Page 1

Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

May 26, 2017

Volume 13, Issue 19

Favoring the single hook

Outdoor bills closer to becoming laws By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

By Craig Nyhus

With the Texas Legislature’s 85th regular session winding down, anglers and hunters could see several new laws impacting their sports or wallets. Notable bills that have made it out of the Texas House or Senate respectively and have a chance of becoming law before the session ends May 29 include: • Senate Bill 722, authorizing the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to charge a fee for the Managed Lands Deer Permit program; • House Bill 3535, legalizing hunting select varmints from hot air balloons; • House Bill 550, requiring a sound producing device for self-propelled boats; • House Bill 1988, mandating motorized boat operators to engage kill switches. Senate Bill 722 would allow TPWD to recoup costs associated with the popular MLDP program, which has stretched the resources of the wildlife division staff. Proposed fees range from $30 to $250, according to Matt Dowling, chief of staff for Sen. Charles Perry, R-Lubbock, who sponsored

Lone Star Outdoor News Lower Laguna Madre anglers have been switching to single hooks on shallow-water and top-water lures for years, especially in summer when the treble hooks seem to immediately find the grass floating on the surface. “I make the switch when there is lots of floating grass,” said Capt. Ruben Garza of Port Mansfield. Garza attaches short-shanked hooks to his lures, to avoid the problem of the hooks catching each other. Debates regarding the hookup rate range from anglers preferring either the treble or the single hooks. “There’s a little difference in the hook rates, but it’s not a significant amount,” Garza said. “I caught at 34-inch snook on a single hook top-water.” Garza and Port Aransas guide Dean Thomas both use Gamakatsu 1/0 live bait hooks. Once the fish is hooked, Garza and many anglers believe the catch rate improves with a single hook. Some saltwater lure manufacturers, aware of the trend, have stepped to the plate. Rapala’s Single Hook Series includes the Skitter V, Magnum X-Rap, Twitchin’ Mullet and Please turn to page 11

Please turn to page 6

CONTENTS Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 11 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12

Attaching single hooks to shallow-running lures like the Rapala Twitchin’ Mullet or top-water lures, normally equipped with treble hooks, is commonly done along the coast. However, few freshwater anglers have made the switch. Photos by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 20

Historic fish records still stand

Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 23 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 24 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

LSONews.com

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Drum, snook, Lake Medina bass live on By Mark England

Despite the odds, the oldest water body fishing record in Texas is approaching its centennial. On Jan. 1, 1924, Asa Short of Fort Worth, an amateur baseball player who later played professionally for the Dallas Steers in the Texas League, stretched a trotline with a whopping 680 hooks across White Rock Lake.

Short’s catch still stands as the state record for a freshwater drum caught with “other methods.” His catch tops the rod and reel record, set in 2011, by 11 pounds. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department biologist Rafe Brock said freshwater drum are no longer prevalent at White Rock Lake. A few North Texas lakes, such as Lake Arlington, have good populations of drum as far as quantity, he said. “Every now and then, in our surveys, we’ll see one around 25 pounds,” Brock said. “But I’ve never seen anything that size.” The next two oldest water

Photo by LSON

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Deer hunting remains king in Texas, but the number of dove hunters has soared over the past 15 years. According to the most recent state game

Please turn to page 11

INSIDE

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

Lone Star Outdoor News

Short told reporters that it took two 5-gallon cans of bait to fill the hooks. He credited his buddy, Roy Johnson, with helping set the line, although Short got the record when they pulled out almost 250 pounds of fish — including a record 55-pound freshwater drum. News of Short’s catch excited the community. “We had that big fish frozen in a block of ice, and it was just about as long as the ice,” Short told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in 1954. “Then we put it on display at Cullum and Boren, where just about everybody in Dallas came to see it.”

Dove hunters on the rise across Texas

HUNTING

Hunting with air guns

Rattlers and quail

More than a novelty. Page 4

Birds infrequent prey for opportunistic snakes. Page 4

FISHING

Please turn to page 23

Artist gets start from Chuy’s

Surf fishing clinic

Unique creations outside the norm. Page 8

Saturday events growing in popularity. Page 8


Page 2

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

It’s your dream. Let’s make it a reality. At Capital Farm Credit, we understand that a piece of land is more than a place to go hunting; it’s an escape where you create memories with family and friends. That’s why we’re with you every step of the way throughout the entire lending process. We’re a cooperative, and that means your goals are our goals. And our patronage dividend program means we share our profits and put money back in your pocket. Because we’re all in this together. And together we’re better.

Together we’re better. Partnership that really pays.

capitalfarmcredit.com | 877.944.5500 NMLS493828

72073.01 CFC Hunting ad_LonestarOutdoorNews_10.5x15.5.indd 1

1/13/17 2:13 PM


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Page 3


Page 4

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HUNTING

Air guns taking a shot at mainstream hunting By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Hunting with high-powered air rifles offers a novel way to take non-game animals that’s similar to hunting with a muzzleloader. Cody Monroe, a pro-staffer with AirForce Airguns out of Burleson, has been The .45-caliber Texan air gun is gaining in popularity when hunting larger game such as this mouflon sheep taken by Cary Hoops. Photo from Cody Monroe.

hunting hogs for 30 years. So when he was introduced to modern, powerful air guns, it seemed a natural fit to marry the two. “It’s a new element, and it’s becoming very popular,” Monroe said. “They’re made right here. The quality of the gun is phenomenal.” After getting the hang of shooting

the air rifles, Monroe decided to try hog hunting with one about three years ago. Normally, he feels comfortable taking a shot with a rifle at around 150 yards. With the air rifle, he prefers to take shots within 100 yards at predators and hogs. “Mainly our hog hunting is at night with thermal meters,” he said. He also Please turn to page 6

A new place for scouts to shoot

Boy Scouts in the North Texas area have a new place to learn to shoot both shotguns and rifles. Volunteer Robert Higginbotham helped Dakota Scott take one of the first shots at a new shooting sports complex built in honor of the late Gill Clements. On May 18, Circle Ten Council of the Boy Scouts of America dedicated the complex located 8 miles from downtown Dallas. Camp Wisdom serves 60,000 youth in North Texas and Oklahoma.The facility includes a new shooter education building, a trap station, a five-stand building complete with seven new Promatic machines and a 75-yard rifle range. Three other camps in Circle Ten offer shooting sports. The BSA has awarded more than two million scouts with shooting merit badges and three million wildlife conservation merit badges. The complex was made possible by gifts from the Gill Clements Foundation and Joe R. Crafton Jr. Photo by Greg Mazen.

Stuffer turkey decoy brings in first bird By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Jeremy Box of Cross Plains started hunting last year with his 11-year-old son, Jaedin. Near the end of turkey season, everything came together for the father and son. “It was our first turkey hunt,” Box said. “We had gone out a few days earlier but didn’t see or hear anything.” For the hunt, they had help from some friends. “We had a borrowed call, a borrowed decoy and a borrowed shotgun,” Box said. His friend, Stan Chism of West Texas Feeder Supply, provided the call and decoy. “He showed me how to call and told me how often to do it,” Box said. On the morning of the hunt, the pair set up in a cleared area among many cedars. “We were out there an hour and a

half,” Box said. “We were thinking about leaving and Jaedin was having trouble sitting still that long. Then I called again and we heard gobbles about 70 yards behind us.” The two hunters froze. “They came down a little two-track road behind us and got right next to us,” Box said. “We had to turn into statues. I thought they could see us, but the decoy deterred them and they headed right for it. It seemed like an hour but I know it was just a few seconds.” The decoy wasn’t plastic. It was a taxidermied hen A taxidermied hen fooled toms and hens alike during a father-son hunting trip. Photo by Stan Chism. that Chism had made. “He wanted a real liveblers,” Box said. “The hens went to the looking decoy,” Box said. decoy first and started pecking on it. The birds were fooled. Then the toms tried to tear it up — the “There were two hens and three gobPlease turn to page 19

Rattlesnakes preying on quail By Ray Sasser

For Lone Star Outdoor News Rattlers eat quail, but it’s not that frequent. But this year, they appear to be on the menu more. At Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch, the snakes have tied a record, eating four birds equipped with telemetry transmitters in just six weeks. As a comparison, four telemetry birds were eaten in the entire year of 2009. The ranch typically has about 120 birds “on the air,” wearing transmitters by nesting season. The nickel-sized devices allow researchers to track the quail. Dale Rollins, executive director, figures quail fall victim to a snake that’s hiding in cover when the bird passes within striking distance. He’s seen it happen once, though the victim was a pen-raised bird being used in a quail management demonstration. The bird had been tracked and flushed once. When it was flushed a second time it flew about 30 Please turn to page 21


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Keep deer eating in the heat of summer Climate Guard supplement encourages feeding

Preserving and Promoting the Sport of Bowhunting Since 1974 43rd Annual Awards Banquet

By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News The Texas summer is right around the corner, and research has shown that whitetailed deer eat less when it gets hot, even when supplemental feed is available. The scientists at Purina Animal Nutrition have de- A new supplement added to Purina’s feed helps deer continue to feed in veloped a product to encour- the heat of summer. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News. age deer to continue to visit the feeder, even during the of summer, Schlegel said. Does consumheat of summer. ing AntlerMax with Climate Guard were Studies conducted by the Caesar Kleberg 10 percent heavier than does consuming Wildlife Research Institute examined the a control diet after 42 days, and 8 percent effect of heat on food consumption, conheavier after 84 days. Also, does consuming cluding that since consuming food generpellets with Climate Guard visited the feedates heat, the hot temperatures causes deer ers more often during the heat of the day. to eat less. “We saw that does supplemented with Purina’s supplement, called Climate Climate Guard gained more weight and Guard, is added to its AntlerMax protein had improved body condition,” he said. feed. “They visited feeders more often and had “It’s a blend of plant extracts that helps improved intake. to support rumen metabolism of the deer, “This is especially important through the improve protein and energy efficiency and summer to maintain their body condition shift some of the digestion from the rumen around the time they gave birth to help to the small intestine,” said Dr. Mike Schlesupport lactation.” gel, Purina’s senior nutritionist for wildlife Climate Guard is comprised of high qualand small ruminant technical solutions. “It ity ingredients that support rumen funchelps decrease the potential of acidosis.” tion, gut heath and optimal nutrient utiliPurina’s research on white-tailed does zation, and it supports digestibility of starch was performed in West Texas in the heat in the small intestine. The plant-based Please turn to page 19

Page 5

Date: Saturday June 24, 2017 Time: 6pm-10pm Location: The REC of Grapevine 1175 Municipal Way Grapevine, TX 76051

Banquet Events

*Guest Speaker – Dale Moses *TBBR Records Awards *Live Auction *Silent Auction *Raffle Items *Various Seminars

More Details at: www.LoneStarBowhunter.com


Page 6

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Hunting with air guns Continued from page 4

Modern air rifles may be used to take predators, exotics or squirrels. Photo from Cody Monroe.

uses them to hunt coyotes, which he calls in. The novelty of using the air rifle keeps things interesting for Monroe. While it offers a unique way to hunt, it does the job of a firearm by delivering a large-caliber bullet. “The thing I tell everybody is it’s a challenge. Basically, it’s the same thing as a muzzleloader.” Most of the animals he’s killed have been with the .45-caliber Texan, which the company says is the world’s most powerful production air rife. According to product literature, the air gun can launch a .45-caliber projectile at over 1,000 feet per second. The air rifle is powerful enough to take down a 600-pound scimitar-horned oryx,

Monroe said. Right now, it’s illegal to hunt most game animals with air rifles in Texas, which limits the sport to mainly hogs and predators. Currently, the only game animal air guns may legally be used to take is squirrels. But the door may be opening to bigger game. Missouri, for example, already allows air gun hunting for game, much like it does for muzzleloaders. Texas could follow suit, according to Alan Cain, white-tailed deer program leader with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “We’re looking into that right now,” Cain said, adding department officials would need to see that the devices are powerful enough to hunt game such as deer.

Legislation Continued from page 1

300# PROTEIN FEEDER

®

1,000# PRO EVO Built to be varmint and weather resistant. With adjustable baffles used PROTEIN FEEDER 600# ELECTRIC to regulate feed flow, All Seasons A heavy duty protein feeder designed to keep Feeders, offers the best protein feeders STAND & FILL FEEDER varmints and rain out! Holding 1,000lbs on the market. This feeder holds 300lbs, comes with legs, drive pins, The 600lb Electric Stand & Fill Feeder™ of protein, this feeder is for those who are serious about supplemental feeding. This and sight glass for easy view of feed maintains the quality and durability of is the most weather resistant and varmint our traditional protein feeders, while levels. resistant feeder on the market! offering you a much safer way to fill your feeder, and regulate feed use. ®

®

THE ANTLERMAX® TECHNOLOGY STORY ANTLERMAX® BY-PASS PROTEIN TECHNOLOGY Developed in 1995 as an innovative first from Purina, AntlerMax® By-Pass Protein Technology promotes antler growth by improving protein quality.

HOW IT WORKS - Traditional

deer feed protein is typically broken down by bacteria in the deer’s rumen and the deer digests the bacteria in its stomach. But the quality of the protein can be degraded by these bacteria, leaving lower quality amino acids available for antler growth. AntlerMax® By-Pass Proteins are protected from being broken down by these bacteria. They “by-pass” the bacteria in the rumen, so the high-quality amino acids are digested in the small intestine, which can support greater antler growth.

www.mummesinc.com

For prices and information call

1-800-221-6398 or visit us online at www.mummesinc.com

830.426.3313 Hondo, TX

120 Hwy 173N

830.334.3323 Pearsall, TX

1845 Business I-35N

830.931.2215 Rio Medina, TX 10195 FM 2676

Follow Mumme’s Inc. on Facebook for info on the latest items & special sales!

* We ship feeders anywhere in the continental United States. 2,000 and 3,000 LB Feeders Available. Skids Available on 2,000 LB & 3,000 LB Feeders. Feeder Capacity Determined by corn weight.

the bill. The program is currently free, offering wildlife management and deer herd management plans. Those enrolled in the program enjoy a longer deer harvesting season and other perks. TPWD biologists conduct on-site visits to survey habitat and wildlife populations and help develop management plans and recommend deer harvest numbers. The bill has made it through the Senate and passed out of the House to the Calendars Committee. That committee must schedule it for a full House vote before it can go to the governor for his signature. “It’s moving along with support,” said Dowling. Another bill moving through the process is House Bill 3535, which will legalize hunting feral hogs and coyotes from a hot air balloon. This bill, sponsored by Mark Keough, R-Woodlands, follows the logic that if it’s legal to hunt those varmints from a helicopter, then why not let folks hunt them from hot air balloons. Blimps weren’t mentioned, but there’s always next time. According to the Keough camp, the bill is needed because hogs have wised up to the sound of helicopters and avoid them. A hot air balloon would be much quieter and not scare them away. The bill passed the House and moved into the Senate. Ruth Mesta, legislative director for Keough, said they are looking for a sponsor on the Senate side. The next step would be to add it to the calendar for a vote.

House Bill 550 was designed to align Texas law with U.S. Coast Guard regulations by requiring kayak, canoe and other nonmotorized vessels operators to have a whistle, air horn or other device that can be heard at least half a mile away. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Ryan Guillen, D-Rio Grande City, received a lot of pushback, died and was resurrected. The argument was Texans should fight against federal regulations, but the bill managed to pass the House and is now in the Senate. At stake is some $3 million in federal funding that TPWD receives from the government. If the law isn’t passed, then the department stands to lose those funds. At most, about half of boat operators use kill switches, or emergency engine cutoff switches, according to surveys. House Bill 1988, sponsored by Rep. Lyle Larson, R-San Antonio, wants to make it part of the Texas Water Safety Act. The emergency switches use short tethers attached to the boat operator. In case a boat operator is thrown from the vessel as a result of hitting an object, for example, the tether turns the boat’s motor off. Without the shutoff, a person can be seriously injured or killed by the engine’s spinning propeller. The still-running boats tend to circle and can strike incapacitated operators. The bill passed the House and has been received by the Senate but hasn’t been put into a committee. “It’s not dead yet. I can say that,” said Sarah DeCuir, legislative director for Larson. “I would love for it to pass.”


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

GIVE BACK TO DAD SAVE ON THE GEAR HE NEEDS THIS FATHER’S DAY • JUNE 8-21

SATURDAY, JUNE 10 | STARTS AT 8 A.M.

DOORBUSTERS 5ONLY

HOURS

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST • LIMITED QUANTITIES • IN-STORE ONLY

Saturday,

FAMILY

adventure DAY

June 10 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. – Try your skills at Cabela’s BB-Gun Range – Fishing and casting demonstrations – Test your archery skills in our S.A.F.E. archery range

Visit cabelas.com/stores to find an event near you

Page 7


Page 8

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

FISHING No rod, no tackle, no license — no problem By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Surf fishing at a Sea Rim State Park clinic is about as close to free as you can get. For the $3 admission price to the park, visitors can attend a free fishing clinic the second Saturday of every month March through October. Rods, tackle, bait and instruction are provided at no extra cost. “You don’t have to pay for anything,” said Nathan Londenberg, park superintendent. “It’s been going

good. The biggest issue we’ve had is weather.” Londenberg said the popularity of the program has grown since it began three years ago. In May, the clinic attracted 25 children and 15 adults. The anglers can catch a variety of Gulf fish, including croaker, redfish, flathead catfish, black drum, sheepshead and shark. The first year of the clinic, Londenberg remembers an 18-year-old girl fishing for the first time who hooked a 4-foot shark. Afterwards, fishing hooked the girl. She and her family

enjoyed it so much, they went out to a local sporting goods store that same weekend and purchased fishing gear. Kimberlie Ringham started her love of surf fishing at one such clinic a couple years back when she caught a black drum. Now she helps teach those same clinics every month. Ringham said she goes over safety and teaches novice shore anglers how to cast and how to use bait such as mullet, cut bait and shrimp. “We’ve had a lot of first-timers come out, and they really enjoy it,” she said. “I love seeing the kids out Please turn to page 11

Sea Rim State Park offers free surf-fishing classes once a month. The next class is June 10. Photo from Sea Rim State Park, Facebook.

Unique fish highlight artist’s work Austin restaurant gives man his start By Shannon Drawe

For Lone Star Outdoor News

Fish with Attitude is the name for artist Mike Quinn’s unusual fish creations. College art projects turned into a lucrative career selling fish art at a Chuy’s restaurant and elsewhere. Photos by Shannon Drawe, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Many fishermen can trace their passion back to the first fish they ever caught. Santa Fe, Texas, artist Mike Quinn can do the same thing. His “Fish With Attitude” started with a fish he molded for an art class assignment at Texas State University in 1990. “I had an art project due and did a mold of this fish, a perch I had caught in the San Marcos River,” Quinn said. A short time later, Mike was at the original Chuy’s Restaurant in Austin, drinking a margarita bought on a free gift certificate. “I noticed a sign that said six week art show,” Quinn said. “So I went up and asked about it with a little liquid courage. Sure enough the guy I talked to was Jay Bunda, the guy in charge of the art show.” Chuy’s regularly displayed artists’ work on its walls. Bunda, however, told Quinn it would be months before he would have a shot at getting his art in the restaurant. “I just kept making fish, and the first of the year rolled around and he said come down and I’ll have a look at your stuff,” Quinn said. Quinn, who didn’t have a car at the time, loaded up a bunch of fish in his backpack, and made his way to the restaurant in a pouring rain on his motorcycle. Please turn to page 14

From pizza to crappie By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News After 42 years in the pizza business, Charles Simmons still likes to eat the food he cooks, and at the end of the day his most relaxing thing to do is fishing for bass and crappie with an emphasis on the latter. “I used to really be into bass fishing and that’s all I would do,” Simmons said. “But now I don’t leave the boat ramp without a crappie rod. I don’t like to kill bass because of the tournament fishing I do. But with crappie it’s nice to catch a lot of fish and put some meat in the freezer.” At 61 years old, Simmons has put in over four decades of feeding people pizza. He does that in Waco at his restaurant, Chuck’s Pizza, Pasta and Wings. He got started in the business in Dallas with the Pizza Inn, then relocated to Waco. Business is good and his favorite crappie fishing lake is just minutes from his house. “Lake Waco is a quick-hit fishing destination for me after a day of working,” he said. “I fish about

15 to 20 bass tournaments a year locally. But I also like to eat fish. I used to get out on the lake and do nothing but bass fish. But I inadvertently got into crappie fishing. While using my fish finder to locate bass structure, I started finding brush piles for crappie. I’d mark them and come back to see what was there. Next thing you know I’m catching a box full of big crappie.” Simmons says the best months for crappie fishing on Waco are July, August and September. “That’s when the wind is starting to calm down and it’s easier to stay over a brush pile,” he said. “I seem to catch more and bigger crappie on a calm day when it’s 100 degrees. If I can sit on top of a brush pile in 16 to 18 feet of water, I’m more than likely going to catch a bunch of crappie.” Unlike many crappie fishermen, Simmons does not use live minnows. It’s all jig fishing. “Being a bass fisherman and using nothing but lures, it didn’t seem right to go buy a bag of minnows,” he said. “So I rigged up with jigs and they seem to put plenty of crappie in the cooler. My favorite is a 3/16-ounce Bass Assassin jig head and Please turn to page 23

Charles Simmons makes pizza for a living, but fishes for crappie for fun and food. July, August and September are his best months to fish for crappie on Lake Waco. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Reds hot on the tails of microshrimp flies By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News On the Lower Laguna Madre, tailing redfish in shallow water often fall for microshrimp flies while anglers pole the flats. “The past few weeks have been excellent for reds on shrimp flies,” said Capt. Ben Paschal, who owns and operates Laguna Madre Outfitters near Rio Hondo. “I started seeing lots of tailing reds while looking for big trout. This has been an excellent spring for trout over 27 inches. But it’s turning out to be even better for tailing reds.” Dave Hayward at the Swan Point Landing Orvis store in Rockport said the guides there have been finding lots of reds working small white shrimp. But he says their most consistent action has been along clear-water shorelines where reds are pushing shrimp to the surface. “Some of the older guides are saying the numbers of tailing reds feeding on shrimp is the best they have seen in years,” Hayward said. “A lot of those reds are being caught on No. 4 fur bead chain eye Seaducers in white or tan.” Hayward said he’s been fishing the No. 4 Seaducer on a 10-foot leader with a 12- to 16-pound test tippet. It’s important to go with a lightweight tippet, especially in the clear water like you’ll find at Port O’Connor and on down the Texas coast to the south The numbers of redfish feeding on shrimp is the best in years, according to Capt. Ben Paschal, and flyend of the Laguna Madre. fishermen have reaped the benefits. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News. Austin Dishman recently fished with Paschal and said even though the wind was howling, he had a good two days on the water. “When the reds are on shrimp, my go-to fly is a white shrimp imi“We started fishing a shallow flat off the Intracoastal Waterway tation that is about 3-1/2 inches long,” Paschal said. “It’s a No. 1 and within an hour after daylight we began to see tails,” Dishman bead-eye fly that that I’ve come up with. It’s easy to work into the said. “That was more or less the drill on day one. But for day two wind with a 7- or 8-weight rod. If I’m in water that’s a little off-color, we headed up towards Port Mansfield and had more than 30 shots I’ll tie on a purple shrimp pattern. The key is to make the fly as visible at tailing reds within a few hours. The reds were schooled up and as possible. These reds on gorging on shrimp. If they see anything pushing small shrimp out of the mud. The shrimp they missed were that remotely looks like a shrimp, it’s attacked.” immediately slurped up by gulls hoovering a foot or so off the water. It was classic Texas fly-fishing at it’s best.” Capt. Ben Paschal (214) 704-3158 Paschal, who has a lodge on the Arroyo Colorado, says the reds Dave Hayward (361) 729-7926 feeding on the shrimp are almost all in the 20- to 28-inch class.

May 26, 2017

Page 9

Busy May for pros, high schoolers Lone Star Outdoor News Mid-month bass tournaments offered up plenty of action on the pro and amateur levels. Some 400 youth entered the Texas High School Bass Association’s State Championship tournament on Lake Ray Roberts May 20-21. Montgomery High School’s team of Derek Pietsch and Trey Dawson came in first with 34.98 pounds. The duo fished shallow with a green pumpkin jig. Their winning bag won them a $20,000 scholarship to be split. David Shuster of Georgetown and Charles Gerhart of Salado used swimbaits and jerkbaits to win Bass Champs’ Central Division final event on Lake LBJ with 25.94 pounds, followed by Landon and Mandi Glass of Jarrell with 25.56 pounds. Charles Whited of San Marcos and Bill Polkington of Canyon Lake won the Angler of the Year award. Shuster and Gerhart won more than $28,000. The Texas Team Trail presented by Cabela’s championship event will take place June 3-4 at Lake Livingston.

WHEN YOU’RE PAID TO PUT FISH IN THE BOAT, YOU DON’T MESS AROUND WITH THE THING THAT PUTS FISH IN THE BOAT.

ALWAYS USE THE BEST LINE.™ NOW AT AN EVEN BETTER PRICE. When the pressure is on, bass pro Dave Lefebre trusts the superior strength, toughness and abrasion resistance of Sufix® 832 Advanced Superline® to deliver in the biggest bass tournaments, even under the nastiest of conditions. You should too.

sufix.com


Page 10

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear on the main lake, stained up the river; 69 degrees main lake, 72 degrees up the river; 2.67’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on cut bait and punch bait on baited holes. AMISTAD: Water murky; 76–80 degrees; 32.83’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, spinner baits, crankbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are good on crankbaits and top-waters. White bass are fair on spinner baits and minnows. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on cheese bait, shrimp and nightcrawlers over baited holes. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 65–69 degrees; 1.03’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs and shallow-running crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around structure. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.22’ high. Black bass are good on Texasrigged craws, weightless worms and black buzzbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. BASTROP: Water stained; 73–77 degrees. Black bass are good on watermelon crankbaits, spinner baits and soft plastics. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on live bait and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.78’ high. Black bass are good trolling lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on shad in 20 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows under lights at night. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 73–76 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, poppers and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 72–75 degrees; 2.75’ low. Black bass are good on topwaters, shallow crankbaits, and Texasrigged soft plastics around rocks, docks and secondary points. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good cut bait and frozen shad. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and dark soft plastics in reeds. Striped bass are fair on liver and perch off points near the pier. Redfish are good on perch, shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are good on shrimp, cheese bait, cut bait and liver near the dam. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 71–74 degrees: 0.08’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, weightless worms and square-billed crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.42’ low. Black bass are good on jigs, green

pumpkin soft plastics and white/ chartreuse crankbaits around docks. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are excellent on minnows and white jigs under lights at night in 10–20 feet. Crappie are excellent on minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles in 1–8 feet. Channel catfish are slow. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.24’ low. Black bass are good on white/chartreuse spinner baits, watermelon top-waters and green pumpkin worms with chartreuse tails along lake points in 8–12 feet at first light. Striped bass are fair on top-waters and lipless crankbaits and drifting live bait on the surface in 20–30 feet. White bass are fair trolling Shad Raps over rock piles in 20–30 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and watermelon tube jigs over brush piles in 12 feet. Channel catfish are good on live bait and cut bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on juglines and trotlines baited with goldfish and minnows. CADDO: Water stained; 74–77 degrees; 1.25’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, black buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are fair on dark soft plastic worms and crankbaits over reed beds. Striped bass are good on spoons and striper jigs near the dam and the crappie wall. Redfish are fair downrigging silver and gold spoons in 10–20 feet. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp, cheese bait and shad. Blue catfish are good on cut bait and liver. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.13’ low. Black bass are fair on tomato/red grubs, watermelon/red worms and Texas-rigged watermelon/red finesse worms along bluff ledges in 8–16 feet. Striped bass are fair on silver spoons. Crappie are good on pink tube jigs and live minnows upriver around submerged brush piles over break lines. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are good on juglines and trotlines baited with live bait. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 0.02’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits, Texas-rigged worms and poppers. White bass are good on slabs and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 21.05’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon deep-running crankbaits and white spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on punch bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.64’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastic lizards and worms. Hybrid striper are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are good on stink bait and shrimp. CONROE: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.43’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon

Texas- and Carolina-rigged soft plastics and spinner baits. Striped bass are good on chartreuse striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on stink bait, frozen shrimp and nightcrawlers. FALCON: Water murky; 75–79 degrees; 33.60’ low. Black bass are very good on crankbaits off ledges and points. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on watermelon tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on cut bait and frozen shrimp. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are good on watermelon shallow-running crankbaits and soft plastic worms in 4–20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on juglines baited with shrimp and shad in 10–12 feet. FORK: Water lightly stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.25’ high. Black bass are fair on squarebilled crankbaits, white buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. White and yellow bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 66–69 degrees; 0.45’ low. Black bass are fair on chatterbaits early, later switching to lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are good on minnows, shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.40’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse/white soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on white bucktail jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and watermelon spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait, liver and frozen shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 71– 75 degrees; 0.51’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on lipless crankbaits around shallow main lake roadbeds. Crappie are fair on marabou jigs in 4-12 feet. Blue catfish are good on shad and prepared bait in 4-15 feet. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait upriver. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 71–74 degrees; 0.04’ low. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged worms, football jigs and top-water poppers. White bass and hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: 30.45’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.12’ high. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows in creek channels. Bream are good on live worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on shad, live worms and chicken livers. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 64–68 degrees; 0.83’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switch-

ing to square-billed crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around cover. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.27’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, weightless worms and spinner baits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LAVON: Water stained; 70–74 degrees: 0.75’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, buzzbaits and Texasrigged craws. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. LBJ: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.75’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, watermelon jigs and weightless green/pumpkin Texas-rigged Whacky Sticks along break lines of flats in 6–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles in 15 feet. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.12’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, squarebillrf crankbaits and top-waters. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are good on crankbaits, spinner baits and soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs, pet spoons and troll tubes. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 72–77 degrees; 0.54’ low. Black bass are fair on buzzbaits, hollow-body frogs and weightless Senkos. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on minnows and crankbaits. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 72–77 degrees; 0.13’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. NASWORTHY: 63–68 degrees; 1.13’ low. Black bass are fair to good on drop-shot rigs, finesse jigs and Texas rigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 0.06’ low. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastics and spinner baits along banks in Liberty Hill Park and near the dam. White bass are good on slabs and pet spoons. Crappie are fair on chartreuse jigs and minnows. Channel catfish are good on minnows and nightcrawlers. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 63–68 degrees; 33.52’ low. Black bass are good on topwaters early, later switching to shallow-running crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers.

OAK CREEK: Water stained; 65–69 degrees; 8’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigs and top-waters. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, buzzbaits and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. White bass are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 63–68 degrees; 0.61’ low. Black bass are fair to good on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs, medium-running crankbaits and green/pumpkin jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs and inline spinners. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.37’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed soft plastics, crankbaits and spinner baits. Striped bass are good on shad. White bass are good on minnows and shad-colored crankbaits. Crappie are very good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are very good on shad and shrimp. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 70–75 degrees; 0.26’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, top-waters and shaky-head worms. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 71–75 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged worms, top-water poppers and football jigs. White bass are good on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, swim jigs and spinner baits. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 1.50’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon/ red soft plastics and crankbaits. White bass are fair on minnows, hellbenders and silver spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs over brush piles. Bream are fair on nightcrawlers. Catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 74–78 degrees; 0.12’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on silver spoons. White bass are good on slabs and spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on punchbait and liver. STAMFORD: 1.38’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 11

waters early, later switching to Texas rigs and weightless flukes. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows in the shallows. White bass are fair to good on Rooster Tails. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 73–77 degrees; 0.29’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow. TAWAKONI: Water lightly stained; 71–75 degrees; 1.90’ low. Black bass are fair on black buzzbaits, hollow-body frogs and Texas-rigged craws. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 70–74 degrees; 2.47’ low. Black bass are good on medium crankbaits, top-water poppers and Texas-rigged worms. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Striped bass are fair on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.83’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on silver spoons and slabs in the river. Crappie are good on minnows and pink jigs over baited holes. Bream are good on crickets and nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 1.77’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits, watermelon worms and smoke grubs in 8–24 feet. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies and minnows in 20–30 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs in 10–20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows and shrimp in 20–35 feet. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are very good on shad. Hybrid striper are fair on shad and silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, frozen shad and frozen shrimp. WHITNEY: Water stained; 72–76 degrees; 2.37’ low. Black bass are good on green/ pumpkin soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on white/chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows, slabs, pet spoons and spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and stink bait.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Photo by Derick Maschmeier

Falcon gets private lake bass offspring Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s inland fisheries staff and local volunteers transported more than 1,000 largemouth bass offspring from a South Texas research lake and stocked them into Falcon Reservoir May 12. The fish are mature, well past the fingerling stage. The fish came from Jalisco Lake, a TPWD contract lake located on La Perla Ranch, near Laredo in Zapata County. The private lake originally received 7,000 offspring, which are normally reserved for public waters. —TPWD

Old fishing records

NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good on the Louisiana shoreline on top-waters and Corkies. Flounder are fair on jigs tipped with shrimp around marsh drains. Trout are good in the river on shad. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Trout are fair to good around Lighthouse Cove on top-waters. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on Bass Assassins, Lil’ Johns and Gamblers. Black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair on live bait around the reefs. Redfish are fair to good in the marsh on shrimp and mullet. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good on the south shoreline on She Dogs and soft plastics. Trout are good while drifting the reefs on plastics. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair on top-waters and Corkies in the afternoon. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Trout are fair to good on Dollar Reef on live shrimp and croakers. Redfish are fair in Moses Lake on mullet and shrimp. FREEPORT: Trout are fair to good at San Luis Pass on shrimp. Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Black drum are good at the jetties on cracked blue crabs.

Continued from page 1

body records date from the ’30s and ’40s. Louis Rawalt hauled in a 57.5-pound common snook in the Gulf of Mexico, near Padre Island, in 1937. His record catch came more than 10 years after he came to the island to die. After being gassed fighting in World War I, Rawalt suffered health problems for years. The chief surgeon at a Massachusetts hospital gave him six months to live, and the Texan set out for home minus a kidney and part of a lung but with a new wife, Viola Mae Bell, a nurse at the hospital, according to a Rawalt biography by Capt. Colin Davis. When Rawalt’s expiration date came and went, he began fishing to earn his way. Like Short’s drum, Rawalt’s snook was caught on New Year’s Day. Rawalt used a cane pole with a 10/0 or 12/0 hook tied to a short wire leader and his bait was a strip of white cloth, which he swirled in a figure eight motion. It’s a method some commercial fishermen still use to catch tuna, according to LSON contributor David Sikes. Guide Billy Sandifer, who knew Rawalt, said the snook was weighed at the Port Aransas fish house where it was sold. Sandifer doesn’t think Rawalt saw his catch as a “big deal.” “I really doubt he paid much attention to it,” Sandifer said. “He was just trying to make a living. I’m told he caught 999 pounds of snook the same night.” Rawalt’s catch isn’t that far behind to-

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT

Lake Limestone on the upswing A greatly improved Lake Limestone was the site for the Century Bass Club’s tournament May 21. Fishing results were good with bass being caught up to the 6-pound range despite high winds. Fish were postspawn heading toward deeper water, which resulted in the winning stringer. Those fishing shallow around docks and shoreline cover produced more fish, but the larger sacks came from deeper areas with structure. Popular soft plastic lure colors were junebug, green pumpkin and watermelon red. Bruce Maschmeier won first place with a five-fish total of 16.92 pounds. He found success with a magnum trick worm on a Carolina rig off main lake points. Other top producers included: Randy Kvapil 16.17 pounds, Jon Harshbarger 15.98 pounds, Coy Frazier 15.74 pounds, Mike Casanova 13.10 pounds. —Staff report

May 26, 2017

day’s world record: a snook weighing 59 pound and 8 ounces taken in Costa Rica in 2014. “We have a slot limit on snooks,” said Perry Trial, TPWD’s lower coast regional director. “Even if one that big was caught, it couldn’t be landed. That aside, that would still be a huge fish today.” The last of the three oldest water body records was also caught in January – Jan. 16, 1943. A bus driver, H.R. Magee, was fishing at Lake Medina outside San Antonio. He told the San Antonio Express that he saw a bass chasing minnows and decided to get in on the fun with a Heddon River Runt, a lure that sank slowly, giving the angler control over how deep it traveled. “The water exploded,” Magee said. “The shock broke my rod in two pieces and from there it was a battle royal.... After the most exciting 30 minutes of my life, I finally hauled him into the boat.” He turned out to be a she that weighed 13 pounds and 5 ounces. Today, Magee’s catch isn’t even ranked in the top 50 largemouths. But Magee is still remembered. Barry St. Clair, whose 18.18-pound largemouth from Lake Fork in 1993 still ranks number one, paid tribute to Magee in his book “Fishing Texas.” “For all practical purposes, the history of Texas fishing began in 1943,” St. Clair wrote.

EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet

and under mud boils in the middle of the bay. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Redfish are fair to good on the edge of Oyster Lake on shrimp and crabs. Trout are fair on shell and grass on soft plastics. Redfish are fair to good in Lake Austin on crabs. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair to good in the guts and channels on free-lined shrimp. Black drum are good in the Lydia Ann Channel on crabs. Trout are fair over grass while drifting with live shrimp. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good at East Flats and around Dagger Island on shrimp and crabs. Trout, redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp and croakers.

CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on scented plastics and live shrimp. Redfish are good in the potholes on shrimp. Trout are good for drifters working like shrimp over sand and grass. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good on topwaters and live bait over deep rocks. Trout are good at night in the Land Cut on live shrimp. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are good on topwaters around sand and grass at Green Island and Gladys Hole. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes and while anchored with natural baits at East Cut. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are good around the spoil islands, channel edges and color changes on DOA and live shrimp. Redfish are good on the edge of the flats on live bait. Snook are fair to good in South Bay. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the flats on live shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in while drifting flats with DOA Shrimp under a cork. —TPWD

Fishing the surf Continued from page 8

there.” Marcus and Debbie Heflin also volunteer at the clinic. For the past 12 years, they hosted a Christian surf fishing adventure for free at the park. They made due by asking anglers to drop off their old equipment they don’t want, which the couple recycled. So after park officials approached them about the clinic, it seemed a natural fit. They never know how many will show up at the monthly clinic— sometimes it’s a handful and others its upwards to 60 people. But for the Heflins, it’s all good. “It’s a labor of passion,” Marcus said. “Load the family up and come down to the park and fish for free.”

Changing hooks

Marcus Heflin started offering free surf fishing adventures 12 years ago at Sea Rim State Park. Now, he offer clinics for the park. Photo from Marcus Heflin.

Continued from page 1

Twitchin’ Minnow. The hooks on Rapala’s offerings all face forward toward the front of the lure, while some anglers, including Garza, will face the rear hook away from the lure. The single-hook trend hasn’t seemed to take hold as much in the bass-fishing world, although some striped and white bass anglers have made the switch, usually for safety reasons as they often have multiple fishermen in the boat. Others attach a single rear hook but leave the front treble hook. Capt. Randy Routh guides striper fishermen on Lake Whitney, and uses single hooks on the big pencil poppers. “When there are three people on the boat throwing lures with two treble hooks, it can feel like I’m playing dodge ball,” he said. “On some of the lures, they don’t run right with single hooks, though.” The bass anglers are still shying away from the single hooks. “It hasn’t caught on at all in fresh water,”

said Bruce Shuler, who guided in the Lower Laguna Madre for years, fished bass tournaments since the 1970s and now lives in Central Texas and fishes for bass. “I tell people I’m fishing with to watch what happens when I throw the lure with single hooks into the duck weed.” Shuler has the back hook pointing up and the front hook pointing forward. “You get into a little hydrilla or duck weed, you can shake it loose,” he said. “You can’t do that with a treble. But when you tell the bass guys about a single hook, their eyes gloss over.” One deep-diving crankbait does sport a single hook. The Sebile Lures D&S Crank, instead of two treble hooks, has only a single hook connected to the rear of the bait. The hook stays in line with crank’s tail, reducing snags, and the company claims pressure causes the hook to pivot upward and project the hook into the fish’s mouth.

MADE IN USA

w e N

Walk where no other topwater has walked before!

Compact and durable, the PT-7’s sleek aerodynamic body casts like a bullet and skips into tight places where others can’t. 3 inches in length and 5/8 oz., this soft plastic minesweeper detonates explosive strikes like no other topwater. Snook, redfish, and seatrout, to lunker largemouth bass find its “walk-the-dog” action simply irresistible. Pre-rigged with a single premium 7/0 EWG hook, it keeps the big fish on where standard trebles fail. Available in 10 realistic colors with several more on the way.

w w w . d o a l u r e s . c o m 171003_DOA_4.17_Lonestar Outdoors.ad_PT-7_TROUT_5.1x3.45.indd 1

4/17/17 11:35 AM


Page 12

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER BIRD BAIT On opening day of the spring eastern turkey hunting season, Red River County game wardens were revisiting areas they had discovered during recent patrols that had been baited with corn. They observed four separate hunters actively hunting eastern turkey over bait in violation of state game laws. One hunter shot a turkey over the bait, but was unsuccessful in finding it. Other hunting license violations were also encountered during these contacts. Multiple cases are pending. 200 FISH AND COUNTING Responding to a tip from an Operation Game Thief call, a Tarrant County game warden caught four men fishing with a cast net and keeping game fish in violation of state fishing laws. The men were in possession of 130 crappie, 64 yellow bass, 8 black bass, and 37 perch. About 50 of the crappie and bass were undersized. None of the men had fishing licenses. The fish were cleaned and donated. Multiple cases filed. FISHING FELON Smith County game wardens were patrolling Lake Tyler when they made contact with a group of individuals fishing in a park on the lake. One of the individuals identified himself by a name that wardens learned was an alias and tagged with outstanding arrest warrants. The suspect was arrested without incident, but had an extensive criminal history, including assault on a public servant and assault with a deadly weapon. The subject’s warrant was a felony theft warrant out of Smith County and

from the net and returned to the Rio Grande River.

PHOTO EVIDENCE In March, a Duval County game warden got a tip about four individuals who had killed an alligator on the Nueces River in McMullen County. The individual gave the warden a list of the four suspects, a narrative of how the violation was committed and a picture of two individuals posing with the alligator. Several wardens executed a search warrant of a residence where two of the suspects were located. After initial denials of any knowledge of the event, one of the suspects admitted to catching an alligator and knocking it out with a paddle, then taking it to the bank to kill and skin. He also implicated three other individuals in the crime; however, he claimed he had no idea where the alligator skull was. The second suspect was interviewed and corroborated the first suspect’s story and con-

felony evading arrest from Corrigan Police Department. UNDONE BY A SPEAR GUN Comal County game wardens responded to the Guadalupe River on a report of a person illegally shooting bass with a homemade spear gun. Upon arrival, the wardens observed the suspect in the river with his spear gun and in possession of an undersized largemouth bass that he had caught/killed with the device. The man also did not have a fishing license. Cases are pending. BOATER HIT BY PROPELLER Comal County game wardens were called to the scene of a boating accident at on Canyon Lake where a 19-year-old male was struck by a boat propeller when he jumped in the lake unexpectedly to relieve himself. The individual was struck on his left shin and calf and

firmed the involvement of two other individuals. A girlfriend of one of the suspects mentioned in passing the group typically throws all of their fish guts over the fence in the back lot. The game wardens searched the lot and found the alligator skull in the brush. One of the suspects knew where the third individual lived, and took the game wardens to his house. Upon seeing his accomplice and the game wardens, the third individual immediately acknowledged that they were probably there because of the alligator and admitted to his involvement in killing the alligator. All of the suspects filled out statements naming themselves and each other in the crime. In total, 16 citations and civil restitution for the alligator are pending.

received a significant laceration requiring medical transport to University Hospital in San Antonio. The investigation is still ongoing. EAGLETS DOWN A Stephens County game warden received a call about a bald eagle’s nest that had blown out of a tree near Hubbard Creek Lake Dam. The reporting party said they had seen young bald eagles in the nest earlier that week and that there were mature eagles circling the area around the destroyed nest. The warden located the nest and found two juvenile bald eagles lying on the ground next to the nest. Both eagles appeared to be unharmed and in decent condition. Arrangements were made to take the birds to the wild bird rescue facility in Wichita Falls.

ROAD HUNT Game wardens responded to a call in Refugio County about a vehicle spotlighting from the roadway. With assistance from the caller, the wardens stopped three individuals in a vehicle on a rural road. After a lengthy investigation and interview, it was found the three subjects were, in fact, out joy riding with intentions of hunting from the road. Multiple citations were issued. FISH RELEASED FROM ILLEGAL NET Game wardens recently retrieved 31 sections of illegal gill net and four illegal crab traps from the Rio Grande River in Cameron County. The illegal net measured over 2,325 yards in length. The gill nets contained numerous species of fish including: snook, spotted seatrout, black drum, sheepshead, blue catfish, tilapia, carp and mullet. Many of the fish were able to be cut free

INTERNET TRADE BUSTED Texas game wardens made multiple criminal cases against individuals attempting to sell online various threatened and protected wildlife species, as well as state and federally regulated natural resources. Navigating through Internet forums and online marketplaces where trade in both live wildlife and wildlife parts are known to occur, wardens were able to negotiate undercover transactions with willing sellers to purchase things like a 100-pound alligator snapping turtle and a timber rattlesnake, both threatened species in Texas, as well as live alligators, illegal Gulf shrimp and raptor parts. During the four-day operation, game wardens seized illegally obtained and possessed wildlife. Native species were released back into their natural habitat. Citations included charges for sale and possession of threatened species, sale of migratory duck parts, sale of live American alligators, Illegal sale of aquatic product (Gulf shrimp), no retail/ truck dealer’s license, and failure to possess nongame dealer permit. All citations issued were class C misdemeanor violations punishable by fine from $25-$500.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263

For more info visit: www.allseasonsfeeders.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Excel Bay Pro 220, 203 & 183 Up to 200 Horsepower Rating Exceleration Pad Hull Performance up to 55 + MPH Twin Folding Rear Jump Seats Dry Box Storage Compartments 30 Cubic Feet Large Front and Rear Deck .125 Tough Aluminum Alloy 24 Gallon Rear Aerated Livewell 30 Gallon Fuel Tank Lean Post w/Footrest Deluxe Console w/6 Rod Holders w/16 Gallon Aerated Livewell w/Three Tray Tackle Center Front Bow 48 qt. Cooler w/220 Model Twin Spacious Rod Boxes Features vary depending on boat model and size. With a finish so fine, it looks like fiberglass.

www.Excel-Marine.com 801-352-8011 You’re up for most anything. So is the F150. The unprecedented displacement and massive power and thrust of a Yamaha teamed with the Excel’s Exceleration™ pad hull enable the Bay Pro 203 and 220 to be the fastest in its class. On step lightning fast with neck-breaking hole shots. Experience the smooth operation, handling and legendary trustworthiness of Yamaha and an Excel Bay Pro.

May 26, 2017

Page 13


Page 14

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

Strange creations Continued from page 8

“He took a look at my fish, and said, ‘Yeah, let’s do it,’” Quinn said. The men filled the dining room up with Quinn’s fish on the walls. A week later, Bunda called and said all of the fish were sold. Mike had an inspirational moment when he was handed an envelope of cash. “I was a starving student at Texas State,” he said. “I was just making fish and making fish, and it was all cash — they didn’t take credit cards, and they didn’t take a cut at first.” Eventually, a new agreement for selling the fish was reached, and an eight-week show turned into an 18-year relationship selling Mike’s “Fish With Attitude” from the walls of Chuy’s Restaurant in Austin. Next, large-scale orders came in from the retail chain Deck The Walls, and Quinn ramped up his production with the help of nearly two dozen employees to supply the 120 stores nationwide. “Then 9-11 happened, and it all pretty much went away,” Quinn said. He worked in industrial services until 2016. “I felt like an impostor in a hardhat,” Quinn said. “I really wanted to be an artist again.” He also had another idea buzzing around in his head; a children’s book based on seeing a housefly fly aboard an international flight he was on while working his previous industrial job. The book, “Fly Phoebe Fly! A Mostly True Story,” was self-published. Quinn was determined to get back to his “Fish With Attitude” that start with real fish, but are given unique comic-like characteristics. One piece he worked on was what he called a “big 8-pound sow trout.” The fish is recreated in clay, the clay is rolled out into a slab, then pressed into a plaster mold of the original fish. From there, Quinn departs from the traditional look one might expect of their prized fish. Exaggerated mouths and vampire teeth Mike Quinn’s fish are a part of the trout piece. are recreated in “Each one is original,” he said. “Collectors, clay and pressed who collect my stuff, want to see something into plaster, different.” then given an Quinn’s work is resurfacing in galleries and exaggerated art shows, and he’s self-published and sold the look. Photos by children’s book. Shannon Drawe, “Most people don’t know me, but they for Lone Star Outdoor News. know the Chuy’s Fish from the past,” he said.

2017 KAWASAKI BONUS DEAL RANCH PACKAGE, STARTING AT $14,499 2017 KAWASAKI 4010 TRANSMULE CAMO W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $14,499

2017 KAWASAKI MULE PRO-FXT CAMO

W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $18,699

UNTIL JUNE 30, 2017

PURCHASE A RANCH PACKAGED SXS

FREE “INSTALLED” - PICK ONE - “Rear Game Winch” Reg $799 Installed, Patented Pending - Set of Roctane Premium 8ply Tires - WetSounds Premium Sound System - Fortress Powder Coated Sliding Windshield

KAWASAKI SxS RANCH PACKAGE (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC)

For Details: DelRioPowerSports.com THE ORIGINAL AND NEW IMPROVED RANCH PACKAGE

• (ALL EQUIPMENT NOW POWDER COATED) FROM DEL RIO POWERSPORTS (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC), GET OUR PACKAGE ON MOSTSIDE X SIDE MODELS • SEAT NOW BUILT WITH 1-1/4” tube steel, no need for under seat wasted space basket welded to keep legs from buckling as our “competitors” have to do • See photos for improved open room in bed for hay bales and feed

PACKAGE INCLUDES: • All Applicable Equipment Now POWDER COATED • 4,000# Winch (2,500# on Kawa 4000 & 4010 Series) • Steel Rollbar Basket • Front Floor Double Gun Holder • HD Tire Tractor Seal

• Steel Roof, Insulated, Powder Coated • Roof Oversize Steel Basket • Rear Utility Seat • Double Gun Holder • Shooter Gun Rest • 50” LED Light Bar

RANCH PACKAGES AVAILABLE ON OTHER MAKES AND MODELS


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Page 15

CALL YOU LOCAL PURINA DEALER TO SCHEDULE YOUR NEXT ANTLERMAX® DELIVERY! ALICE FEEDERS SUPPLY JOHNSON FEED AND WESTERN WEAR ANGLETON FEED AND SUPPLY ARCOLA FEED AND HARDWARE SOUTHSIDE FEED AND SUPPLY BANDERA RANCH STORE BASTROP FEED AND SUPPLY BAY CITY FEED INC SAMS WESTERN STORE BLUE RIBBON COUNTRY STORE BEAR CREEK LINSEISENS FEED AND SUPPLY BELTON FEED AND SUPPLY HOWARD COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY WHEELERS FEED AND OUTFITTERS BEREND BROTHERS OF BOWIE BRENHAM PRODUCE CO PRODUCERS CO-OP DAVIS FEED AND FERTILIZER INC BERNARDO FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY BOLES FEED SILVERS PET AND FEED RICKS FARM AND HOME CLIFTON FEED SERVICE CENTER J AND D COUNTRY STORE LONE STAR COUNTRY STORE PECOS COUNTY FEED/CRANE COUNTY FEED CROCKETT FARM AND FUEL CENTER DEWITT COUNTY PRODUCERS DAMON FARM AND RANCH SERVICE CENTER NRS FEED STORE DEL RIO FEED AND SUPPLY D AND L FARM AND HOME BLAMAR FEED AND SURPLUS MARTIN FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY UNITED AG CO-OP POTTS FEED STORE CAPPS TRUE VALUE HARDWARE AND AG NOONDAY FEED STORE PECOS COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY LOCHTE FEED FREER DEER CAMP GANADO FEED AND MORE CORYELL FEED AND SUPPLY GEORGETOWN FARM SUPPLY HINES CO INC GOLIAD FEED CO E-BARR FEEDS INC J AND N FEED AND SEED S AND S AG CENTER BUCHANANS FEED MACI FEED AND SUPPLY MUMME’S INC HIEDEN FEED AND SUPPLY HUNTSVILLE FARM SUPPLY LINDEMANN STORE C AND T AUTO-FEED H-BRAND FEED ODIORNE FEED JUNCTION WAREHOUSE MCDONNELL BUILDING MATERIALS KERRVILLE RANCH AND PET CENTER RICARDO RANCH AND FEED LA VERNIA COUNTRY STORE HOFFPAUIR’S RANCH & SUPPLY LAREDO COUNTRY STORE BEAR CREEK COUNTRY STORE LEXINGTON FEED AND FARM LLANO FEED & SUPPLY TEXAS RANCH OUTFITTERS JAKES FEED AND ANIMAL CENTER LUFKIN FARM SUPPLY LULING AND HARWOOD FARM AND FEED STANDLEY FEED AND SEED SPRING CREEK FEED CENTER WILLIAMS FEED STORE MCGREGOR GENERAL STORE CIRCLE G ENTERPRISES KOTHMANN’S SHEFFIELD FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY WALDEN FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY SOUTHWEST HAY AND FEED SCOTTS CROSSING FARM STORE BOLES FEED COMPANY MIDDLE G CATTLE CO NEEDVILLE FEED AND SUPPLY NEW BRAUNFELS FEED AND SUPPLY BEREND BROTHERS ORANGE GROVE CO-OP ENGLEDOW FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY BIG COUNTRY FARM CENTER MUMME’S INC REEVES COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY D AND L FARM AND HOME PRIMOS FEED ANDERSON AG SUPPLY BORDER ENTERPRISES MUMME’S INC ROUND TOP FARM AND RANCH SABINAL GRAIN CO GROGAN’S FARM & RANCH FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY STEINHAUSERS PRODUCERS COOPERATIVE D&D FARM & RANCH BERANS AGRI-CENTER SOMERVILLE FARM AND RANCH STRUTTYS FEED AND PET SUPPLY SPRINGTOWN FEED AND FERTILIZER COOPERS COUNTRY STORE THREE RIVERS FARM AND RANCH FREE FLO FEEDS D AND D FEED AND SUPPLY TEXAS FARM STORE INC NORTHSIDE RANCH PET AND GARDEN CENTER WACO BRAZOS FEED AND SUPPLY BAR NONE COUNTRY STORE NEUHAUS AND CO WHARTON FEED AND SUPPLY BEREND BROTHERS KING FEED AND HARDWARE BEREND BROTHERS TRI COUNTY ENTERPRISES YOAKUM GRAIN SERIOS FEED AND SEED G AND H OUTDOOR STORE THOMAS NURSERY AND FEED RANCH OUTLET LLC CURRIE AND SON FEED AND GARDEN CENTER RAMSEYS SOUTHERN OUTFITTERS LANDRYS FEED STORE TOMMYS FEED STORE AND MORE PAULS FARM AND GARDEN SUPPLY TAYLORS FEED AND FARM SUP T AND C SPORTSMANS HAVEN VINTON FEED STORE CIRCLE S FEED STORE BUNKS FEED BARN

ALICE ALPINE ANGLETON ARCOLA ATHENS BANDERA BASTROP BAY CITY BEAUMONT BEEVILLE BELLS BELLVILLE BELTON BIG SPRING BOERNE BOWIE BRENHAM BRYAN BUFFALO CAT SPRING CENTER CIBOLO CLARKSVILLE CLIFTON CONROE CORPUS CHRISTI CRANE CROCKETT CUERO DAMON DECATUR DEL RIO DENTON EAGLE PASS EDINBURG EL CAMPO EMORY FAIRFIELD FLINT FORT STOCKTON

FREDERICKSBURG

FREER GANADO GATESVILLE GEORGETOWN GEORGE WEST GOLIAD GONZALES GRAHAM GROESBECK HALLSVILLE HARDIN HONDO HOUSTON HUNTSVILLE INDUSTRY IRAAN JACKSBORO JOHNSON CITY JUNCTION KELLER KERRVILLE KINGSVILLE LA VERNIA LAMPASAS LAREDO LEONARD LEXINGTON LLANO LOMETA LONGVIEW LUFKIN LULING MADISONVILLE MAGNOLIA MARLIN MC GREGOR MCALLEN MENARD MEXIA MILLSAP MISSION MURCHISON NACOGDOCHES NAPLES NEEDVILLE NEWBRAUNFELS OLNEY ORANGE GROVE PALESTINE PARIS PEARSALL PECOS PILOT POINT PLEASANTON REFUGIO RIO GRANDE CITY RIO MEDINA ROUND TOP SABINAL SAN ANGELO SAN ISIDRO SEALY SEGUIN SEGUIN SHINER SOMERVILLE SPRING BRANCH SPRINGTOWN STEPHENVILLE THREE RIVERS TILDEN TOMBALL UVALDE VICTORIA WACO WACO WESLACO WHARTON WICHITA FALLS WIMBERLEY WINDTHORST WINNSBORO YOAKUM BOSSIER CITY CROWLEY FARMERVILLE LAFAYETTE LAKE CHARLES MINDEN RAYNE RUSTON SHREVEPORT SPRINGHILL TROUT VINTON CARLSBAD HOBBS

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA NM NM

361-664-3404 432-837-5792 979-849-6661 281-431-1014 903-677-5373 830-796-3342 512-321-3700 979-245-2712 409-842-2625 361-392-3333 903-965-4900 979-865-3602 254-939-3636 432-267-6411 830-249-2656 940-872-5131 979-836-3523 979-778-6000 903-322-4316 979-732-5161 936-598-3061 210-566-8020 903-427-3395 254-675-3416 936.756.7667 361-387-2668 432-558-2225 936-544-3855 361-275-3441 979-742-3317 940-627-3949 830-775-5090 940-891-0100 830-757-6310 956-383-4949 979-543-4104 903-473-2249 903-389-4504 903-561-5622 432-336-6877 830-997-2256 361-394-5586 361-771-2401 254-865-6315 512-930-4054 361-449-1713 361-645-3266 830-672-6515 940-549-4631 254-729-8008 903-668-2012 936-298-9404 830-426-3313 281.444.1010 936-295-3961 979-357-2121 432-639-2189 940-567-3794 830-868-4579 325-446-2537 817-431-3551 830-895-5800 361-592-3622 830-779-2600 512-556-5444 956-206-7357 903-587-0385 979-773-2782 325-247-4126 512-564-0303 903-663-3139 936-634-7414 830-875-5423 936-348-5272 281.252.5400 254-883-2401 254-840-3224 956-631-1321 800-637-0951 254-562-3818 940-682-4667 956-580-1717 903-469-3122 936-564-2671 903-575-1869 979-793-6146 830-625-7250 940-564-5674 361-384-2766 903-723-3210 903-785-8372 830-334-3323 432-447-2149 940-365-3129 830-570-1134 361-526-5018 956-487-2570 830-931-2215 979-249-5666 830-988-2215 325-227-6870 956-481-3346 979-885-2967 830-379-1750 830-379-7340 361-594-3395 979-596-2224 830-438-8998 817-220-7656 254-968-5633 361-786-3242 361-274-3232 281.351.7144 830-278-3713 361-573-5000 254-756-6687 254-848-9112 956-968-7502 979-532-8533 940-723-2736 512-847-2618 940-423-6223 903-342-5328 361-293-3521 318-746-8559 337-684-3391 318-368-2425 337-235-2163 337-433-2111 318-377-5355 337-334-4224 318-255-4095 318-425-2222 318-539-5818 318-992-6310 337-589-3260 575-885-8369 575-397-1228


Page 16

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Ashia De La Garza, 16, bagged a spike with a .243 Winchester in Brooks County at Aqui Me Quedo Ranch.

Chris Sessions caught a nice kingfish 60 miles offshore at a depth of about 200 feet deep.

Ayssa De La Garza, 13, harvested a doe, her second deer to date. Like her sister, she used a .243 Winchester to harvest her deer at Aqui Me Quedo Ranch.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Jake Bryarly, 9, of Dallas, caught this trout in a Hill Country creek this spring.

Benny Rodriguez of Lockhart shot this 10-point buck in Caldwell County.

Hunt Free Range Aoudad Llano County • Now Booking for Sept.- Oct. 2017

SQUARE 1 CONTAINERS, LLC 20Ft/40Ft Used Containers Modifications Available Hunting Camps Construction Offices

20ft Used Containers - $1600 + Delivery 40ft Used Containers - $2100 + Delivery Photo taken Dec. 2016

For more information on 2017 hunts email darrellsteffek@gmail.com

Great for storage of: Small Equipment Four Wheelers Feed Anything you want to keep secure and dry Ernie Williamson ernie1@square1containers.com

Fran Linnell fran@square1containers.com

877-470-1662

www.square1containers.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Page 17


Page 18

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

First

Full

Last

New

June 1

June 9

June 17

June 23

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON May/Jun Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON May/Jun Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

26 Fri 27 Sat 28 Sun 29 Mon 30 Tue 31 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

26 Fri 27 Sat 28 Sun 29 Mon 30 Tue 31 Wed 01 Thu

6:26 12:11 7:32 1:16 8:39 2:24 9:46 3:31 10:48 4:35 11:46 5:33 12:13 6:25

6:57 12:42 8:03 1:47 9:09 2:54 10:15 4:00 11:16 5:02 ----- 5:59 12:37 6:49

06:22 06:22 06:21 06:21 06:20 06:20 06:20

02 Fri

1:00 7:12

1:23

7:34

06:20 08:29 2:30p

2:29a

03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

1:43 2:22 3:00 3:38 4:18 5:00 5:45

2:05 2:43 3:21 4:00 4:40 5:23 6:08

8:16 8:54 9:32 10:11 10:51 11:34 -----

06:19 06:19 06:19 06:19 06:19 06:19 06:18

3:03a 3:36a 4:08a 4:42a 5:17a 5:55a 6:36a

6:21 12:05 7:26 1:10 8:33 2:18 9:40 3:25 10:43 4:29 11:40 5:27 12:07 6:19 12:54 7:06 1:37 7:48 2:16 8:27 2:54 9:05 3:32 9:43 4:12 10:23 4:54 11:06 5:39 11:51

6:51 7:57 9:04 10:09 11:10 ----12:31 1:17 1:59 2:38 3:16 3:54 4:34 5:17 6:03

12:36 1:41 2:48 3:54 4:56 5:53 6:43 7:29 8:10 8:49 9:26 10:05 10:46 11:29 -----

06:23 06:22 06:22 06:22 06:21 06:21 06:21 06:21 06:20 06:20 06:20 06:20 06:20 06:20 06:20

08:13 08:14 08:14 08:15 08:15 08:16 08:16 08:17 08:17 08:18 08:18 08:19 08:19 08:20 08:20

7:22a 9:22p 8:20a 10:26p 9:22a 11:24p 10:26a NoMoon 11:29a 12:16a 12:31p 1:02a 1:29p 1:43a 2:25p 2:21a 3:19p 2:57a 4:12p 3:31a 5:05p 4:04a 5:57p 4:39a 6:49p 5:15a 7:41p 5:54a 8:32p 6:35a

7:54 8:33 9:11 9:49 10:29 11:11 11:57

08:25 08:26 08:27 08:27 08:28 08:28 08:29 08:30 08:31 08:31 08:32 08:32 08:32 08:33

7:22a 9:34p 8:20a 10:38p 9:23a 11:35p 10:27a NoMoon 11:31a 12:26a 12:33p 1:12a 1:33p 1:52a 3:26p 4:20p 5:13p 6:07p 7:00p 7:52p 8:43p

San Antonio

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON May/Jun Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON May/Jun Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

26 Fri 27 Sat 28 Sun 29 Mon 30 Tue 31 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

26 Fri 27 Sat 28 Sun 29 Mon 30 Tue 31 Wed 01 Thu 02 Fri 03 Sat 04 Sun 05 Mon 06 Tue 07 Wed 08 Thu 09 Fri

6:33 12:18 7:38 1:23 8:46 2:30 9:52 3:38 10:55 4:41 11:52 5:40 12:20 6:32 1:07 7:18 1:49 8:00 2:29 8:39 3:07 9:17 3:45 9:56 4:24 10:36 5:07 11:18 5:52 -----

7:04 8:09 9:16 10:21 11:23 ----12:44 1:30 2:11 2:50 3:28 4:07 4:47 5:30 6:15

12:48 1:54 3:01 4:07 5:09 6:05 6:56 7:41 8:22 9:01 9:39 10:18 10:58 11:41 12:03

06:36 06:36 06:35 06:35 06:35 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:33 06:33 06:33 06:33

08:25 08:25 08:26 08:26 08:27 08:27 08:28 08:28 08:29 08:29 08:30 08:30 08:31 08:31 08:32

7:36a 9:35p 8:34a 10:38p 9:36a 11:36p 10:40a NoMoon 11:43a 12:28a 12:44p 1:14a 1:42p 1:56a 2:38p 2:34a 3:32p 3:09a 4:25p 3:43a 5:17p 4:17a 6:09p 4:52a 7:02p 5:29a 7:53p 6:07a 8:44p 6:49a

6:47 12:31 7:52 1:36 8:59 2:44 10:06 3:51 11:09 4:55 ----- 5:53 12:33 6:45 1:20 7:32 2:03 8:14 2:42 8:53 3:20 9:31 3:58 10:09 4:38 10:49 5:20 11:32 6:05 -----

7:17 8:23 9:30 10:35 11:36 12:06 12:57 1:43 2:25 3:04 3:42 4:20 5:00 5:43 6:29

1:02 2:07 3:14 4:20 5:22 6:19 7:09 7:55 8:36 9:14 9:52 10:31 11:11 11:54 12:17

06:36 06:36 06:36 06:35 06:35 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:33 06:33 06:33 06:33 06:33 06:32 06:32

08:51 08:52 08:52 08:53 08:54 08:54 08:55 08:56 08:56 08:57 08:57 08:58 08:58 08:59 08:59

7:39a 10:00p 8:36a 11:04p 9:39a NoMoon 10:43a 12:01a 11:48a 12:51a 12:51p 1:36a 1:52p 2:15a 2:51p 2:51a 3:47p 3:24a 4:42p 3:55a 5:37p 4:27a 6:31p 5:00a 7:25p 5:34a 8:18p 6:11a 9:09p 6:52a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Time 5:32 AM 6:26 AM 7:24 AM 12:33 AM 1:30 AM 2:31 AM 3:39 AM 4:54 AM 12:55 AM 2:07 AM 3:04 AM 3:51 AM 4:30 AM 5:04 AM 5:36 AM

Port O’Connor Height 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H -0.3L -0.1L 0.1L 0.4L 0.6L 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H 1.7H

Time 10:59 AM 11:51 AM 12:49 PM 8:25 AM 9:28 AM 10:28 AM 11:21 AM 12:05 PM 6:12 AM 7:25 AM 8:27 AM 9:17 AM 9:56 AM 10:27 AM 10:54 AM

Height 1.3L 1.3L 1.4L 1.9H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 0.8L 1.0L 1.1L 1.2L 1.2L 1.3L 1.3L

Time 3:22 PM 4:01 PM 4:45 PM 2:00 PM 3:31 PM 5:02 PM 6:01 PM 6:42 PM 12:41 PM 1:10 PM 1:34 PM 1:52 PM 2:04 PM 2:12 PM 2:19 PM

Height 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.3L 1.2L 1.1L 0.9L 0.6L 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H

Time 10:49 PM 11:40 PM

Height -0.5L -0.5L

5:40 PM 7:10 PM 9:27 PM 11:25 PM

1.5H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H

7:16 PM 7:45 PM 8:13 PM 8:42 PM 9:12 PM 9:43 PM 10:17 PM

0.4L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 6:03 AM 6:58 AM 7:58 AM 12:30 AM 1:24 AM 2:26 AM 3:36 AM 4:58 AM 12:45 AM 2:07 AM 3:13 AM 4:11 AM 4:57 AM 5:36 AM 6:12 AM

Height 2.2H 2.2H 2.2H -0.3L -0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.7L 1.3H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 1.9H

Time 12:26 PM 1:25 PM 2:34 PM 8:59 AM 9:52 AM 10:39 AM 11:21 AM 12:01 PM 6:32 AM 7:42 AM 8:43 AM 9:57 AM 11:14 AM 9:50 PM 10:24 PM

Height 1.5L 1.5L 1.5L 2.1H 1.9H 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 0.9L 1.1L 1.2L 1.3L 1.3L -0.1L -0.1L

Time 3:23 PM 4:03 PM 4:48 PM

Height 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H

Time 10:51 PM 11:40 PM

Height -0.5L -0.4L

4:39 PM 5:34 PM 6:19 PM 6:55 PM 12:34 PM 1:01 PM 1:18 PM 1:25 PM 1:32 PM

1.3L 1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H

6:52 PM 9:14 PM 11:00 PM

1.4H 1.3H 1.3H

7:25 7:54 8:20 8:48 9:17

0.5L 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L

Height 1.4H 1.4H -0.3L -0.3L -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.4L 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H

Time 1:08 PM

Height 1.1L

Time 3:18 PM

Height 1.1H

Time 11:38 PM

9:19 AM 10:15 AM 11:06 AM 11:57 AM 12:41 PM 1:09 PM 7:35 AM 8:36 AM 9:41 AM 11:08 AM 10:23 PM 10:55 PM 11:23 PM

1.4H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 0.9L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L

Height 2.2H 2.3H 2.2H -0.3L -0.1L 0.2L 0.5L 0.7L 1.3H 1.4H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.9H 1.9H

Time 10:13 PM 11:07 PM

Height -0.4L -0.4L

8:46 AM 9:44 AM 10:28 AM 11:05 AM 11:34 AM 6:23 AM 8:03 AM 9:18 AM 8:25 PM 8:47 PM 9:13 PM 9:44 PM

2.1H 2.0H 1.8H 1.7H 1.5H 0.9L 1.1L 1.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

Height 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.3L 0.4L 0.6L 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.4H 0.3L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L

Time 10:01 AM 11:13 AM 12:31 PM 1:46 PM 2:41 PM 3:14 PM 3:33 PM 9:24 AM 10:32 AM 11:36 AM 12:37 PM 8:31 AM 9:25 AM 10:12 AM 10:49 AM

Height 1.7H 1.7H 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 0.7L 0.9L 1.0L 1.1L 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H

PM PM PM PM PM

Time 6:57 AM 8:08 AM 12:25 AM 1:16 AM 2:15 AM 3:24 AM 4:39 AM 6:16 AM 1:42 AM 3:08 AM 4:27 AM 5:23 AM 6:02 AM 6:35 AM 7:07 AM

7:24 7:48 1:20 1:26 1:35 1:39

PM PM PM PM PM PM

0.6L 0.5L 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

Height -0.3L

11:06 PM

0.8H

8:17 8:47 9:18 9:51

0.3L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L

PM PM PM PM

Freeport Harbor Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Time 5:49 AM 6:44 AM 7:42 AM 12:01 AM 12:55 AM 1:55 AM 3:08 AM 4:29 AM 12:26 AM 1:57 AM 2:57 AM 3:48 AM 4:35 AM 5:16 AM 5:53 AM

Time 1:26 AM 2:13 AM 3:06 AM 4:09 AM 5:25 AM 6:48 AM 8:10 AM 2:18 AM 4:37 AM 6:13 AM 7:28 AM 12:03 AM 12:33 AM 12:59 AM 1:22 AM

Time 1:14 AM 2:07 AM 3:01 AM 3:54 AM 4:44 AM 5:27 AM 6:01 AM 6:21 AM 12:25 AM 1:10 PM 1:16 PM 1:31 PM 1:52 PM 12:04 AM 12:46 AM

Time

Height

11:58 AM 12:55 PM 1:43 PM 2:16 PM 2:38 PM 2:49 PM 2:33 PM 6:39 AM 10:03 PM 10:23 PM 10:46 PM 11:12 PM 11:42 PM

1.0H 1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.4L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L

Height 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.1L 0.1L

Time 2:50 PM 3:47 PM 4:51 PM 5:59 PM 7:11 PM 8:29 PM 2:55 PM 1:39 PM 6:21 AM 9:53 PM 10:39 PM 11:22 PM

Height 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L

2:20 PM 2:54 PM

0.4H 0.4H

Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H -0.2L -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.4L 0.6L 0.8H 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 11:41 AM 11:13 PM

Height 1.1L -0.2L

9:25 AM 10:26 AM 11:15 AM 11:49 AM 12:00 PM 11:12 AM 7:08 AM 8:07 AM 8:58 AM 9:43 AM 10:26 AM 11:10 AM

1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.7L 0.8L 0.9L 0.9L 0.9L 0.9L

Height 1.4H 1.5H 1.4H -0.6L -0.5L -0.3L 0.0L 0.2L 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 1.0H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H

Time 10:24 PM 11:15 PM

Height -0.7L -0.7L

9:46 AM 10:37 AM 11:13 AM 11:34 AM 11:46 AM 5:39 AM 6:57 AM 8:15 AM 8:32 PM 9:00 PM 9:29 PM 9:58 PM

1.4H 1.3H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.4L 0.6L 0.7L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L

Time

9:59 PM 1:10 PM

Time

Height

0.4L 0.6H

Height

Time

9:50 PM

Time

Height

0.2L

Height

5:23 PM 7:43 PM 1:15 PM

0.3L 0.3L 0.3H

10:07 PM

0.3H

8:58 PM

0.2L

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Time 6:11 AM 7:15 AM 8:20 AM 12:07 AM 1:06 AM 2:12 AM 3:29 AM 4:48 AM 6:02 AM 2:33 AM 4:07 AM 4:57 AM 5:19 AM 5:44 AM 6:13 AM

Time 1:57 PM

Height 1.2H

Time 10:21 PM

Height -0.2L

6:06 PM 6:39 PM 7:12 PM 11:23 AM 11:44 AM 12:09 PM 12:37 PM 1:08 PM 1:39 PM

0.7L 0.6L 0.4L 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

8:40 PM 10:45 PM

0.8H 0.7H

7:45 PM 8:16 PM 8:45 PM 9:13 PM 9:37 PM 10:01 PM

0.3L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L

South Padre Island Time

5:41 PM 6:15 PM 6:48 PM 11:57 AM 12:14 PM 12:25 PM

Height

1.1L 0.9L 0.7L 1.4H 1.3H 1.3H

Time

Height

8:16 PM 10:31 PM

1.1H 1.1H

7:18 PM 7:43 PM 8:04 PM

0.5L 0.4L 0.2L

Rollover Pass Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Height 1.0H -0.1L -0.2L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.2L 0.3L 0.4H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Rockport

Time 10:59 AM 12:43 AM 1:38 AM 2:36 AM 3:34 AM 4:30 AM 5:22 AM 6:06 AM 4:25 AM 12:24 PM 11:07 AM 11:06 AM 10:55 AM 10:01 AM 10:29 AM

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Time 6:32 AM 7:38 AM 8:43 AM 12:09 AM 1:06 AM 2:06 AM 3:12 AM 4:23 AM 12:09 AM 2:44 AM 4:18 AM 5:19 AM 6:08 AM 6:47 AM 7:18 AM

Time

6:49 PM 11:50 AM 11:44 AM 11:16 AM

Height

0.4L 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

Time

Height

7:09 PM 7:36 PM 8:04 PM

0.2L 0.0L -0.2L

East Matagorda Time

9:24 9:51 3:40 3:39 3:34 3:36 1:35

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height

1.1L 0.9L 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.2L

Time

Height

11:39 PM

1.1H

10:24 PM 10:58 PM 11:31 PM

0.7L 0.6L 0.4L

3:47 PM

1.2H

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Time 1:03 PM 12:13 AM 1:26 AM 2:42 AM 3:26 AM 4:04 AM 4:55 AM 6:54 AM 1:11 AM 4:17 AM 5:25 AM 6:12 AM 7:26 AM 8:56 AM 12:15 PM

Height 0.4H -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 1:23 PM 1:41 PM 1:44 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:34 PM 1:30 PM 7:44 AM 8:48 AM 10:13 AM 11:01 AM 11:40 AM 11:26 PM 11:45 PM

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.0L 0.0L

Time

7:50 8:24 1:13 1:16 1:30 1:49 2:06

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height

0.2L 0.2L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H

Time

Height

10:20 PM

0.3H

9:06 PM 9:48 PM 10:22 PM 10:48 PM 11:09 PM

0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

Texas Coast Tides

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9

Date May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 Jun 1 Jun 2 Jun 3 Jun 4 Jun 5 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 8 Jun 9


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Father-son success Continued from page 4

turkeys sure seemed to think it was a live bird.” Jaedin took his first shot and downed one of the gobblers. “It was flopping on the ground, he wasn’t sure if he got it,” Box said. “The other birds ran off, but after about 20 seconds the other toms came back and jumped on the dead one. I told Jaedin to pump the gun.” Jaedin took his second shot and had a two-bird morning. “He was so excited afterward, he was crying,” Box said. The father and son went on some dove hunts last fall and tried deer hunting at the end of the season but didn’t see any. Their next adventure will be with a coworker that has a place to hog hunt.” “Jaedin did better than I did on the dove,” Box said. “He sure has the bug now — we’re both hooked.”

Page 19

Feed for the heat Continued from page 5

ingredients help maintain feed intake, comfort, and helps sustain weight gain during climatic stress events. Will Climate Guard help bucks? Yes, Schlegel said. “It helps keep them eating which improves body condition,” he said. “It compliments the improved antler growth from the AntlerMax.” Climate Guard is available in AntlerMax products at Texas dealers. “It has been very well-received,” Schlegel said.

Jaedin and Jeremy Box enjoyed a two-bird hunting adventure. Hog hunting is next on the agenda. Photo from Stan Chism.

Crappie tourney benefits youth The team of Greg Culverhouse and Jeff Beard topped 25 teams at the inaugural Field Guides Crappie Classic on May 20 at Lake Waco. The team brought in 8.3 pounds for their best seven crappie, using jigs over submerged brush piles. David Phythian and Jacob Rucker finished second with 8.1 pounds, followed by Alan and Cameron Carrizales and Bobby and Stanton Salome, each with 7.8 pounds. The event benefitted the HOT Field Guides, a mentoring organization for young men.

Built Right the First time to last a lifetime!

R

U.S. PATENTS 8201520, 7370605, 6920841, D575908, D599503, D602649, D603104, D603105, D604017, D603566, D624706, D624708, D622453, D624707, D636942, D629572, D629976, D629975, D624709, D630802, D630653, D647253, D642750, D681883, 9278813, 9554555 • OTHER PATENTS PENDING • U.S. TRADEMARKS 3629190 & 3625066

BRAND NEW DESigN!

—HOT Field Guides

BOBWHITE QUAIL

The “Share-Kropper” Low profiLe feeder

Strong Fast Flying Wild Natured Beautiful •

(325) 945-2508 (325) 660-7869 •

ChOOse FROM DiReCTiOnAl OR SPINNER DISTRIbUTION Directional Feeder spreads heavier feed out to 50’ in a 20’ wide pattern. spinner Feeder spreads up to 360 degrees. • Works equally well with all types of fish feed, corn or milo • Can be placed on a pier, dock, bank or truck • 24” tank diameter holds 175# floating fish feed or 300# corn

(25 mi. north of I-20, near Moran, Tx; Hwy 6 between Cisco and Albany, Tx)

BUIlT wITH PrIde In AMerICA wITH Only AMerICAn MATerIAls And CrAfTsMAnsHIP

CP REGULATOR The Regulator has “The Timer” inside the gravity flow system allowing control of the feed amount while maintaining dispensed feed inside the feeder housing and tubes. You program to dispense feed up to 6 times/day at the rate of 2 lbs./ second & 360 lbs./day max.

CF CORN FEEDER with Solar Powered Timer • 600, 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities • Optional Fold-up Cage • Optional 4-Tube Adapter on TM Tube For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below.

OUTBACK feATUres THe TIMer 12-VOlT COnTrOl UnIT wITH 5

Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

Craig Nyhus

Managing Editor

Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Design Editor

C2-Studios, Inc.

Associate Editor

Mark England

Products Editor

Mary Helen Aguirre

Operations Manager

Mike Hughs

Accounting

Ginger Hoolan

Website

Bruce Solieu

National Advertising Mike Nelson Founder & CEO

yeAr wArrAnTy

CP GRAVITY FLOW PROTEIN FEEDER • 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities

BRAND NEW DESigN! GREAT bALL OF FIRE WILDLIFE sCene eMbellisheD FiRe piT no two alike, each one a work of art! • 1400o high-temp. powder-coat finish • Fire poker & ash pan included FIRE PITS • Features swivel grill, Dutch oven support, fire poker & ash pan • 3 sizes: 38” Texas, 30” Junior or 24” Tailgater

hAlF-bACk pROTein FeeDeR • 700 lb. capacity has 4 feed ports • 1000 lb. capacity has 6 feed ports

The “Grub-Shak” comes standard with all the ruggedness & reliability Outback is known for. “GRub-shAk” Open-TROuGh REGULATED FEEDER • Feed all types of animals including deer, sheep, goats, horses, cattle, etc. • 1000# & 2000# capacities • built-in rain shield • Removable ladder & platform included

David J. Sams

Advertising: Call (214) 361-2276 or email editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com to request a media kit.

For home delivery subscriptions www.LSONews.com • (214) 361-2276

“bAbY-bACk” seRies VeRY lOW pROFile FeeDeRs • 360o corn distribution or up to 50 feet in one direction via Outback’s “pistolero” directional unit • 400#, 600# & 1000# capacities

See our many other products at

.outbackfeeders.com

www

office 903.734.4210 • 800.396.6313 • shop 903.734.6774 • cell 903.790.1071 • e-mail: rickmeritt@yahoo.com • 5197 FM 2685 • Gilmer, TX 75645


Page 20

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

AGFC hires online license provider

Solution on Solution onPage Page2626

1 6

2

3

4

Sovereign Sportsman Solutions will serve as the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s exclusive provider of online and retail hunting and fishing licenses and permits. Sovereign also will oversee all harvest reporting. 

5

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14 15

16

17 18

19

20

21

22 23

25

26

24

27

28

29

30 31

LSONews.com

Bachman named to QDMA board Melissa Bachman of Minnesota has joined the Quality Deer Management Association’s Board of Directors.

GSM buys Scent Web GSM Outdoors acquired Scent Web, a maker of scented foam spray.

32

33

Reis named VP

34 35 36

Across

ACROSS 1. A safari destination 4. Insects gather in deer blinds in winter 1. Athat safari destination 9. The 4. collared Insectsdove that gather in deer blinds in 10. Good animal management practices 11. Gobblewinter made in response to truck door 9. The collared dove slamming 12. Castle Fort Worth 10. west Goodofanimal management practices 14. A type turkeymade call in response to truck door 11. of Gobble 16. A spiral-horned antelope slamming 18. Pork rinds are used for this 12. of Fort Worth 19. ShooterCastle afraidwest of recoil may do this 14. this A type 21. Locate fishofatturkey brushcall piles 23. A favorite of venison eaters 16. A spiral-horned antelope 26. A catfish species 18. Pork rinds are used for this 28. A dog-training device 19. Shooter afraid recoil this 29. Trapping a tagged on of could winmay youdo$50 21.for Locate fish at brush piles 31. Good bait orthis entree 32. An offshore species 23. A favorite of venison eaters 33. Bass pro was on The Bachelor 26. A who catfish species 34. Larva of the dobsonfly 28. A dog-training device 35. Device that shuts down the boat, kill ____ 36. The29. K inTrapping H&K a tagged one could win you $50 31. Good for bait or entree 32. An offshore species 33. Bass pro who was on The Bachelor 34. Larva of the dobsonfly 35. Device that shuts down the boat, kill ____ 36. The K in H&K 37. Oversized decoys

Nature’s Calling

37

Down

DOWN 2. The quail species you can't hunt in Texas 3.2.AThe shotgun quail manufacturer species you can’t hunt in Texas 5.3.AAwhite bassmanufacturer lure shotgun 6. The mount without the hide A white 7.5.The bird'sbass nestlure for baitcasters Thehook mount without hide 8.6.The with three the points 10.7.The goose TheCanada bird’s nest for baitcasters 11.8.AThe submerged bar hook withridge threeorpoints 13. The cleaned piece of fish 10. The Canada goose 15. The distance between a deer's main beams 11. submerged ridge or bar 17. AA snack for hunters 13. Thediminutive cleaned piece 18. The duck of fish 20. A The favorite food between for bass a deer’s main beams 15. distance 22. The Spanish 17. A snack for goat hunters 24. Fishing technique in matted waters 18. diminutive 25. A The grouse speciesduck 20. A favorite for deer bass 27. The spotted,food exotic 30. Texas term for goat bluegill, panfish 22. The Spanish 31. The striped furbearerin matted waters 24. Fishing technique 25. 27. 30. 31.

A grouse species The spotted, exotic deer Texas term for bluegill, panfish The striped furbearer

Shimano named manufacturer of the year The Center for Sportfishing Policy honored Dave Pfeiffer, the president and CEO of Shimano, with its Eddie Smith Manufacturer of the Year Award.

Green joins Syren Syren USA, maker of Syren shotguns designed for women, added Lynne Green as brand manager.

New board members at PF Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever announced Tom Henning, Jeff Erickson, and John Thames are the newly elected members of PF’s and QF’s board of directors.

FeraDyne Outdoors named Mike Reis vice president of commercial sales for the Eastman Outdoors, Carbon Express and Gorilla Gear brands.

Befus new president at Scientific Anglers

Sportco gets award

Archery legend dies

Chris Sausman with Sportco Marketing won Shimano’s Stella Award for his overall commitment to Shimano, including his efforts in assisting with G. Loomis rod development. John Allen from the Don Coffey Company won Rep of the Year.

Andy Simo, founder of New Archery Products, died on May 18. He was 79. Simo was inducted into the Archery Hall of Fame in 1999.

Award for PRADCO Cabela’s named PRADCO Outdoor Brands as a recipient of the Cabela’s 2016 Strategic Partnership Award.

Brad Befus has been promoted to president of Scientific Anglers.

New deer director The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks named William T. McKinley the new deer program coordinator.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Panfish and chips

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

4 cups potatoes (about 4 medium) 1 tablespoon oil (canola or vegetable) 1/8 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. ground black pepper 4 fish filets 3 cups cornflakes 1 egg 2 tbsps. water 1/3 cup flour The potatoes (chips) take longer to bake. Once they are in the oven, prepare the fish. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Scrub potatoes under running water using a clean vegetable brush. Cut in half and then into 1/4-inch slices. Combine potatoes, oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Stir so potatoes are

covered with oil. Spray a cookie sheet with cooking spray and lay slices out in a single layer. Bake for 15 minutes. Turn potatoes over and bake for 15 minutes more (for a total of 30 minutes). Cut each fillet into two strips. Place cornflakes in a plastic bag. Crush by rolling a glass over the bag. Beat egg and water together in a bowl. Spray a cookie sheet with cooking spray. Put flour on a dish. Dip each strip into flour, then egg mixture, then cornflakes. Place fish on the sheet and bake in oven for 15 minutes until fish reaches 145 degrees or flakes easily with a fork. —Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

Dove d’elegence 12 dove 1 onion, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 1/3 cup chives, chopped 1 tbsp. salt 1 tbsp. pepper 1/2 cup evaporated milk 3/4 cup water 1 can (10 3/4 oz.) cream of mushroom soup 3/4 cup brandy 1 can (17 oz.) English peas 3 beef bouillon cubes 3 tsps. margarine or butter

Place dove in casserole dish. Arrange onions, celery and chives around. Salt and pepper. Add milk, water, mushroom soup, brandy, peas, margarine and bouillon cubes. Bake at 375 degrees for 2 hours. Remove doves and place on platter. Thicken gravy. Pour over doves. Serve with wild rice. —Missouri Department of Conservation


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Texas chef uses sporting background as inspiration for restaurants

May 26, 2017

Page 21

System provides water to Trans Pecos mule deer, bighorns

More than 3 miles of water lines were used to install a wildlife water system benefiting mule deer and desert bighorns. Photo from David Wetzel, Mule Deer Foundation.

Fort Worth chef Marcus Paslay likes to cook what he hunts, and one of his restaurants is aptly named Clay Pigeon. Many of his dishes are inspired from a lifetime of hunting and fishing. Photo from Marcus Paslay.

By Julia C. Bunch

For Lone Star Outdoor News The name of Marcus Paslay’s Fort Worth restaurant, Clay Pigeon, is a good indication that the chef believes in the relationship between hunting and cooking. The Arlington native’s lifelong love of hunting, fishing and the outdoors has inspired his career and whole relationship with food. “Growing up, (my family put a) strong emphasis on respecting animals, utilizing the whole thing and not wasting,” Paslay said. “That’s the same mantra we have at the restaurants. It’s both economical and respectful to the food.” Paslay opened Clay Pigeon Food & Drink in Fort Worth’s Linwood neighborhood in 2013, and Piattello Italian Kitchen in Fort Worth’s Waterside development earlier this year. Both concepts have menus filled with seasonal, from-scratch dishes. But the Culinary Institute of America graduate’s version of “from scratch” doesn’t include a lot of foods from suppliers, and instead includes making sourdough from his own starter, curing and smoking meats in-house and making ice cream and cheese from fresh milk. Clay Pigeon and Piattello both utilize sustainable meats and seafood. “We use local meat when we’re able, but we’re not highly stressed about that because we don’t want to sacrifice raising practices just to say it’s local,” Paslay said. He also utilizes some cuts that tend to be less popular and makes seasonal sausage or pasta fillings with remaining meat. A lifetime of hunting and fishing trips taught Paslay to cook simply and with

on-hand ingredients. Years ago on a dayslong hunting trip with relatives in Idaho, Paslay’s group shot a whitetail on the second day and had few ingredients in their packs with which to prepare the deer. Paslay rubbed down the meat in coffee grounds and salt. “We have refined that recipe and replicated it in the restaurants,” he said. “The flavors of coffee and game animals can match up well and those coffee grounds tenderize meat.” These days, his two restaurants keep him pretty busy on the weekends, but Paslay bow hunts big game in and around Breckenridge and bass fishes anywhere in Texas when he’s able. Last fall, Paslay went on a hunting trip with Texas Parks and Wildlife to Solana Ranch in Salado where he killed, cleaned and cooked his game. “We killed a deer and a pig and we cooked it up the next day with a big feast. To share that common likeness of hunting and being outside with strangers, that was a great experience.” Before opening Clay Pigeon, Paslay spent time in Alaska, Hawaii and Colorado working as a farm-to-table (and in some cases, fishing-line-to-frying-pan) chef. “You’re dealt a stronger flavor and tougher texture in the wild. Hunting and cooking go hand-and-hand because hunting is really just harvesting food.”

Quail and snakes Continued from page 4

yards and landed near a cactus. The trackers saw dust fly up. When they approached the spot, they found the bird in its death throes within 2 feet of a rattler. It had been struck squarely in the breast. The trauma of being struck by a snake, combined with the venom load, quickly kills a 5-ounce bird, said Rollins. If the quail managed to fly after the bite and then died, he reasons, the snake would not find it. There would be no scent trail. A reptile that lies patiently in wait for an edible-sized animal to wander within striking range is a minor quail threat. Since the telemetry work began just two birds have been eaten by snakes other than rattlers. Rat snakes were the predators in both cases. Hawks account for about a third of annual telemetry quail mortalities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this may be a banner year for rattlers and snakes in general. David Davis, an outdoorsman who lives near Coleman, said he’s killed seven snakes within 3/4 of a mile of his house. One was in the garage and another in his yard. “I think the drought of 2010 through 2012 knocked the snake numbers down considerably,” he said. “Now we’ve had a few years of normal to good weather and the snakes are coming back.”

On April 29, more than 30 volunteer conservationists from around the state and beyond descended upon Van Horn to put their money and muscle behind efforts to strengthen and rebuild mule deer populations in the Trans Pecos. Funded by the Mule Deer Foundation with support from numerous other hunting conservation groups, the project took place on the Lado Ranch located south of Van Horn. The project was designed to enhance critical fawning habitat in the Van Horn Mountains and improve recruitment levels in the mule deer population throughout the region. The project involved laying about 3 1/2 miles of water line connected to an existing well and wildlife water system, installing multiple water storage and pressure reduc-

ing cisterns, and placing seven drinkers (water troughs) at locations along the route. The end result will be better habitat utilization and the provision of reliable water sources critical to lactating does in the area. While populations of mule deer in the region have begun to recover, these efforts will hasten that progress, and more importantly better prepare the wildlife of this area for the next drought. The Lado Ranch is owned by Wexford Ranches and these efforts represent the latest salvo in an ambitious undertaking to bring effective and broad-based wildlife conservation programs to the property. —Mule Deer Foundation


Page 22

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL NEW MEXICO

Company donates ammunition to youth camp Aguila Ammunition/Texas Armament & Technology donated 56,000 rounds of ammunition to the NRA Whittington Center in support of their youth Adventure Camp. The breakdown includes 50,000 rounds of Aguila .22 Super Extra rimfire as well as 6,000 rounds of 12-gauge shotshells. The two-week camps allow boys and girls ages 13-17 the opportunity to learn everything from shooting/hunting fundamentals to firearm safety, marksmanship and basic survival skills. —Aguila Ammunition

PENNSYLVANIA

Officials report 25 new cases of CWD in deer

ALEAH DE LA GARZA, 11, HARVESTED HER VERY FIRST BLUEWINGED TEAL WITH A .410 IN HIDALGO COUNTY.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Glick Twins

419 U.S. Hwy 83 Pharr, Texas 78577 (956) 787-4291 glicktwins.com

The Pennsylvania Game Commission tested 5,707 deer and 110 elk for chronic wasting disease during 2016, with 25 deer testing positive for the disease. All of the wild deer were in or near Disease Management Area 2, the only area of the state where CWD has been detected in the wild. These 25 deer more than doubled the number of CWD-positive deer detected in Area 2 from 2012 to 2015. No positives have been detected in the state’s elk herd to date. —PGC

MISSOURI

Turkey hunters harvest 43,339 birds Preliminary data from the Missouri Department of Conservation shows that turkey hunters checked 39,239 birds during Missouri’s 2017 regular spring turkey season April 17 through May 7. Top harvest counties were Franklin with 932 birds checked, Texas with 843, and Callaway with 697. Young turkey hunters harvested 4,100 birds during the 2017 spring youth season, April 8-9, bringing the overall 2017 spring turkey harvest to 43,339. —MDC

CALIFORNIA

Thousands of salmon die when pump fails at facility An estimated 200,000 to 300,000 fall-run Chinook salmon died at the Feather River Fish Hatchery – Thermalito Facility due to a pump failure from a faulty wire. More than 2 million remaining salmon at the facility will be released over the next month as they reach an appropriate size. California Department of Fish and Wildlife staff first observed stressed fall-run Chinook salmon at 6:30 a.m. along with mortalities in the raceways due to low dissolved oxygen levels. Hatchery staff immediately started supplying supplemental oxygen to the raceways to keep fish alive. CDFW notified the California Department of Water Resources, which manages the wells, and DWR electricians made immediate repairs to restart the pump motor and resume the flow of water. —CDFW

MINNESOTA

Fishy catch A 59-year-old angler from Grand Rapids reeled in a puzzling catch, which has since created quite a bit of drama for Minnesotans

and shark experts alike according to news accounts and social media. The man was fishing with his son when they pulled in a jawbone and took it to the Grand Rapids Department of Natural Resources office to be identified. The fisheries biologist said the set of jaws is from a sand tiger shark, a saltwater species that can’t survive in fresh water. A spokesman for the department said it was doubtful the jawbone got there on its own due to dams downstream that would prohibit a shark from reaching the area. —GRDNR

MONTANA

Prisoners help out greater sage-grouse A new program with Montana Correctional Enterprises at Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge will help restore sagebrush habitat for greater sage-grouse in Montana while providing inmates an opportunity to cultivate a new set of skills. Inmates will sow sagebrush seeds into 25,000 “cone-tainers” starting the third week in May, followed by careful daily watering, fertilizing and thinning the plants over summer until the plants reach 6-10 inches tall. In autumn, the BLM will plant the sagebrush plants in greater sage-grouse management priority areas throughout Montana. The greater sage-grouse, once a common sight in the western part of the U.S. and numbering in the millions, has declined substantially across its historic habitat. — Institute for Applied Ecology

ALABAMA

FLW College Fishing National Championship College fishing teams from across the country will be heading to Wheeler Lake in Florence, Alabama, May 31-June 3 for the 2017 YETI FLW College Fishing National Championship presented by Lowrance C-Map Genesis. A total of 148 college bass fishing clubs will be competing in the tournament for a $30,000 prize package, including a new Ranger Z175 boat with a 90-horsepower Evinrude outboard and entry into the 2017 Forrest Wood Cup. —www.flwfishing.com

OKLAHOMA

National fish hatchery wraps up paddlefish spawning Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery, located 10 miles north of its namesake town, has completed its annual spring spawning of paddlefish. The hatchery has spawned, raised and released paddlefish since 1992. The federal fisheries facility took on paddlefish production 25 years ago in the face of declining paddlefish populations across the fish’s native range. The paddlefish naturally occur in the large rivers feeding the Mississippi River basin from Montana to Louisiana. Tagged fish have been shown to move hundreds of miles, particularly in the springtime when they ready themselves to spawn. As daylight increases, water temperature warms and river flows ramp up, paddlefish are cued by nature to move to spawning habitats of gravel bars on shallow riffles. The fish run headlong into dams and in many cases cannot get past them to spawn. Females absorb their eggs and fail to spawn. Over time, paddlefish populations above dams were depleted. —U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Chasing crappie

May 26, 2017

Page 23

PRODUCTS

Continued from page 8

>>

B15 BEAUCHAMP: Browning’s new over-and-under shotgun will be part of the company’s John M. Browning Collection. According to the company: the gunsmiths of Fabrique Nationale d’ Herstal, Belgium, will exquisitely enhance each B15, meaning that owners of the shotgun can expect balance and reliability from precision engineering plus the finest of aesthetic finishes. The heart of the new shotgun is the locking system and technical features shared with the legendary B25, the first over-and-under shotgun manufactured by Browning. New features include a low-profile receiver, performance-enhancing mechanical triggers, back-bored Vector Pro barrels and Invector-DS choke tubes. The B15 will be offered in four grades with a choice of engravings, wood grades, buttplates and forearm styles. The suggested MSRP will be $12,999.99 for the Grade B, $15,499.99 for the Grade C, $17,999.99 for the Grade D, and $20,499.99 for the Grade E shotgun.

brush piles recently, since he finds quite a few while keeping an eye on his depth finder while bass fishing. “The other day I was easing along looking for bass structure and noticed a big brush pile had popped up on the fish finder,” he said. “It was in 12 feet of water next to a 16-foot drop. That’s a perfect place for a brush pile. I marked it and went back later. The first six drops with a jig caught six big crappie.” After 42 years in the business, what is his favorite pizza? “It’s tough to beat a plain thin crust pepperoni pizza,” Simmons said. “Like eating fried crappie, that never gets old.”

Dove data Continued from page 1

harvest surveys, dove hunters have increased from an estimated 362,000 during 2000-2001 to nearly 404,000 in the 20152016 hunting season. That’s far less than the number of deer hunters in the state, which remains the most popular type of hunting. Since 20002001, the number of deer hunters has remained at around 640,000. The reason for the growth is twofold according to Shawn Oldenburger, dove program leader for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. One is that dove hunting tends to be a social event in Texas, with family and friends heading out to fields wide and far. “The camaraderie is a big deal. You can bring multiple generations,” Oldenburger said. “Every county has dove. They are found everywhere.” The other factor is that dove hunting only requires a license, a shotgun and shells. Dove hunting trips are relatively inexpensive at $100-$150 for the day. On the other hand, deer hunting is big business in Texas with gear and leases costing tens of thousands of dollars in some cases. Other small game hunting, such as quail hunting, can also involve extra expenses such as trained dogs. Murray Stacy, a longtime dove hunter, said it makes sense that dove hunting has become so popular. Dove are everywhere and hunting them is inexpensive. “It’s almost a religion Sept. 1. It’s a rite of passage,” Stacy said. As for harvest numbers, state data showed more than 11 million dove killed during the 2015-2016 season — the most ever according to records. Of that total, about 7 million were mourning dove and 3 million were white-winged dove, with the remainder being white-tipped and Eurasian collared-dove. However, federal harvest numbers for mourning dove— the

number used to manage dove in Texas — was around 5 million for the same time period. “Dove (number differences) aren’t tracking as well. I don’t know why,” Oldenburger said. The reason for the discrepancy is perhaps due to changes in licenses like the Super Combo, Oldenburger said. Dan Collins, migratory bird coordinator for Region 2 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services, agreed with Oldenburger. Federal officials use banding data and the Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program to determine bag limits and the number of days set for dove hunting. The increase in popularity has been followed by an increase in hunting opportunities. Dove hunting for the 20162017 season saw an increase to a 90-days, the longest in 80 years. TPWD integrated those additional days early in the season to take advantage of mourning dove migrating into the state, as well as at the end of the season in the Special White-winged Dove Area to offer more bird hunting opportunities. While the record harvest numbers may sound large, Oldenburger said that it is a small percentage compared to the estimated 50 million mourning dove present at the beginning of September. Additionally, there are perhaps 230 million mourning dove in the Central Management Unit that includes Texas. Oldenburger doesn’t think hunting pressure is enough to significantly change the season length or bag limits any time soon, especially since about 45 percent of dove would die each year without hunting. “Our plan is we’re going to monitor that. But I can tell you right now based on where the white-winged dove population is now, it’s probably going to continue.”

CRAW FATHER: Missile Baits’ 3 1/2-inch craw bait was designed with a little action in the claws: it subtly thumps as it glides through the water. The versatile bass bait can be fished in a variety of applications, including flipping, punching, Carolinarigging, and as a jig trailer. Available in eight hues, the Craw Father costs $4.39 for a pack of seven.

RIDGEFIELD FISHING SHIRT: This Carhartt shirt with a mesh-lined back utilizes “FastDry” technology, which wicks away sweat for comfort during a long day on the lake. It is made from a 60 percent Polyester and 40 percent blend fabric that releases stains in the wash. The shirt has a double-layer collar that stands up to protect a fisherman’s neck plus two front pockets to stash smaller gear. And, the shirt also has buttons on the sleeves to hold them up and out of the way. “The shirt is a little heavier and sturdier than most fishing shirts, and was great for winter wade-fishing,” said LSON’s Executive Editor Craig Nyhus. “When it warmed up, you could feel the wind coming through the fabric as well as with any other fishing shirt.” The fishing shirt, available in medium to 4X large and in four colors (Asphalt, Dark Khaki, Burnt Olive and Celestial Blue), costs about $50-$55.

>>

>>

>>

plastic tail. The most productive colors are chartreuse/glitter or white/blue glitter. The chartreuse is best when the water is a little off-color. The white one is best in clear water.” Simmons uses an ultralight rod and reel. The rod has a soft tip for feeling more bites. The reel is spooled with 15-pound test braid with a 4-foot section of 8-pound test fluorocarbon leader. “I’ll connect the leader to line with a blood knot,” he said. “I fish the jigs in and over the brush piles and get hung up quite a bit. One little trick is to tie the knot to the top of the eye on the jig head to keep it from snagging so many limbs.” Simmons said he hasn’t put out any

>>

The best jig colors for crappie fishing at Lake Waco are chartreuse/glitter in off-color water or white/blue glitter in clear water, according to fisherman Charles Simmons. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

KSB 0-DEGREE SLEEPING BAG: This four-season Klymit performance sleeping bag will keep outdoorsmen warm during backcountry hunting trips. The synthetic fill, which insulates even when wet, combines with high tenacity fabrics for durability and comfort. Features include a draft collar, over-stuffed foot box, insulated mummy hood, and flexible baffles at the body’s core, which all work to minimize heat loss for greater thermal efficiency. The expanded chest area and flexible baffles also provide room to move. An interior pocket allows hunters to stash small items nearby. The 7.4-lb. Realtree Xtra camo sleeping bag costs about $225.

TEXAS AVENGER: Ranch King Blinds’ userfriendly fish feeder requires no assembly and easily mounts to a dock or inclined pond bank. Its patent-pending leg system comes installed and rotates and tilts as well. The fish feeder, which features an eliminator spinner plate and timer, is powered by a 12-volt system, battery and solar panel (included). Its galvanized hopper eliminates internal sweating. Both the timer and battery are housed in the lid for easy access, and the eliminator spinner plate keeps varmints away from the fish food. Model 100 costs about $900 and Model 250 costs about $1,000.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276


Page 24

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263 AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does. Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189 NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 LSONF LOOKING FOR LEASE Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation creates hunters for a lifetime by giving an opportunity to people who have the passion for hunting but lack the opportunity. LSONF is seeking hunting property to accomplish its mission. All hunting rights sought and house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276 DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582 AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com (830) 896-6996

TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 Call (214) 361-2276 WATERFOWL AMMO Stock up while it is cheap Hevi-Steel 12 ga. 3” and 2 3/4” number 3 shot. By the case only. $120 per case. Call David at (214) 361-2276 STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210 TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

FISHING BULL RED RUN AND FLOUNDER GIGGING

Port O’Connor, TX Call Capt. Alex Cruz Now booking trips for September and October www.affordableguideservice.com (210) 789-0607

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Check Out Multiple Trip Discounts (956) 551-1965 PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000

DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503

TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! dickyn@lagovistalodge.com (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296

TRUCKS FOR SALE DFW Area 2016 Ford F-250 XLT - 6.7L V8 Power Stroke Diesel - 4X4 Oxford White 32,665 Miles Stock #GEC71678 2010 Ford F-250 Lariat Truck Crew Cab 4x4 161,187 Miles Stock #AEB31411   2015 Ford F-250 Platinum Truck Crew Cab 4x4 6.7L V-8 cyl 53,873 miles Ruby Red Metallic Tinted Clearcoat Interior Black Stock #FEA57226   2017 Ford F-250 XLT - 6.7L V8 Power Stroke Diesel - 4X4 Oxford White Interior medium earth gray 22,587 Miles Stock #HEB59450

2012 Ford F-150 Platinum Truck SuperCrew Cab 4x4 Red Candy Metallic 56,201 Miles Stock #CFC20081   2013 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor Truck SuperCrew Cab 4x4 Oxford White Interior black 89,615 Miles Stock #DFB02345   2008 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT w/2LT - 5.3L V8 - Z71 4X4 Summit White Interior ebony 96,801 Miles Stock #8G193016   2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Truck Double Cab 4x4 Green 34,380 Miles Stock #EZ397690 Call Bobby (214) 632-7963

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@GMAIL.COM

TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478 DOMAIN

LoneStar.blog is for sale. Incredible-Rare Texas keyword. $4,500 OBO. Details: www.Lonestar.blog

VEHICLES ATVS, TRUCKS ATVs, UTVS, trailers, feed, new and used equipment and vehicles, guns, bows, exotics, blinds, feeders, hunts; Call for pricing on overstocked Rangers, Can Ams, and NatureBlinds. Call or text (512) 748-2810 or jwmaroney@gmail.com NEW 2016 White Chevy 3500 Silverado 6.6L V8 Duramax 4WD LTZ Diesel only $53,821.00 plus TTL NEW 2017 Pepperdust Metallic Chevy 1500 Silverado Z-71 4x4 Crew Cab Pepperdust Metallic $39,687.00 plus TTL savings of $10,000 after rebates PLUS $1000 TRADE ALLOWANCE Used New Holland 2015 L230 skid steer 193 hours, cab air, mech hand and foot controls for $44,500 Used F-150 4WD 88,602 miles; $22,881 and another used 2013 F-150, 83,000 miles; $25,000 jwmaroney@gmail.com Call or text (512) 748-2810

DAMON ASTORIA MOTOR COACH 2011 360Hp 6.7L Isb Cummins Engine On a Freightliner Chassis, Air Bag Suspension, Exhaust Brake, 3 Slide-outs, Onan Diesel Generator, 2 Ducted Air Conditioners with Heat Pumps, Levelers, 4 Door Gas/110V Norcold Refrigerator with Ice Maker, Automatic Main Awning And Slide/Door Awnings, 1 Piece Washer/Dryer, Backup and Side View Camera, Satellite Dish, Outside Entertainment System, 3 TVs, DVD Player, Satellite Radio, Outside Shower, Fireplace, Central Vacuum, Convection Microwave and 3 Burner Range. M&G Brake System and Blue Ox Tow Bar. See it in the Houston area. (806) 438-3048

C o r p o r a t e Pa r t n e rs


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Page 25


Page 26

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK MAY 26-27

Port-A Pachanga Fishing Tournament Robert’s Point trinityoaks.org Willacy County Young Farmers Fishing Tournament Port Mansfield wcyf.org

MAY 27

Coastal Conservation Association Brush Country Baffin Bay Shoot-Out Fishing Tournament (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

JUNE 3

National Wild Turkey Federation Llano Estacado Upland Game Hunting Heritage Banquet Bailey County Electric Co-op Office nwtf.org Coastal Conservation Association Redfish Bay Kid Fish Woody’s Sports Center, Port Aransas (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Houston 30th Anniversary Omni Houston at Westside (281) 682-3264 rmef.org

JUNE 7

Houston Safari Club Wild Game Cooking Demonstration Scott Leysath, The Sporting Chef Norris Conference Center, Houston houstonsafariclub.org

JUNE 7-8

2017 North American Deer Summit Austin, Sheraton nationaldeeralliance.com

JUNE 8

Coastal Conservation Association Centex Chapter Banquet Waco Convention Center (254) 405-1300 ccatexas.org

JUNE 8-12

2017 Skeeter Owners Tournament Lake Fork skeeterboatsdev.com/owners-tourney

JUNE 9-10

Coastal Conservation Association Inter Chapter Challenge Tournament Aransas Pass Civic Center (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

JUNE 10

Texas Hill Country Shooting Classic Joshua Creek Ranch, Boerne (803) 537-5090 joshuacreek.com

JUNE 20

Delta Waterfowl Cowtown Chapter Dinner (817) 715-7008 deltawaterfowl.org

National Wild Turkey Federation Cottonwood Creek Chapter Banquet Stonebriar Country Club, Frisco (214) 693-0024 nwtf.org

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Royal Oaks Country Club biggame.org

JUNE 22

Coastal Conservation Association San Jacinto Chapter Banquet Bay Area Community Center, Seabrook (713) 320-1847 ccatexas.org

JUNE 17

National Wild Turkey Federation 10th Annual Youth Jakes Day YMCA Roberts Ranch, Comfort nwtf.org

Dallas Safari Club Writing Seminar with Jay Ann Cox Fort Worth biggame.org

Ducks Unlimited Hemphill Dinner Sabine County VFW Hall 3049 (936) 275-8153 ducks.org

JUNE 23-25

Great Outdoors Expo Midland Horseshoe Pavilion goetx.com

JUNE 10-11

National Wild Turkey Federation Women in the Outdoors Tri-County Longbeards Jack Hilliard Ranch, Buckholts nwtf.org

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 26

1 6 9

JUNE 13

Ducks Unlimited Lubbock Chapter Abuelos Courtyard (806) 790-0709

R

H

C

P

19

A

F L

E

I A N

R

T

E

12

5

W A S P S L

10

O

13

G R E Y S T O N E

E L A N D

U

A

E

L

A

M

20

S

21

C R A P P

R

26

A

G

W F

V E L V

T C H

T R A

I E

23

31

S H R

27

X

X

I M P S

U

32

B O X

15

S

L

P

E

J

L E R S

E R

E

24

K

28

D U M M Y

30

B

N H

H E L L G R A M M I M

K O C H

1. A safari destination [ZIMBABWE] 4. Insects that gather in deer blinds in winter [WASPS] 9. The collared dove [EURASIAN] 10. Good animal management practices [HUSBANDRY] 11. Gobble made in response to truck door slamming [SHOCK] 12. Castle west of Fort Worth [GREYSTONE] 14. A type of turkey call [BOX] 16. A spiral-horned antelope [ELAND] 18. Pork rinds are used for this [TRAILERS] 19. Shooter afraid of recoil may do this [FLINCH] 21. Locate this fish at brush piles [CRAPPIE] 23. A favorite of venison eaters [BACKSTRAP] 26. A catfish species [CHANNEL] 28. A dog-training device [DUMMY] 29. Trapping a tagged on could win you $50 [CRAB]

17

E

E

34

N

31. Good for bait or entree [SHRIMP] 32. An offshore species [AMBERJACK] 33. Bass pro who was on The Bachelor [VELVICK]

I

E

14

A M B E R J A C K

36

Across

T

B A C K S T R A P

C H A N N E L

I C K S

22

18

B

F I

I N C H

8

H U S B A N D R Y

K

C R A B

S W I

O

4

T

S

35

3

Z

25 29

2

I M B A B W E

L

16

O

Z

B

S H O C K

33

Coastal Conservation Association Alvin/Pearland Chapter Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, Hatfield (713) 501-2778 ccatexas.org

E

E U R A S

11

JUNE 15

National Wild Turkey Federation Corpus Christi Hunting Heritage Banquet Richard M. Borchard Regional Fairgrounds nwtf.org

7

37

T E

N

M A G N U M

Down

2. The quail species you can't hunt in Texas [MONTEZUMA] 3. A shotgun manufacturer [BERETTA] 5. A white bass lure [SLAB] 6. The mount without the hide [EUROPEAN] 7. The bird's nest for baitcasters [BACKLASH] 8. The hook with three points [TREBLE] 10. The Canada goose [HONKER] 11. A submerged ridge or bar [SHOAL] 13. The cleaned piece of fish [FILLET] 15. The distance between a deer's main beams [SPREAD] 17. A snack for hunters [JERKY] 18. The diminutive duck [TEAL] 20. A favorite food for bass [CRAWFISH] 22. The Spanish goat [IBEX] 24. Fishing technique in matted waters [PUNCHING] 25. A grouse species [SAGE] 27. The spotted, exotic deer [AXIS] 30. Texas term for bluegill, panfish [BREAM] 31. The striped furbearer [SKUNK]

Puzzle solution from Page 20


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

May 26, 2017

Page 27

VP9SK...ACCURACY, ERGONOMICS, AND FIREPOWER IN A COMPACT The VP9SK, the eagerly anticipated compact model of the acclaimed striker fired Heckler & Koch VP handgun line is here! And it has all of the sought-after characteristics of larger frame VP pistols but in a more concealable design. The VP9SK is a compact handgun but substantial enough for accurate and comfortable shooting — unlike some competing “single stack” models. And its 10 round magazine can be backed up with a variety of accessory high capacity magazines* that give the VP9SK some major 9 mm firepower. VP9SK pistols use HK’s ergonomic handgun grip design that includes changeable backstraps and side panels — accommodating all hand sizes. Only HK handguns have such a personalized grip.

Like full-size HK VP pistols, the compact VP9SK has easy to change backstraps and side panels for a personalized fit, 27 custom-fitted grip combinations are possible.

The VP9SK uses the same trigger system found on full-size VPs — a trigger that surpasses those found on competitors and has been widely hailed as a groundbreaking component and one of the best triggers in the industry. And this contributes to the VP9SK’s superb accuracy, matching the precision on-target performance demonstrated by full-size VP models. Add in features like controls that are completely ambidextrous, HK’s patented charging supports for better gripping to rack the slide rearward, and a cold hammer forged polygonal barrel made from cannon grade steel and you can see why this is a “No Compromise” pistol. The VP9SK is value priced and backed by Heckler & Koch’s legendary German quality and an exceptional lifetime warranty.

VP9SK (9 mm) with flat floorplate 10 round magazine

VP9SK (9 mm) with 13 round magazine

VP9SK (9 mm) with 15 round magazine

*Extended capacity (13 & 15 rd.) magazines available in spring 2018

www.hk-usa.com • 706-568-1906

Visit Your Local HK Premium Dealer to Learn More!

RAY’S SPORTING GOODS 730 Singleton Blvd., Dallas (214) 747-7916 rayssportinggoods.com RIFLEGEAR 6101 Windhaven Pkwy. #145, Plano (972) 292-7678 riflegear.com/plano DFW SHOOTING SPORTS 105 Bedford Rd., Bedford (817) 285-0664 dfwshootingsports.com

DEFENDER OUTDOORS SHOOTING CENTER 2900 Shotts St., Fort Worth (817) 935-8377 defenderoutdoorsshootingcenter.com SAW INC. 184 S. Collins Rd. #100, Sunnyvale (972) 226-3200 MCBRIDES 2915 San Gabriel, Austin (512) 472-3532 mcbridesguns.com NAGELS 6201 San Pedro Ave., San Antonio (210) 342-5420 nagelsguns.net

CARTER’S COUNTRY North: 6231 Treaschwig, Spring (281) 443-8393 West: 8927 Katy Freeway, Houston (713) 461-1844 Southwest: 11886 Wilchrest Dr., Houston (281) 879-1466 Pasadena: 2120 Shaver (713) 475-2222 carterscountry.net

XTREME GUNS & AMMO 1110 E. Hwy. 90A, Richmond (832) 363-3783 Xtremegunsandammo.com

TMP 2700 South Rankin Hwy. 349, Midland (432) 686-2500 gotmp.com

ATHENA GUN CLUB 10814 Katy Fwy., Houston (713) 461-5900 athenagunclub.com

CAROLINE COLT CO. 4409 Crawford Dr., Abilene (325) 704-5426 carolinecoltcompany.com

CHAMPION FIREARMS 1925 S. Texas Ave., College Station (979) 693-9948 championfirearms.com

SPRING GUNS & AMMO 4401 Spring Cypress Rd., Spring (888) 788-4867 springgunsandammo.com

HOFFPAUIR RANCH AND SUPPLY 1189 N. Hwy. 281, Lampasas (512) 556-5444 hrandsupply.com

ABLE’S 357 FM 1791, Huntsville (800) 720-3275 ableammo.com

FIELD & STREAMS SPORTING GOODS 3812 W. Houston Harte Expy., San Angelo (325) 944-7094 fieldandstreams.com


Page 28

May 26, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NEW

1-4x24 ILLUMINATED RETICLE

Extreme targeting speed, repeatable precision and superior accuracy is why BLACK FORCE1000 should be on your AR/MSR platform. True 1x magnification designed for both-eyes-open engagement, 4x zoom for extended ranges and metal-capped turrets assure sighting confidence under tough conditions. — SPEEDFORCE glass-etched reticle helps frame close targets quickly. Hashmarks and ballistic circles provide holdovers and hold-offs for intermediate ranges

All Nikon trademarks are the property of Nikon Corporation.

— Side-mounted illumination control with 10 brightness settings and intermittent off — Ultra-rugged aircraft grade aluminum 30mm main body tube

SPEEDFORCE Reticle

Built and Backed for a lifetime of performance.

Become Unstoppable. Use BLACK cantilever mounts for rock-solid precision.

NikonSportOptics.com ALPINE 5483 Shelby Road, Fort Worth (817) 478-6613 alpinerange.com

STAR ARMS 6688 South U.S. Hwy. 377, Stephenville (254) 965-9099 stararmsllctx.com

CAROLINE COLT CO. 4409 Crawford Dr., Abilene (325) 704-5426 carolinecoltcompany.com

CHAMPION FIREARMS 1925 S. Texas Ave., College Station (979) 693-9948 championfirearms.com

GIBSON’S DISCOUNT CENTER 111 West Main St., Kerrville (830) 257-3511 gibsonsdiscount.com

1-800-GUNSANDAMMO (800) 486-7497

FIELD & STREAMS SPORTING GOODS 3812 W. Houston Harte Expy., San Angelo (325) 944-7094 fieldandstreams.com

CARTER’S COUNTRY North: 6231 Treaschwig, Spring (281) 443-8393 West: 8927 Katy Freeway, Houston (713) 461-1844 Southwest: 11886 Wilchrest Dr., Houston (281) 879-1466 Pasadena: 2120 Shaver (713) 475-2222 carterscountry.net

ABLE’S 357 FM 1791, Huntsville (800) 720-3275 ableammo.com

MODERN PAWN & GUNS 1701 Airline Rd., Corpus Christi (361) 993-9390 modernpawnandguns.com

MCBRIDES 2915 San Gabriel, Austin (512) 472-3532 mcbridesguns.com

DANNY’S PAWN & SPORTING GOODS 300 S. Broadway St., McAllen (956) 687-4692 dannyssportinggoods.net

SUPERIOR FIREARMS 4520 South Broadway, Tyler (903) 617-6141 superiorgunshop.com

TMP 2700 South Rankin Hwy. 349, Midland (432) 686-2500 gotmp.com

May 26, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you