powell said.

“He gave the guy cash. When he returned to the lease to hunt, he ran into the real landowner. He had to tell his kids, who were all excited about the lease, that they didn’t have a place to hunt.” Another case had eight complainants. “They were embarrassed,” Powell said. “They took their kids out there. One guy had to tell his 8-year-old they don’t have anywhere to go — that makes me mad.” Not all leases on the website are scams. Mark Croysdale of Arlington found his lease this summer on Craig’s List, where he’ll take his two sons hunting. “I drove down and met the lady who owned the land,” he said. “She wasn’t good on the computer, she had to ask a friend to put the listing on Craig’s List for her. I went to her house and she gave me her business card. I felt pretty safe about it.” Powell recommended that hunters should look for red flags when getting a lease, especially if it is a last-minute deal. “Do your homework,” he said. “Check references. If they have a story why the last group is leaving and they need the money quickly, that’s a red flag. Find the property on Google Maps, go to the appraisal district and find the owner.” When someone is showing a property, look at more than just the land. “Take a picture of the guy, his truck and license plate, and even ask for his driver’s license,” Powell said. “If someone is legit, they’ll have no problem with that.” Cash only are two words to watch for. “If they want cash only, it’s a red flag,” Powell said. “They shouldn’t be in that big of a hurry — most landowners want the best people they can find on their land. “Most often, we don’t hear about the cases until months later. So if it sounds too good to be true, slow down because it may be. Otherwise, you’ll lose your money and you won’t have a place to hunt.”

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Big Easy Ranch received Orvis recognition The Big Easy Ranch near Columbus has received the Orvis Endorsement for Excellence for its wingshooting operations. The lodge is one of only three Orvis-endorsed lodges in Texas (the other two being Greystone Castle in Mingus and Joshua Creek Ranch in Boerne). Orvis-endorsed wingshooting operations, such as Big Easy Ranch, are researched, vetted and selected by experts in wingshooting. Orvis-endorsed wingshooting operations include: lodges, grounds, outfitters and guides. Photo from Big Easy Ranch Big Easy Ranch is situated on 1,300 wooded acres 70 miles from Houston. The ranch features wingshooting adventures for upland birds and ducks, hunting for trophy whitetail deer, clay shooting and a challenging, 9-hole, par-3 golf course that is the home course for the Hal Sutton Golf Academy. —Orvis


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August 12, 2016

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New game wardens graduate After seven months of training, the 60th Texas game warden cadet class graduated at the Texas State Capitol. The cadet class includes 41 game warden cadets and five state park police officers. The graduates will begin their new careers stationed in counties and state parks throughout the state. The duties of a Texas game warden include the enforcement of all state laws, but primarily hunting, fishing and water safety regulations. As fully commissioned peace officers, they respond to emergencies, assist other law enforcement agencies and work to educate the public about conservation issues. State park police, also commissioned peace officers, provide law enforcement services to the visitors and users of state parks and help enforce laws within their local jurisdictions. 60th Cadet Class Texas Game Wardens Albert A. Alvarez, McKinney — Starr County Benjamin J. Andrews, Johnson City, N.Y.- Jim Wells County Stephen R. Boultinghouse, Fort Davis — Jeff Davis County Kord M. Bradshaw, Garrison — Zapata County John M. Braesicke, Georgetown — Duval County Graydon L. Cass, Reno — Reeves County Daniel Castañeda, Pasadena — Jim Hogg County Anthony W. Cimini, Wichita Falls — Reeves County Dillan W. Conley, Tuscola — Mitchell County Jacob Copeland, Boling — Maverick County Aidan W. Dietz, San Marcos — Starr County Dustin L. Favor, Amarillo — Haskell County Chad R. Goertz, Red Rock — Zapata County Michael J. Gonzalez, Harlingen — Cameron County Kegan Gould, Schertz — Webb County Hollis S. Gregory, Athens — Hall/Childress County William C. Gulsby, Fort Worth — Hudspeth County William Hackney III, Tyler —Starr County William B. Hancock, Bastrop — Presidio County Hewitt S. Holmes, Ozona — Terrell County Shane M. Horrocks, College Station — Webb County Garrison J. Howard, Lubbock — Andrews/Gaines County Lauren Iles, Brookeland — Webb County Chelsey A. Kidder, Houston — Hudspeth County Marcus L. Lowe, Angleton — Zapata County Patrick I. Merriman, Abilene — Midland/Glasscock County Andrew J. Meyer, Sylvan Grove, Kan.- Sherman/Moore County Casey E. Pentecost, Brownwood — Brewster County Mark Perez, Olney — Kinney County David A. Prieto, San Antonio — Maverick County Carter Rangel, Kemah — Hudspeth County Welden B. Rappmund, Saint Hedwig — Maverick County Thomas W. Rinn, Cameron — McMullen County Juan A. Rosendo, Brownsville —Maverick County Forrest C. Schmidt, College Station — Grimes County Britton A. Stuckey, Slaton — Scurry/Garza County Brandon L. Thacker, Alto — Polk County Marcus T. Whitworth, Kyle — Webb County Kevin R. Winters Jr., San Antonio — Webb County William K. Yoder, Loving — Pecos County Mathew Zitterich, Red Oak — Presidio County State Park Police Officers Dustin A. Bowers, Henrietta — Lake Arrowhead State Park Landon G. Cook, Throckmorton — Abilene State Park Jeremy D. Gann, Woodway — Mother Neff State Park James R. Hestilow, Del Rio — Seminole Canyon State Park Jeremy J. Velazquez, Rio Hondo — Lake Casa Blanca State Park

Brewer honored for work with wild sheep Clay Brewer received the Professional of the Year Award from the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Brewer is Wild Sheep Coordinator for WAFWA and his career spans three decades of natural resource contributions across Texas and the western states. During his TPWD career, he served in various roles in the wildlife division, including as a wildlife division regional director and acting wildlife division director. He became WAFWA’s Wild Sheep Working Group Chair in 2011. Brewer’s life work to restore desert bighorn sheep extends back to 1996, when he became project leader at TPWD’s Elephant Mountain Wildlife Management Area. He reestablished eroded relationships with important landowner partners and Clay Brewer, TPWD spent countless building trust and scratching out important cooperative agreements. These efforts improved department access and enhanced working partnerships crucial to continued bighorn sheep restoration. Brewer also published the widely used, Records of Wild Sheep Translocations in the U.S. and Canada, 1922-present (2015). His communication skills and power of persuasion brought together the wild sheep managers, veterinarians and specialists on WAFWA’s Wildlife Health Committee to work collaboratively on wild sheep disease and health issues. —TPWD


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Pronghorn up in West Texas Continued from page 4

estimating more than 5,000 pronghorns in the region. “We had a wonderful year, with adequate rainfall, good cover and plenty of grass,” Gann said. “The survival of this year’s translocated animals is still above 90 percent and there was a 26-percent increase in fawn survival — fawn recruitment was over 1,000, along with a dramatic increase in adult numbers. “We are growing the population.” Another relocation is planned next year to help populations to the northwest of Marfa. “In the future, we will be assessing habitat in other areas,” Gann said. “We are developing an estimate of how many animals the Trans Pecos can sustain — we can only put animals into habitat that can support them. And the animals moved this January will drop their collars in February (2017) and we’ll be able to look at their movement over the past year.”

Walmart Foundation to help rice growers More rice producers will have the opportunity to increase sustainability and profitability on their farms, thanks to a grant from the Walmart Foundation. The grant supports work through the USA Rice and Ducks Unlimited Rice Stewardship Partnership. A $1 million grant from the foundation was awarded for rice work in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and along the Gulf Coast, according to DU Senior Director of Development Chris Cole. In late 2014, USA Rice and DU secured a $10-million grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service through its Regional Conservation Partnership Program. The majority of the RCPP grant is dedicated to financial assistance for producers who implement conservation practices on their lands through Farm Bill programs. “DU will serve as the delivery mechanism to provide professional advice to interested landowners,” DU Director of Conservation Innovation Scott Manley said. “However, only 10 percent of the RCPP grant is dedicated to this role, so we needed to seek additional funding to better support rice growers interested in implementing conservation measures on their farms.” Walmart Foundation funding will be used primarily for technical assistance to and training for farm owners, operators and workers. Conservation projects on rice lands will also improve rural economies. Rice agriculture provides managed wetland resources for North America’s waterfowl and 32 other at-risk wildlife species. —DU

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Coating guns, bows and cups Continued from page 4

customer service, and in a business where the “possibilities are endless,” that’s a big task. “I had one lady who spent a few hours in here deciding what she wanted,” Mike said. “She finally found something she was pleased with and headed home. About half an hour later she came back and changed her mind. She changed her mind multiple times all to end up back at the original plan.” After a customer has picked out their desired film and base coat, the product is sanded and primed. Then they paint, dip, rinse and apply a clear coat finish. The item must dry completely between each stage. “It’s not a long process, it is just timeconsuming,” Matthew said. “If we could eliminate the drying process we could do everything within an hour. But we can’t do that. However, at the beginning of the year our wait period was 45 days and now we are down to five to seven days.” Cactus Coatings can dip virtually any hard surface that can be submerged underwater, from guns to bows to coolers and cups. Although there are a few ways to prevent water getting into things like gun scopes, elec- NEW TEXAS BUSINESS: In January, father and son Mike Gillespie (L) and Matthew Gillespie, started Cactus Coatings tronics are not allowed. “We have dipped everything from guitars in Kerrville. They specialize in paintings, hydrographics and customer service. Photo by Autumn Bernhard, for Lone Star to gunstocks to wheelchairs to plastic Taco Outdoor News. Casa cups,” Matthew said. “We currently have someone who wants their prosthetic leg done but he needs to figure out how to go without it for a week.” The biggest limitation is the size of the dipping tank. So far the biggest item Matthew dipped was a 125-quart Yeti cooler. “That was a challenge,” Matthew said. “It’s as big as our tank and it took both of us to push it underwater. It was like trying to shove a beach ball under the water, it fought back. When you’re dipping something you can’t move or struggle because it will show and then you have to start over which made it even harder.”


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FISHING

Feeding the hungry with fishermen’s catch By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

HELPING OTHERS: Pastor Erny at the Fisherman’s Chapel in Port O’Connor takes fish, including big marlin, from tournaments, cleans them and distributes food to the needy. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Pastor Erny McDonough is a man of means, and one his goals in life has been to see to it that people get fed. He’s doing a good job of doing just that from the Fisherman’s Chapel in the small fishing town of Port O’Connor. Last year, Pastor Erny and his wife, Joane, both ordained ministers, gathered and packaged more than 6,000 pounds of fish and converted that catch into 12,000 meals. “Did you know that one in six children go to bed hungry here in America every night?” asked Pastor Erny. “That is disturbing. That’s what drove us to start helping the hungry.” The couple has been feeding the hungry from their little church since 1995. “We try to spread food around to anybody that needs it,” Pastor Erny said. “Just recently, we worked with a feeding program in Pasadena. Throughout the year, we’ll work in conjunction with health fairs. Those are programs that invite the needy to come in and get a checkup, maybe Please turn to page 13

Team Wild Bill wins Sharp Tooth Shootout By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Capt. “Wild” Bill Caldwell and Jason Armstrong teamed up to catch the heaviest shark and win the Sharp Tooth Shootout shark tournament held Aug. 5-6 out of Port O’Connor. Their winning catch was a finetooth shark weighing 155.9 pounds. That was good enough for first place in the heaviest shark division. They also won the team event with the two heaviest sharks with a total weight of 272.7 pounds. During the tourney, the team caught three sharks weighing 155.9, 116.8 and 89 pounds. Armstrong’s big shark also is a pending state record. “All the paperwork has been filled out, the shark was weighed on certified scales and documented by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department,” Armstrong, who has been fishing for sharks with Wild Bill for about 11 years, said. The tournament was well attended with 75 teams at

$250 per boat. Each team could fish in the bays, at the jetties and up to two miles offshore from Friday at midnight until 2 p.m. Saturday. The second place team weighed in two sharks weighing 156.4. Third place was 88.7. “It was real rough going out, but we made it the spot and caught sharks,” Wild Bill, who has been guiding out of POC for 12 years, said. His specialty is fishing the jetties and short offshore for reds, trout, black drum, kings and big sharks. “We were fishing 1/4-mile off the jetties with chunks of jackfish and skipjacks,” Wild Bill said. “The trick was to let the shark pick up the bait and run. Once it takes off is when you set the hook.” The anglers were using 50-pound test Big Game line, an 8-ounce sinker and a 7-foot leader with 300-pound test fluorocarbon leaders, and an 18-inch steel leader attached to a 16/0 circle hook. RECORD SHARK: Spectator gathered around to view Jason Armstrong’s finetooth shark. The 155.9-pound shark won first place at the Sharp Tooth Team Wild Bill caught Shootout and is a pending state record. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News. three finetooth sharks Please turn to page 14

Fly-fishing the generators at Whitney By Jillian Mock

For Lone Star Outdoor News

SOUND THE HORN: When power is generated at Lake Whitney, anglers head to the Brazos River below the dam, as the current disorients the bait fish, sometimes causing a feeding. Photos by Ben Tendrick.

If you catch it at the right time of day, the Brazos River below Lake Whitney has some of the best fly-fishing during the sweltering Texas summer. As the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers releases water from the dam to generate electricity at peak hours, they can inadvertently spark a feeding frenzy on the river below. “It is a spectacular river, wild and lush and full of life,” said Lloyd Tackitt, an avid angler who lives on the banks of the Brazos about nine miles downstream

from the dam at Lake Whitney “It’s loaded with fish, just loaded with fish.” Tackitt, who primarily wadefishes from his property, closely monitors the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website and the gauge at the “Brazos near Aquilla” to determine when it is safe for him to step in the water. Normally predicting when the Corp will open the gates is like reading a “crystal ball,” according to Tackitt. Anglers like Tackitt and Bryan, Texas native Ben Tedrick say the Corp website is rarely accurately updated with times and cfs rates in advance. Luckily,

the need for air conditioning creates a certain level of predictability in July and August. Lake Whitney is a hydroelectric dam that operates on an as-needed basis. When demand surges on a hot summer afternoon, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers will open the gates and Brazos Electric Cooperative will then distribute the power to the surrounding area. “During the hot months they often begin generating around noon and go on generating until around 9 p.m.,” Tackitt said. When he expects a heat wave, Tedrick will leave Bryan at 4 a.m. Please turn to page 17


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Tagged red landed after movie date After having lunch in Rockport on July 30, Mike Boyer and his wife of 35 years, Gina, passed by the movie theater and noticed the parking lot was nearly empty. They decided on a movie date before going fishing. After the movie, the couple headed out at 5 p.m., heading to their favorite shoreline. After catching a trout and an undersized redfish, they moved two more times, ending up in St. Charles Bay at a spot Boyer had fished a few times. “I had never caught anything at this spot, but it just looked right,” he said. Boyer anchored between two old duck blinds and cast a lively mullet behind a fluorescent orange popping cork. He thought he felt a bump, checked the bait and cast to the same spot. The cork disappeared. After fighting the fish, it finally tired and was netted by Gina. As Boyer removed the fish from the net, he noticed something by the dorsal fin. “Honey, it’s a tag!” he said to his wife. Boyer quickly placed the fish on the deck for a closer look and made out in very small print, “2016 CCA.” The next morning, the couple was parked at Terry’s Seaworthy Marine more than an hour before the store opened, and finally weighed in tagged redfish TA847. Boyer was registered for the CCA STAR tournament and is the second winner of a 2016 loaded Ford F-150 “Texas Edition” XLT SuperCab, and a brand new 23’ Haynie BigFoot boat rigged with a Mercury 150L Pro

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Cranking bass Continued from page 1

HAPPY ANGLER: Mike Boyer landed a tagged redfish on July 30, and will receive a truck, boat and trailer since he was registered for the CCA STAR tournament. Photo from CCA.

XS OptiMax motor and Coastline trailer prize package, which will be awarded to him at the STAR Awards Ceremony in October. Three tagged reds have been caught in the last eight days, but Boyer’s is the only confirmed winner. —CCA STAR

Lake-record bass in the heat of summer David Rabalais of Nacogdoches went bass fishing at Lake Naconiche on the afternoon of July 29 and had only one bite. It was a whopper. The bass weighed 14.12 pounds and measured about 26 inches long. Pending certification by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the fish will be the lake record. The previous record was 12.54 pounds, caught by Lane Kruse of Garrison in 2013. According to the Mount Pleasant Enterprise, Rabalais caught the fish on a Texas-rigged tequila sunrise worm in about 15-16 feet of water. Lake Naconiche is a relatively new lake, having been impounded in 2009. Most of the timber was flooded, creating cover and nutrients that benefit the fish. The lake was stocked with Florida-strain largemouths and adult fish also were released into the lake. The lake was opened to the public in September of 2012. —Staff report

will attract and hold threadfin shad.” Kirkpatrick said the bass may start feeding shallow at dawn, but by 8 a.m. they will move out to deeper water that’s 6- to 8-feet deep. By noon, they might move deeper to 16- to 18-foot depths. “A good crankbait to use on this lake is a Fat Free Shad,” Kirkpatrick said. “The one I use is 3 inches long, and is a perfect imitation of a threadfin shad. A couple of good color patterns are the Tennessee Special and Bama SUMMER CRANKING: Medium- to deep-diving crankbaits, Shad.” Another type of structure that fished near points, structure or creek channels is a producyou definitely want to crank is tive hot-weather tactic. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News. a creek channel. This is the type of structure that tournament angler Ray Beck will fish a lot during the hot water months of August. He fishes regularly on Toledo Bend and Rayburn. “A creek channel is a natural place for numbers of bass to feed in when the surface water temperature is warm enough to move baitfish and bass deep,” Beck said. “You can find creek channels on just about any lake, and somewhere along those depths you’ll find bass.” Beck starts with a shallow-running crankbait that runs about 4- to 6-feet deep. “As the sun clears the trees, I’ll fish deeper cranks on a slow to medium-fast retrieve,” he said. “The trick is to crank fast to get the lure down, then slow the retrieve to keep the bait in the zone bass are holding in.” Dennis Lala is a South Texas bass fisherman who has spent more than 60 years chasing largemouths. Much of that time was spent on fishing tournaments. Some of his favorite crankbait lakes include Coleto Creek, Falcon and Amistad. “I like to fish cranks anywhere from 8- to 16-feet deep,” Lala, who lives in Victoria and spends a lot of time on Coleto Creek, said. “Right now the surface water temperature on South Texas lakes can hit 90-plus degrees. That’ll move bass deep in a hurry.” Lala said the best structure on Coleto is humps, hardwood structure like stumps, a tank dam and creek channels. “I’ll fish it at 8 to 10 feet,” he said. “One of my best color patterns is a fire tiger. That’s a good color on lakes with dark, slightly off-colored water. In clearer water, I’ll go with a color pattern that closely matches a threadfin shad.” On Falcon, Lala prefers a Bagley DB3 that’ll run down to 16 feet. “That’s important when fishing the thick brush on this lake,” he said. When cranking deep runners, Lala uses baitcasting reels loaded with 15-pound fluorocarbon line and a fast-action, 7-foot rod with a soft tip. “The tip allows me to feel the crank over and around structure, but has the backbone to set the hooks on big bass and move them out of structure and to the surface in a hurry,” he said.


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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear; 84 degrees; 2.98’ low. Black bass are fair early on top-waters, later switching to Texas rigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair at night under lights. Catfish are fair on jug lines. AMISTAD: Water murky; 86–90 degrees; 24.45’ low. Black bass are good on jigs and Texas-rigged soft plastic worms in 4–14 feet. Striped and white bass are fair trolling crankbaits along the bluffs up Devils River. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait in 6–10 feet. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 85–89 degrees; 1.15’ low. No reports on black bass. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on worms and stink bait. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 86–89 degrees; 0.49’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs and top-waters. Fish are schooling in the afternoon. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow on trotlines. BASTROP: Water murky; 86–90 degrees. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and shallow-running crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. BELTON: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 8.74’ high. Black bass are good on soft plastic worms early. Striped and white bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.70’ low. Black bass are fair on square-bill crankbaits, Texasrigged worms and top-waters early. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 1.40’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, football jigs and Carolina-rigged flukes. Crappie are good on minnows near brush piles. Catfish are fair on cut shad. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and soft plastic worms in reeds. Striped bass are fair on shad and perch off points near the pier. Redfish are good on shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver, cheese bait, and minnows near the dam. BRIDGEPORT: Water stained to lightly stained, 85–89 degrees: 0.08’ low. Black bass are good on square-bill crankbaits and Texas-rigged worms in green pumpkin with a chartreuse tail. Crappie are fair on white jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and rod and reel. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.61’ low. Black bass to 4 pounds are excellent on blue fleck, watermelon red, and black/blue soft plastics over brush piles in 5–8 feet, spinner baits in flooded brush in 2–7 feet, and shad crankbaits off points. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and crankbaits in 12–16 feet, and on minnows and jigs under lights at night. Crappie are good on minnows and on black/chartreuse and red/

white tube jigs. Channel catfish are slow. BUCHANAN: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 0.32’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon flukes and whacky sticks in Silver Creek in 5–15 feet early. Striped bass are fair on lipless crankbaits and chartreuse striper jigs near Lighthouse Point. White bass are good on minnows and Tiny Traps around structure. Crappie are good on chartreuse tube jigs and live minnows. Channel catfish are good on liver, nightcrawlers, and blood bait. Yellow and blue catfish are very good on perch upriver. CADDO: Water stained to muddy; 86–90 degrees; 0.50’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and stinkbait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon lipless crankbaits near the dam. Striped bass are slow. Redfish are good down-rigging spoons, and on live bait near the crappie wall. Channel and blue catfish are fair on liver, stink bait and nightcrawlers. CANYON LAKE: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 0.68’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon flukes and top-waters, and watermelon/blue flake soft plastic worms over brush piles. Striped bass are fair on spinner baits and shallow-running crankbaits around humps early. Smallmouth bass are good on watermelon jigs and white grubs. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait and live bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on perch upriver. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.93’ low. Black bass are slow on weightless worms and shaky heads on docks with brush. White bass are fair on

slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. CHOKE CANYON: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 22.41’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics and lipless crankbaits early and late. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait. Yellow catfish are good on live perch and goldfish. COLEMAN: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.85’ low. Black bass are fair on crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on shad. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch. Yellow catfish are slow. COLETO CREEK: Water stained; 98 degrees at the hot water discharge, 87 degrees in main lake; 0.89’ low. Black bass to 6 pounds are good on watermelon soft plastic worms and crankbaits in 8–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs in 8–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish to 25 pounds are good on live perch and cut bait in

8–10 feet. CONROE: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.56’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and liver. FALCON: Water murky; 86–90 degrees; 32.39’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastics and spinner baits in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are very good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on shrimp, cut bait and stink bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits and lipless crankbaits early and late. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. FORK: Water stained; 86–89 degrees; 1.24’ low. Black bass are good on Carolina-rigged flukes, flutter spoons and deepdiving crankbaits. Top-waters and hollow-body frogs are good in early morning. White and yellow bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and stink bait. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are fair on spooks early, later switching to Texas rigs and medium-diving crankbaits. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait. GIBBONS CREEK: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are fair on stink bait, shrimp, and liver. GRANBURY: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.02’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse Carolina-rigged soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are good on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on pet spoons and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are slow. GRANGER: Water murky; 82–86 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slab spoons. Crappie are good on white tube jigs around standing timber. Blue catfish are fair on prepared baits on rod and reel, and on jug lines baited with shad. GRAPEVINE: Water stained to muddy; 85–89 degrees; 0.35’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged soft plastics and square-bill crankbaits. White bass and hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse jigs. Catfish are slow on trotlines and prepared bait. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 88–92 degrees; 0.61’ low. Black bass to 4 pounds are fair on dark worms early and late. Crappie are slow. Bream are fair on live worms off grass beds. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with bream. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 85–90 degrees; 1.44’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Yellow Magics, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and live shad. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.24’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, top-

waters and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water stained; 2.15’ high. Black bass are good on hollow-body frogs, top-waters and Carolinarigged worms. White bass are fair on slabs and deep-diving crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LAVON: Water stained; 85–89 degrees: 1.13’ low. Black bass are fair on buzzbaits, Texasrigged craws and top-waters. White bass are fair to good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.83’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse jigs and shallow-running crankbaits early, and on watermelon tubes and Texas-rigged soft plastics along shorelines. White bass are fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs early and late. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are very good on nightcrawlers, stink bait, and live bait. LEWISVILLE: Water stained; 85–90 degrees; 0.10’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, top-waters and weightless flukes. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.09’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits. Striped bass are good on slabs, white striper jigs and troll tubes. White bass are fair on minnows, pet spoons, and slabs. Crappie are slow. Blue catfish are slow. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 87–91 degrees; 1.40’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, Senkos and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 86–92 degrees; 0.16’ high. Black bass are slow on deep crankbaits and drop-shot worms. Crappie are slow on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. NASWORTHY: 84–89 degrees; 0.94’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, mediumrunning shad pattern crankbaits and watermelon seed jigs. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water murky; 85–89 degrees; 0.05’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs early. Channel catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and stink bait. Blue catfish are slow. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 86–90 degrees; 35.08’ low. Black bass are fair to good on

spooks early, later switching to Texas rigs, square-bill crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on live bait. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 11.55’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters early, later switching to dropshot rigs, jigs, Texas rigs and chatterbaits. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs in the shallows. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 85–89 degrees; 0.79’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws and white buzzbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs.

White bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water offcolor; 84–90 degrees; 0.47’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, jigs and drop-shot rigs. Crappie are fair to good on split-shot weighted live minnows. White bass are fair to good on Rooster Tails. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 0.14’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits, crankbaits, and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on shad and chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines and juglines baited

with perch and goldfish. RAY HUBBARD: Water stained; 84–89 degrees; 0.64’ low. Black bass are good on hollow-body frogs, top-waters and deepdiving crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water stained; 84–89 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are fair on deep-diving crankbaits, top-waters and Carolina-rigged worms. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are slow on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are slow on trotlines and cut shad. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water stained; 85–90 degrees; 0.31’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, topwaters and swim jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 0.66’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow-running crankbaits and watermelon lipless crankbaits. White bass are good on minnows and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows over baited holes. Bream are good on nightcrawlers. Catfish are good

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

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on trotlines baited with live bait, shrimp and liver. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 86–90 degrees; 9.38’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and shad. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 84– 88 degrees; 2.41’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on chicken livers and nightcrawlers. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 86–89 degrees; 0.48’ low. Black bass are good on hollow-body frogs, flipping jigs and Texasrigged creature baits. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. TEXOMA: Water stained to muddy; 85–88 degrees; 0.52’ high. Black bass are fair on topwaters, medium crankbaits and Texas-rigged worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water murky; 83–87 degrees; 1.10’ low. Black bass are good on redbug and June bug soft plastic worms and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows over baited holes. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with liver. TRAVIS: Water murky; 85–89 degrees; 1.99’ low. Black bass are good on small spinner baits and shallow-running crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on frozen shrimp and nightcrawlers. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are slow. WHITNEY: Water murky; 84–88 degrees; 1.51’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows, pet spoons, and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are fair on shrimp, stink bait, and chicken livers. WRIGHT PATMAN: Water muddy; 15.99’ high. No report available.

—TPWD


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GAME WARDEN BLOTTER STRANDED KAYAKERS RESCUED Four kayakers became stranded on the Devils River during a flash flood. Val Verde County Game Warden Alli Hatten responded. The kayakers had all their kayaks and equipment washed away in the darkness but made it to the bank to save themselves. Two of the kayakers ended up on the other side of the river and were without any food and water. The other two kayakers were on the Devils River State Natural Area North Unit, and after six hours of walking found the Park PPO. Hatten and a PPO officer located the two cold, wet, thirsty and hungry but not injured kayakers and crossed them back to the park side where they reunited with the rest of their group, in all about an 18-hour ordeal. After two weeks and using her extensive knowledge of the river and landowners, Hatten located and returned three of the lost kayaks and equipment back to the owners. MAN CAUGHT FISHING WITHOUT PERMISSION Red River Game Warden Josh Bonney received a call about trespassing from a local landowner. With the help of a trail camera, he was able to make contact with the owner of the trespassing SUV who admitted that he had been fishing without permission. Charges of fishing without landowner consent were filed. TILAPIA SELLER NOT LICENSED Tarrant County Game Warden Clint Borchardt received a call concerning someone selling tilapia on the side of the road. The warden arrived and witnessed a sale of fish take place. The seller was not licensed

KEEPING FAWNS LEADS TO MULTIPLE DRUG CHARGES Cherokee County Game Warden Eric Collins and a Cherokee County Sherriff’s Office Deputy investigated reports of fawns being held inside a building. Contact was made with the resident and he admitted to being in possession of two deer fawns. The

and had several other violations. It was determined that the fish were being commercially harvested at Squaw Creek reservoir. Appropriate citations issued. OPEN GATE TO DEER CAMP SUSPICIOUS A deputy reported a burglary and abandoned four-wheeler. Harrison County Game Warden Darrin Peeples arrived to assist and noticed a deer camp gate that had always been closed was left open. At the camp, vandalism was apparent. A contact who lives on the same road informed Peeples that a man had come to his house the night before and requested gas. Peeples traveled the road and noticed a man walking in the woods. At the Sheriff’s Office, the man admitted stealing a John Deere tractor and told the warden where it was hidden. The tractor, hidden in the woods at another hunting lease, was located. ALLIGATOR POACHERS NABBED An alligator poaching complaint was received in Smith County. The caller said several subjects

man also was in possession of drug paraphernalia and consent was given to search the area. A sizeable amount of methamphetamine, marijuana and 68 undocumented Xanax pills were located. The subject was arrested.

had killed an alligator from a public road and sent pictures to several people claiming to have killed and eaten it. Smith County Game Warden Brad Clark Wood and Wood County Game Warden Derek Spitzer obtained confessions from two adults and one juvenile. The suspects admitted to seeing the alligator while fishing from a county road and shooting the alligator with a .22 pistol and crossbow, then finally killing it by beating its head with a bat. Numerous citations were issued, including take alligator out of season, illegal means and methods, and hunter education. DROWNING VICTIM LOCATED ON LAKE BELTON On Lake Belton, a man fell out of a boat while bowfishing with friends and never surfaced. Bell County Game Wardens Brandt Bernstein and Bryan Dulock responded and searched the area. The TPWD Dive Team was requested. The dive team searched one entire day until the victim was located floating in the water near where the team had been searching.

HOOP NET DISCOVERY FOLLOWED BY STRUGGLE WITH COMMERCIAL BOATERS, DROWNING SUBJECT RESCUED After a report of hoop nets being discovered, Starr County Game Wardens Brad Whitworth, Jordan Favreau and Zapata County Game Warden Josh Espinoza were dragging for the nets when a commercial boat with three male subjects approached. As the wardens attempted to make a water safety contact, the vessel attempted to flee. The vessel rammed the wardens’ boat three times. The subject vessel became lodged under the wardens’ vessel and a struggle ensued. When the vessel was dislodged, three subjects jumped into the swift water of the Rio Grande River. One of the subjects was not able to swim and began to struggle. A throw rope was deployed but the subject could not grab the rope and continued to go underwater and come up for air. Finally, the subject was able to grab the rope and was pulled to the wardens’ vessel. The other two made it to the Mexico shore. The wardens recovered the subjects’ vessel.

HOG KILLER WAS A FELON When serving an arrest warrant along with the Sheriff’s Department, Coleman County Game Warden Lee Morrison learned the individual had killed a hog with a firearm. The subject, who had three rifles in his possession, was arrested for Felon in Possession of a Firearm. MAN CAUGHT SHOOTING AT RABBIT FROM ROAD An individual in a vehicle had witnessed shooting from a roadway, and a vehicle description was given to McCulloch County Game Warden Zack Moerbe. Later that day, Moerbe tracked down the vehicle owner due to the unique description of the vehicle. The driver admitted shooting at a rabbit from the road. A citation was issued for discharging a firearm from a public road. SHRIMPERS TRAWLING AT NIGHT Willacy County Game WardensAbraham Amaya and Oscar Castaneda teamed up with the Marine Tactical Operations Group to patrol the Lower Laguna Madre area just outside of Port Mansfield. The team made contact with three bait shrimp boats. All three bait shrimp boats were found to be trawling for shrimp during the night. Further inspection resulted in the finding of all vessels being in possession of aquatic resource in their holding tanks. Cases were filed on all three boats and all aquatic resources were returned to the bay.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263


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Texas State angler narrowly misses Classic Sam Stone and Evan Coleman of Texas State University led the College Series National Championship after the first day, but a tough third day caused the team to fall to third place. However, the top four teams qualified for the Carhartt Bassmaster College Classic Bracket tournament on Kentucky Lake in Tennessee, and Coleman made the best of it, finishing second, and just missing out on a berth to the Bassmaster Classic. Kyle Alsop and Taylor Bivins of Kansas State University won the College Series National GOOD SHOWING: Evan Coleman, left, and Sam Stone from Texas Championship on Kentucky’s State University placed third in the College Series National Green River Lake, thanks to a se- Championship. In the College Classic Bracket event that followed, ries of consistent weights. They Coleman finished second. Photo by B.A.S.S. finished the tournament with 36 pounds, 4 ounces. The Kansas State team was the only one in the field of 89 teams to bring in more than 10 pounds every day. The Bethel University team of Brian Pahl and John Garrett finished second with 35 pounds, 7 ounces, followed by the Texas State University team. John Garrett of the Bethel University team topped Texas State’s Coleman in the final at the Classic Bracket event that pitted individuals from the top four teams in headto-head competition. Garrett weighed in a 14-pound, 13-ounce limit, while Coleman struggled and had no keepers. Garrett defeated Stone of Texas State in the first round, Taylor Bivins of Kansas State in the second round, and Coleman in the final. —B.A.S.S.

Providing fish for hungry Continued from page 8

get some school supplies, get a meal and some food to take home. It’s a good thing for a lot of people.” Benefactors received more than just food. “With their bag of fish we include instructions on how to cook it,” Pastor Erny said. “We’ll also set up fish fries for the needy, and anybody that’s hungry. And at the chapel we’ve got a food pantry that we keep stocked with food for anybody that shows up hungry.” The Fisherman’s Chapel deals mainly in fish, but they will also accept venison and pork. But for the most part they are big time into taking in fish — big fish. One of Pastor Erny’s biggest fish hauls of the year was from the Poco Bueno billfish tournament held recently out of Port O’Connor. During the first day of the tournament, they hauled away two blue marlin — one weighed 547 pounds, the other weighed 406. That’s a lot of fresh fish, es-

pecially if you’re the one cleaning them. “We use some pretty big knives to fillet our fish,” Pastor Erny said. “We’ll cut the bill off and the tail for the crew that caught the fish. After that, we’ll start cutting chunks of meat and placing them in gallon bags. We were recently blessed with the donation of a 20-foot freezer to store all that fish.” Each year they accept donated fish from three offshore tournaments. They not only get blue marlin but tuna, wahoo, dorado and sharks as well. They also accept trout and redfish from inshore tournaments. This program was started back in ’95 in a little town with a little church and, as Pastor Erny says, a little operation that is out to help the needy. “We are here as an interdenominational church,” he said. “We accept people from all Christian religions. We hope what we do will inspire other fishermen to help the hungry.”

TEXAS TROPHY HUNTERS ASSOCIATION PRESENTS TM

THE GRANDDADDY OF ALL HUNTING SHOWS Fort Worth August 5-7 • Fort Worth Convention Center

Houston August 12-14 • NRG Center San Antonio August 19-21 • Freeman Coliseum Expo Hall Corpus Christi August 26-28 • American Bank Center HUNTING & FISHING Extravaganza

w w w. H u n t e r s E x t r a v a g a n z a . c o m


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Top flies for reds

Big shark

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 8

caught so many of them on conventional tackle. The erratic movement of a spoon has an action that triggers a redfish bite.” During August, Horbey favors fishing marsh ponds. “The backwater ponds hold lots of small crabs, shrimp and mullet,” he said. “That’s why these areas attract so many reds during late summer. These are fun areas to fly-fish because you have so many options. You can fish the canals feeding into the marsh and along the edges of grass. These are places where you can see plenty of tailing and waking reds.” Going super shallow is the key to success with Horbey’s weedless No. 2 spoon flies. “I find a lot of reds in 4- to 7-inches of water,” he said. “A spoon fly has a concave shape allowing it to be fished very shallow with a lot of action. When fishing a spoon you want to give it quick 2- to 3-inch strips. That will trigger more strikes.” His top spoon fly colors are red or purple, and he prefers to fish them with either a 7 or 8 weight rod, depending on the wind. A 9-foot, 12-pound test fluorocarbon leader is usually best when fishing the spoons. The Laguna Madre, down around South Padre Island, is where you can find Capt. Eric Glass fly-fishing the flats, and on most days he’s in the hunt for reds. He’s worked as a fulltime guide there for 21 years.

during the tourney, unusual since the shark is known as a rare catch. Armstrong’s 155.9-pounder, when certified, will replace the current 100.50-pound finetooth record caught on June 3, 1979. The Wild Bill team ended with $14,500 in winnings in their first shark tournament.

Coast Guard rescues fishing boat, crew Coast Guard air and boat crews responded to a fishing boat with an internal water leak and medevaced the captain due to carbon monoxide poisoning. The captain of the 89-foot fishing boat, Redemption, called Sector Corpus Christi watchstanders at approximately 10:50 p.m., stating they were taking on water from a damaged onboard potable water tank. The boat was six miles off of the Port Aransas inlet. Watchstanders launched a Station Port Aransas 45-foot response boat crew, an Air Station Corpus Christi MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and diverted an Air Station Corpus Christi HC-144 Ocean Sentry airplane crew to assist. Once on scene, the Ocean Sentry dropped a dewatering pump to the fishing boat. While dewatering, the boat’s captain began showing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. Due to safety concerns, the response boat crew transferred him off the boat and he was then hoisted to the helicopter and taken to Spohn Shoreline Hospital in stable condition. All other persons aboard were able to disembark safely at the pier. The boat was towed by the response boat.

FAVORITES: Guides and anglers use a number of flies to pursue red drum on the flats, including a spoon fly, a bend back fly and crab flies. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

“I can’t think of a better job to have than fly-fishing for a living,” Glass said. “The clear water flats of the Laguna Madre are made for fly-fishing. It’s a great place to catch reds and trout.” The flats on the lower Laguna Madre can be as clear as mountain air on most days. This is where small flies rule. A favorite for Glass is a No. 4 weedless crab fly that’s similar to a Merkin. This type of fly is tied with grizzly marabou, EP fibers, hackle, rubber legs and dumbbell eyes. It’s a slow-sinking

pattern that reds love to eat. “I tie my own crab flies that seem to be perfect for reds on the Laguna,” Glass said. “The best colors are a tan, brown or off-white with a striped tail. I fish a lot in 6- to 24-inches of water over sand and grass. In the afternoons I find lots of reds in some pretty warm water. As long as I’ve got current, they will be pretty aggressive.” Another fly Glass favors is a No. 4 or 6 chartreuse or white Clouser. Victor Randazzo has been fly-fishing for years along the

Texas coast and uses bend back flies to specifically catch reds. The fly is more or less a streamer that rides through the water upside down. “I fish a lot at Matagorda and Port O’Connor,” Randazzo said. “In really clear water I’ll go with a No. 6 bend back in copper flash with maybe a few strands of yellow bucktail tied on. In water that’s a little deeper than a foot and slightly off-color, a gold/chartreuse No. 2 bend back is tough to beat.”

—U.S. Coast Guard

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Page 15


Page 16

August 12, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are good while working slicks and shad. Redfish are good under rafts of shad on topwaters. Redfish are fair to good at the mouths of bayous draining from the marsh. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters. Trout are good while drifting scattered shell on plastics. Trout are good at the rigs on finger mullet and croaker. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on live shrimp and croakers. Trout, sand trout, whiting and croakers are fair to good at Rollover Pass on live bait. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair for drifters working the wells on live shrimp. Redfish are fair around the spillway on live bait. The bays are becoming saltier daily. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good for drifters working deep shell on live shrimp and plastics. Trout are good on croakers in the Ship Channel. Trout are good over reefs on the lower end of the bay on paddle tail lures. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout and redfish are good at the jetty on shrimp and finger mullet. Trout and redfish are fair to good at the mouth of bayous on the outgoing tide on live shrimp. Tarpon are showing along the beachfront. TEXAS CITY: Trout are fair to good on the reefs and in the channel on live shrimp and croakers. Redfish and sand trout are fair to good in Moses Lake on shrimp. FREEPORT: Trout are good at San Luis Pass and the jetties on shrimp and soft plastics. Trout, redfish, sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Trout are fair to good in the surf on live bait. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair to good for drifters on live shrimp over midbay reefs . Redfish are good while wading the shorelines with small top-waters. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass on soft plastics and top-waters around the jetties.

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Redfish are fair on mud and shell on live shrimp. Trout are good while wading with croakers. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair on topwaters and live bait over sand, grass and shell near Pass Cavallo. Trout and redfish are fair at the mouths of the back lakes on the outgoing tide. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair in the guts and channels on free–lined shrimp. Trout are fair over grass while drifting with live shrimp. Redfish are good on mullet on the flats. PORT ARANSAS: Trout, redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp and croakers. Offshore is good for kingfish and ling. Trout are fair to good in the surf on live shrimp and croakers. CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on live shrimp and croakers. Redfish are fair to good for waders in Nueces Bay on small top-waters and Gulps. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good on top-waters and croaker around rocks and grass. Trout are fair to good while drifting grass around spoil islands on scented plastics and croakers. Trout are fair to good in the Land Cut at night under lights. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are fair to good on top-waters on the edge of the channel and around sand and grass. Trout and redfish are fair while wading spoil islands on top-waters and scented plastics. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are good on shrimp, artificial shrimp and scented plastics while drifting the grass beds. Snook are fair to good in South Bay on live shrimp, scented plastics and piggy perch. PORT ISABEL: Trout are good on the deeper edges and flats on top-waters and live shrimp. Redfish are fair to good on scented plastics and live shrimp while making long drifts over sand and grass. —TPWD

The 2016 CCA STAR tournament ends September 5. As of August 8, here are the leaders in each category: STARKIDS SCHOLARSHIP DIVISION (ages 6-10) Flounder: 5 pounds, 1 ounce. Kathryn Burda, 8, of Corpus Christi. Sheepshead: 8 pounds, 12 ounces. Rylan Basci, 7, of League City. Gafftop: 6 pounds, 5 ounces. Ashton Sumrall, 8, of Orange. STARTEENS SCHOLARSHIP DIVISION (ages 11-17) Speckled Trout: Upper Coast: 7 pounds, 9 ounces. Dawson Heinicke, 15, of Cypress. Middle Coast: 6 pounds, 14 ounces. Sydney Greaves, 16, of Palacios. Lower Coast: 7 pounds, 9 ounces. Mitch Lyssy, 17, of Falls City. Flounder: 5 pounds, 3 ounces. Cade Dugi, 16, of Adkins. Sheepshead: 10 pounds, 2 ounces. Nick Bell, 13, of Baytown. Gafftop: 6 pounds, 5 ounces. Jordan Sandow, 17, of Kingwood.

Nick Bell, photo from CCA Star

STAR LEADERBOARD Speckled Trout: Upper Coast: 9 pounds, 9 ounces. Dean Halewyn of Alvin. Middle Coast: 9 pounds, 1 ounce. Thad Reichert of Catspring. Lower Coast: 9 pounds, 1 ounce. James Vaughan of Runge. Kingfish: 62 pounds, 13 ounces. Matthew Bronstein of Houston. Dorado: 24 pounds, 11 ounces. Shane Huff of Canyon Lake. Ling: 60 pounds, 7 ounces. Travis Hild of Lavernia. Flounder: 6 pounds, 13 ounces. Paul Gregory of Brazoria. Sheepshead: 10 pounds, 5 ounces. Jerry Mills of Houston. Gafftop: 7 pounds, 8 ounces. Troy Sumrall III of Orange. —CCA STAR


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Fly-fishing the Brazos Continued from page 8

BIG DRUM: Fly-anglers may catch a number of species on the Brazos when the power is generating, including big freshwater drum. Photo by Ben Tedrick.

and drive the 115 miles to reach Riverside Park by sunlight. He and his crew of fly-fishing buddies will start the day wade-fishing, exploring the creek bottom, before switching to kayaks when the Corp sounds the horn that they are letting water out of the dam. For Tedrick, this is when the real fun begins. “The fish are sitting down (in the deep pools) staging, and then when they start generating power the bait fish and shad get disoriented. That triggers a feeding frenzy,” said Tedrick. “It’s an opportunity to catch a striper on a fly rod.” According to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department biologist Stephen Dumont, Tedrick is probably right about the flood of fresh water triggering mass feeding. “I’m speculating that when the gates are opened, there is an influx of bait and zooplankton from the reservoir,” he said. “Also, the flushing/stirring of sediment below the dam dislodges all the critters that live in that sediment, who then become abundant and vulnerable.”

The Brazos can be difficult to access, because private property lines much of the river. Riverside Park, however, is publicly accessible and run by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, making it a good place to start. A horn sounds when the Corp starts letting water out of the dam, an important cue for anglers to stay close enough to hear, especially when wadefishing the river. Tackitt recommends wade-fishing only when the flow is around 200 cfs or below and switching to kayaks or canoes when the Corp is releasing about 250 to 500 cfs from the dam. “If the flow passes 500 cfs, it is time to get out,” he said. “At that point the water [is] much too fast to do any fishing anyway.” Even in the sluggish summer heat, you can catch just about anything in the Brazos with a little luck. “The nice thing about the Brazos is whatever you want to fish for, it’s in there,” Tedrick said.

August 12, 2016

Page 17

Team Mucho Mas wins at Bastante At the 5th Annual Bastante John Uhr Memorial Billfish Tournament in Rockport, team Mucho Mas landed a blue marlin and five sailfish to take the top spot. The event, held each year to celebrate the life of Capt. Johnny Uhr, benefits local charities. Leaderboard: 1st Place: Mucho Mas 1 blue marlin and 5 sailfish = 1000 points 2nd Place: Uno Mas 1 blue and 2 sails = 700 points 3rd Place: High Noon 1 blue and 1 white = 650 points 4th Place: Game Hog 1 white and 1 sail = 250 points 5th Place: Playing Hooky 1 white and 1 sail = 250 points 1st Place Tuna: Game Hog 36.00 pounds 1st Place Wahoo: Paradise Ranch 50.40 pounds 1st Place Dorado: Game Hog 23.55 pounds

Photo by Larry Doonan

—rockporttournament.com

Duck, goose callers compete in Katy At the 2016 World Waterfowl Calling Championship held at the Bass Pro Shops in Katy, John Chiasson of Lake Charles, Louisiana, won the top award for “Best Overall Waterfowl Caller.” “To win that award, a caller earns points in the four duck and four goose calling contess and the caller with the most points wins,” said event organizer Randy Wheeler. Chiasson and Nathan Wright of Elton, Louisiana won the Team Real Duck contest, followed by Justin Beckendorff and Nick Kissamiss, both of Katy. The Real Duck contest was won by Seth Fields of McKenzie, Tennessee, with Trevor Shannahan of Paducah, Kentucky finishing second. In the Gulf Coast Regional Open Duck contest, Shannahan topped the field, followed by Nick Patin of Sunset, Louisiana. Shannahan and Fields won the Team Mallard Meat competition, and Cory Niccum of Gardner, Kansas topped the Mallard Meat individual contest. In the goose calling contests, Matthew Aucoin of Hayes, Louisiana and Mike Miller of Bell City, Louisiana won the Team Snow Goose competition; Chiasson won the individual Snow Goose contest; and Patin won the individual Specklebelly contest. Chiasson and Patin won the Team Specklebelly contest. —TeamRealDuck


Page 18

August 12, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HEROES

Cardon Penrod, 7, of Ennis, shot his first pig at his family’s ranch in Lometa.

Robert Miles caught this amberjack out of Port Aransas on the SkipTrace.

Carinne Pepper caught her first trout while fishing out of Port Aransas with Capt. Jeremy Griffis in June. The trout was 24-inches long.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Adrian Trevino of Alice landed this wahoo offshore from Rockport on the Texas Crew’d with Capt. Blake Sevier.

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Dustin Schwartz, 14, of Washington County, hunting with Jason Grimm, bagged this 33-inch axis buck at 200 yards near Comfort.


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American Shooting Centers back at full strength

Two drown while bank-fishing in Fort Worth

After a long nine weeks since the devastating flood of April 18, Ed Arrighi, the CEO of American Shooting Centers in Houston, said all facilities and activities have returned to full operation. “While several of our venues suffered serious damage, excellent response by our insurance companies and a lot of very hard work by our outstanding staff have brought ASC back better than ever,” Arrighi said. ASC retained all of its team members on full salaries in order to minimize any disruptions to families during the time the facility was underwater. “We are very anxious to show off the fresh look of our newly painted buildings and corporate facilities,” Arrighi said. ASC is located at 16500 Westheimer Parkway.

Two men died after falling into the Trinity River near downtown Fort Worth on August 6. The victims were reportedly fishing behind the Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus, and fell into the river. MedStar spokesman Macara Trusty told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that a bystander heard someone yell and called 911 at about 7 a.m. after looking downriver and seeing a man come up from the water and immediately go back down. Fire Department divers recovered both bodies just after 8 a.m. in what was described as a Trinity spillway dam. One victim was identified by the Tarrant County medical examiner’s office as Angel Ibarra, 23, of Fort Worth. The other was identified as Eduardo Cortina Mares, 21, also of Fort Worth. —Staff report

August 12, 2016

Hunting on private land increases conservation efforts by landowners A new study from the University of CaliforniaBerkeley has found that recreational use of private land in the U.S. could have significant benefits for both conservation efforts and economic return. The study, published August 5 in the journal Land Use Policy, found that approximately 440 million acres of private land — roughly 22-percent of the contiguous land area of the U.S. — are either leased or owned for wildlife-associated recreation, which is defined as fishing, hunting and wildlife-watching. Hunting was the most widespread recreational use, accounting for 81-percent of the total acreage (356 million acres). Luke Macaulay, an assistant cooperative extension specialist in the department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at UC Berkeley, authored the study, which used 18 national surveys over 14 years for a comprehensive analysis. The study estimated that the annual spending for wildlife-associated recreation on private land to be $814 million in day-use fees, $1.48 billion for longterm leases, and $14.8 billion for ownership of land primarily for recreation.

It also found that on crop and grazing land, landowners who earn income from recreation are more likely to participate in government conservation programs and are more likely to pay for private conservation practices. Macaulay suggests that this data provides support for the idea that recreation incentivizes conservation at higher rates than agricultural activities alone. “That’s because many landowners are receiving either personal enjoyment or financial benefit from the wildlife that live on their land,” he said. The study showed that hunters own or lease much larger properties than anglers or wildlifewatchers, which indicates that hunting may provide a greater economic incentive for maintaining large, unfragmented properties that provide a variety of conservation benefits. The study emphasized the importance of encouraging conservation practices in conjunction with recreation in order to yield benefits for both conservation and landowner economic return. — UC Berkeley

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comp at

$24.15

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day. At Harbor Freight Tools, the "comp at" price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the "comp at" price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

7/11/16 3:24 PM


Page 20

August 12, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Full

Last

New

First

Aug. 18

Aug. 24

Sept. 1

Sept. 9

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

12 Fri 13 Sat 14 Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 Wed 18 Thu 19 Fri 20 Sat 21 Sun 22 Mon 23 Tue 24 Wed 25 Thu 26 Fri

12 Fri 13 Sat 14 Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 Wed 18 Thu

1:09 1:53 2:37 3:22 4:09 4:59 5:51

19 Fri

6:45 12:32

20 Sat 21 Sun 22 Mon 23 Tue 24 Wed 25 Thu 26 Fri

7:42 8:41 9:40 10:40 11:38 12:10 1:00

1:03 7:15 1:47 7:59 2:31 8:44 3:16 9:29 4:04 10:17 4:53 11:06 5:45 11:58 6:40 12:26 7:37 1:23 8:35 2:22 9:34 3:21 10:34 4:20 11:32 5:18 12:04 6:14 12:54 7:08

1:27 7:39 2:11 8:24 2:56 9:09 3:42 9:55 4:30 10:43 5:20 11:33 6:12 ----7:06 12:53 8:03 1:50 9:01 2:48 10:01 3:48 11:01 4:47 ----- 5:46 12:28 6:42 1:22 7:36

6:46 06:47 06:47 06:48 06:49 06:49 06:50 06:50 06:51 06:52 06:52 06:53 06:53 06:54 06:54

08:04 08:04 08:03 08:02 08:01 08:00 07:59 07:58 07:57 07:56 07:55 07:53 07:52 07:51 07:50

3:28p 1:40a 4:19p 2:23a 5:10p 3:11a 6:00p 4:04a 6:47p 5:00a 7:33p 6:00a 8:17p 7:01a 9:00p 8:04a 9:41p 9:08a 10:23p 10:12a 11:06p 11:16a 11:51p 12:20p NoMoon 1:24p 12:39a 2:26p 1:29a 3:26p

7:21 8:05 8:49 9:35 10:23 11:12 ----1:29 2:28 3:27 4:26 5:24 6:20 7:14

1:33 2:17 3:02 3:48 4:36 5:26 6:17

7:45 8:29 9:15 10:01 10:49 11:39 12:04

3:39p 4:31p 5:22p 6:11p 6:58p 7:43p 8:26p

1:41a 2:24a 3:12a 4:04a 5:01a 6:01a 7:04a

7:12 12:59

06:53 08:07 9:07p

8:08a

8:09 9:07 10:07 11:07 ----12:34 1:28

06:53 06:54 06:55 06:55 06:56 06:57 06:57

1:55 2:54 3:54 4:53 5:52 6:48 7:42

06:48 06:48 06:49 06:50 06:51 06:51 06:52

08:15 08:13 08:12 08:11 08:10 08:09 08:08 08:06 08:05 08:04 08:02 08:01 08:00 07:59

9:47p 9:13a 10:28p 10:18a 11:09p 11:24a 11:53p 12:29p NoMoon 1:34p 12:40a 2:37p 1:30a 3:37p

San Antonio 2016 Aug

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

12 Fri 13 Sat 14 Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 Wed 18 Thu 19 Fri 20 Sat 21 Sun 22 Mon 23 Tue 24 Wed 25 Thu 26 Fri

1:16 7:28 1:59 8:12 2:43 8:56 3:29 9:42 4:16 10:29 5:06 11:19 5:58 ----6:52 12:39 7:49 1:36 8:48 2:34 9:47 3:34 10:46 4:33 11:44 5:31 12:17 6:27 1:06 7:20

1:40 2:24 3:09 3:55 4:43 5:32 6:24 7:19 8:15 9:14 10:14 11:13 5:31 12:41 1:34

7:51 8:36 9:21 10:08 10:56 11:46 12:11 1:05 2:02 3:01 4:00 5:00 ----6:55 7:48

06:59 07:00 07:01 07:01 07:02 07:02 07:03 07:03 07:04 07:05 07:05 07:06 07:06 07:07 07:07

08:16 08:15 08:14 08:13 08:12 08:12 08:11 08:10 08:09 08:07 08:06 08:05 08:04 08:03 08:02

3:40p 1:53a 4:31p 2:37a 5:22p 3:25a 6:12p 4:18a 6:59p 5:14a 7:45p 6:13a 8:29p 7:15a 9:12p 8:18a 9:54p 9:21a 10:36p 10:25a 11:19p 11:29a NoMoon 12:33p 12:04a 1:36p 12:52a 2:38p 1:43a 3:38p

Amarillo

2016 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

12 Fri 13 Sat 14 Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 Wed 18 Thu 19 Fri 20 Sat 21 Sun 22 Mon 23 Tue 24 Wed 25 Thu 26 Fri

1:29 7:41 2:13 8:25 2:57 9:10 3:42 9:55 4:30 10:43 5:19 11:32 6:11 12:00 7:06 12:52 8:02 1:49 9:01 2:48 10:00 3:47 11:00 4:46 11:58 5:44 12:30 6:40 1:20 7:34

1:53 2:37 3:22 4:08 4:56 5:46 6:38 7:32 8:29 9:27 10:27 11:27 ----12:54 1:48

8:05 8:50 9:35 10:21 11:09 11:59 12:24 1:19 2:16 3:14 4:14 5:13 6:12 7:08 8:02

07:04 07:05 07:06 07:06 07:07 07:08 07:09 07:09 07:10 07:11 07:12 07:12 07:13 07:14 07:15

08:38 08:37 08:36 08:35 08:34 08:33 08:32 08:30 08:29 08:28 08:27 08:25 08:24 08:23 08:22

4:04p 1:57a 4:57p 2:40a 5:48p 3:28a 6:36p 4:20a 7:23p 5:17a 8:07p 6:19a 8:49p 7:22a 9:29p 8:28a 10:08p 9:34a 10:47p 10:40a 11:28p 11:47a NoMoon 12:53p 12:11a 1:59p 12:56a 3:03p 1:46a 4:03p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Time 2:03 AM 2:42 AM 3:12 AM 3:39 AM 4:05 AM 4:31 AM 4:58 AM 5:26 AM 5:54 AM 6:24 AM 12:41 AM 1:34 AM 2:36 AM 3:57 AM 12:49 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 0.6L 0.9L 1.2L 1.3L 1.7H

Time 6:09 PM 8:33 AM 8:31 AM 8:45 AM 9:08 AM 9:39 AM 10:15 AM 10:57 AM 11:43 AM 12:33 PM 6:54 AM 7:26 AM 8:02 AM 8:47 AM 5:42 AM

Height 0.1L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.2L 1.0L 0.9L 0.7L 0.5L 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.4L

Time

Height

Time

Height

10:46 AM 11:51 AM 12:47 PM 1:39 PM 2:32 PM 3:27 PM 4:26 PM 5:31 PM 6:44 PM 1:28 PM 2:27 PM 3:29 PM 4:33 PM 9:52 AM

1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 1.6H

6:54 PM 7:37 PM 8:19 PM 9:01 PM 9:42 PM 10:25 PM 11:08 PM 11:53 PM

0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.2L 0.4L

8:07 PM 9:43 PM 11:22 PM

1.5H 1.6H 1.6H

5:35 PM

-0.1L

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 1:18 AM 2:17 AM 3:22 AM 4:01 AM 4:31 AM 4:59 AM 5:26 AM 5:52 AM 6:14 AM 12:15 AM 1:06 AM 2:00 AM 2:51 AM 3:45 AM 12:38 AM

Height 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 0.4L 0.7L 0.9L 1.2L 1.3L 1.7H

Time 6:42 AM 7:12 AM 7:42 AM 8:20 AM 9:15 AM 10:09 AM 10:48 AM 11:25 AM 12:05 PM 6:29 AM 6:49 AM 7:22 AM 8:05 AM 8:46 AM 6:03 AM

Height 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.2L 1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5L

Time 9:32 AM 10:02 AM 11:02 AM 12:22 PM 1:21 PM 2:28 PM 3:47 PM 4:46 PM 5:40 PM 12:52 PM 1:45 PM 2:36 PM 3:29 PM 4:33 PM 9:27 AM

Height 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 0.5L 0.3L 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L 1.6H

Time 6:24 PM 7:04 PM 7:43 PM 8:25 PM 9:14 PM 10:05 PM 10:50 PM 11:32 PM

Height 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.2L

7:14 PM 8:53 PM 10:02 PM 11:20 PM

1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H

5:55 PM

0.0L

Height 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 0.4L 0.6L 0.8L 1.0L 1.1L 1.4H 1.5H

Time 8:07 AM 8:42 AM 9:17 AM 9:54 AM 10:27 AM 9:16 AM 10:01 AM 10:57 AM 6:38 AM 7:05 AM 7:34 AM 8:10 AM 8:56 AM 6:55 AM 7:49 AM

Height 1.0L 1.1L 1.1L 1.2L 1.2L 1.2L 1.1L 1.0L 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2L 1.2L

Time 11:08 AM 11:26 AM 12:11 PM 1:00 PM 1:45 PM 2:32 PM 3:30 PM 4:38 PM 11:47 AM 12:42 PM 2:03 PM 3:36 PM 4:46 PM 9:44 AM 10:34 AM

Height 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 0.6L 0.4L 1.2H 1.3H

Time 7:36 PM 8:11 PM 8:44 PM 9:19 PM 10:00 PM 10:44 PM 11:28 PM

Height 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L

Time 2:49 AM 3:32 AM 4:15 AM 4:51 AM 5:19 AM 5:37 AM 5:53 AM 6:14 AM 12:11 AM 12:58 AM 2:18 AM 3:53 AM 5:20 AM 1:16 AM 2:16 AM

5:45 7:03 9:05 1:24

PM PM PM PM

1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H

5:56 PM 6:57 PM

0.3L 0.2L

Height 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 0.6L 0.9L 1.2L 0.0L 1.8H

Time 5:52 PM 6:38 PM 7:21 PM 8:02 PM 8:44 PM 11:19 AM 11:23 AM 11:35 AM 11:59 AM 12:32 PM 6:52 AM 7:14 AM 7:34 AM

Height 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L 1.2L 1.1L 1.0L 0.9L 0.7L 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H

5:22 PM

-0.1L

Height 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H 1.3H -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H

Time 10:08 PM 10:58 PM 11:47 PM

Height 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L

9:05 AM 9:25 AM 9:35 AM 9:39 AM 9:45 AM 9:51 AM 9:58 AM 5:10 AM 8:12 AM 7:55 PM 9:15 PM

1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 1.0H 0.9L 1.1L 0.1L 0.0L

Freeport Harbor Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Time 2:07 AM 2:47 AM 3:21 AM 3:51 AM 4:20 AM 4:47 AM 5:14 AM 5:40 AM 6:05 AM 6:29 AM 12:38 AM 1:45 AM 3:29 AM 4:14 PM 12:55 AM

Time 8:26 AM 8:20 AM 8:20 AM 8:41 AM 12:35 AM 1:20 AM 2:03 AM 2:44 AM 3:22 AM 3:59 AM 4:34 AM 12:00 AM 2:06 AM 5:43 AM 6:32 AM

Time 7:58 PM 8:54 PM 9:49 PM 10:39 PM 11:25 PM

Height 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L

10:23 AM 10:22 AM 9:49 AM 8:23 AM 7:53 AM 4:25 PM 5:24 PM 6:29 PM 7:38 PM

0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.5H 0.6H 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L

Time 11:15 AM 11:54 AM 12:37 PM 1:20 PM 2:05 PM 12:10 AM 12:52 AM 1:29 AM 2:01 AM 2:19 AM 2:00 AM 8:36 AM 8:52 AM 9:27 AM 10:15 AM

Height 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 9:04 PM 9:52 PM 10:40 PM 11:26 PM

Height 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

2:54 PM 3:53 PM 5:14 PM 10:00 AM 9:09 AM 8:42 AM 5:50 PM 6:46 PM 7:42 PM 8:38 PM

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2H 0.2H 0.3H 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L

Height 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 0.9L 1.3L 1.6L 1.9H 2.1H

Time 5:29 PM 6:18 PM 7:04 PM 7:47 PM 8:30 PM 10:29 AM 10:40 AM 11:03 AM 11:34 AM 12:12 PM 6:17 AM 6:21 AM 6:16 AM 3:52 PM 4:57 PM

Height 0.2L 0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L 1.4L 1.3L 1.2L 1.0L 0.9L 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 0.2L 0.1L

Height 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 0.6L 0.9L 1.1L -0.2L 1.6H

Time 5:28 PM 6:15 PM 7:00 PM 7:44 PM 8:27 PM 10:11 AM 10:20 AM 10:44 AM 11:16 AM 11:56 AM 6:09 AM 6:08 AM 6:00 AM

Height 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L 1.3L 1.2L 1.1L 0.8L 0.6L 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H

4:50 PM

-0.2L

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 7:53 AM 9:43 AM 10:12 PM 10:55 AM 1:04 AM 10:51 AM 11:36 PM 8:05 8:34 6:33 3:27 3:52 6:51 7:29

Time

1:39 2:03 2:44 3:31

PM PM PM PM

Time

2:12 PM 3:46 PM 4:52 PM

Height

0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L

Height

0.2L 0.2L 0.1L

Time

4:00 PM 6:21 PM 8:46 PM

Time

7:16 PM 10:16 PM

Height

0.6H 0.5H 0.5H

Height

0.2H 0.2H

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Time 2:36 AM 3:11 AM 3:40 AM 4:07 AM 4:33 AM 4:57 AM 5:19 AM 5:39 AM 5:56 AM 6:08 AM 12:14 AM 1:10 AM 2:26 AM 12:02 AM 1:28 AM

Time

12:45 PM 2:08 PM 3:27 PM 4:48 PM 6:17 PM 12:57 PM 1:49 PM 2:48 PM

Height

1.4H 1.4H 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 0.7L 0.5L 0.3L

Time

Height

9:12 PM 9:55 PM 10:39 PM 11:25 PM

-0.1L 0.0L 0.3L 0.6L

8:00 PM 10:01 PM

1.6H 1.8H

South Padre Island Time

1:52 PM 3:00 PM 4:08 PM 5:20 PM 6:38 PM 1:15 PM 2:07 PM 3:07 PM

Height

1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L

Time

Height

9:25 PM 10:08 PM 10:54 PM 11:43 PM

-0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.4L

8:04 PM 9:39 PM 11:21 PM

1.5H 1.5H 1.7H

Rollover Pass Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Height 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.0L 0.1L 0.2L 0.3L 0.4L 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Rockport

Time 8:16 AM 8:18 AM 8:47 AM 9:24 AM 10:01 AM 10:24 AM 12:06 AM 12:43 AM 1:18 AM 1:52 AM 2:22 AM 7:28 AM 7:30 AM 7:38 AM 7:53 AM

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Time 3:20 AM 3:38 AM 4:00 AM 4:24 AM 4:47 AM 5:09 AM 5:28 AM 5:44 AM 5:57 AM 6:05 AM 12:19 AM 1:15 AM 2:26 AM 3:42 PM 1:36 AM

Time

Height

Time

Height

12:20 PM 1:49 PM 3:10 PM 4:34 PM 6:04 PM 12:43 PM 1:37 PM 2:37 PM

1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 0.4L 0.1L 0.0L

9:10 PM 9:55 PM 10:41 PM 11:29 PM

-0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.3L

7:48 PM 9:49 PM 11:58 PM

1.2H 1.3H 1.4H

Height 0.3L 0.4L 0.0L 0.4L 0.4L 0.4L 0.1L

Time 12:58 PM 11:48 AM

Height 0.3H 0.4H

Time 7:39 PM 8:06 PM

Height 0.1L 0.1L

1:07 PM 1:38 PM 2:13 PM

0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

10:38 PM 10:51 PM 11:10 PM

0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3L 0.3L 0.0L 0.4L

3:00 3:15 3:22 7:29 8:19

PM PM PM AM AM

0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3H 0.4H

5:25 PM 8:51 PM

0.4H 0.3H

3:51 PM 6:06 PM

0.1L 0.1L

9:30 AM

0.4H

7:23 PM

0.0L

East Matagorda Time

2:27 PM 2:56 PM 3:22 PM 3:43 PM 3:59 PM 4:19 PM 4:53 PM 10:07 AM 10:17 AM

Height

1.0L 1.0L 0.9L 0.8L 0.6L 0.5L 0.3L 1.1H 1.1H

Time

Height

4:43 PM 5:53 PM 7:00 PM 8:08 PM 9:18 PM 10:33 PM

1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H

5:41 PM 6:40 PM

0.2L 0.1L

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Time 4:39 AM 5:18 AM 12:37 PM 6:50 AM 8:04 AM 8:46 AM 3:24 PM 4:39 PM 12:09 AM 3:00 AM 3:14 AM 1:16 AM 1:51 AM 2:40 AM 4:09 AM

AM AM AM AM AM PM AM

Texas Coast Tides

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26

Date Aug 12 Aug 13 Aug 14 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 Aug 18 Aug 19 Aug 20 Aug 21 Aug 22 Aug 23 Aug 24 Aug 25 Aug 26


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

August 12, 2016

Page 21

PRODUCTS

>>

(800) 227-6433 www.minnkotamotors.com

>>

ULTREX: Minn Kota garnered ICAST’s best-in-show spot last month for this trolling motor. It is a hybrid that merges the body of the company’s popular Fortrex, which anglers appreciate for its control and responsiveness, with the brains of the Bluetooth-enabled i-Pilot (to include Spot-Lock electronic GPS anchoring). Features include power steering; steering lock, which allows a user to take his foot off the pedal without losing motor heading; Universal Sonar 2; and more. The Minn Kota Ultrex product lineup will consist of several i-Pilot- or i-Pilot Link and US2-enabled combos, including 24-volt and 36-volt versions in 45-inch, 52-inch and 60-inch shaft lengths. Available this fall, the MSRP will range from $2,199.99 to $2,799.99.

TAUTEN LINEWELDER: This compact rechargeable batterypowered device with a molded-in-place polymer sleeve utilizes technology originally developed for surgeons making “blind” suture connections that eliminated knots that could fail. Now, anglers can benefit from that technology with this handheld — or mountable — device, which takes about 35 seconds to form the “perfect” loop connection to a lure or hook, or when connecting two fishing lines together. It is designed to work with myriad line types — from braid to fluorocarbon – and sizes. It can deliver more than 100 welds per full charge. The LineWelder, which is water-resistant and floats, comes with a welding head, AC and USB charges, and three welding cartridges. It has an MSRP of $189.95. www.tautensports.com

INTEGRATOR 2.0 WINDPROOF PANTS: Nomad’s newest fleece pants will work from early to late in the hunting season. The quiet, sixpocket pants are 100-percent windproof to protect hunters from the elements. Features include a scent-suppression system, an autoadjustable elastic waist, a crescent cuff to keep heels unhindered, articulated knees for ease of movement, and more. The pants, which are available in youth, women and men’s sizes, cost about $150.

>>

(866) 529-3794 www.nomadoutdoor.com

(877) 431-4433 www.natureblinds.com

>>

ONESIXONE CROSSBOW: Browning Crossbows’ newest offering, part of the ZeroSeven series, is rated to shoot at 350 fps and comes mostly assembled. Hunters can just put the front end on the stock and tighten the nose bolt and they are ready to go. The bow includes a 4 x 32-mm illuminated scope with automatic shutoff, three 22-inch carbon arrows, and a custom quiver that places it in line with the stock. The crossbow has a pull weight of 3 pounds with a responsive and smooth release with zero trigger creep. For safer shooting, the anti-dry fire feature of the bow will not allow the safety to be off if an arrow hasn’t been loaded and the trigger won’t fire unless the arrow has been loaded with the proper vane facing down. The OneSixOne has an MSRP of $999.99.

>>

SOLO BLIND: NatureBlinds’ realistic HD hunting blinds include this model, which counters all of a buck’s defenses: vision, hearing and smell. It is made from durable high-density foam with a 3-D bark texture that will blend into almost any environment. The foam material also absorbs sound as does the carpeted floor. Because the SOLO is weatherproof, it will keep human scent inside. The 83.5-inch tall blind offers multiple vantage points for shooting as well as lockable doors. It sells for $2,895.

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Call 210-872-7790 or visit www.evolvedballistics.com to learn about our training courses and the full line of PROOF rifle packages and barrels we carry.


Page 22

August 12, 2016

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on on Page Solution Page25 25

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ACROSS Wear this while boating Won first medal of Rio Olympics Newer lakewhile with boating big bass 1.Texas Wear this A dove 2. hunter's Won firstorganization medal of Rio Olympics Popular coastal fishing area 7. Newer A favorite frog Texas lure lake with big bass A dovelike hunter’s organization Duck9. hunters the wind at their ____ 10. coastal fishing Keep in Popular your dove-hunting bagarea A retrieving dog frog lure 12. A favorite An offshore 14. Ducktarget hunters like the wind at their ____ A popular Texas striper lake 16. Keep in your dove-hunting bag A shell that fails to fire 18. A retrieving dog A Texas saltwater rod manufacturer 20.the Andistance offshore to target Show the deer 22. popular Texas striper lake Bass in A Hill Country rivers 23. Afish shell fails to fire Favorite forthat sushi Live24. baitAused redfish,rod trout Texasfor saltwater manufacturer A Texas/Oklahoma border lake 29. Shows the distance to the deer Time to Bass stop shooting at dove 33. in Hill Country rivers A Panhandle lake 35. Favorite fish for sushi Food for bass, crappie 37. Live bait used for redfish, trout An oryx species 38. 40. 42. 45. 46. 47.

A Texas/Oklahoma border lake Time to stop shooting at dove A Panhandle lake Food for bass, crappie An oryx species The diminutive oak

Smith & Wesson Holding Corporation has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Crimson Trace Corporation, the industry leader in laser sighting systems and tactical lighting for firearms, for $95 million.

United Sporting Companies announces the hire of Robert C. George as vice president of marketing.

Polymer company enters archery business

The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies named Sean Saville as its new campaign manager for the Blue Ribbon Panel on Sustaining America’s Diverse Fish & Wildlife Resources.

PolyOne Corporation, a provider of specialized polymer materials, services and solutions, acquired Gordon Composites, a producer of high-performance composite technology for bow limbs for the archery industry.

Quail Forever has announced Tim Caughran was named the new director of field operations of Quail Forever. Caughran is responsible for raising the profile of Quail Forever.

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New VP at United Sporting Companies

New director at QF

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1.DOWN Bass caught in the Amazon 3. Valuable body part on a rhino 4. 1. Popular duck along coast Bass caught in theTexas Amazon 5. 3. Scaled or Montezuma Valuable body part on a rhino 6. Found in the boathouse Popular duckknown along Texas coast hide 8. 4. African animal for reddish Scaled or Montezuma 11. 5. State known for elk numbers Found in the boathouse 13. 6. Group holds four Extravaganza in Texas 15. 8. Famous along Texas coast hide Africanranch animal known for reddish 17.11. Term forknown a missed shot State for elk numbers 19.13. The maleholds elk four Extravaganza in Texas Group 21.15. Helps keep spinning-rig line from twisting Famous ranch along Texas coast 22. Fastest growing hunting group Termmaker for a missed shot 25.17. A rifle The male to elkattract fish 26.19. Bait tossed keep line from twisting 27.21. HeHelps treats thespinning-rig hides 28.22. DSC executive director Fastest growing hunting group 30.25. Person fixes guns A riflewho maker 31.26. A young deer to attract fish Bait tossed 32. A shotshell brand He treats the by hides 34.27. A sound made a wild turkey DSC executive 36.28. A duck species director 30. 31. 32. 34. 36. 39. 41. 43. 44.

Person who fixes guns A young deer A shotshell brand A sound made by a wild turkey A duck species Keep these open when shooting A good redfish lure, in gold Keeps the catch fresh The white goose

Trijicon acquires IR Defense Trijicon, Inc. announced the acquisition of IR Defense Corporation, a manufacturer of industry leading thermal viewing and aiming systems.

Tactical apparel acquisition Compass Diversified Holdings of Westport, Connecticut has purchased 5.11 Tatical of Irvine, California, a manufacturer of tactical apparel and gear.

Saville to head AFWA campaign

New VP at Polaris Polaris Industries Inc. announced that Joel Houlton, the senior engineering director at Polaris Industries, Inc., has been named vice president of global safety and quality.

Fall Hunting Classic underway The Fall Hunting Classic returns to Bass Pro Shops locations throughout the U.S. and Canada August 12-28.

Curci named TFO Rep of Year Matt Curci, who works in the northern Rocky Mountain territory, received the Sales Representative of the Year award from Temple Fork Outfitters.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Quick redfish Creole

Nature’s Calling

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

3-5 pounds of redfish fillets cut into 1x2-inch chunks 4 tbsps. minced garlic 1 can diced tomatoes 1 medium onion, chopped Olive oil 24-36 oz. jar of chunk-style salsa Worcestershire sauce Salt, pepper and cayenne pepper to taste Fresh chives, snipped, for garnish

Sauté onions in olive oil for 3 minutes or until soft. Add garlic and tomatoes and simmer for five minutes. Add salsa, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper and simmer for 20 minutes. Add fish and stir gently and simmer with cover for about 10 minutes. Serve over rice with chives for garnish. —Outdoor Alabama

Duck breast with red chili glaze 8 duck breasts 1 cup champagne vinegar 1 to 1-1/2 tbsps. red chili flakes 1 tbsp. garlic, minced 2 tbsps. onions, minced 2 cups light brown sugar, packed 2 tbsps. tomato paste 1/2 cup soy sauce 1 tsp. salt 1 stick sweet butter, cut into 8-10 chunks Simmer champagne vinegar, chili flakes, garlic and onion in a heavy saucepan until reduced by half. Add brown sugar, tomato paste, soy sauce and salt and

bring back to a simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in butter chunks. Score the skin and fat layer of the raw bird with a sharp knife. Lightly season with salt and pepper. Place the duck breast, skin side down, over a hot charcoal or hardwood fire. Cook the breast skin-side down for the majority of the grill time — approximately 8 minutes depending on the heat of the fire. Turn breast over and grill the inside for 2 minutes maximum. Slice the duck breast and serve topped with red chili glaze. —TPWD


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Research projects to use dollars from Deepwater settlement The Texas OneGulf Center of Excellence announced more than $2 million in research projects to address priority problems affecting the health and well-being of the Gulf of Mexico and those who depend of it. These projects, funded by the Office of the Governor, represent the first major allocation of research dollars from the Texas OneGulf consortium, which was created after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to direct funding in support of programs, projects, and activities that restore and protect the environment and economy of the Gulf Coast region. The projects, helmed by a variety of institutions across Texas, include: Gulf of Mexico Report Card Prototype for Texas (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi: $550,000;
Collaborating Institutions: Harwell Gentile & Associates and University of Delaware) This project will develop a prototype Gulf of Mexico Report Card by evaluating the overall ecosystem health of the Texas Gulf Coast. Restoring and enhancing structurally complex nursery habitat to enhance reef fish populations (Texas A&M University at Galveston: $223,752;
Collaborating Institutions: Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi and The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley) This project will develop structurally complex nursery habitat using both natural and man-made materials to improve the early life survival and recruitment success of reef-dependent fishes, and gather baseline biological information on the fishery benefits of creating and enhancing these habitats in the northwest Gulf of Mexico. Isotope Geochemistry of Texas Coastal Waters (Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi: $220,365;
Collaborating Institution: Texas A&M University) This project employs an underwater glider to conduct sampling, providing an early and late summer overview of coastal Texas water column carbon and nitrogen source variations, and examines how they contribute to water column hypoxia. Developing a predictive ecosystem model for the Lower Laguna Madre (The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley: $213,956;
Collaborating Institution: Texas State University) This project will develop an ecological modeling system for sustainable management of the Lower Laguna Madre, a data-poor yet ecologically important region of the Gulf of Mexico. Texas OneGulf Center of Excellence Pilot Project Program (Texas A&M University Health Science Center: $150,000;
Collaborating Institution: The University of Texas Medical Branch) The project will provide seed money for pilot projects that can be employed rapidly to assess the impact of disasters along the Texas Gulf coast in real-time. Red Tide Data Integration Project
 (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi: $103,650) Researchers will work together to better prepare first responders, emergency rooms and the medical system in responding to red tide events, minimizing human health risks.

Texas OneGulf Network of Experts Communications (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi: $81,390;
 Collaborating Institution: Amazee Labs LLC) The Texas OneGulf Network of Experts (TONE) is a network of more than 150 Texas experts in human health, science, marine policy and related fields convened to work to tackle Gulf problems, and the goal of this tool is to facilitate communications amongst the researchers, policy makers and the general public. Species Identification Training for Effective Monitoring and Management of Harmful Algai Blooms (Texas A&M University at Galveston: $60,000;
Collaborating Institutions: Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System) This program will provide comprehensive training in identification and taxonomy for scientists, technicians and managers regarding the effective monitoring and management of harmful algae blooms. Texas OneGulf is led by the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi. —Harte Research Institute

August 12, 2016

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NATIONAL Endangered species procedures change

MATTHEW GRASSEDONIO , 12, OF CORPU S CHRISTI, HAD BEEN WANTIN G TO GET A DEE R WITH A BOW FOR A LONG TIME. HE PRACTICED A ND PRACTICED U NTIL HE COULD FIN ALLY DRAW ENOUG H POUNDS TO H UNT.

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its final methodology for improving the way it identifies and prioritizes pending Endangered Species Act status reviews. The new approach will allow the Service to be more strategic in how it addresses pending status reviews, to be more transparent in how it establishes workload priorities, and to work better with partners to conserve imperiled plants and wildlife. The Service has more than 500 species in line for consideration for listing under the ESA. With this new methodology, the Service will place each pending status review in one of five priority categories or “bins,” that will ensure that the species most in need of consideration for listing are addressed first. The five prioritization bins for pending status reviews, listed in priority order, and the revisions made to the final methodology are: 1: Highest Priority: Critically Imperiled 2: Strong Data Available on Species’ Status 3: New Science Underway to Inform Key Uncertainties 4: Conservation Efforts in Development or Underway 5: Limited Data Currently Available The final methodology applies only to actions that consider whether to add a species to the lists of threatened and endangered species. Actions to remove species from the lists due to recovery or other reasons are prioritized and funded separately. —USFWS

Service earlier this week, we do not believe there is a sufficient enough need that exists to issue elk contingency licenses this year,” Leif said. “Following the elk management plan, the Commission already increased the antlerless license allocation by a total of 839 to slow the growth of the Black Hills elk population.” —SDGFP

Nebraska’s upland numbers on the rise Nebraska’s upland bird harvest saw a big increase between the 2014 and 2015 seasons, according to results from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission’s annual hunter harvest survey. Pheasant harvest was up by 26 percent. During the 2015 season, 166,285 rooster pheasants were harvested, compared to 131,423 during the 2014 season. Quail harvest increased by 73 percent, with 91,472 quail harvested in 2015, compared to 52,947 birds in 2014. “To see such large increases in upland bird harvests shows that our pheasant and quail populations are rebounding from the harsh drought of 2012, and that hunters are taking notice,” said Karie Decker, interim Wildlife Division administrator for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. Early reports indicate that 2015-16 overwinter survival was good for pheasants, quail and other upland game in Nebraska. —NGPC

Former DU president dies

Feral hogs may damage water quality

Former president and longtime Ducks Unlimited volunteer leader Hazard Campbell died in Buffalo, New York, at the age of 87. “An international ambassador for philanthropy, Hazard Campbell cut a path for future volunteer leaders of Ducks Unlimited to follow. He was more than just a great mentor to me, he was a hero for conservation,” said Mike Woodward, chairman of DU’s National Development Committee. Beginning in 1956, Campbell was involved in almost every aspect of Ducks Unlimited. He served as the western New York chairman and as a national trustee. He also founded the first DU Canada chapter in 1974. Later, he served as DU Atlantic Flyway regional vice president, member of DU Canada’s board of directors and Atlantic Flyway senior vice president. He was also a member of Wetlands America Trust and served as WAT president from 1991 to 1993. From 1986 to 1987, Hazard served as president of Ducks Unlimited Inc. and subsequently served as board chairman. Campbell was the chairman of the Seymour H. Knox foundation and a lifelong member of the historic Turkey Point Company, one of the oldest duck hunting clubs in Canada.

A research project by the Louisiana State University’s Agricultural Center’s School of Renewable Natural Resources in conjunction with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries shows that feral hogs, recorded in all 64 parishes, are having a detrimental effect on water quality on some water bodies in central Louisiana between Alexandria and Natchitoches. The research, conducted from June 18-September 1 in 2015, revealed that pathogens were extensive in sampled water bodies on private lands adjacent to Kisatchie National Forest and were regularly associated with feral hogs. The water at all 40 sites in the study contained one or more pathogens that were potentially unsafe for human or wildlife contact. Of particular concern, of the 40 sites sampled, DNA fingerprinting positively matched 22 sites with high levels of E. coli in the water with fecal samples obtained from feral hogs both within and outside the areas sampled. Additionally, salmonella was found at 38 of 40 sites. Associations were also noted between feral hog presence, heterotrophic bacteria counts (a measure of overall bacteria amount in the water) and microbes that could cause leptospirosis, yersinosis and Klebsiella pneumonia. Leptospira can cause kidney damage and loss of renal function in squirrels, raccoons and white-tailed deer. Leptospira has caused abortions in white-tailed deer and other mammals. Salmonella can infect wild turkeys and other wild birds resulting in liver damage, severe diarrhea and death. Klebsiella can cause sinusitis and pneumonia in wild birds and turkeys. Yersinia can cause gastroenteritis in white-tailed deer and raccoons, and severe overwinter mortality has been observed in wild migratory birds. “We learned through this study that there are some alarming pathogens in the water and feral hogs are implicated in the spread of these pathogens,’’ said Scott Durham, LDWF director of Species Management.

—DU

No contingency elk licenses in Black Hills Earlier this year, the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks Commission established a pool of standby contingency antlerless elk licenses that could be issued if range conditions in the Black Hills dictated a need for them. Next week, at the August Commission meeting, the Department of Game, Fish and Parks will recommend the Commission not authorize issuance of any contingency licenses. “One component of our agency’s elk management plan was the development of elk contingency licenses,” noted Tony Leif, director of the GFP Division of Wildlife. “These licenses provide us with the ability to issue more licenses to assist in lowering elk numbers when reduced habitat conditions such as a drought dictate a reduction.” “After a discussion with the U.S. Forest

—LDWF


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August 12, 2016

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CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING

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FIELDPRO FEEDERS Quailty feeders and control units 25 years experience Henry Gresham (405) 359-0017 TROPHY TOTES Soft-sided coolers designed for the head and cape of a deer. Contact Brian Hicks brian.hicks@trophytotes.com or (409) 781-2329

WWW.LITTLEPEACHHOUSE.COM Dathne (979) 241-5119

HUNTING PROPERTIES Briggs Freeman Sotherby’s International Realty Johnny W. Purselley listing broker 17 years experience jpurselley@briggsfreeman.com or (817) 793-9274

CLINTON, ARKANSAS 210 acres with house, cabin, Turkeys Deer, Hogs, Bears All offers welcome (501) 412-6621

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

HUNTING ON THE RIO GRANDE White Wing and Dove / Texasdovehunt.com (956) 542-2223

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does. Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996

AMMO FOR SALE 80 Rounds 416 Rigby Ammunition, 400GR Hydro Solid Federal Premium Ammunition in the box $4.00 per round or $75.00 per box. (817) 925-1352

503.44 ACRE REAL CO. NEAR KERRVILLE Axis/Whitetail Deer, 2 mobiles Prop. #25 www.hillcountryrealestate.net PIONEER REAL ESTATE Shirley Shandley, Broker

NORTH IDAHO, 40 ACRES Elk, deer and bear Old cabin included $97,500 (888) 820-2030

(830) 232-6422 191.31 ACRES NEAR LEAKEY, REAL CO. 4/3 Country House Prop. #6 www.hillcountryrealestate.net PIONEER REAL ESTATE Shirley Shandley, Broker (830) 232-6422

SOUTH TEXAS QUAIL HUNTING 20000 + acres la salle Dimmit counties Banner quail year Min 2 day packages, food, lodging, guide (210) 215-1837

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

Puzzle solution from Page 22

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 25

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FISHING CHARTER FISHING Port Mansfield Shallow water, wade and fly fishing specialist Capt. Steve Ellis (956) 492-8472 SABINE LAKE FISHING Trout, flounder, reds. Captain Randy’s Guide Service running multiple boats. Check for specials at www.fishsabine.com (409) 719-6067 TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296 dickyn@lagovistalodge.com DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

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DALLAS ECOLOGICAL FOUNDATION The mission of DEF is to promote outdoor education and to promote and fund conservation of wildlife worldwide. Brandon Hindman (972) 504-9008

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ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

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Bass caught in the Amazon [PEACOCK] Valuable body part on a rhino [HORN] Popular duck along Texas coast [REDHEAD] Scaled or Montezuma [QUAIL] Found in the boathouse [OARS]

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JOBS JOURNALIST WANTED Lone Star Outdoor News is seeking a reporter for a full-time position at its Dallas office. Journalism degree required. Candidates must have a passion for hunting and fishing and experience with both. Experience with social media, web, Adobe and InDesign a plus. Join our team and write about the Texas outdoors. Send resumes to EDITOR@LONESTAROUTDOORNEWS.COM

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DATEBOOK MAY 28-SEPTEMBER 5

Coastal Conservation Association CCA Texas Star Tournament (713) 626-4222 startournament.org

AUGUST 11-13

Texas Deer Association Annual Convention JW Marriott Hill Country (512) 499-0466 texasdeerassociation.com

AUGUST 12-14

Texas Trophy Hunters Association Houston Extravaganza NRG Center (210) 529-8500 ttha.com

AUGUST 13

Coastal Conservation Association Aransas Bay Banquet Paws N’ Taws, Rockport (800) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation North Texas Banquet Embassy Suites Bass Pro, Grapevine (214) 693-8523 rmef.org

AUGUST 13-14

Texas Gun and Knife Shows Abilene Civic Center texasgunandknifeshows.com

AUGUST 18

Coastal Conservation Association Lower Laguna Madre Banquet Port Isabel Convention Center (800) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Ducks Unlimited Frisco Dinner Embassy Suites Conference Center (972) 743-5230 ducks.org/Texas

AUGUST 19

Delta Waterfowl Smith County Banquet Bushman’s Event Center, Bullard (903) 276-9883 deltawaterfowl.org

AUGUST 19-21

Texas Trophy Hunters Association San Antonio Extravaganza Freeman Coliseum Expo Hall (210) 529-8500 ttha.com

AUGUST 20

Quail Forever Sporting Clays Tournament American Shooting Center, Houston gulfcoastquailforever3066.org Dallas Safari Club Summer Fun Shoot Elm Fork Shooting Range (972) 980-9800 biggame.org Delta Waterfowl Brazos Valley Banquet Burleson County Expo Center, Caldwell (979) 451-1262 deltawaterfowl.org National Wild Turkey Federation Blackland Prairie Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, West (254) 855-2902 nwtf.org Ducks Unlimited Northwest Prairie Dinner St. Sava, Cypress (281) 213-3301 ducks.org/Texas

AUGUST 25

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

Ducks Unlimited Waco Sportsman’s Night Out The Phoenix Ballroom (254) 366-0197 ducks.org/Texas Coastal Conservation Association Hill Country Banquet New Braunfels Civic Center (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Delta Waterfowl Houston Banquet Chateau Crystale (713) 824-7973 deltawaterfowl.org

AUGUST 26

Coastal Conservation Association Trinity Bay Banquet Nuevo Leon Event Center, Baytown (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

AUGUST 26-27

Deer Breeders Corporation Annual Convention Hyatt Regency Hill Country (972) 289-3100 dbcdeer.com

AUGUST 26-28

Texas Trophy Hunters Association Corpus Christi Extravaganza American Bank Center (210) 529-8500 ttha.com Texas Women Angler’s Tournament Port Aransas gofishtx.com

AUGUST 27

Quail Coalition South Texas Banquet Richard M. Borchard Fairgrounds, Robstown (979) 204-3329 southtexasquailcoalition.org Ducks Unlimited Wimberley Dinner Wimberley Community Center (512) 656-0535 ducks.org/Texas National Wild Turkey Federation Cowhill Chapter Banquet 10-2-4 Ranch, Commerce (903) 886-8880 nwtf.org

AUGUST 31

Quail Coalition Hill Country Banquet Raddison Hotel & Suites, Downtown Austin (214) 534-4122 hcquail.org

SEPTEMBER 1

Coastal Conservation Association Sam Houston Chapter Banquet Walker County Fairgrounds (281) 797-6908 ccatexas.org

SEPTEMBER 8

Ducks Unlimited Pflugerville Dinner Pluger Hall (512) 461-3568 ducks.org/Texas Ducks Unlimited Lake Lewisville Dinner Circle R Ranch, Flower Mound (214) 287-1219 ducks.org/Texas


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August 12, 2016

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August 12, 2016

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7/12/16 8:07 AM

August 12, 2016 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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