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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

July 28, 2017

State holding up to $47M of hunters’ money to balance budget

Volume 13, Issue 23

Silky smooth

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News An annual legislative tradition lives on with the approval of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s 2018-2019 budget. A pot of money in the agency’s largest funding source, Fund 9, remains unappropriated in order to help balance the state’s budget. This year, the amount of Fund 9 is almost $47 million. Why legislators leave hefty amounts of funds sitting in Fund 9 was amply demonstrated five years ago. Then, approximately 44 percent of the Fund 9 balance was used to help certify the General Appropriations Bill (2012-13), according to the Legislative Budget Board. In fiscal 2017, Fund 9 will account for 36.2 percent of TPWD’s budget or about $135 million. Besides hunting and fishing stamps, revenues stream into Fund 9 from hunting and fishing licenses and permits as well as from the state’s portion of the Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts. Boat users and manufacturers chip in fees and taxes. Other revenue flows from the sale or lease of grazing rights on public land and fines collected for violating state laws protecting fish and wildlife. Fund 9 is also known as the Game, Fish and Water Safety Account since it may only be used for purposes related to regulating and protecting fish and wildlife and enforcing Texas’ water safety laws. Legislators, though, authorize much of its spending. Clayton Wolf, Wildlife Division director, said TPWD officials knew the

Anglers, like South Padre Island fly-fishing guide Eric Glass, have been taking advantage of some calm winds. Offshore, captains at Blue Fin Charters in Freeport said they had two good weeks in July after a windy June. To the south, anglers noticed a change from calm to windy conditions the weekend of July 21. August is typically the calmest month along the Texas coast. Garret Hodne studied wave height data for 15 years (from 2000-2014) from the closest wave height recording buoy to South Padre Island.

In August, on average, wave heights exceeded 5 feet about 5 percent of the time. July is the second calmest month averaging 12 percent. June is third at 17 percent, and Sept. fourth at 19 percent. In August, the phenomenon where the bay and horizon appear indistinguishable happens only a few times. Fishermen are reporting good catches all along the coast. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Hill Country bass fishing heats up By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Please turn to page 19

Gator hunting Why a hook and line set is required

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News It’s an unfamiliar hunting method to some. A hook and line is set, often hanging from a tree branch. Dangling a few feet above the water’s surface is often a store-bought chicken. The hunters wait, hoping an American alligator

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 14 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 24 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 25 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

Largemouth and smallmouth bass are biting deep on many lakes by midmorning. Bass are schooling during the hottest hours of the day. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

Barry Dodd. “The bite has been very good for both smallmouth and largemouth bass,” Dodd said. “The small-

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HUNTING

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

Safety and game recovery are two reasons why Texas requires a hook and line set to harvest American alligators. Photo by Joe Richards, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

All sorts of lures are being used to catch bass on Hill Country and Central Texas lakes right about now. But when push comes to shove, soft plastics rule, especially after the first couple of hours of daylight when the sun is up and temperatures are soaring. Canyon Lake bass fishing is going strong, but to get in on the action you’ll have to go deep, like about 40 to 45 feet down with drop-shot rigs, whacky worms and tubes in watermelon, said guide

Bowhunting at night

FISHING

(Pg. 4)

Technology assists hunters.

TV show host busted Bizarre charges include arrowing cow.

Croaker cash

(Pg. 8)

Bait is big business.

(Pg. 4)

Cats in summer Bite picks up in the heat.

(Pg. 8)


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HUNTING Youth hunters out to prove their mettle By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Team members competed in New Mexico this month, representing Texas in a national youth hunter education contest. Photo from Jeanette Hammonds.

For most Texas youth, hunter education is just a one-day event. But for five North Texas teens, it’s a never-ending quest that’s landed them in a national competition. Team Redneck, as the five are called, is representing Texas in the NRA’s national Youth Hunter Education Challenge in New Mexico.

The competition involves eight skill tests on hunting knowledge and shooting skills. The knowledge categories are: hunter responsibility, trail safety, orienteering and wildlife identification. The youth are then tested on their ability to shoot a .22 rifle, shotgun, muzzleloader and on archery. The competition, which has been around since 1985, has junior and senior divisions based on age. Winners will receive trophies.

YHEC North Texas Coordinator David Hammonds said this is the first time Texas has had an organized team before the competition. The teens, Nathan Collins, 18; Seth Chapman, 17; Aiden Lovell, 15; Brayden Parker, 15; and Alura Lovell, 13, have been practicing weekly since midMarch, while reviewing hunter information on their own. Registering for the competition wasn’t cheap with a $695 entry fee per person, Please turn to page 23

Bowhunting hogs by night a thrill By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

For many, killing hogs is a necessary part of ranch management. But under the right circumstances, hog hunting can be an elite hunting experience. Jeff Christopher, of Ridgeback Creek in Crowell, only caters to those who want to bowhunt hogs — day or night. By far, the most challenging is bowhunting at night, which also happens to be when monster hogs become active. “I do mainly archery, that’s my passion,” Christopher said. “You settle into nature a little bit better with a bow.” Hunting hogs with a rifle is easier because hogs can be taken at a greater distance than with a bow. Getting close is necessary with a bow, meaning there’s not a lot of room for mistakes. Taking account of wind and terrain is important when stalking a target, which isn’t as critical when hunting with a firearm. “You’re going to have to be in his backyard,” Christopher said. “It’s a challenge.” Clint Montgomery, executive director of the Texans Archery Club & Texas Archery Academy, agrees that night hog hunts are a test of skill. “These pigs are mostly nocturnal, so your best results are at night,” he said. Hogs are highly intelligent and don’t stick to a pattern, which means hunters must use all their skill to move in close and arrow one successfully. Hunting them by bow at night is generally far more difficult than shooting a buck with a rifle, Montgomery said, adding his record is 12 hogs in one night. “You are part of the woods,” Montgomery said. “You are a predator.” Christopher said his night hunts use solar-powered lights to illuminate feeder areas. Bowhunters must have the right equipment, such as a light on the bow sight to see the pins, to be successful, he said. The hogs start to move around 30-40 minutes before dark. Out-of-state hunters like to come to Ridgeback Creek to hunt for hogs. So do people new to hunting or “meat eaters” who are looking to provide food for the table. Christopher said he sees a lot of recreational archery enthusiasts who decide to hunt for the first time. He ends up guiding them on how and where to take a shot. Unlike deer or other animals, a hog’s vital organs are bunched up in the front. He coaches bowhunters to aim toward the lungs. Big hogs also have a tough shield behind their shoulders, which

Bowhunters who target hogs at night say the pastime is more challenging and exciting than hunting with a rifle. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

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Another TV host in trouble An online outdoor television host, former Weatherford police officer and deputy county fire marshal, was arrested June 29 on charges of livestock theft, theft of property and unauthorized use of a motor vehicle. Ken Dabbs claimed he observed two men cutting apart a cow when a Parker County Sheriff’s officer arrived at the scene, and also claimed he had taken several shots at the men. Dabbs also told the officer his truck got stuck when trying to chase the men, and he used a John Deere tractor to try to pull his vehicle out. A generator also was located in his truck bed. The cow was located and a necropsy was performed

at the North Texas Veterinary Hospital. The cause of death was determined to be an arrow in the heifer’s abdomen. The arrow matched arrows in Dabb’s truck. The property owner told an officer that Dabbs did not have permission to use the generator or the tractor. Dabbs currently hosts an online hunting show, “Hunt Wicked Close,” on huntchannelTV. The show was aired on the Pursuit Channel in previous years. The show involves Dabbs and his wife, Rachel Dabbs, hunting with bows and firearms. —Staff report

Pronghorn poacher pleads guilty A Seminole man Texas Parks and Wildlife game wardens arrested in connection with the shooting and killing of a pronghorn entered a guilty plea this week in Yoakum County court, according to news reports. Isaak Harder Harms, 31, entered the guilty plea stemming from four charges filed by the Lubbock District Game Wardens, accusing him of having shot, killed and failing to retrieve a pronghorn, according to Lubbock officials. The incident occurred approximately 4 miles west of Highway 214 and County Road 120 in Yoakum County. —Staff report


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July 28, 2017

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Boddington named Weatherby award winner Hunter, author and television host Craig Boddington has been named the 2017 Weatherby Hunting and Conservation Award winner. The award will be presented at the Weatherby Foundation banquet on Jan. 3, 2018 at the Omni Dallas Hotel. Boddington was born and raised in Kansas, where his early big-game experience began in the mid-1960s. An Eagle Scout, he attended the University of Kansas on an NROTC scholarship, graduating with an English degree and a regular commission in the United States Marine Corps. After leaving active duty in 1979, Boddington continued his service in the Marine Corps Reserve and was recalled to active duty seven times. He retired as a colonel in 2005.
 His outdoor writing career began in college. In 1979, he joined Petersen Publishing Company. From 1983 to 1994, he was editor

of Petersen’s Hunting Magazine. His body of work includes more than 5,000 published articles and 28 books, and he has hosted six series on outdoor television. Boddington’s first international hunt was in northern British Columbia in 1973 and his first African safari was in Kenya in 1977. He has extensive hunting experience on six continents, including obtaining the Capra Super 30, Ovis Super 20, two North American Grand Slams, and the North American Super Slam from Grand Slam/Ovis. Boddington is a life member of DSC and SCI, a Permanent Director of Weatherby Foundation International, and a Professional Member of the Boone and Crockett Club. He received the Conklin Award in 2009. He lives with his wife, Donna, in Paso Robles, California, and has a small farm in southeastern Kansas.

 —Weatherby Foundation

Drones used to study predator management A $10,000 grant from the DSC Foundation, a charitable arm of the Dallas Safari Club, will boost Delta Waterfowl’s breakthrough research into using drone-mounted, thermal-imaging cameras to locate nesting ducks and other wildlife. The grant will fund Delta Waterfowl studies aiming to use drone technology to find overwater nesting ducks such as canvasbacks, monitor densities of waterfowl predators, and detect the nests of upland-nesting birds such as mallards, pintails, teal, pheasants, songbirds and piping plovers. In 2016, a team led by Frank Rohwer, Del-

ta’s president and chief scientist, performed an initial test-flight using a drone carrying a thermal-imaging camera over grassland cover. Rohwer was able to pinpoint nesting ducks indicated by the camera’s heat signature. The discovery led to formal research that could revolutionize the way ducks are studied and surveyed. Even in the digital age, waterfowl researchers are required to painstakingly search for duck nests. Using drones could be a game changer. —Delta Waterfowl

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Pursuing gators Continued from page 1

has taken the bait. ter, you can lose it,” Warner said. “It will Once hooked, the gator is reeled in and sink and it won’t float up until it bloats in usually dispatched with a shotgun loaded about a week.” with buckshot. Permits are currently issued to landownIn the fall season, open in 22 counties ers based on their location and the availin Southeast Texas (called the core coun- able habitat, but Warner hopes to update ties), this is one of only a few methods al- that approach in the coming years. lowed to take a gator, “We can make with the others being the program more an approved alligator scientific and isgig, archery equipsue tags based ment with a barbed on the habitat in arrow and at least the specific area 300-pound test line as opposed to the attached or a handcounty in generheld snare with an inal,” he said. “Tags Sept. 10-30 tegral locking mechacould be issued nism. more like we isCore Counties: The fall alligator sue deer tags unAngelina, Brazoria, season begins Sept. der the Managed 10. Lands Deer PerCalhoun, Chambers, “We will issue bemit program.” Galveston, Hardin, Jackson, tween 1,500 and If you’re lucky Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, 1,700 permits,” said enough to get a Matagorda, Nacogdoches, Jonathan Warner, alpermit, check the ligator program leader alligator hunting Newton, Orange, Polk, for Texas Parks and regulations. For Refugio, Sabine, San Wildlife Department. example, baited Augustine, San Jacinto, Some hunters wonlines have to be Trinity, Tyler and Victoria der why the methods labeled with a visare so specific, espeible gear tag with cially when they see specific informaa big gator near the tion, using rimfire bank. ammunition is illegal and alligators killed “It’s mainly a safety issue,” Warner said. must be immediately tagged with a hide “We do drawn hunts on WMAs, and most tag within 10 inches of the tip of the alof the hunting areas in Southeast Texas ligator’s tail. Special regulations also apare wide-open marshes and bayous — it’s ply to the sale of an alligator to a licensed all very flat topography. We don’t want dealer. shots fired over open water.” A spring season in noncore counties has Recovery of the animal can also pose a a different set of regulations and tagging problem without a line attached. requirements. About 200 permits are is“Even if you kill a gator over open wa- sued in the spring, Warner said.

Fall Alligator Season


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FISHING

The business of catching croaker

Croaker are in high demand by fishermen who pay upwards to $18 per dozen. The haul for croaker boats is limited to 1,500 per day. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Popular baitfish brings big bucks By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The croaker fishing business is booming along the Texas coast and on any given weekend, from about June through September, bait camps are cashing in on these little baitfish that catch tons of trout. There are thousands of “croaker soakers” that catch fish every weekend during the summer.

And the number of fishermen using them is increasing each year. Brian Huggaid at Clem’s Marina in Corpus Christi said during the peak summer months, they will go through about 1,500 croaker each day. The cost of the popular baitfish can vary depending on where you purchase them. At Port O’Connor, they go for about $10 per dozen. But, down at South Padre Island, some of the bait camps are getting upwards of $18 a dozen. “I’d have to say that the average fisherman will buy four to six

dozen croakers at a time,” Huggaid said. “But we’ve got guides that come in and get 10 to 20 dozen every morning. Our sales of croaker continue to grow each year. The past two years have been very good.” At one marina in Port O’Connor, it’s estimated that they sell 250 to 350 dozen croaker on most summer weekends. At $10 per dozen with 350 dozen sold that comes out to $3,500. Couple that with sales of live shrimp at $20 per quart, beer, ice and tackle. Summer is good, but bait camp

operators have some pretty lean months to deal with as well. “Selling croaker is a big part of our business here in Port Mansfield,” said Capt. Chad Kinney. “We run two croaker boats and barely catch enough to keep the customers happy. Croaker bring in the fishermen that buy bait, tackle, ice and drinks.” But that’s not enough money to make marina owners rich. Kinney said they have boats to maintain, permits and licenses to buy, along with a number of slow winter months. Just to be able to buy a

croaker catching permit is in the $15,000 range. One of the main spots for catching croakers is West Matagorda Bay, according to Robby Sanders, who along with his dad runs two boats out of Froggies Bait Dock in Port O’Connor. “My dad runs the shrimp boat, I run the croaker boat,” he said. “They are basically rigged the same. But I fish different areas to find croaker.” Windy conditions are good for catching croaker. The first hour and last hour of daylight are also Please turn to page 14

Guide takes on challenge of fishing entire coast

Some like it hot Catfish hitting in summer haunts By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

fly-fishers and traditional anglers, although Chavez will mostly fly-fish. Chavez said the idea for the expedition came to him during a camping trip near Rockport. “I got to thinking how cool it would be to fish the whole coast,” he said. “I’ve spent time in almost every bay in the state, but I’ve never done it on one trip.” David Todd is helping Chavez organize the trip. Tackle, meals and lodging will be provided and arrangements are being made to move clients’ vehicles from one fishing spot to the next

Darrell “Killer” Taylor focuses on eating-size catfish this time of year, and the fishing has been good at Lake Conroe. “We’re catching a lot of catfish,” the Conroe guide said while fishing under a Channel and blue catfish are being landed in shallow bridge on the lake on July water on rivers and at mid-depths in reservoirs. Photo by 24. “Most of the fish we keep Lone Star Outdoor News. have been channel cats, but we have been catching a good num- especially on South Texas rivers at ber of throwback blues the last few night, when the fish move out of weeks. It’s good to know they are in the holes and into shallower water to feed. here.” River anglers have been locating Taylor uses his own Catfish Killer cats at night in the Colorado River punch bait to attract the fish for his customers. In wintertime, he switch- near Eagle Lake and the Trinity River near Bridge City. es to jug lines for trophy-sized fish. On 2coolfishing.com, austin2989 Anglers don’t think shallow water for most species in the Texas sum- reported good catches of both catmer, but catfishermen are different, fish and freshwater drum on live bait

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By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News Describing an upcoming month-long excursion along the entire Texas coast seems challenging. It’s part guided fishing trip, part tournament, part video and part fundraiser. For guide Jeremy Chavez, though, it’s easy. “To me, it’s more of an adventure than anything,” said the Houston native, who guides in Texas, Florida and Louisiana. The Clearwater Texas Coastal Adventure begins Aug. 26 in South Padre Island and concludes Sept. 27 on Sabine Lake. It will be broken down into one- and two-day trips with Chavez on his journey to fish the approximately 415mile Texas coast. The fishing will be done in shallow water on a flat skiff. It’s open to both

Jeremy Chavez will fly-fish the Texas coast from bottom to top beginning next month. Photo from David Todd.


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July 28, 2017

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High-octane surf fishing By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

For many casual anglers, there’s only one kind of surf fishing: anchor a rod in the sand and hope for the best. But one former guide who specialized in surf fishing takes an ADHD approach, if you will, that keeps things interesting. Johnny Quiroz II’s strategy when fishing the surf is to keep his eyes peeled and his rod ready. Quiroz, a resident of McAllen, was a fishing guide in Alaska and got into guiding surf fishing at South Padre Island some five years ago before retiring recently. Quiroz believes in starting out the morning looking for trout and transitioning to Spanish mackerel or maybe even tarpon as the situation dictates. Plenty of opportunity to sight-cast to jack crevalle exists as the fish cruise the waves throughout the day. “Look for anything different. Look for soft water,” he said, explaining he looks for shoreline water with less waves cresting. Like traditional guides, Quiroz goes to where he thinks the fish are, except he uses a 4-wheel drive instead of a boat to race

up and down the beach to find them. “I’m looking for birds. I’m looking for bait,” he said. Birds circling over a ball of baitfish are a good indication that mackerel or something bigger could be feeding. If ladyfish are present in the surf, there’s a chance Spanish mackerel aren’t far away. Once birds are spotted, Quiroz and anglers alike spring into action by running into the surf to cast toward the birds from sandbars. He recommends using spoons or a lure that can be cast a long distance. “Most people will set up and wait. I personally like to move. If it doesn’t happen in 15 minutes, I didn’t read it right,” he said. Once the bait dissipates, Quiroz will call his anglers in and move up the beach until something new catches his eye and the action starts all over again. “This is more of run and gun,” he said. “I’m more reactive to what’s happening. You just move on it.” Quiroz uses spoons, and jigs with soft plastic when targeting trout or any game fish in the surf. Conditions of water will determine what to use. A calm

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surf calls for small, soft plastics to work the bottom. If big waves are present or distance casting is needed, he uses spoons. Shrimp are great for catching reds near the edges of sandbars when they move in later in the fall. “It’s hard and challenging and interesting,” Quiroz said. “There’s a little something for everyone.” Finding birds helps surf-fishermen find fish in the Lower Laguna Madre. Photos by Bobby Sanchez, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Mother and father die in boating accident A father and mother of two children were killed in mid-July after their boat was hit by another fishing boat at night on Lake Conroe. Jason Clark, 39, of Magnolia was pronounced dead at the scene July 11, while his wife, Sara, was rushed to a local hospital where she was in critical condition. However, she was later taken off life support and died, according to reports. The Clark’s 10-year-old daughter, who was also on the boat, was treated and released from the hospital that night as well. She was able to call 911 and help rescuers reach the boating accident. The Clarks are also survived by an 18-year-old son. Preliminary information showed the bass boat with the family had marker lights illuminated. The other bass boat with two bass fishermen was believed to have been headed back in for a weigh-in deadline. Their boat was also lit. The two bass fishermen did not see the family ahead of them. They slammed into the family’s boat at the center where the adult male was sitting at the steering console. The boat then continued forward before rolling over and ejecting the two bass fishermen, according to news reports. Both anglers were wearing lifejackets and were not injured. Authorities said during a press conference that boat lights can be difficult to distinguish from lights on the shore coming from homes and businesses. Game wardens did a field sobriety test on the bass fisherman who did not appear impaired. The investigation continues. —Staff Report

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear on the main lake, stained up the river; 78–84 degrees; 3.85’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live perch and goldfish. AMISTAD: Water murky; 79–83 degrees; 32.56’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics and perch-colored lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver slabs. White bass are good on top-waters and slabs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and punch bait. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 79–84 degrees; 1.47’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to weightless flukes, Texas rigs and shallow-running crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around structure. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 85–88 degrees; 0.23’ high. Black bass are fair on Carolinarigged flukes, weightless stick worms and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. BASTROP: Water stained; 79–83 degrees. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 0.30’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad in coves. White bass are fair on pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on summer sausage. Yellow catfish are fair on perch and live shad. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 84–87 degrees; 0.30’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, white buzzbaits and buzz frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 83–84 degrees; 2.00’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows on brush piles in 12-15 feet. Catfish are slow. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and dark soft plastic worms in reeds. Striped bass are fair down-rigging silver and gold spoons near the dam. Redfish are good on perch, tilapia and shad. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp and cut bait. Blue catfish are fair on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 83–86 degrees: 0.18’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, swimbaits on deeper docks and shakyhead worms in green/pumpkin. Crappie are slow. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.40’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon seed, green/pumpkin and redbug soft plastic worms around docks in 8-10 feet. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs over brush piles in 5-15 feet. Channel catfish are fair on cut shad and prepared bait over baited holes. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, flukes and watermelon/candy stick worms in creeks early. Striped bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits and

plastic swim baits at daylight. White bass are fair on small lipless crankbaits and plastic swim baits in creeks. Crappie are fair on pink/white and chartreuse tube jigs and live minnows. Channel catfish are good on liver, minnows and dip bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on goldfish and perch upriver. CADDO: Water stained; 85–90 degrees; 0.33’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Striped bass are good on spoons and striper jigs near the dam. Redfish are very good down-rigging silver and gold spoons near the crappie wall. Channel and blue catfish are very good on liver, cheese bait and shrimp. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 1.23’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin flukes and top-waters early. Striped bass are fair trolling crankbaits over humps, White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs in standing timber. Channel catfish are fair on live bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on goldfish and perch upriver. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, Texasrigged worms and top-water poppers. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 22.21’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse/white spinner baits, crankbaits and green/pumpkin worms with chartreuse tails in 5-15 feet early. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are good on live bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on live bait upriver. COLEMAN: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.70’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms and perch-colored crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 91 degrees at the hot water discharge, 83 degrees in main lake; 1.49’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits and spinner baits in 4-6 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch and shad in 8-10 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 76–80 degrees;

0.06’ high. Black bass are good on pumpkinseed and watermelon Carolina-rigged soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and liver. FALCON: Water murky; 78–82 degrees; 37.09’ low. Black bass are very good on watermelon crankbaits and soft plastics in 10-20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are very good on frozen shrimp and stink bait.

FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits and lipless crankbaits early. Channel and blue catfish are slow. FORK: Water lightly stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.19’ low. Black bass are fair on football jigs, Carolina-rigged worms and deep-diving crankbaits in shad patterns. White and yellow bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 78–83 degrees; 0.15’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, square-billed crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits and soft plastic worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait, shrimp and live bait. GRANBURY: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.02’ low. Black bass are fair on green/pumpkin soft plastics and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on shad Li’l Fishies. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on stink bait, nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 76– 80 degrees; 0.23’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits in flooded willows upriver. White bass are fair on slab spoons over humps in the main lake. Crappie are good on marabou jigs in 4-12 feet. Blue catfish are good on shad and prepared bait in 4-10 feet. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait upriver. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 83–86 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are good on shaky-head worms, Texas-rigged craws and top-waters. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. GREENBELT: 31.68’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early and late, midday switching to square-billed crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 85–89 degrees. Black bass are very good on top-waters, rogues with orange bellies and Carolina-rigged soft plastics. Crappie are very good on live minnows near creek channels and around brush piles. Bream are fair on live worms off piers. Channel and blue catfish are good on live worms, chicken livers off piers and on trotlines baited with shad. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-color; 77–84 degrees; 0.76’ low. Black bass are fair to good on buzzbaits early and late, midday switching to jerkbaits, squarebilled crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around cover. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 0.24’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, shaky-head worms and football head jigs. White bass are good on slabs.

Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water stained; 84–88 degrees: 1.94’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, hollowbody frogs and weightless stick worms. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 84–88 degrees: 0.03’ high. Black bass are fair on flipping jigs, weightless worms and Texasrigged creature baits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. LBJ: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.73’ low. Black bass are fair on perch-colored crankbaits, white jigs, and green/ pumpkin tubes in 6-15 feet early. Striped bass are good on 2-inch shad jigs at night. White bass are good on jigs at night. Crappie are good on chartreuse tube jigs and live minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on nightcrawlers, liver and dip bait. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with goldfish and perch. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 0.17’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, top-waters and shaky-head worms. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.22’ high. Black bass are good on green/ pumpkin spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are good on slabs, pet spoons and tubes. White bass are good on tubes, pet spoons and slabs. Crappie are very good on minnows in 20 feet. Blue catfish are fair on shad. MACKENZIE: 73.95’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. No reports on crappie or bass. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 87–96 degrees; 0.18’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. MEREDITH: 60.14’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on shallowrunning crankbaits, Texas rigs and jerkbaits. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 88–96 degrees; 0.35’ high. Black bass are fair on hollowbody frogs, deep-diving crankbaits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. NASWORTHY: 73–78 degrees; 1.16’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs, Carolina rigs and weightless stick worms. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 0.14’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon shallow-running crankbaits near the dam. White bass are fair on jigs and silver spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and chartreuse jigs off docks in Liberty Hill Park. Chan-

nel catfish are good on stink bait over baited holes. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 78– 84 degrees; 34.76’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters early, later switching to weightless flukes, Texas rigs, jigs and square-billed crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 79–85 degrees; 8.83’ low. Black bass are fair to good on split-shot weighted flukes, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 84–87 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged worms, shaky-head worms and top-water walking baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and prepared bait. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water offcolor; 78–83 degrees; 0.02’ high. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to dropshot rigs, Texas rigs, mediumrunning crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs and inline spinners. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water murky; 77–81 degrees; 0.32’ high. Black bass are good on green/ pumpkin crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are good on live shad. White bass are fair on live shad and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and pearl tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines and juglines baited with live bait and cut shad. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.05’ low. Black bass are fair on flukes, football jigs and Carolinarigged craws. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 83–87 degrees; 0.20’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and punch bait. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 84–87 degrees; 0.06’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 0.28’ low. Black bass are good on green/ pumpkin soft plastic worms and crankbaits. White bass are fair on silver spoons and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows over baited holes. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait, cut bait and liver. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 77–81 degrees; 0.13’ low. Black bass are slow. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on silver spoons. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shad, live

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 14

minnows and nightcrawlers. STAMFORD: Water stained; 79–83 degrees; 0.9’ high. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early and late, midday switching to shallow-running crankbaits, Texas rigs and finesse jigs. Crappie are good on live minnows around cover. White bass are fair to good on live bait and tail spinners. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 76–80 degrees; 0.24’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on hot dogs and nightcrawlers. TAWAKONI: Water lightly stained; 84–89 degrees; 1.36’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, hollow-body frogs and buzzbaits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Hybrid bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 83–86 degrees; 1.22’ high. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, top-water walking baits and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 77–81 degrees; 0.41’ low. Black bass are good on junebug and plum soft plastic worms early and late, and on top-waters early. Striped bass are fair on silver spoons. White bass are fair on jigs and spoons. Crappie are slow. Bream are very good on crickets and nightcrawlers off docks. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait, stink bait, liver and hearts in 30 feet. TRAVIS: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 6.15’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies at night. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good on pet spoons and hellbenders. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp and live bait. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 77–83 degrees; 20.41’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 1.26’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastics and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair trolling with downriggers. White bass are good on white Li’l Fishies. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and stink bait.

­—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

July 28, 2017

Page 11

The Yamaha Outboards

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7/11/17 1:52 PM


Page 12

July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER MAN DIES WHILE ON CANOE TRIP On the evening of July 2, Val Verde County game wardens responded to a call for help on a medical emergency from canoers that were paddling the Devils River. The group of 12 paddlers reported the death of one of the group along a very remote section of the river. The wardens coordinated with state parks personnel to get the County Sheriff’s Evidence/Crime Scene Unit and the justice of the peace to the location. Due to the remote area of the incident, the coordination for extraction of the deceased, the 11 remaining paddlers, their equipment and canoes and transport of all personnel turned into a 12-hour operation. The 25-year-old victim died of natural causes. FISHING FELON Game wardens were checking bank fishermen in Delta County when they encountered a subject whom they had arrested recently on drug possession and weapons charges. During a pat down search of the subject, drug paraphernalia was found in his pants pocket. When the wardens attempted to arrest the subject, he violently resisted and assaulted both wardens. The wardens were able to subdue the suspect and take him into custody. However, while waiting for a transport unit from the Greenville Police Department to arrive, the subject fled on foot while handcuffed. Wardens gave chase and captured the subject, who was attempting to hide near a fence. Multiple felony charges were filed against the subject. WALLOWING IN THE MUD Harris County game wardens were patrolling an area for reported poaching activity. At dusk, they spotted a truck trespassing along

SUSPECT STEALING CAMERAS CAUGHT ON VIDEO A Grimes County game warden responded to a call from a landowner stating he had captured video of an individual stealing game cameras and battery packs off his property. After reviewing the video evidence, the warden was able to link this case to an investigation earlier this year regarding the same individual. The suspect was found to be await-

a power line easement on county property. The truck attempted to drive away and the wardens split up and moved to intercept it at one of two exit points farther ahead of the vehicle. After dark, the truck and its occupants were located near the easement stuck in the mud on a flood control levee. After discharging a 12-gauge shotgun in an effort to signal others, the suspects were detained. Subsequent interviews revealed the subjects were trespassing and hunting hogs on county property without landowner consent. A 12-gauge shotgun, ammunition and a flashlight were seized. Charges are pending. MULLET RUN A Matagorda County game warden was checking bank fisherman when he observed an individual throwing a cast net and placing mullet in a large ice chest. When the warden made contact with the individual, he admitted to not having a fishing license, and did not have any other identification. He also stated he was catching mullet to sell to bait camps for another person under their bait dealer’s license. The warden could smell marijuana when he approached the individual, and when he asked about it, the subject

ing trial in the Brazos County Jail for burglary of a habitation. The warden made contact with the Brazos County district attorney and handed over all information regarding the suspect on this case. New charges of criminal trespassing and theft are pending.

took off running. The warden gave chase and observed the subject throw some kind of substance in the salt grass while running. He was able to catch the subject and place him into handcuffs. The subject admitted that he had a small amount of marijuana and he threw it while running away. A brief search along their back trail revealed a small clear plastic bag that contained marijuana residue. The subject told the warden that he was scared and did not want to go back to jail. He was just released from jail the day before, after being placed on probation for running from the police. The warden transported the subject to the Matagorda County Jail where he was charged with evading arrest/ detention, tampering with physical evidence, and no fishing license. OVER THE LINE A Dimmit County game warden was patrolling for fishing enforcement when he spotted a pickup truck parked behind a cluster of trees, up against a fence, quite a distance from the river bridge. Upon closer inspection, several fishing-related items were in the bed of the pickup. Figuring that the person, or persons, possibly jumped the fence next to the truck to fish

farther down river, the warden and an assisting county sheriff’s deputy, initiated a search for the vehicle’s owner. They made contact with a local man and his son who were returning from the river through the private property and led them back to the truck. When the man was informed that they were trespassing, the man stated, “I thought it was OK to go into the property because part of the fence was pushed down from the last flood.” The man was issued a citation for trespassing. The case is pending. TEENS DRINKING IT ALL IN Over the July 4 extended holiday weekend, game wardens patrolling Lake Travis around Lakeway and Rough Hollow observed a boat pass by with an individual standing up at the front bow “surfing.” Upon seeing the warden boat, the subject sat down and several other occupants appeared to be hiding/ stowing items in several compartments as a stop was initiated by the wardens. In all, there were 10 people on the boat ranging in age from 15-18 years old. A strong odor of alcohol was apparent along with a large quantity of evidence of alcoholic beverage consumption. The boat and occupants

were escorted ashore where field sobriety tests were administered on the vessel operator, who was later identified as being 16 years of age with a blood alcohol level of 0.196. Due to the level of intoxication of the teenagers, their demeanor, and several attempts by a few to leave the scene or incite violence and interfere with the investigation, the wardens called for assistance from other law enforcement agencies. Multiple cases were filed and are pending. SNAGGING A SNAGGER Smith County game wardens were patrolling by truck around Lake Palestine when they observed a man in the water at an old boat ramp using a metal pole with a large treble hook affixed to one end trying to catch flathead catfish. After making contact, citations were issued for fishing with illegal means and methods and no fishing license. JET JOCKEY A Montgomery County game warden responded to a reported boat accident on Lake Conroe where a personal watercraft operator had hit a wave, was ejected from his jet ski and could not pull himself back on. When the warden was asking the operator about the accident, he believed alcohol could be involved. After a complete investigation, the operator was arrested for boating while intoxicated. The case is pending.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Morning, night best for bass Continued from page 1

mouth are good from 2to 3-1/2 pounds. Largemouth bass are good to 6 pounds off main lake points and drop-offs.” Dodd said the lake is at normal level with surface water temps in the mid-80s. The morning bite is good from dawn till about 8:30. After that, anglers need to move deeper. Late morning jig and pig combos are good, along with drop-shot rigs in 18 to 22 feet of water along ledges and over rocks. Guide Steve Nixon said he’s been catchOn Lake LBJ, fishing shallow grass early with buzz baits, chuggers and white Whopper Ploping 25 to 40 bass each pers has been successful. Photo by Robert Sloan. morning on Canyon while fishing extended “What a lot folks don’t know is that one of the lake points with brush piles. Most of those bass best bass bites on LBJ right now is over matted are schooling during the hottest hours of the day. grass with frogs,” he said. “If that doesn’t work, Dodd has also been fishing a good bit on Inks I’ll go with a punch jig over the thick beds of Lake where the morning bite is very good in and hydrilla.” over grass. Whited said perch-colored cranks are good “The topwater bite is good early,” he said. “But along the edge of hydrilla. He’s also fishing Sena 3/4-ounce spinner bait in chartreuse/white kos and trick worms. with gold and silver blades is best for the heavier “One of the most dependable bites is after bass. about 8 in the morning,” he said. “That’s when “Once the temperature cranks up, drop shots bass will feed pretty good along drops and ledges and whacky worms in watermelon or peanut colin 18 to 22 feet of water. That’s where we’re using ors are best.” jigs and swimbaits in bluegill colors.” On Lake LBJ, shad-colored chuggers are good In downtown Austin on Lady Bird Lake, some for about the first hour and half of daylight in pretty solid bass are being caught on black or clear water over hydrilla, said guide Charles purple 10-inch worms fished Texas style along Whited. the shoreline in 5 to 8 feet of water. Right at “We’re fishing shallow grass early,” he said. dawn, anglers should try a black and white Tiny “Chuggers have been good lately, along with Torpedo around any type of shoreline structure. buzz baits and white Whopper Ploppers.” Lady Bird also offers some excellent night fishing Midmorning is best around boat docks with for big bass on buzz baits and chuggers. frogs on 50-pound test braid. Under bright skies, he recommends pitching KVD frogs to laydowns and under boat docks.

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Page 13

ICAST 2017 announces Best of Show winner. The International Convention of Allied Sport fishing Trades, better known as ICAST, held its 60th trade show this July in Orlando with nearly 15,000 people attending. This year, 1263 products, accessories and apparel were entered by 280 companies into 26 “Best of Category” awards in the New Product Showcase, all vying for the overall ICAST 2017 “Best of Show” award. The winner this year was BOTE’s Rover, a combination paddle board/microskiff, which was voted by buyers and media as the best product in both the Boat Accessories category and the overall “Best of Show.” —ICAST

Finding catfish Continued from page 8

on the Colorado, while Dwight reported free-lining shad with a cork in 3 feet or less has worked best on the Trinity River near the Liberty Bridge. Somerville Lake has seen big changes the past few years, and the fish and fishermen are reaping the benefits. “The lake has really changed a lot,” said guide Weldon Kirk. “It covers 25,000 acres the last two years with all of the flooding — the floods gave us a lot more baitfish including freshwater shrimp and shad.” The catfish are being cooperative. “The water is running near 90 degrees,” Kirk said. “The bite is more of a nibble, but we released six fish over 11 pounds the other day and kept 34 smaller fish, and the bass have exploded — it used to take 15 pounds to win a tournament here, now it takes 25 pounds.” At Lake Waco, the fishing is fair but expected to improve. “The fish aren’t on the bottom, said guide James Tucker with Fish

Hauler Guide Service. “We don’t have a thermocline and the water temperatures (86 to 89 degrees) are a little lower than usual for this time of year.” Tucker has been having his best luck in the evening from 6 to 10:30 p.m., using cut shad and live perch for bait. “Our shad hatch has made the fishing a little tougher,” he said. “The lake is covered with shad. I think the blues are suspending 5 to 10 feet from the surface — most of our bites have been in 10 to 12 feet of water. We’re catching 12 to 20 blues per trip, and we can still catch limits of channel cats.” The summer reminds Tucker of a previous wet year. “It was like this in 2010,” he said. “We caught more big blues in September that year and the winter was great.” Darrell Taylor (936) 788-4413 James Tucker (254) 495-6726 Weldon Kirk (979) 229-3103


Page 14

July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT

Bait equals money Continued from page 8

NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad on soft plastics. Redfish are good in the cuts and drains leading to the marsh on shrimp and scented plastics. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good while drifting the reefs on live shrimp and top-waters. Redfish and trout are good at the jetty. BOLIVAR: Trout are good on the south shoreline on Bass Assassins, Trout Killers and Sand Eels. Black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair to good on the wells on Lil’ Johns and Bass Assassins. Redfish are fair

Croaker-catching season runs from May 1- Sept. 30. Supplying the bait to anglers has turned into big business. Photo by Robert Sloan.

ideal. But there is a daily limit on the number of croaker a boat can haul back to the dock. “I’m allowed to catch 1,500 croakers per day,” Sanders said. “And the game wardens will definitely check us out and count the croaker. If we’re over the limit it can be a $500 ticket.” Calhoun County Game Warden Chelsea Bailey said the croaker-catching season is May 1 through Sept. 30. During that time, game wardens board croaker boats to make sure everybody is working within the law and have the proper permit with a valid license. If they aren’t, a ticket is a Class C misdemeanor. “Most boats are catching legal limits,” Bailey said. “But there are some that will go over the 1,500 per day limit. We checked a boat that had about 2,000 croaker. That’s what we had counted.

They probably had 4,000 more.” The key to catching and keeping croaker alive is to make a short drag with the net, cull them and get them to the bait camp tanks as soon as possible. Once at the dock, they are put into oxygenated tanks. If croaker can sit two days, they are good to go. Fishermen like healthy croaker, and they know the difference. The business of catching and trucking in big numbers of live croaker is huge. There are only a couple of bays that produce lots of the bait fish. West Matagorda Bay is one, which is why there are croaker truckers working out of Palacios. “We’ve got a lot of good connections for trucking in croaker every day during the summer months,” said Huggaid at Clem’s. “All of ours are shipped in, and we’ll sell them all in one day.”

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to good in the marsh on shrimp. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good for drifters working deep shell on limetreuse and plum plastics. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Trout are good on the Ship Channel on croaker and live shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good for drifters on live bait over reefs. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Offshore is good for tarpon, red snapper, kingfish, shark and ling. TEXAS CITY: Trout are fair to good on the reefs on live shrimp and croaker. Trout are good on the edge of the Ship Channel on croaker and shrimp. FREEPORT: Trout are good at San Luis Pass on shrimp and MirrOlures. Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Trout, Spanish mackerel and sand trout are good at the jetties on soft plastics and shrimp fished on the bottom. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Redfish have been mixed with the trout. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are fair on topwaters and live shrimp on the south shoreline. Trout are good in the surf.

PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair on top-waters and live bait over sand, grass and shell in San Antonio Bay. Trout are fair to good in the surf and at the jetty on croaker and topwaters. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair in the guts and channels on free-lined shrimp. Trout are fair over grass while drifting with live shrimp. Redfish are good on mullet on the Estes Flats and around Mud Island. PORT ARANSAS: Trout, redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp and croaker. Trout are fair to good in the surf on topwaters, piggies and croaker. Offshore is good for dolphin, kingfish, red snapper and tuna. CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on scented plastics and live shrimp. Redfish are good in the potholes on shrimp. Trout are fair to good at Emmord’s Hole on croaker and piggy perch. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters around rocks and grass. Trout are fair to good on the King Ranch shoreline on croakers, top-waters and plum plastics. Trout are good in the Land Cut on shrimp. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are good on top-waters

around sand and grass. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes and on live bait. Offshore is good for kingfish, red snapper and dorado. SOUTH PADRE: Redfish and trout are good in the shallows of South Bay and Mexiquita Flats on shrimp and plastics under rattling corks. Tarpon and Spanish mackerel are showing at the pass. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the flats on live shrimp. Redfish are good in the guts along the flats and small top-waters. Trout are good on the edge of the channel on shrimp.

—TPWD


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July 28, 2017

Page 15

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July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Bite Me Babes teammates Sarah Browning, Betty Cook, Valerie Jones and Julie Janaszak had a great time catching trout and redfish at the Babes on the Bay tournament in Rockport. Doug Jones of Keller caught this striper at Lake Texoma.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

James J Handley took a turkey while hunting with grandson JJ in Red River County.

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Lauren Green harvested her first red stag in New Zealand last year with a single shot from a .270.

Matt Howard caught this nice jack crevalle in San Jose Del Cabo, Mexico.

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July 28, 2017

Page 17

Guide to tackle Texas coast Continued from page 8

during each two-day trip, Todd said. Those who sign up will also get a goody bag and a chance to win a share of more than $3,000 in a redfish tournament. The cost per person for two days is $900. And part of the proceeds will be donated to Texas conservation groups. It’s more of a showcase for Chavez than a moneymaker, Todd said. “He’s the best fisherman I’ve seen,” Todd said. “I saw him catch 12 tarpon in a day. You do that in a week and you’ve done good. One of the guys in the next boat, who were all dominant fly-fishermen, said, ‘I’ve never seen anything like that.’ You know how certain ballplayers have it. He has it.” Meredith McCord of Houston puts it this way:

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“You can be a great angler and not be a great guide, but you can’t be a great guide and not be a great angler.” McCord has fished numerous times with Chavez since he became a guide in 2013. She doesn’t need many tips given she’s the holder of more than 140 world fishing records. Chavez posted video on his Facebook page of McCord simultaneously catching redfish on two fly rods. What she does need, however, is someone to help bring out her best. “If a guide is impatient or tense, I, in turn, become that way,” McCord said. “With Jeremy, it’s, ‘Redfish, 2 o’clock, 50 feet.’ There’s a casualness that allows me to relax. I much prefer that to, ‘Redfish! 2 o’clock! 50 feet!’ I primarily fly-fish and the moment you pick up speed, it all goes

out the backdoor. You become hurried and start rushing.” Chavez, whose laid-back nature served him well in his previous career as a revenue analyst in the volatile oil and gas industry, helps McCord cope when things don’t go her way. “I’m a little Type A, as are most fly-fishers. I need someone who can bring me back to reality, who can laugh it off and say, ‘It’s no big deal. Let’s go get another one.’” A videographer will accompany Chavez on his coastal journey. The video documenting the trip will be provided to fellow adventurers, and the guide hopes to show it at various locales around the state. “I want to showcase fishing on the Texas coast,” Chavez said. “Texas has a really

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good fishery. There’s so much shrimp on the upper coast. I’ve spent a lot of time in Florida and Louisiana, and I’ve never seen schools of redfish there like you see around Galveston.” During the trip, Chavez plans to communicate with his followers via social media. Todd said they plan to have a website up that will let people follow the trip daily. As the Texas trip approaches, ideas for new adventures are already percolating in Chavez’s mind. “I’ve got four or five going around in my head,” he said. “I love figuring it all out. Of course, things change and you have to play it by ear. But, yeah, I’ve got a few pipe dreams. This is my focus right now, though. It’s going to be fun.”

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For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below. Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

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July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

First

Full

Last

New

July 30

Aug 7

Aug 14

Aug 21

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jul/Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jul/Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu

10:39 11:28 ----12:35 1:17 1:58 2:39

04 Fri

3:21 9:33

05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

4:05 4:50 5:38 6:27 7:18 8:11 9:04

10:33 4:22 11:22 5:11 ----- 5:57 12:29 6:40 1:11 7:22 1:52 8:03 2:33 8:45 3:15 9:27 3:59 10:11 4:45 10:57 5:32 11:44 6:22 12:09 7:12 1:01 8:05 1:53 8:58 2:46

10:56 4:45 11:44 5:33 12:08 6:19 12:51 7:02 1:33 7:45 2:15 8:26 2:57 9:09 3:40 9:52 4:24 10:36 5:09 11:22 5:57 ----6:46 12:34 7:36 1:24 8:29 2:17 9:22 3:10

06:37 06:38 06:38 06:39 06:40 06:40 06:41 06:41 06:42 06:43 06:43 06:44 06:44 06:45 06:46

08:16 08:16 08:15 08:14 08:14 08:13 08:12 08:11 08:11 08:10 08:09 08:08 08:07 08:06 08:06

11:57a NoMoon 12:52p 12:05a 1:45p 12:39a 2:38p 1:15a 3:30p 1:52a 4:22p 2:31a 5:12p 3:13a 6:01p 3:59a 6:48p 4:48a 7:32p 5:40a 8:15p 6:35a 8:55p 7:31a 9:33p 8:28a 10:11p 9:25a 10:48p 10:24a

4:28 5:17 6:02 6:46 7:28 8:09 8:51 10:17 11:03 11:50 12:15 1:06 1:59 2:52

11:02 11:50 12:13 12:57 1:39 2:21 3:03

4:50 5:39 6:24 7:08 7:50 8:32 9:14

06:37 06:38 06:39 06:39 06:40 06:41 06:41

3:45

9:57

06:42 08:22 6:13p

4:29 5:15 6:02 6:52 7:42 8:34 9:28

10:42 11:27 ----12:39 1:30 2:22 3:16

06:43 06:43 06:44 06:45 06:46 06:46 06:47

08:28 08:27 08:26 08:25 08:25 08:24 08:23 08:21 08:20 08:20 08:19 08:18 08:17 08:16

12:03p NoMoon 1:00p 12:09a 1:54p 12:43a 2:48p 1:17a 3:41p 1:53a 4:33p 2:32a 5:24p 3:13a 6:59p 7:43p 8:25p 9:04p 9:41p 10:18p 10:53p

3:59a 4:48a 5:41a 6:36a 7:33a 8:31a 9:30a 10:29a

San Antonio

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jul/Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jul/Aug Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

28 Fri 29 Sat 30 Sun 31 Mon 01 Tue 02 Wed 03 Thu 04 Fri 05 Sat 06 Sun 07 Mon 08 Tue 09 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri

10:46 4:34 11:34 5:23 ----- 6:09 12:41 6:53 1:11 7:22 1:52 8:03 2:33 8:45 3:15 9:27 3:59 10:11 4:45 10:57 5:32 11:44 6:22 12:09 7:12 1:01 8:05 1:53 8:58 2:46

11:09 11:57 12:20 1:04 1:33 2:15 2:57 3:40 4:24 5:09 5:57 6:46 7:36 8:29 9:22

4:57 5:46 6:31 7:15 7:45 8:26 9:09 9:52 10:36 11:22 ----12:34 1:24 2:17 3:10

06:50 06:51 06:52 06:52 06:40 06:40 06:41 06:41 06:42 06:43 06:43 06:44 06:44 06:45 06:46

08:28 08:27 08:27 08:26 08:14 08:13 08:12 08:11 08:11 08:10 08:09 08:08 08:07 08:06 08:06

12:10p NoMoon 1:04p 12:18a 1:58p 12:53a 2:50p 1:28a 3:30p 1:52a 4:22p 2:31a 5:12p 3:13a 6:01p 3:59a 6:48p 4:48a 7:32p 5:40a 8:15p 6:35a 8:55p 7:31a 9:33p 8:28a 10:11p 9:25a 10:48p 10:24a

10:59 4:48 11:48 5:37 12:10 6:23 12:55 7:06 1:37 7:48 2:18 8:29 2:59 9:11 3:41 9:53 4:25 10:37 5:11 11:23 5:58 ----6:47 12:35 7:38 1:26 8:31 2:19 9:24 3:12

11:22 ----12:34 1:17 1:59 2:41 3:23 4:06 4:50 5:35 6:23 7:12 8:02 8:54 9:48

5:11 5:59 6:45 7:28 8:11 8:52 9:35 10:18 11:02 11:47 12:10 1:00 1:50 2:43 3:36

06:52 06:53 06:54 06:55 06:55 06:56 06:57 06:58 06:58 06:59 07:00 07:01 07:02 07:02 07:03

08:53 08:52 08:51 08:50 08:49 08:49 08:48 08:47 08:46 08:45 08:44 08:43 08:42 08:41 08:40

12:25p NoMoon 1:22p 12:29a 2:18p 1:02a 3:13p 1:35a 4:06p 2:10a 4:59p 2:48a 5:50p 3:29a 6:39p 4:14a 7:25p 5:04a 8:09p 5:57a 8:49p 6:53a 9:28p 7:50a 10:04p 8:50a 10:39p 9:49a 11:14p 10:50a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Time 1:36 AM 2:32 AM 3:41 AM 12:50 AM 2:03 AM 2:55 AM 3:33 AM 4:04 AM 4:30 AM 4:54 AM 5:19 AM 5:44 AM 6:10 AM 6:36 AM 12:08 AM

Port O’Connor Height 0.4L 0.7L 1.0L 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 0.3L

Time 8:39 AM 9:18 AM 9:55 AM 5:23 AM 7:46 AM 9:11 AM 9:44 AM 9:45 AM 9:45 AM 9:59 AM 10:24 AM 10:57 AM 11:35 AM 12:18 PM 7:01 AM

Height 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 1.1L 1.2L 1.2L 1.3L 1.3L 1.3L 1.2L 1.2L 1.1L 1.0L 0.9L 1.5H

Time 2:57 PM 3:56 PM 4:50 PM 10:32 AM 11:07 AM 11:41 AM 12:16 PM 12:51 PM 1:28 PM 2:06 PM 2:48 PM 3:33 PM 4:25 PM 5:26 PM 1:05 PM

Height 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.3H 0.7L

Time 9:23 PM 11:13 PM

Height 1.2H 1.2H

5:39 PM 6:23 PM 7:04 PM 7:43 PM 8:21 PM 8:59 PM 9:36 PM 10:13 PM 10:50 PM 11:28 PM

0.2L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L

6:38 PM

1.3H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 1:44 AM 2:45 AM 4:02 AM 12:39 AM 2:02 AM 3:05 AM 3:58 AM 4:37 AM 5:08 AM 5:34 AM 5:56 AM 6:17 AM 6:37 AM 6:57 AM 12:06 AM

Height 0.4L 0.7L 0.9L 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 0.3L

Time 8:58 AM 9:27 AM 9:48 AM 5:55 AM 7:22 AM 7:10 PM 7:46 PM 8:22 PM 8:59 PM 9:38 PM 12:05 PM 12:24 PM 12:42 PM 1:01 PM 7:20 AM

Height 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.1L 1.2L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.1L 1.2L 1.1L 1.1L 0.9L 1.5H

Time 3:24 PM 4:13 PM 5:01 PM 9:58 AM 10:04 AM

Height 0.6L 0.4L 0.2L 1.3H 1.3H

Time 9:33 PM 11:01 PM

Height 1.2H 1.2H

5:48 PM 6:31 PM

0.1L 0.0L

2:39 3:37 4:36 5:36 1:31

1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 0.8L

10:17 PM 10:54 PM 11:30 PM

-0.1L 0.0L 0.1L

6:46 PM

1.2H

Height 0.3L 0.5L 0.8H 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 0.2L 0.3L

Time 9:53 AM 10:15 AM 5:57 AM 7:31 AM 8:22 AM 8:58 AM 8:52 PM 10:12 AM 10:51 AM 11:25 AM 11:54 AM 12:12 PM 11:50 AM 7:35 AM 8:08 AM

Height 0.8H 0.8H 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 0.9L -0.1L 0.9L 1.0L 1.0L 0.9L 0.9L 0.9L 1.0H 0.9H

Time 4:20 PM 5:18 PM 10:38 AM 11:01 AM 11:23 AM 11:25 AM

Height 0.5L 0.3L 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H

Time 9:44 PM

Height 0.7H

6:17 7:04 7:43 8:18

0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L

12:37 PM 1:23 PM 2:02 PM 2:43 PM 3:32 PM 4:29 PM 12:25 PM 1:19 PM

1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 0.8L 0.7L

9:27 PM 10:04 PM 10:42 PM 11:17 PM 11:50 PM

-0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L

5:27 PM 6:35 PM

1.0H 0.9H

Height 0.6L 0.8L 1.1L 1.4H 1.5H 1.7H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.8H 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H

Time 8:14 AM 8:36 AM 8:53 AM 6:57 AM 6:08 PM 6:51 PM 7:30 PM 8:04 PM 8:37 PM 9:09 PM 9:44 PM 12:46 PM 12:55 PM 1:06 PM 1:23 PM

Height 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 1.2L 1.1L 1.0L 0.9L

Time 3:21 PM 4:02 PM 4:41 PM 9:03 AM

Height 0.7L 0.5L 0.4L 1.2H

Time 8:59 PM 10:55 PM

Height 1.2H 1.2H

5:23 PM

0.2L

3:02 4:06 5:16 6:27

1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H

10:23 PM 11:05 PM 11:49 PM

0.1L 0.3L 0.4L

Height 0.5L 0.8H 0.9H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.2L 0.4L

Time 11:37 AM 7:00 AM 8:28 AM 9:35 PM 10:21 PM 11:04 PM 11:45 PM

Height 1.0H 0.7L 0.9L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L

9:40 AM 9:50 AM 10:01 AM 10:13 AM 10:22 AM 10:29 AM 10:35 AM

1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H

PM PM PM PM PM

Time 3:13 AM 4:25 AM 12:21 AM 2:02 AM 3:09 AM 4:16 AM 4:53 AM 5:19 AM 5:43 AM 6:05 AM 6:23 AM 6:41 AM 7:05 AM 12:22 AM 12:59 AM

PM PM PM PM

Freeport Harbor Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Time 1:18 AM 2:21 AM 4:10 AM 12:39 AM 1:54 AM 2:42 AM 3:23 AM 4:02 AM 4:37 AM 5:08 AM 5:33 AM 5:53 AM 6:11 AM 6:29 AM 6:49 AM

Time 5:54 AM 1:15 AM 5:59 AM 7:08 AM 7:53 AM 8:31 AM 9:02 AM 9:26 AM 12:24 AM 1:02 AM 1:39 AM 2:15 AM 2:51 AM 3:26 AM 4:00 AM

Time 10:32 AM 6:09 PM 6:49 PM 7:28 PM 8:08 PM 8:50 PM 9:35 PM 10:22 PM 11:09 PM 11:54 PM

Height 0.3H 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L

Time 5:25 PM

Height 0.1L

10:51 AM 11:11 AM 11:16 AM 9:45 AM

0.6H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H

Time 3:33 AM 3:15 AM 10:29 AM 10:46 AM 11:14 AM 11:50 AM 12:32 PM 1:18 PM 2:05 PM 12:08 AM 12:49 AM 1:27 AM 2:01 AM 2:31 AM 2:56 AM

Height 0.0L 0.0L 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L

Time 10:39 AM 10:25 AM 7:25 PM 8:14 PM 9:01 PM 9:49 PM 10:37 PM 11:23 PM

Height 0.1H 0.1H 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L

2:49 PM 3:32 PM 4:14 PM 5:06 PM 11:32 AM 10:39 AM

0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H

Height 0.2L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H

Time 7:31 AM 7:48 AM 8:09 AM 5:37 PM 6:23 PM 7:07 PM 7:49 PM 9:08 AM 9:43 AM 10:16 AM 10:47 AM 11:10 AM 10:05 AM 10:50 AM 11:40 AM

Height 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.8H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 1.0H 0.9H

Height 0.1L 0.2L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L

Time

Height

3:40 PM

0.3L

7:57 PM

0.4H

Time 5:17 PM 6:30 PM

Height 0.0L 0.0L

Time 10:35 PM

Height 0.1H

2:54 PM 4:35 PM

0.2L 0.1L

6:31 PM 9:01 PM

0.2H 0.1H

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Time 1:07 AM 12:48 AM 12:36 AM 8:29 AM 8:49 AM 5:09 AM 5:41 AM 6:08 AM 5:19 AM 5:43 AM 6:11 AM 6:32 AM 6:09 AM 6:11 AM 6:29 AM

Height 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L 0.8L 0.8L 0.8L 0.8L 0.7L 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L

Time 2:53 PM 3:52 PM 4:47 PM

Height 0.3L 0.2L 0.1L

Time 7:24 PM 9:05 PM

Height 0.5H 0.5H

11:28 AM 12:25 PM 1:16 PM 2:04 PM 2:52 PM 3:44 PM 4:45 PM 5:55 PM

0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.7H

8:29 PM 9:08 PM 9:43 PM 10:14 PM 10:37 PM 10:58 PM 11:23 PM 11:52 PM

-0.2L -0.2L -0.2L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L 0.3L

Time 8:31 AM 8:36 AM 8:26 AM 4:59 AM 6:13 PM 6:54 PM 7:35 PM 8:14 PM 8:52 PM 9:29 PM 10:06 PM 10:43 PM 12:03 PM 12:28 PM 1:01 PM

Height 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2L -0.1L 0.9L 0.8L 0.6L

Time 3:10 PM 3:58 PM 4:44 PM 7:53 AM

Height 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L 0.8H

Time 8:29 PM 11:09 PM

Height 0.6H 0.7H

5:29 PM

0.0L

3:02 PM 4:26 PM 6:02 PM

0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

11:20 PM 11:58 PM

0.0L 0.2L

Time 9:20 AM 9:35 AM 3:42 AM 7:55 PM 8:40 AM 9:59 AM 10:41 AM 11:09 AM 11:27 AM 11:34 PM 11:53 PM

Height 0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.1L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.0L 0.0L

Time 5:06 PM 6:31 PM 10:02 AM

Height 0.2L 0.1L 0.3H

Time 9:06 PM

Height 0.3H

7:16 PM

0.1L

11:42 AM 12:27 PM 1:01 PM 1:31 PM 2:00 PM

0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

8:39 PM 9:31 PM 10:15 PM 10:48 PM 11:14 PM

0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

5:33 PM 6:24 PM 8:33 AM

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H

3:23 PM

0.2L

7:51 PM

0.3H

South Padre Island

PM PM PM PM

Rollover Pass Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Height 0.0L 0.3H 0.4H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.1L

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Rockport

Time 3:17 AM 9:56 AM 9:30 AM 9:02 AM 9:06 AM 9:21 AM 9:39 AM 9:48 AM 9:37 AM 9:59 AM 10:26 AM 12:36 AM 1:15 AM 1:50 AM 2:23 AM

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Time 1:32 AM 2:24 AM 3:27 AM 2:53 AM 3:52 AM 4:38 AM 5:20 AM 5:58 AM 6:33 AM 7:00 AM 7:07 AM 6:55 AM 6:58 AM 7:06 AM 7:13 AM

East Matagorda Time 7:12 PM 11:39 AM 11:44 AM

3:46 4:10 4:32 4:49 5:07

PM PM PM PM PM

Height 0.4L 1.0H 1.0H

1.0L 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 0.6L

Time 8:00 PM 8:48 PM

5:59 PM 7:02 PM 8:06 PM 9:14 PM 10:29 PM

Height 0.3L 0.2L

1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Time 3:20 AM 3:34 AM 1:25 AM 10:42 AM 5:47 AM 5:59 AM 6:23 AM 8:43 AM 9:21 AM 2:36 PM 3:55 PM 4:50 PM 12:16 AM 12:54 AM 2:22 AM

Texas Coast Tides

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11

Date July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 5 Aug 6 Aug 7 Aug 8 Aug 9 Aug 10 Aug 11


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

July 28, 2017

Page 19

Funds on hold Continued from page 1

budget would be tight. “The expectations going into the session were pretty clear,” he said. “We were told not to expect additional items approved unless they were on a priority list.” The tight rein on Fund 9’s purse strings leads to programs battling each other for limited funds. For example, Texas legislators gave the go-ahead for TPWD to battle invasive aquatic species, authorizing it to spend $6.4 million over the next two years, but declined additional funding for the Texas Farm and Ranch Land Conservation Program. It keeps private land, valuable in terms of fish, wildlife or agriculture, from succumbing to development. Inland Fisheries campaigned for its funding, putting together a slick brochure entitled “Fighting Aquatic Invaders.” It discussed the economic impact, $140 million annually in the U.S., showcased eradication efforts and displayed before-and-after photos to illustrate their effectiveness. And it worked. “The Legislature made an unprecedented investment that is helping significantly expand our role in invasive species control,” said Tim Birdsong, habitat conservation chief for Inland Fisheries. “It’s allowed us to get out in front of issues like Asian carp, for example. They’re in Arkansas and we can now do sampling to see how far they’ve made it up the Red River.” Although spending restrictions protect Fund 9 from rampant legislative raiding, it’s not untouchable. State leaders are taking more than $10 million over two years from the Unclaimed Refunds of Motorboat Fuel Tax, which goes into Fund 9, for border security. Politicians

are able to justify using game wardens to do such things as guard against the smuggling of radiological and nuclear material along the coast and the Rio Grande River since TPWD is the state’s primary maritime law enforcer. The benefit for TPWD is that legislators this session were also willing to take $4 million from the state’s general revenue to buy the agency a new 65-foot offshore patrol vessel. Concerns in the Wildlife Division are more mundane but no less vital, at least to hunters. And they got some good news, too, from legislators. They reauthorized funding for two key programs: restoring eastern wild turkeys in East Texas and expanding public dove hunting opportunities. TPWD plans to reintroduce 500 more eastern wild turkeys at six sites, said Dave Morrison, small game program director. “We’re going to do super stocking, put about 80 birds (3 to 1 hens to gobblers) into suitable habitat sites and let them pioneer into surrounding lands. We’ve been pleased with the results up to now.” And Wolf said renewed funding will again let hunters put up $10 for a chance to hunt dove on a private day lease. While it’s a bargain for those lucky enough to be drawn, Wolf sees it as payback to Texas’ hunters. “People have been paying into the stamp fund for years,” he said. “With minimal public hunting opportunities available, we’re trying to figure ways to get people out there to enjoy hunting.”

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Page 20

July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Solution on on Page Solution Page26 26

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11 14

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AcrossACROSS 1. 6. 9. 10. 16. 18. 19. 20. 21. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 34. 36. 37.

1. Searching forwith game with binoculars Searching for game binoculars A favorite food forfood deerfor deer 6. A favorite A safari 9. Adestination safari destination Non-targeted sea life caught by commercial 10. Nontargeted sea life caught by fishermen commercial fishermen A flashlight manufacturer 16. flashlight Type ofAwood used manufacturer in fishing lures Rig 18. withType four of orwood moreused luresin fishing lures A quail German _____ 19. dog, Rig with four or morepointer lures The back part of the boat 20. A quail dog, German _____ pointer A phase of an insect's life 21. Thetoback part ofto the boat Command bring dog your side A hook-removing 25. A phase ofdevice an insect’s life The26. small pistol to bring dog to your side Command Material used in making arrows 27. Amaterial hook-removing device waders Popular for cold-weather 29. The small pistol Site of 2018 Bassmaster Classic Material in making arrows The30. dove limit inused Texas 34. Popular material for cold-weather waders 36. Site of 2018 Bassmaster Classic 37. The dove limit in Texas

Nature’s Calling

PRADCO-Fishing named Mark Cowan as executive director of operations, Chris Gulstad as executive director of marketing and Scott Faldon as marketing manager.

Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. announces the acquisition of Bennett Marine, Inc., creator of the adjustable trim tab.

Fish Tales acquired

Vista Outdoor Inc. announced the hiring of Matt Rice, formerly of Blue Heron Communications, as brand manager for its Optics Global Product Line.

29

32

Yamaha buys trim tab company

Rice moves to Vista

27 28

New leadership at PRADCO

American Outdoor Brands Corporation, the parent of Smith & Wesson, announced its accessories business, Battenfeld Technologies, Inc., agreed to acquire substantially all of the assets of Fish Tales, LLC.

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DOWN Down

Used fish finders locate structure 2. 2. Used byby fish finders toto locate structure 3. 3. Bass Pro retailer Bass Proisisbuying buyingthis this retailer 4. 4. River that feeds Lake River that feeds LakeConroe, Conroe,San San____ ____ 5. The long goose call 5. The long goose call 7. Exotic that can damage feeders Exotic that can 8. 7. The immature fishdamage feeders The immature fish a river 9. 8. A stream that feeds 11. 9. Annual fishing A stream thattrade feedsshow a river 12.11. AnAnnual offshore species fishing trade show 13. Trees that grow in saltwater An offshore species 14.12. A small rapid in a stream Trees that grow in saltwater 15.13. The pogey 17.14. Part of therapid hookin from the eye to the bend A small a stream 18.15. The big-tailed The pogey furbearer 21. Summer-long coastal fishing tournament of the hookspecies from the eye to the bend 22.17. AnPart African game 18. The big-tailed furbearer 23. Sheep in Big Bend Summer-long coastal fishing tournament 24.21. A old-time wooden decoy 26.22. A fishing vessel thatspecies carries multiple fishermen An African game 27.23. The distance between Sheep in Big Bend the water and the bottom of the boat A old-time wooden decoy 7 28.24. When pH of water is below 26. A fishing vessel that carries multiple fishermen 27. The distance between the water and the bottom of the boat 28. When pH of water is below 7 29. Used for carp bait 31. The central section of the bow 32. Dirt backstop on a shooting range 33. The baby deer 35. Type of sinker

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

Parker to lead Bear Archery Escalade Sports hired industry veteran Dave Parker as general manager to lead its Bear Archery brand.

MDF seeks director The Mule Deer Foundation is seeking a regional director in the state of Wyoming.

LaserMax sells to Crosman Crosman Corporation acquired LaserMax, Inc., a designer and manufacturer of gun-mounted laser aiming devices.

RMEF hiring development director The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation seeks an experienced individual to cultivate prospects and solicit and acquire major gifts.

Cabela’s receives award Cabela’s received the 2017 Corporate Achievement Award from the Quality Deer Management Association.

Sales rep position PRADCO Outdoor Brands is searching for a sales representative for Michigan and Indiana.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Curried braised rabbit 2 lbs. rabbit 1 qt. chicken stock 1 cup rice wine vinegar 4 cup blood orange juice 1/2 cup yellow curry powder 1 cup honey 3 tbsps. red pepper flakes Salt and blended pepper 4 tsps. Chinese 5 spice 2 tbsps. paprika 2 tbsps. garlic In a saucepan, combine the stock, honey, red pepper flakes, Chinese 5 spice, garlic, paprika, rice wine vinegar, blood orange juice, and curry powder. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and cool in the refrigerator. Once sauce has cooled, mix with rabbit meat in a large plastic bag and remove all air. Marinate in refrigerator for 12 to 48 hours.

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Pull meat from marinade and place in a heavy braising dish. Add the marinade and one quart of water to the dish. Place lid on the dish and put on the center rack of the preheated oven. Bake for 3 to 4 hours. Check internal temperature every 45 minutes and adjust temperature accordingly. The goal is to raise the temperature of the meat to 175 degrees and hold it there for 2 hours. This heat-time combination is critical for tenderization. Once cooked, let the meat rest in the oven for 30 minutes, remove from oven and place it in a cool container. Let the meat rest for an additional 30 minutes before pulling the meat from bone. —gourmetgonewild.org

Cajun catfish with shrimp and red bell pepper 2 catfish fillets 8-12 small-to-medium-sized shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 red bell pepper, julienned Cajun spice 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 tbsp. peanut oil Rice Fresh chopped parsley for garnish Prepare rice before starting catfish - this dish comes together quickly. Place oil in pan or electric skillet over medium high heat. Sprinkle Cajun seasoning to taste on fil-

lets (do not dredge). When oil is hot, place fillets in pan, adjust heat as necessary. Cook 3-4 minutes then turn. Add shrimp and peppers about one minute after flipping. Cook another 3-4 minutes, making sure not to overcook the shrimp. Remove pan from heat. Spoon rice onto middle of the plate then place catfish on the rice followed by shrimp and bell peppers. Garnish with chopped parsley. —Ohio Department of Natural Resources


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July 28, 2017

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July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL MISSOURI

Cabela’s merger with Bass Pro approved Cabela’s shareholders approved their proposed merger with Bass Pro Shops. Under the current terms, shareholders will receive $61.50/per share, paving the way for the merger of the two outdoor retailers. After the merger, the companies will be based in Springfield, Missouri. —Staff report

ARKANSAS

Angler set two records in one night Jimmy Ruple of Greenbrier, Arkansas arrowed a highfin carpsucker and a river carpsucker the night of June 19 on the Arkansas River to claim the unrestricted tackle record for both species. Ruple was bowfishing with his son, Steven, when he took both of the fish. The highfin carpsucker weighed 1 pound, 12 ounces, but no record had ever been submitted for the species. The river carpsucker, weighing 3 pounds, 2 ounces, bested the previous record, set in May. According to Justin Stroman, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission biologist who verified the species of the two fish, carpsuckers are a fairly common fish in the Arkansas River, although highfin carpsuckers are not as numerous as river carpsuckers. —AGFC

NEBRASKA

IS AT THE

IS AX DLAND HARVESTED TH ADAM MUNOZ FROM MI BRADY. CHAMPION RANCH IN

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

Super Tag lottery permits drawn Mindell Rethwisch of Elkhorn and Troy Stonacek of Lincoln were drawn as lottery winners of two Super Tag multispecies big game permits. The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission drew the names July 13. Thomas Hruby of Unadilla and Keith Chipman of Lakewood, California, were drawn as winners of the Combo multispecies big game permits. The Super Tag bag limit is one elk, one pronghorn, one deer and two turkeys. The Combo bag limit is one pronghorn, one deer and two turkeys. The permits are valid in open seasons with appropriate equipment. —NGPC

MICHIGAN See a full selection of Nikon products at:

TMP Hunter’s Equipment

2700 South Rankin Hwy 349 Midland, TX 79706 (432) 686-2500

The goal of the expanded feeding ban is to help limit the spread of chronic wasting disease. The 41 counties comprise of the state’s CWD Management Zone. MDC designates counties in and around where CWD has been found as part of its CWD Management Zone. —MDC

NATIONWIDE Lesser prairie chicken numbers stable The latest lesser prairie chicken survey shows population trends remain stable after six years of aerial survey data collection, according to the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. The survey indicates an estimated breeding population of 33,269 birds this year, up from 25,261 birds counted last year. Lesser prairie chickens can be found in four ecoregions in five states: Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas, and their numbers fluctuate due to changes in habitat conditions. An apparent population decline was noted in the shinnery oak ecoregion of eastern New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle. —WAFWA

Ethanol issues with boats growing A new survey by Boating Industry magazine said those in the boating industry that manufacture, sell, repair and store recreational vessels are seeing a growing number of problems caused by ethanol-related fuels. The survey reported that 92 percent of survey respondents said they have seen damage caused by ethanol, up from 87 percent from a similar survey last year. More than half of the necessary repairs were caused by ethanolrelated issues. —BoatUS

Modern sporting rifle owners spend more According to a report released by NSSF and Southwick Associates, modern sporting rifle owners are more ethnically-diverse, spend more time at the shooting range and are more likely to pay a premium price for a firearm than most other firearm owners. —NSSF

INTERNATIONAL

Lake trout survival study TANZANIA released EU approves import of The Michigan DNR has been looking specifically at what happens to lake trout after they elephant are caught through a mortality assessment survey. From 2010 to 2013, the following numbers of fish were tagged and released in southern Lake Superior: 2,300 trap net-caught lake trout and 1,800 angler-caught lake trout. In west-central Lake Huron, 1,670 trap netcaught and 930 angler-caught lake trout were tagged and released. Tag recapture data were then tallied between 2010 and 2016. Tag return rates were much lower for angler-tagged than large trap net-tagged fish in both lakes Superior and Huron. In Lake Superior, results from tag-return data analysis indicated mortality of anglerreleased fish averaged 43 percent when the surface water temperature at release exceeded about 50 degrees and was 15 percent when surface water temperatures were below 50 degrees. In Lake Huron, mortality of angler-released lake trout was 53 percent for surface temperature below 50 degrees and averaged 61 percent above 50 degrees. —MDNR

MISSOURI

Missouri expands deer feeding ban The Missouri Department of Conservation has expanded restrictions on feeding deer and placing minerals for deer from 29 to 41 counties throughout the state, effective July 1.

Elephant hunting trophies from four of the six main ecosystems in the elephant range of Tanzania are again importable to the European Union. The Scientific Review Group of the EU recently conveyed a partial positive opinion on the import of elephant trophies from Tanzania to the CITES Committee of the EU. The committee endorsed the opinion. The committee placed several conditions of importation. The quotas in those areas cannot exceed more than 0.3 percent of the managed population. —Staff report

QUEBEC

Poaching ring busted A network of 30 poachers was brought down by the Canadian province of Quebec’s Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks in one of the province’s biggest poaching busts on record. Totaling 360 illegal wildlife charges including illegal possession of white-tailed deer, night hunting with a searchlight, hunting without a license, and a surplus of large game limits, the individuals involved are now facing fines in the amount of $280,000. Wildlife officers involved in the case estimated that the group of individuals was responsible for the illegal take of upwards of 60 deer per year. In addition to seizing three cars, two off-road vehicles, and two weapons, the team also recovered 13 whitetail deer and approximately 2,200 pounds of venison. —QMFWP


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Youth hunters Continued from page 4

Alura Lovell, 13, practices her shooting skills. She is one of five teens representing Texas in a national youth hunter education contest. Photo from Jeanette Hammonds.

so besides practicing, the youth did some fundraising and even secured a couple of sponsors (TPWD-Texas Hunter Education Instructor Association and YHEC Outdoor Sports). Hammonds feels optimistic about the group’s chances at the nationals. Lovell, the only girl on the team and the youngest, had to compete up in the senior division since other team members are in that division. Collins, who graduated from Chisholm Trail High School in Saginaw this year, said this will be his second time competing in the national event. The first time he attended was four years ago. While he didn’t place in any events, he learned plenty. This time, he’s hoping to do better. “The competition is pretty tough. Normally I do pretty good at shotgun and archery,” Collins said. Siblings Alura and Aiden Lovell said this will be their first national competition, but they are eager to compete after sticking to a practice routine for months. Alura didn’t seem fazed that she’s competing against older teens or that most of her teammates are boys. “I live with three brothers,” she explained. This year she placed third in the state competition for muzzleloader. Her brother

hopes to do well in his best events, which are the rifle and shotgun. Beyond the competition, the most important thing is putting their training to use as hunters. Collins said the courses have helped him become more aware when hunting with his grandfather. “It just made me more ethical. You can’t take every shot,” he said, explaining he was taught to try for a clean shot. Others involved in the courses have similar stories. Chapman, who’s the second oldest in the group, said the training has definitely helped him while hunting deer and turkey with his father. For example, the safe way to cross a fence while out hunting is to unload the firearm and place it across a fence pointing away from any hunters before attempting to cross it. “It’s always something you keep in the back of your mind while you’re crossing a fence or climbing into a blind,” Chapman said. Hammonds, who organizes the state competition, has also managed to reward his top scorers with a hunting trip in January, where he’s seen the youth demonstrate their knowledge firsthand. “We try to teach them to be safe, ethical, responsible hunters,” Hammonds said.

Allen shotgun team wins national championships The Allen Eagles Competitive Shooting Team topped 2,750 shotgun competitors from 33 states to win the High Overall and Sporting Clays championships at the Scholastic Clay Target Programs American Team Nationals, held July 8-15 in Marengo, Ohio. The team has represented Texas at the competition five times, winning in 2015 and finishing as the runner-up in 2016. This year, their aggregate score of 2,716 out of 3,000 combined targets in trap, skeet and sporting clays was enough for the win. In skeet, Allen shooters Brandon Stone, Rob Beach and Sean Packer secured fourth-place team finishes with a score of 580 out of 600. Stone hit 100 straight targets in the competition. In sporting clays, Allen’s Lake Bishop, Stone, both seniors, and Packer, a freshman, claimed the national championship with a combined 487 out of 600. Allen shooters Stone, Isaiah Irby, Bishop, Jackson Harper, Nick Hawkins and Nick Platt were named to the Texas SCTP all-state team. —Staff report

Night hogs Continued from page 4

makes them even harder to kill, so arrow placement is crucial. “Most of them have never attempted something like this,” he said. “They’re like, ‘Oh, my gosh.’ A lot of my hunters get nervous.” Montgomery added that bow-mounted lights are great, but sometimes the hogs will get wise to them. Most hog hunts at night involve lit feeder areas, he said. Montgomery likes to hunt from a tree so hogs can’t get the scent of a human. Sometimes he spreads corn on the ground and hunts under a full moon. His bow of choice is a recurve bow or longbow. “It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “I rarely hunt with a gun anymore.” Photo from Ridgeback Creek Hog Hunts

July 28, 2017

Page 23


LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

PRODUCTS TARGET CAMERAS: Bullseye Camera Systems offers two models of target cameras. The “Sight In” model (about $350) features 300-yard range while the “Long Range” model (about $650) reaches out to a mile with direct line of sight. The cameras’ proprietary software allows hunters to easily reference their last shot as it blinks on the screen, as well as mark and track a shot sequence. Additional features include live recording, calculating adjustments, and more.

>>

DIGITAL BATTERY CHARGER: Stow Minn Kota’s lightweight battery charger on board just in case. Designed for digital onboard charging technology and available in two convenient, portable, single-bank battery chargers, both models offer a built-in digital microprocessor that, among other functions, facilitates automatic temperature compensation. High and low outdoor temperatures can greatly affect a battery’s ability to take a charge, often resulting in under- or over-charging, which can damage marine batteries. The chargers sense the outside temperature and automatically adjust the charge profile. This self-regulation ensures a faster, more precise charge. They also recognize when the battery has achieved full power, and shut off automatically when the charge is complete. The chargers deliver five or 10 AMPS of total output and work on flooded/wet-cell, maintenance-free, and AGM batteries. The digital charger costs about $60 or $85, depending on the model.

TRAILBLAZER BOOTS: Irish Setter’s midheight hunting boots are lightweight - yet heavy-duty - to allow for more active hunting. These waterproof, non-insulated boots are great for rugged hunting terrains that require scrambling and a wider range of motion. The height of the boots allow freer muscle movement in the calf area, minimizing constriction on steep slopes when muscles are working their hardest. The boots combine a variety of features that contribute to their comfort and durability, including the leather welt construction provides some flexibility with enough rigidity for stability on uneven terrain. And the cushioning of the “Comfort Cork” EVA with memory foam and an odor inhibitor footbed comes standard on all models. The leather pebble brown boots are available in sizes 8-14 and cost about $185.

>>

MAG SPRING PLIERS: Rapala’s new pliers help hooks come out quickly and easily so that anglers can get their bait back in the water and catch more fish. The innovative tool utilizes a patent-pending, magnetic “MagSpring” system that keeps the pliers open and ready, which translates into no fumbling around to open the pliers while holding a fish or rod. The pliers come in three sizes: 4-, 6- and 8-inch-long models. Additional features include stainless steel construction with tin-nickel-alloy plating, serrated jaws, an offset design, vented soft-touch handles, a line-cutter, and a pivoting, quick-draw sheath with a belt loop and clip. The pliers cost about $25.

>>

>>

July 28, 2017

>>

Page 24

DEER SEASON XP: Winchester’s ammunition, made specifically for deer hunters, will be offered in two new calibers: the 64-grain .223 Rem. and the more recently developed 125-grain 6.5 Creedmoor. Winchester describes this ammo as having massive knockdown power with precision accuracy. It has a big polymer tip and a thin jacket and is a quick expander. The loads come 20 rounds to a box. Available in 13 calibers, the ammo ranges in price from $20 to $40.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

July 28, 2017

Page 25

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263 AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does.Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159 TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189 NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 LSONF LOOKING FOR LEASE Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation creates hunters for a lifetime by giving an opportunity to people who have the passion for hunting but lack the opportunity. LSONF is seeking hunting property to accomplish its mission. All hunting rights sought and house/camp needed. (214) 361-2276 DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

HUNT THIS YEAR!

Huge Hill Country Ranch Divided into 100 - 500 acres. Low fenced neighbors, exclusive game management for high quality whitetail, axis and other free ranging game. Call Bill for a personal showing: (361) 815-0140

NORTHERN OUTFITTERS ARCTIC SUIT

2XL tall camouflage parka, white overcoat shell, pants, full length mitts, boots. Good to minus 40. Original $1200 value. Like new. Asking $550. (214) 616 0293

COLORADO ELK AND MULE DEER RANCH Own a beautiful 5,800 ac ranch that sits in the middle of the home to the largest elk herd in North America. Remote, end of road. 45 mins SW of Trinidad CO  Elevation: 6,389 – 7,543 ft Resident and migrating elk herd with exceptional trophy genes. Large mule deer, bear and turkey population. 2 story custom log home, 3 BR, 3 1/2 Bath,  2 Master Suites, Bunk Room 2+ car garage, 2 RV pads with all utilities, beautiful views. call Paul Phillips (210) 274-9094

TIRED OF LEASING? BUY YOUR ON HUNTING PROPERTY. Prime hunting property for a family. Great hunting for whitetail, axis, turkey and dove. 125 acres or 67 acres with log style home 30 minutes northwest of Kerrville. (830) 928-4437

(214) 616-0293

55.38 AC Real Co., Cabin $185,523 Prop. #6 429.14 AC Edwards Co. $1350 P/ AC Prop. #11 90.87 AC Leakey, Cabin $515,000 Prop. #7 370.79 AC Axis, Fallow, Sika Deer, Elk, Cabin, Barn, $985,000 Prop. #9 (Photo taken on Prop. #9 July 2017) PIONEER REAL ESTATE Shirley Shandley, Broker hillcountryrealestate.net (830) 232-6422

TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES

VEHICLES

Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044

ATASCOSA 4-TON QUIK FEED TRAILER $7,500.00 will@goolsbytesting.com (281) 540-1255 1980 CJ7 HUNTING JEEP W/HIGH RACK rubber coated $4,500.00 will@goolsbytesting.com (281) 540-1255

TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! dickyn@lagovistalodge.com (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com

29’ AQUASPORT SPORTFISHERMAN

(717) 512-3582

FISHING DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

For sale or trade. Twin 220 hp Cummins Diesels less than 200 hours, 27 knts cruising speed. Marine head and shower, Furuno plotter/fishfinder, Standard Horizon VHF Radio, Refrigerator and stove, 4 bunks, and outriggers. Sell for $35K or equivalent value bay/flats boat.  (361) 876-4583

BIG GAME HUNT NAMIBIA 1 Trophy Elephant and 1 Trophy Leopard hunt available for September 2017 ONLY. Elephant hunt in the Caprivi area. Leopard SW of Etosha area. lloydmb1@hotmail.com For details contact George (409) 739 5172

WEATHERBY MARK V .375 H&H

Synthetic stock, new condition Less than 20 rounds fired through it. Tapered screw for muzzle break $2,500 retail, will take $1,500 or make offer! 

HUNTING RANCHES FOR SALE

SOUTH TEXAS TROPHIES

Maverick County Native, mature herd Management hunts available Quality lodging

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503 BULL RED RUN AND FLOUNDER GIGGING

Port O’Connor, TX Call Capt. Alex Cruz Now booking trips for September and October www.affordableguideservice.com (210) 789-0607

ULTIMATE LEASE ACCOMODATIONS Damon Astoria Motor Coach 2011 360Hp 6.7L Isb Cummins Engine On a Freightliner Chassis, Air Bag Suspension, Exhaust Brake, 3 Slide-outs, Onan Diesel Generator, 2 Ducted Air Conditioners with Heat Pumps, Levelers, 4 Door Gas/110V Norcold Refrigerator with Ice Maker, Automatic Main Awning And Slide/Door Awnings, 1 Piece Washer/Dryer, Backup and Side View Camera, Satellite Dish, Outside Entertainment System, 3 TVs, DVD Player, Satellite Radio, Outside Shower, Fireplace, Central Vacuum, Convection Microwave and 3 Burner Range. M&G Brake System and Blue Ox Tow Bar. See it in the Houston area. (806) 438-3048

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Check Out Multiple Trip Discounts (956) 551-1965

PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

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TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 Call (214) 361-2276

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Deer season native deer/hogs Cabins, guides etc. 3 day hunts $1250 hunter. (214) 469-5031

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

HUNTING ON THE RIO GRANDE

White Wing & Dove Texasdovehunt.com (956) 542-2223

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@GMAIL.COM


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July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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DATEBOOK JULY 29

Texas Deer Association Texas Deer Summit LoneHollow Whitetails, Mountain Home texasdeerassociation.com Coastal Conservation Association Galveston Annual Banquet Moody Gardens Convention Center (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Texas Gulf Coast Big Game Banquet (281) 245-9723 rmef.org

AUGUST 3

Delta Waterfowl Lamar County Chapter Banquet, Paris (903) 517-5889 deltawaterfowl.org Ducks Unlimited Allen Chapter 19th Annual Banquet (214) 770-3551 ducks.org Coastal Conservation Association San Gabriel Chapter Annual Banquet Sheraton Georgetown Texas Hotel ccatexas.org Mule Deer Foundation Lubbock Chapter Banquet (817) 565-7121 muledeer.org Dallas Safari Club DSC 100 Volunteer Event DSC office (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

AUGUST 4

National Wild Turkey Federation Pineywoods Banquet Lufkin Civic Center (936) 465-7516 nwtf.org

AUGUST 4-5

Deer Breeders Corporation 2017 Annual DBC Convention Hyatt Regency Hill Country, San Antonio dbcdeer.com

AUGUST 4-6

AUGUST 11-13

AUGUST 5

AUGUST 12

Hunters Extravaganza Houston NRG Center ttha.com

AUGUST 16-18

Ducks Unlimited Lake Somerville Dinner American Legion Hall (979) 777-4115 ducks.org

Statewide Quail Symposium MCM Elegante Suites, Abilene (325) 698-1234 statewidequailsymposium.com

AUGUST 17

Hunters Extravaganza Fort Worth Convention Center ttha.com

Quail and Pheasants Forever Lone Star Banquet, Grapevine (972) 332-1612 pheasantsforeverevents.org

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Lee County Bull Busters Big Game Banquet, Dime Box (979) 366-9366 rmef.org

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation North Texas Big Game Banquet Embassy Suites, Grapevine (214) 693-8523 rmef.org

Coastal Conservation Association Lower Laguna Madre Chapter Banquet Port Isabel Event and Cultural Center (956) 491-8148 ccatexas.org

National Wild Turkey Federation Pineywoods Banquet Lufkin Civic Center (936) 465-7516 nwtf.org

Coastal Conservation Association Aransas Bay Annual Banquet Fulton Convention Center ccatexas.org

Delta Waterfowl North Houston Chapter Banquet, Spring (832) 576-0334 deltawaterfowl.org

AUGUST 10

Houston Safari Club Larysa Switlyk event Gordy & Sons Outfitters, Houston houstonsafariclub.org Coastal Conservation Association Northwest Houston Chapter Annual Banquet Raveneaux Country Club (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

AUGUST 10-12

Texas Deer Association Convention Marriott Hill Country Resort, San Antonio (512) 499-0466 texasdeerassociation.com

AUGUST 11

National Wild Turkey Federation Harris County Banquet Whitney Oaks Hall, Houston (832) 292-1811 nwtf.org

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 26

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1. Searching for game with binoculars [GLASSING] 6. A favorite food for deer [ALFALFA] 9. A safari destination [TANZANIA] 10. Non-targeted sea life caught by commercial fishermen [BYCATCH] 16. A flashlight manufacturer [COAST] 18. Type of wood used in fishing lures [BALSA] 19. Rig with four or more lures [UMBRELLA] 20. A quail dog, German _____ pointer [SHORTHAIRED] 21. The back part of the boat [STERN] 25. A phase of an insect's life [LARVA] 26. Command to bring dog to your side [HEEL] 27. A hook-removing device [DEGORGER] 29. The small pistol [DERRINGER] 30. Material used in making arrows [CARBON] 34. Popular material for cold-weather waders [NEOPRENE] 36. Site of 2018 Bassmaster Classic [HARTWELL] 37. The dove limit in Texas [FIFTEEN]

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Down

2. Used by fish finders to locate structure [SONAR]

3. Bass Pro is buying this retailer [CABELAS] 4. River that feeds Lake Conroe, San ____ [JACINTO] 5. The long goose call [FLUTE] 7. Exotic that can damage feeders [AOUDAD] 8. The immature fish [FRY] 9. A stream that feeds a river [TRIBUTARY] 11. Annual fishing trade show [ICAST] 12. An offshore species [SNAPPER] 13. Trees that grow in saltwater [MANGROVES] 14. A small rapid in a stream [RIFFLE] 15. The pogey [MENHADEN] 17. Part of the hook from the eye to the bend [SHANK] 18. The big-tailed furbearer [BEAVER] 21. Summer-long coastal fishing tournament [STAR] 22. An African game species [ELAND] 23. Sheep in Big Bend [BIGHORNS] 24. A old-time wooden decoy [BLOCK]

Puzzle solution from Page 20


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

July 28, 2017

Page 27


Page 28

July 28, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NEW 1900 YARD RANGEFINDER BINOCULAR With split-second ranging capability out to 1,900 yards* and the optical prowess to bring the farthest targets to focus, the new LaserForce 10x42 is your single optic solution for serious hunting and shooting. — ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass

for high contrast viewing — ID Technology Compensates for

Incline/Decline Shot Angles — OLED display offers 4 brightness levels — Waterproof, fogproof and

shock resistant

ONE MILE

All Nikon trademarks are the property of Nikon Corporation.

*FOR REFERENCE. UNDER NIKON’S MEASUREMENT CONDITIONS.

OF INSTANT GRATIFICATION

Become Inseparable. Built and Backed for a lifetime of performance.

ALPINE RANGE Fort Worth (817) 478-6613 FIELD & STREAM Friendswood – (281) 488-0796 Katy – (281) 574-3456

NikonSportOptics.com

CARTER’S COUNTRY North: 6231 Treaschwig (281) 443-8393 West: 8927 Katy Freeway (713) 461-1844 Southwest: 11886 Wilchrest Dr. (281) 879-1466 Pasadena: 2120 Shaver (713) 475-2222 carterscountry.net

MCBRIDE’S 2915 San Gabriel, Austin (512) 472-3532 mcbridesguns.com FIELD & STREAM Friendswood – (281) 488-0796 Katy – (281) 574-3456

TMP HUNTER’S EQUIPMENT 2700 TX-349, Midland (432) 686-2500 gotmp.com

July 27, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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