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Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

February 10, 2017

Volume 13, Issue 12

Crossbow-toting granny gets her elk

Fish switching sexes Condition perplexes researchers

Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Glenda Bullard, an 82-year-old great-grandmother, can tell you where the meat is. It’s in the freezer — about 400 pounds of it, thanks to a recent

hunt where she took down a 378inch elk with her crossbow. For Glenda, hunting and cooking go together like peanut butter and jelly. “Oh, my, we’ll all eat it. I have a big family,” she said. Glenda, who was born in the Great Depression

era, was happy to put meat on her table. She intends to make lots of chicken-fried elk steak. “She was more excited about the steaks than the horns,” said her son, Glen Bullard, who, along with grandson Tyler Bullard, took her to hunt for elk at the Reata

WORTH THE WAIT: At age 82, Glenda Bullard arrowed the 378-inch elk with her crossbow at the Reata Ranch in Glen Rose. Photo by Tyler Bullard.

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CONTENTS

Learning about your old rifle

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 11 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 16 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 19 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 22

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

RELIC: This Winchester Model 1866 is on display at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming. Photo from Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

By Craig Nyhus

Do you have your great-grandfather’s rifle or shotgun in your gun case? If it’s old enough and if it’s a Winchester, Marlin or L.C. Smith, the people at the Cody Firearms Museum Records Office can help you. The office is located at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, officially holds

the records for the three brands. Jessica Bennett is the firearms record specialist. “For most, we can get you the manufacturing dates,” Bennett said. With Winchester, records include the early iconic models. “Winchester runs the gamut. We have records for the Model 1873, 1880, 1892 and 1894,” Bennett said. “Most of the records started petering out from

1907-1915; we can’t do anything on firearms newer than that.” L.C. Smith made double-barreled shotguns, and the firearms office has records from the 1890s to the 1940s. The number of records held in the office is astounding. “We have more than 1 million Winchester records, 365,000 Marlin lever-action records and some shotgun records and 350,000 to 400,000 L.C. Smith Please turn to page 5

INSIDE

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

Lone Star Outdoor News

HUNTING

Cooler wars

Game birds book

YETI, RTIC resolve lawsuit. Page 4

Gary Kramer completes four-year project. Page 17

FISHING

Scientists are still trying to piece together the causes and ramifications of a perplexing condition called intersex almost 15 years after its discovery in the Chesapeake Bay. Immature female eggs were detected inside the testicles of male fish — with largemouth bass particularly susceptible. Unfortunately, Texas did not provide a haven from the malady. Several years ago, researchers found high proportions of intersex largemouth bass at three sites along the lower Rio Grande Basin. Fifty percent of the bass tested near Brownsville showed intersex characteristics. At Falcon Dam, the percentage was 44 percent. And at Mission, it dropped to 20 percent. The cause? Many scientists suspect pollution, particularly estrogen or similar chemicals flushed through our nation’s waterways. But the answer may not be that simple, said Don Tillitt, a research toxicologist with the Columbia Environmental Research Center. It’s operated by the United States Geological Survey. Tillitt has studied intersex fish in the Rio Grande. “Estrogens can cause this condition,” he said. “That’s why some people want to say, ‘Yes, estrogen is causing this.’ But there are just so many different factors that can influence gonad development. Bass are planted in different locations. Where do they come from? What is the condition of the aquaculture where they were first raised? There’s just a lot of (unanswered) questions for me.” Please turn to page 14

Underwater drones

East Texas crappie

Controversial fishing method to begin. Page 8

Big slabs on Angelina River. Page 8


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February 10, 2017

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February 10, 2017

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HUNTING

Disease discovery in free-ranging whitetail brings emergency measures By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

The discovery of chronic wasting disease in a free-ranging whitetailed deer in Medina County has left some hunters and landowners concerned about the government’s response. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department announced on Jan. 25 they detected the disease in a hunterharvested 1 1/2–year-old whitetailed buck from Medina County, approximately three miles from a breeding facility where CWD was

previously discovered. This marked the first confirmed case of CWD in a free-ranging Texas whitetail. TPWD took emergency action making Surveillance Zone 3, which includes portions of Bandera, Medina and Uvalde counties, a CWD Containment Zone. That means there are restrictions on the movement of carcass parts as well as live deer processed under a permit. The department is also implementing mandatory testing of hunter-harvested deer within the zone. Steve Lightfoot, TPWD spokesman, said the measure will last 120

days. The TPWD Commission is expected to take up the issue, probably at its March 23 meeting, and could take action at its May meeting, he said. While the general deer-hunting season is over, TPWD will continue to collect samples from Managed Lands Deer Program properties in the new Containment Zone as well as roadkills. The department is seeking as many additional samples for testing as it can obtain in order to get a better handle on the geographic extent and prevalence of the disease in this area. Please turn to page 7

SEARCHING: A pathologist at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostc Lab reads slides during testing for CWD. Photos by TVMDL.

Duck season hits for some, down for others By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

A GOOD DAY: Denny Copeland hunts ducks in Central Texas. While he had some good hunts for mallards and gadwall, the season in the area he hunted was less than stellar. Photo by Robert Sloan.

Depending on who you talk to, the 2016-17 duck season ranged from excellent to the worst ever. Guide Dwayne Lowery, who runs trips on the middle Texas coast out of Port O’Connor, said this was one of his best seasons. Conversely, Denny Copeland, who has been hunting on Central Texas lakes and rivers for more than 40 years, says this was the worst season they have every experienced. “We were never without birds,” Lowery, with over 25 years of duck hunting along the Texas coast, said. “I’ve got a big freshwater lake that was good for at least one hunt a week. It held a good mix of ducks like pintails, gadwall, teal and widgeon. The rest of the time I was hunting on the backwater lakes from West Matagorda Bay to San Antonio Bay. There were plenty of birds throughout the season.” Lowery’s success continued until the season’s end. “The last week of the second split was incredible,” he said. “We had easy limits of pintail, wigeon, Please turn to page 7

Cooler, cup wars YETI, RTIC resolve lawsuit By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News When YETI coolers, and later drinkware, burst on the scene in 2006, a frenzy broke out among hunters and fishermen to obtain the ice-saving but heavy items from the Austin-based company. What followed was competition. Among others, Cypress-based RTIC, owned by brothers John and Jim Jacobsen, entered the fray in 2015 and compared its products and price with its competitor, using the slogan, like “half the price of a Yeti cooler and holds more ice.”

YETI, believing RTIC’s products were little more than copies, sued RITC and its owners in federal court in March of 2016, alleging RTIC copied the trade dress and design of YETI’s insulated drinkware products, and engaged in unfair competition. RTIC countersued, seeking a declaratory judgment that its products did not infringe YETI’s design. On Feb. 2, YETI announced in a press release the lawsuit had been settled. According to YETI’s release, RTIC Coolers and its owners “are required to make a financial payment to YETI; to cease sales of all products subject to the lawsuit —

this includes hard-sided coolers, soft-sided coolers and drinkware; and to redesign all products in question.” “We are extremely pleased with the results we have achieved. We will continue to defend our innovation and intellectual property, YETI CEO Matt Reintjes said in the release. “This is a true win.” RTIC’s Facebook page, though, provided a different perspective. Its post on Feb. 3 read in part: “RTIC … announces that it has entered into a settlement agreement with YETI today for the purpose of avoiding the additional costs and uncertainty of continued

litigation. The dispute has been amicably resolved and as part of the agreement, RTIC has agreed to redesign only those products involved in the dispute. As part of the agreement, RTIC is precluded from commenting further, but RTIC is very pleased with the settlement and considers it a win.” RTIC Coolers has generated about $200 million in revenue since shipping its first cooler in September 2015 and employs about 100 people. A majority interest of YETI was sold in 2012 to a New York private equity firm. YETI reported revenues of $468.9 million in 2015.


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First study examines deer after antibiotic administration Lone Star Outdoor News In the first study of its kind on whitetailed deer, antibiotics and anhelminthics (deworming agents) were administered by injection to 102 deer. After 11, 21 and 31 days post injection, tissue and liver samples were obtained and tested. In the last decade, there has been mounting evidence that frequent delivery of antibiotics in food-producing animals leads to an increase of antibiotic resistance in bacteria species. Some concerns resulted from the potential levels of antibiotic residues in tissues of harvested game animals. The study, published in Small Ruminant Research, the Official Journal of the International Goat Association, concluded that of the five drugs studied, florfenicol, ceftiofur, tulathromycin, oxytetracycline, and moxidectin (cydectin), only tulathromycin was detected at a level less than 0.01 ppm in the deer liver and muscle samples tested, and only oxytetracycline was detected in liver at day 11 post injection. No other drugs were detected in either muscle or liver at these time points. The study obtained tissue and liver samples from 102 white-tailed deer that were transported to a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Permitted Private Deer Facility in Somerville. Fifty-one of the deer were from the captive deer herd on the Kerr Wildlife Management Area, Hunt, Texas, and 51 other deer were transported from nine private captive deer facilities. After a two-week acclimation and adjustment period, all of the 102 deer were individually weighed and re-ear

tagged. Each of the four antibiotics and cydectin were delivered at dosages calculated as the average of those used by six veterinarians practicing in the deer industry, and all doses used in the project were close to those recommended and used in cattle. After injection of the drugs, the deer were randomly assigned to three groups of 33 each. At day 11 post injection, 33 deer in Group 1 were euthanized and veterinarians collected muscle and liver samples from each carcass. The samples were transported on ice to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and stored in a freezer. Tissues were thawed prior to extraction for drug residue analysis. At day 21, 33 deer in Group 2 and day 31, 33 deer of Group 3 were DRUG RESIDUES: A study just completed determined that most antibitransferred from the out- otics given to white-tailed deer are gone from the animal’s tissue and side pen into the han- liver after 11 days. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News. dling facility and sampled for tulathromycin in beef liver is 5.5 in an identical manner. All of the mean levels of the drugs de- parts per million. Such minute concentrations detected tected in the muscle and liver tissues in would preclude any pharmacological white-tailed deer at day 11, 21, and 31 effects in humans that might consume post injection are below that which is the muscle or liver tissues from the allowed by the Federal Drug Adminiswhite-tailed deer at the drug dosages tration in tissues from cattle, sheep, and swine. For example, the FDA tolerance used, the study concluded.

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Firearms Continued from page 1

records,” Bennett said. What about that old Model 12 shotgun in the gun case? “They began in 1912,” Bennett said. “But the records disappeared. We can tell an owner the day it was made, but not the configuration or special features.” To determine the manufacturing date and information for a memorable rifle or shotgun that falls within the parameters, owners may take a few simple steps. “They may contact us by phone or through the website, provide the serial number and we can get a factory letter to them in about four weeks,” Bennett said. The fee to obtain the information usually runs about $70. The Cody Firearms Office also has about 1,200 members, mostly collectors, buyers and sellers, and history buffs, along with some individuals who simply support the cause. “We take care about 8,000 lookups for members and 3,000 to 4,000 factory letters for nonmembers each year,” Bennett said. For firearms of other brands, the office can also help people with questions. “If it is one we don’t have, we have a great staff that answers random questions, like explaining markings you don’t understand,” said Bennett, who describes herself as an archivist. “We’re there to help educate people and let them know about firearms history.” And more records are on the way. “We’re starting to get Ithaca records,” Bennett said. “Within the next year, we’ll be able to help with those.” Gun collectors don’t always just exhibit their guns. “One of our collectors has a group that hunts elk with their 1886 Winchester models,” Bennett said.


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February 10, 2017

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Teacher takes students hunting Lone Star Outdoor News The Falfurrias High School Agriculture Science department provided 10 students with their first hunting opportunity, thanks to the efforts of two teachers, Megan Kolbe and Oscar Galindo. “We teach how hunting is used as a wildlife management tool, and we teach hunter education as part of the program,” Kolbe said. “We wanted the kids to practice what we preach in class.” In 2015, Kolbe got in touch with the local game warden and he helped organize the hunt with one of the leases on the King Ranch. That wasn’t the only hurdle, though — school administration approval was needed. “I had to sit down with the principal and explain the program to her,” Kolbe said. “We preach safety all the time in class, and it’s important to teach the kids the proper use of a firearm, not the improper use. The hunt is very safe and in a controlled manner with the game wardens acting as mentors and guides. The hunt would give the kids an opportunity to learn all of the steps we

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teach them in class.” After the first hunt in the 20152016 season, the principal met with the kids and viewed all of the photos. “After the first year, she and the administration were on board,” Kolbe said. The students were required to compose an essay on how hunting is used as a wildlife management tool in order to become eligible to participate in the hunt. A few days before the December 2016 hunt, the students spend a day at the range, with the game wardens helping instruct them on safe firearm handling and accurate shooting. “Then, on the day of the hunt, we convoyed to the lease and met the lease manager. He explained the management practices, and then the kids headed out with the wardens to find a doe — we had wardens from six counties,” Kolbe said. Each of the students harvested a doe during this season’s hunt. “They come back with all kinds of cool, eye-opening experiences and a new appreciation for wildlife and the outdoors,” Kolbe said. “Most of our kids don’t have the opportunity to spend time out-

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side, away from town.” After the hunt, the students’ work began. “They were shown how to field dress the deer and how to cape and quarter them back at the camp,” Kolbe said. “The kids all helped and learned safety instructions on handling sharp knives.” Texas Parks and Wildlife biologist Cody Gann was on hand, and conducted a necropsy where the students learned about the deer’s digestive system and looked at the stomach contents. “It was an awesome day for the kids,” Kolbe said. “Allowing our youth to spend time outdoors and teaching them the ethics of hunting is a timeless tradition that will only continue if we work to pass it along — we plan to continue this tradition for years to come.”

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PRACTICING WHAT THEY LEARNED: Students from the Falfurrias High School Ag program each harvested a doe on a hunt organized by their teachers, Megan Kolbe and Oscar Galindo. Photos by Megan Kolbe.


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February 10, 2017

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Diver, puddler season over Continued from page 4

teal and gadwall.” From Matagorda to the Laguna Madre, the numbers of redhead ducks were reported as incredible, with the two-bird limit an easy task during the season’s second split. On the upper Texas coast, Mike Rezsutek at the J.D. Murphree Wildlife Management Area in Port Arthur said they never had a shortage of ducks. The WMA is known as a prime gadwall area. “Throughout the season, we had 3,970 hunters that harvested 12,593 ducks,” Rezsutek said. “Out of those ducks, 6,000 were gadwall and 3,000 were green-winged teal. Others included pintail, wigeon and spoonbill.” The flooded rice fields and plowed ground, between Beaumont and Winnie, held consistent numbers of ducks along with fair numbers of geese, according to guide Colby Denbow. “We had pretty steady hunts throughout the season,” he said. “My flooded fields had consistent numbers of teal, along with pintail and spoonies. It seemed like every time we ran low on birds we would get another push of fresh ducks in with the cold fronts.” Guide Tobin Copeland works for Mike Ladnier, who owns and operates Bay Prairie Outfitters in the Garwood area about 80 miles southwest of Houston. Overall, their

hunts weren’t great. Copeland says that he normally harvests about 500 ducks. This season it was down to 260. “Ladnier has been hunting this area for 38 years and says this was the worst season he’s ever had,” Copeland said. “At one point we had about 200 acres of water. Then we got about 14 inches of rain and all of a sudden we had over 1,000 acres of water. It spread the birds out and made our hunts very tough.” Ladnier said the lack of success wasn’t about a lack of habitat. “We have access to thousands of acres of prime waterfowl habitat that includes rice, corn, wheat, milo, soybean and rye grass fields,” he said. “It was just a very tough season for us.” Central Texas duck hunters were less than thrilled about this past season. Denny Copeland said they had a couple of good hunts with limits of mallards and pintail. But it was so hit and miss the hunting was totally unpredictable. “We would set up on a lake where we had scouted a good buildup of birds, come back the next morning and not fire a shot,” Copeland said. “We hunted lakes in Central Texas and traveled all the way up to the Red River on the Oklahoma/Texas border. “I was glad to see this season end.”

Deer disease response Continued from page 4

Neil Hernandez, a longtime hunter who used to own land in Medina County, said the state might make the situation worse by trying to contain CWD. Hernandez said letting the disease run its course would produce stronger genetics in the deer that survive. “My opinion is it’s a waste of money and resources,” he said. “Let nature take care of it.” Hernandez believes trying to stop the spread of the disease will simply prolong the process of natural selection. Jesse Adams, owner of Adams Land and Livestock in Medina County, is a whitetailed deer breeder. Since news of the finding was made public, Adams said he’s been getting at least three emails a day about it. “I do think Parks and Wildlife is blowing this thing out of proportion,” he said. “I think it’s been here all along.” Adams said that of the thousands of deer tested, the disease rarely shows up. Deer breeders understand all too well the headaches mandatory testing brings. “It’s a huge financial burden,” Adams said. To certify that his herd is clear of the disease, he had to kill 33 valuable deer and pay to have them tested as well. Live testing is available, but it’s even more costly, he said. Chad Foster, a hunter who lives in Uvalde County, said there’s a lot of speculation right now about how the discovery will impact the area. He thinks it could very well hurt landowners who want to lease or sell ranches depending on how long the state imposes emergency measures. Mark Hubbard, a real estate agent in the area, said if addition harvest regulations are imposed on land owners, it would negatively impact ranch values. Adams predicted the hunting industry in the three-county area will suffer. “Bureaucrats don’t think about that,” he said. Hunters will just find other areas to hunt because they don’t want to go through the hassle, Adams said. Fewer hunters would mean less business for hotels, meat processors, taxidermists and other dependent businesses. However, Adams say that state officials would argue that the steps they are taking is meant to help the hunting industry, a $2.2 billion economic engine supporting

many rural towns across the state. Rumors also abounded about whether the testing was reliable. But according to Dr. Bruce Akey, director of Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab where state testing takes place, there are procedures in place to assure testing accuracy. Hunters can send in cooled samples or formalin-preserved samples. Tests are compared to known positive and negative result with each run. And if a test comes back as “suspected” positive, the USDA national Lab in Ames, Iowa repeats the test. The national lab then determines if they agree or disagree with the state lab finding and makes the call. “We do everything for quality assurance,” Akey said. Fresh tissue samples are kept cool at the lab so they don’t deteriorate, and samples preserved in formalin, which is like formaldehyde, stop the tissue from rotting. The free-range whitetail that tested positive was killed around mid-December, Akey said. The results, including the second testing at the national lab, took about 4 weeks. The lab is expecting 8,000-10,000 samples from wild deer for this hunting season and hired more employees to help handle the demand, Akey said. A&M’s lab has shipped out tests to other testing facilities across the country to help deal with the load. However, only about seven state labs across the country perform CWD testing. Overall, the lab has performed some 40,000 tests of all types since July of 2015. Akey pointed out that only one sample tested positive out of many, which means there’s hope CWD can be contained. “If you find it early enough… I think you stand a chance of getting your arms around it and stopping it,” he said. Dr. Bob Dittmar, TPWD’s wildlife veterinarian, said in a news release that the state’s measures are part of a proactive epidemiological investigation. “Although the disease has been discovered in a free-ranging whitetail in this area, we cannot draw any conclusions at this time based on one detection,” Dittmar said. “The more effective we are at containing this disease within a limited geographic area, the better it will be for our wildlife resources and all those who enjoy them.”

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February 10, 2017

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FISHING

Drones moving beneath the surface

Angelina River crappie, sandies

Underwater use raises legality questions

NICE SLAB: Big crappie are biting and the white bass run is kicking off on the Angelina River north of Sam Rayburn Reservoir. Photo by Robert Sloan.

By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

HOW FAR WILL THIS GO? A Chinese company introduced a drone equipped with a sonar system that dives to 98 feet. The drone could allow a fisherman to motor a lure up to a fish’s mouth. Photo illustration by PowerVision.

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News This year promises to be one where government and private organizations overseeing fishing scramble to keep up with emerging technology. A Chinese company announced it will release an underwater drone this spring that will dive up to 98 feet while fitted with a sonar system allowing it to detect fish an additional 130 feet below

that. The PowerRay underwater drone will have a 12-megapixel camera that lets anglers not only get a look-see into fish movement but even document catches with 4-K quality video, according to the manufacturer, PowerVision. An internal Wi-Fi system will allow transmission of images and data up to 262 feet. An attachment would even let anglers motor a lure right up to a fish’s mouth.

PowerVision gave techno enthusiasts a preview of the underwater drone in January at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The technology is so new that many people, and agencies, are unaware of it. For example, an International Game Fish Association spokesman told LSON that it’s unclear at this point what would happen if an angler used an underwater drone to help catch a trophy fish. Please turn to page 15

Snapper, wahoo offshore when seas calm

Lone Star Outdoor News Offshore anglers are getting anxious. With duck and deer seasons over, they scan the skies and watch the weather forecast, hoping for a calm day. Mike Kubecka of Reel Rush Charters found such a day last week, and headed out 120 miles from Matagorda Harbor. “We caught five yellowfin tuna and two swordfish,” Kubecka said. “The first sword was 350 pounds, we caught him on the first drop. The next one was 100 pounds

on the second drop.” After landing the yellowfin, it was time to return home. “We had filled the coolers up with fish, we didn’t have any more room,” he said. His next trip? “Whenever it’s calm,” Kubecka said. “As soon as there is a good day, everyone is headed out to fish.” Kubecka tries to avoid red snapper when heading offshore, but will target them closer to home. “We can take the bay boat out six miles or so from Matagorda,” he

said. Kubecka said he is hearing reports of wahoo being landed at the Flower Gardens. The Winter Wahoo Championship, a boat tournament with 15 competitors held at Freeport Marina, runs from Jan. 2 through March 31, and early results show good fish being caught. Team Reelin N Dealin, with three fish totaling 182.2 pounds, is currently in the lead. Trips out of Port Mansfield with Osprey Cruises have resulted in good catches of red snapper.

Some parts of the Angelina River above and below Sam Rayburn Lake are remote, while others are easily accessible. And the crappie and white bass fishing is excellent. “I’ve been fishing the Angelina for years,” said Bill Fondren, a well-known crappie and white bass fishing guide on Rayburn and the Sabine and Angelina rivers. “This is the best time of year to be fishing the upper reaches of this river. It’s so isolated that you don’t normally see too many boats north of Rayburn.” February is the time to head to the Angelina. “The white bass fishing is good on the upper reaches of the Angelina during February and March,” Fondren said. “The water below the Sam Rayburn dam and on down to the Bevelport boat ramp is considered to be one of the most scenic areas of water in the Pineywoods.” The lower areas of the Angelina provide excellent year-round fishing for white bass, crappie, largemouth bass, perch and catfish. But if you’re looking to catch a box of crappie, the area of the river above Sam Rayburn is the place to be. “I made a trip to the river above Rayburn about the middle of January and we loaded up with crappie,” Fondren said. “I’m not talking little crappie either. We had 68 and most of them were in the 2-pound class.” On another recent trip to that same stretch of water Fondren and friends caught 48 white bass and 20 nice crappie. Fondren launches his boat on a backwoods road that requires the use of a four-wheel drive vehicle. From there he runs up the river a mile or so. The Angelina white bass run is not nearly as popular as what you’ll find on the Sabine, but it’s definitely worth a shot. The number one lure is a 1/4-ounce Road Runner with a silver blade and orange head. If the water is muddy, a black/chartreuse pattern is best. Another good lure is a micro-spinnerbait with silver blade. Fondren said he’s been doing best for whites and crappie on the Angelina with white/pink or white/chartreuse Road Runners. But if he’s targeting crappie, he’ll tip a jig with a live shiner. “What I’ll do is pitch the jig and shiner combination up to brush and along logs,” he said. “I’ll slowly fish it over that type of structure in about 4 to 6 feet. Even though the water is cold, the crappie will thump a jig or spinner pretty hard. It’s fun fishing on ultra-light spinning gear.”

Please turn to page 11

Ray Roberts to receive Florida bass fingerlings By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

After a long wait, Lake Ray Roberts is scheduled to get a booster shot for big bass this spring much to the delight of the reservoir’s fishing clientele. Dan Bennett, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Inland

Fisheries Denison district supervisor, said the lake is scheduled to receive 230,000 Florida largemouth bass fingerlings in May. It will be the first time since 2013, when the lake received more than 500,000 bass fingerlings, that it has been stocked. “That’s good news. It’s been too long,” said guide Jim Wall-

ing. Walling, who runs Ucatchem Guide Service, has guided on the lake for 27 years. While the lake suffered a few years back during the drought, he has seen it bounce back thanks to abundant rainfall. An infusion of Florida bass that have genetics to produce bass weighing double digits Please turn to page 19

OVERDUE: Lake Ray Roberts is scheduled to receive 230,000 Florida bass fingerlings in May. Photo by TPWD.


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water stained to muddy in the river; 46 degrees; 1.67’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie and bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on punch bait up the river. AMISTAD: Water murky; 65–69 degrees; 19.80’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits, jigging spoons and soft plastics. Striped bass are good on watermelon slabs and jigging spoons. White bass are good on slabs and jigging spoons. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 49–56 degrees; 0.68’ low. Black bass are fair on finesse jigs, Texas rigs and slow-rolled spinner baits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 54–58 degrees; 0.33’ high. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged worms, bladed jigs and weightless flukes. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BASTROP: Water stained; 61– 65 degrees. Black bass are fair on watermelon red soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and shrimp. BELTON: Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 0.39’ high. Black bass are good on crankbaits, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows under lights at night. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and hot dogs. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 55–58 degrees; 0.24’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, bladed jigs and weightless stick baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 53–57 degrees; 2.90’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good drifting cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits and dark soft plastic worms in the reeds. Striped bass are good down-rigging silver and gold spoons and marble spinners near the dam. Redfish are slow. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp and cut bait. Blue catfish are good on cut bait. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 54–57 degrees: 0.19’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 0.35’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits, jigs and crankbaits along shorelines. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and minnows. Crappie are fair on Li’l Fishies and tube jigs over brush piles. Catfish are slow. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 1.99’ low. Black bass are fair on Carolina-rigged watermelon creature baits and blue flake stick baits on jigheads in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are fair trolling chartreuse jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows over brush piles in

12–18 feet. Catfish are slow. CADDO: Water stained; 55–59 degrees; 0.50’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits and bladed jigs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms, spinner baits and crankbaits around reed beds. Striped bass are fair on spoons and jigs near the crappie wall. Redfish are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver, minnows and cheese bait near the railroad trestle. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 62–65 degrees; 0.48’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse hair jigs, Carolina-rigged lizards, and Texas-rigged blue flake worms along break lines and ledges. Striped bass are good on white jigs and Spoiler Shads. White bass are fair jigging bladed lures in the main river channel. Smallmouth bass are fair to good on smoke/red flake tubes over rock piles in 10–20 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs upriver. Catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water stained; 54–57 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are slow on lipless crankbaits, spinner baits and bladed jigs. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows, Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 19.96’ low. Black bass are fair on heavy jigs and large crankbaits over grass. White bass are good on small spinner baits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on punch bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 1.26’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel catfish are good on stink bait and frozen shrimp. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 76 degrees at the hot water discharge, 65 degrees in main lake; 1.87’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics and crankbaits in 8–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live perch in 8–12 feet. CONROE: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.05’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on stink bait and shrimp. FAIRFIELD: Water lightly stained; 65–71 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits and bladed jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. FALCON: Water murky; 62–66 degrees; 31.98’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and soft plastics. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are very good on frozen shrimp and cut bait.

FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and Ra lipless crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live bait. FORK: Water lightly stained; 55–58 degrees; 2.27’ low. Black bass are fair on square-billed crankbaits, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White and yellow bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows near bridges. Catfish are fair on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 50–56 degrees; 0.26’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs and slow-rolled spinner baits with a Colorado blade. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are good on silver/blue lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.03’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon and watermelon red soft plastics, spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and nightcrawlers. GRANGER: Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 1.03’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on shad upriver. Crappie are fair upriver under lights at night. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits and on juglines baited with cut bait and Zote soap. GRAPEVINE: Water stained; 53–56 degrees; 0.25’ high. Black bass are fair on jerkbaits in mat shad, shallow crankbaits and bladed jigs in shad patterns. White bass and hybrid bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on prepared bait and rod and reel. GREENBELT: 31’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow-running crankbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 59–63 degrees; 0.23’ high. Black bass are fair on black and red soft plastic worms in 5–15 feet, and on black jigs around stumps. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs near the dam and around piers. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on juglines and in creek channels. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-color; 51–55 degrees; 0.48’ low. Black bass are fair on black/ blue jigs, chatterbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 54–57 degrees; 0.03’ high. Black bass are fair on

weightless stick baits, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 56–58 degrees: 1.00’ high. Black bass are good on spinner baits, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White bass are slow on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 55–58 degrees: 2.83’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse jigs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. LBJ: Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 4.81’ low. Black bass are fair on green pumpkin tubes and pumpkinseed drop-shot worms along docks and seawalls. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on Spoiler Shad and silver minnow biats near the power plant. Crappie are good on minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on minnows and worms. LEWISVILLE: Water stained; 53–56 degrees; 0.06’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 0.36’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on small spinner baits and soft plastics. Crappie are fair on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad. MACKENZIE: 73.68’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 82–85 degrees; 1.10’ low. Black bass are fair on weightless flukes, bladed jigs and Texas-rigged creature baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are slow. Catfish are fair on trotlines. MEREDITH: 60.46’ low. Reports of black bass are rare. No reports of smallmouth bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 81–85 degrees; 0.71’ high. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, flipping jigs and Texasrigged creature baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are slow. NASWORTHY: 49–55 degrees; 1.44’ low. Black bass are fair to good on jigs, Texas rigs and crankbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.25’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and pet spoons. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and nightcrawlers. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 49–56 degrees; 33.6’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, swim jigs and shaky heads. Crappie

are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 48–56 degrees; 8.91’ low. Black bass are fair on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 53–57 degrees; 0.15’ high. Black bass are good on finesse jigs, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 48–55 degrees; 0.05’ high. Black bass are fair to good on drop-shot rigs, Texas rigs and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 59–63 degrees; 0.23’ low. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on juglines baited with cut shad. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 55–57 degrees; 0.18’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow. RAY ROBERTS: Water stained; 53–57 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and punch bait. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 53–56 degrees; 0.25’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are slow on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 1.53’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Bream are good on worms. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and stink bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 61–65 degrees; 1.93’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and nightcrawlers. STAMFORD: 0.36’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on minnows and Rooster Tails. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 59–63 degrees; 0.49’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastic worms and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 11

and blue catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 55–58 degrees; 2.67’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. TEXOMA: Water stained; 52–56 degrees; 0.04’ low. Black bass are good on suspending jerkbaits, umbrella rigs and weightless flukes. Crappie are fair on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 2.56’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon red soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Bream are fair on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on live bait, frozen shrimp and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 1.92’ high. Black bass are good on chrome spoons, black worms and chartreuse crankbaits in 20–35 feet. Striped bass are fair on shad crankbaits in 30–50 feet. White bass are good on minnows and white grubs in 30–50 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and blood bait. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on crickets and shrimp at the gravel pit. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 45–52 degrees; 19.59’ low. Black bass are very slow.. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 3.06’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits, spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are fair on small spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and stink bait.

—TPWD


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Heading offshore Continued from page 8

Capt. Ruby Delgado, who usually fishes in the bay, was on a recent trip and landed snapper limits with friends. Other offshore anglers had their fill of snapper. On 2coolfishing.com, yakin ag posted results from a trip to state water rigs out from Port O’Connor, where he fished at a depth of 200 feet. “My father-in-law and I left out of POC yesterday morning and ran out to the Dunbar area. At several bottom spots and the rigs we could catch nothing but red snapper. Live bait, dead bait, jigs — all equaled snapper. I was hoping to find some amberjack.”

HS teams headed to national championship The John B. Connally High School duo of Jeffrey Padavick of Austin and Matthew McMillan of Pflugerville, landed a five-bass limit weighing 16 pounds, 10 ounces, to win the 2017 FLW/TBF High School Fishing Texas State Championship tournament on Sam Rayburn Reservoir. The win advanced the team to the 2017 High School Fishing National championship, held June 27-July 1 at Pickwick Lake in Florence, Alabama. A field of 77 teams competed, and the top 10-percent of teams competing advance to the national championship. Other qualifiers to the 2017 High School Fishing National Championship: Lake Travis High School – Abbi Gass, Spicewood, and Mark Lackey, Austin, (15 pounds, 2 ounces) Huntington High School– River Johnson, Lufkin and Brenton Peters, Huntington (14 pounds, 8 ounces) Regents High School – Brian Arabie and Hunter Jackson, both of Austin, (13 pounds, 1 ounce) Kirbyville High School – Braden Berryman, Kirbyville and Kenneth Pickett, Call, (12 pounds, 2 ounces) Rains High School – River Lee, Normangee, and Thomas Martin, Jewett, (11 pounds, 11 ounces) Magnolia West High School – Cameron Carter, Magnolia, and Aaron Batten, Houston, (10 pounds, 15 ounces) —FLW Outdoors

w e N

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 10, 2017

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good on the Louisiana shoreline on top-waters and Corkies. Flounder are fair on jigs tipped with shrimp around marsh drains. SOUTH SABINE: Redfish are good in the cuts leading to the marsh. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Trout are fair to good while dredging the reef on soft plastics. BOLIVAR: Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on soft plastics and plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Trout are fair good for drifters working mud and shell on Bass Assassins, Gamblers, Lil Johns and Corkies. Redfish are fair at the Spillway on crabs and shrimp. Trout are fair to good in the marsh. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good in the guts on Corkies and MirrOlures. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair to good for waders working shorelines at sunset. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Redfish are good in the cuts leading to the back lakes on shrimp and scented plastics. TEXAS CITY: Black drum and redfish are fair to good at the mouth of Moses Lake on shrimp and crabs. Sheepshead are fair on shrimp under a popping cork around the rock groins.

FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Black drum and redfish are good at the jetties on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters over mud and shell on live shrimp and plastics. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for waders working the soft guts on plastics. Redfish are fair to good

on the edge of Oyster Lake on shrimp and crabs. Black drum and redfish are fair to good at the jetty on crabs. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair on soft plastics over soft mud. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the mouths of back lakes on soft plastics. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair to good in the deep cuts on free-lined shrimp. Redfish are good in California Hole on natural baits. Trout are fair on the edge of the shrimp boat channel on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp. Trout are fair at the mouths of guts on the outgoing tide. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are fair to good in the guts in Oso Bay on scented plastics. Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on scented plastics and live shrimp. Black drum and redfish are fair to good in the channels on crabs. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good in the Land Cut on glow plastics. Trout are fair to good for waders working rocks and mud on Corkies. Trout are fair to good on soft plastics on the drops adjacent to the ICW. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are fair to good on Corkies and MirrOlures around sand, grass and mud. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes with scented plastics. SOUTH PADRE: Trout are fair to good around the spoil islands and edges of channels on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics under popping corks. Black drum, sheepshead, mangrove snapper and redfish are fair on shrimp at the jetty. PORT ISABEL: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the flats adjacent to deep water on scented plastics and live shrimp. Black drum and redfish are fair in the channel on shrimp and crabs. —TPWD

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Page 12

February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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GAME WARDEN BLOTTER SUN DOWN, GUNS UP Game wardens in Trinity and Angelina counties investigated a tip about hunters shooting ducks after legal hours along the Neches River, but by the time they arrived on the scene the shooting had stopped and they were unable to locate the suspects. Based on the tip, there were two groups hunting after hours; one on each side of the Neches River. Believing the suspects might attempt to repeat their actions the following evening, Trinity County game wardens set up surveillance on the Trinity County side of the Neches and an Angelina County game warden set up on the Angelina County side of the river. Wardens waited and listened for shots and once the shooting began again well after legal hours, wardens were able to pinpoint the suspects’ location on the Trinity County side. All three wardens converged and made contact with four individuals. Cases for hunting waterfowl after legal hours, possession of lead shot, and no hunter’s education were filed as well as civil restitution. It was determined that this was one of the groups hunting late the day before. A BOAT FULL OF TROUBLE A Shelby County game warden received a call about duck hunters trespassing and hunting without landowner consent. Upon the warden’s arrival, the hunters quickly fled the area but left behind decoys on the water and a small vessel. Further inspection of the scene revealed empty lead shotshells, which are illegal for hunting waterfowl. The warden also found corn scattered around the area, indicat-

TRIED AND UNTRUE A Frio County game warden patrolling an area for illegal road hunting activity came upon a vehicle driving slowly and erratically. After observing the driver periodically position his vehicle broadside in the road and shine his headlights into ranch pastures, the warden made a traffic stop. The driver had a loaded rifle in the seat next to him and admitted to hunting from the road, but denied shooting anything. The warden issued a citation for hunting from a public roadway and cut him loose.

ing illegal baiting of waterfowl. A quick call to dispatch returned a registered owner and address for the vessel, which wasn’t far from the scene. The warden was able to quickly locate and make contact with the subjects. Charges and restitution are pending for trespassing, hunting over bait, hunting waterfowl with unplugged shotguns, and illegal use of lead shot. COLD AND ALONE A Houston County game warden was contacted by the Houston County Sheriff’s Office one evening in regards to a lost hunter. The hunter had been out all day and failed to return to his hunting camp in the Davy Crockett National Forest. Since the temperature was below freezing, a Department of Public Safety helicopter was called to assist in the search. The helicopter located the subject at 2 a.m. and kept a spotlight on the subject while the game warden and another first responder walked in to make contact. The hunter had injured his ankle and was very cold, but other-

A few hours later, the warden received a call from a ranch manager and advised that he had found a dead 10-point buck that appeared to have been shot from the same road where he had just issued the citation. The warden made contact with the road hunter and during the interview the driver admitted to shooting the buck the night before and had gone back out in hopes of shooting another buck. Charges and civil restitution pending.

wise OK. Paramedics were called to the scene to assess the hunter. INSISTING NO ASSIST Game wardens conducting surveillance along a county road one night observed a pickup driving slowly and making several U-turns. The vehicle came to a stop on the side of the road about 100 yards from where the wardens were set up. Wardens then heard a shot fired, followed by sounds of a tailgate opening and then close a few minutes later. After the vehicle pulled back onto the roadway and began speeding away from the scene, wardens initiated a traffic stop and made contact with the driver, who admitted to shooting the 8-point buck loaded in the truck bed. He claimed the passenger in the truck was his girlfriend and had not assisted him in any way. Another warden approached the girlfriend and asked if she held the antlers or legs while loading the buck. She indicated that she had held onto the antlers while they loaded the deer into the truck.

The wardens educated the couple, ages 21 and 17, about the multiple violations they’d committed. Charges and civil restitution for the 8-point buck are pending for both hunters. SORTING IT ALL OUT A Jack County game warden observed a deer hanging from a skinning rack at a residence and upon entering the property observed five hunters and nine additional deer on the ground nearby. A huge case of shuffling paper trails followed. Initially, it was determined that four of the deer had not been tagged. The warden then asked to see hunting licenses that, coincidentally, all five said they had left inside the residence. After a short while, one of the subjects exited the home with a completed tag for one of the deer and explained that he had filled it out in the field but forgot to attach it to the deer. The only problem was that the guy failed to allow the ink to dry before handing the tag to the warden. At that point the warden confronted

the others inside of the home where they were scrambling to fill out tags and harvest logs. The warden collected all the paperwork and began to sort through it. During his investigation, the warden determined that of the five remaining deer, three were falsely tagged by a hunter who had lost his license and decided to use his brother’s tags instead. Two other hunters were attempting to use tags belonging to individuals who weren’t present and another hunter couldn’t explain why a buck tag was missing from her license because she had only harvested a doe earlier in the season. Her husband then confessed to harvesting an illegal buck on opening weekend and using her tag. He then admitted to harvesting a larger buck the following weekend and tagging it with his tag. The other individual not present was then contacted by phone and asked why he had left his hunting license behind. He said he no longer had a need for it and left it behind for the others to use. In total, 20 citations/warnings were issued in addition to numerous verbal warnings including: untagged deer, improperly tagged deer, failure to display hunting license, harvest log violation, illegal buck harvest, allowing another to hunt under a license, and hunting under the license of another. Cases are pending.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263

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Photo Courtesy of

Bob Zaiglin

1(800)-870-4463 Uvalde, Texas


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Bass club helps add fish habitat in Stamford Reservoir At Stamford Reservoir near Abilene, the local Friends of Reservoirs organization, the Still Waters Bass Club and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Inland Fisheries staff placed 150 donated Christmas trees as fish attractors Jan. 28. “The goal is to give our anglers the opportunity to catch more fish,” said TPWD Inland Fisheries assistant biologist Natalie Goldstrohm. “And it’s really great because if you’re new to town or new to the lake and you’re looking for an opportunity to go fishing and you’re not quite sure where to go, if you look at the TPWD website you will find places around the reservoir that you know are good spots.” Goldstrohm said recent drought and a golden algae fish kill made Stamford Reservoir a special case in need of assistance. “When the lake was so low, we saw that there wasn’t a ton of habitat in some of the

lower water depths,” she said. TPWD staff and the bass club sourced the trees from local vendors, who donated what they didn’t sell after Christmas. Members of the bass club also worked with local businesses to gather enough cinder blocks to help sink the Christmas trees in the marked locations and help them stay put. Before dropping trees in the lake, TPWD staff identified 15 spots with the ideal depth of between 13-23 feet; gentle slope to avoid the trees moving from their specified locations; limited natural habitat; and safe locations on the lake that will benefit tournament and recreational anglers. The bass club helped provide the manpower in tying 150 Christmas trees to 75 cinder blocks and delivering them to 16 locations on the lake by boat. —TPWD

Matsuba, Mire take TXTT opener Relying on two productive spots, local anglers Ben Matsubu and Brannon Mire pried over 28 pounds from the brush, clinching the 2017 Texas Team Trail season opener, presented by Cabela’s. At 11 a.m., Matsubu and Mire were struggling with no quality keepers in their livewell. After running way up north toward the Highway 103 Bridge, Matsubu and Mire observed dirty water and realized they had wasted even more time. With their backs against the wall, the two decided to roll the dice on a pair of historically productive deep brush piles. “We caught an 8-pounder at about 11:30 and shortly after got a 7 1/2,” recalled Matsubu, the former Bassmaster Elite Series champion. “Then we went to the other spot and caught a 4-pounder and a 7-pounder. “We’ve been fishing these same spots for five years and we’ve won so much money on them,” added Matsubu. “And the incredible thing is that we still have them all to ourselves.”

Matsubu used a 5/8-ounce Talon football jig paired with a Yamamoto Hula Grub. His best color combinations were cinnamon purple and green pumpkin. Mire employed a similarlysized Biffle Bug in watermelon. TXTT rookies Ronnie Bland of Indian Creek, Texas, and Malcolm Franks of Florien, Louisiana, finished second with a five-bass limit weighing 26.42 pounds. Stephen Johnston and Dan Wilson took third with 23.47 pounds, earning $7,735. In fourth place with 22.20 pounds were Mark Richard and Gary Osbourne. Behind them were Nick Diberardino and Shane Howell with 21.80 pounds. For winning the season opener, Matsubu and Mire claimed a new boat and motor package — a Stratos 189VLO with a 225-horsepower Mercury outboard and $3,555 of Anglers Advantage cash. —TXTT

February 10, 2017

Page 13


Page 14

February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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HEROES

Allegra Flores, 13, of Laredo, shot a big buck off their family ranch in Webb County using a .308.

Casen Cox, 8 of Adkins, got his birthday present early with a hunting trip to West Texas for mule deer and quail in December. He bagged a 10-point buck with his .243 and some quail with his 20-gauge shotgun.

Patricio Ramirez caught this redfish on a Homewrecker topwater lure.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

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Ethan Morris took a nice buck during muzzleloader season in Hunt County at 60 yards away.

William Torres, 10 of Austin, waited patiently for his monster buck. Torres took his shot at 100 yards with the 6.5 Grendel.

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Intersex bass Continued from page 1

Low levels of dissolved oxygen and warming water temperatures are other factors that scientists have broached as contributing to intersex. Also, fish exposed to a diabetic drug in labs have developed intersex characteristics. While Metformin is not a hormone, tests indicate it may be an endocrine disruptor: a chemical that disturbs the hormonal system. That can foul up reproduction, among other things. Despite the sensational nature of intersex fish, the condition has reaped more headlines than funding. The most intensive study is occurring in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. At some spots there, almost 100 percent of the male fish are intersex. As in Texas, bass have been found to be most at risk. “Across the country, we’ve seen that largemouth and smallmouth bass have a greater prevalence of intersex,” Tillitt said. “We don’t know if that has to do with their sensitivity or what.” A Texas Parks and Wildlife Department official said he knows of no study done by the agency on intersex fish. One TPWD biologist told LSON that he doesn’t see it as a public health threat. Randy Myers noted that he had eaten a Rio Grande bass recently. “Yesterday, I ate a bass from the Rio Grande drainage (Casa Blanca) and will eat them again,” Myers said. A USGS official reported that most of the chemicals causing intersex in fish do not accumulate in muscle tissue, which, she added, is “obviously what we’re eating.” Some scientists, though, argue the safety of eating intersex fish is unknown. A smallmouth bass die-off in 2003 led to the discovery of intersex fish. Scientists

could not determine the extent of the disorder’s culpability. Tillitt hazards a guess that intersex could potentially play a part in everything from killing fish to limiting their growth. “If intersex is due to estrogenic chemicals, then you can expect that the fish might have a compromised immune function as well,” he said. “That could mean fish kills or more disease outbreaks. And when a fish is putting energy toward fighting disease or a compromised immune system, then it doesn’t have the energy to put toward growth.” A Canadian study published in January offers hope of curtailing the numbers of intersex fish, at least in some areas. When a wastewater treatment plant on the Grand River upgraded to reduce the presence of toxic ammonia, the process also reduced the presence of endocrine disruptors in the water, the study found. The numbers of intersex fish among rainbow darters fell dramatically. “Once the water quality was improved, there was an almost immediate response (one year),” said professor Mark Servos, who headed the University of Waterloo study. “Within the three years of the study, the intersex in darters was at background levels.” Neither Servos nor Tillitt is proclaiming what happened in Canada as the cure for intersex. But it does show the ability of fish to respond for the better if given a little help. “Fish have been around for a long time,” Tillitt said. “They wouldn’t have been around for a long time if they had not been adaptive.”


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February 10, 2017

Page 15

Drones down under Continued from page 8

“Typically, if something new like this comes up, our staff will study it and come up with a recommendation, then it’s vetted through our rules committee and then presented to our board,” said Jason Schratwieser, IGFA conservation director. “If it’s something that becomes prevalent, we might have to take a look at it.” Schratwieser said his gut feeling is that using an underwater drone to scout for fish would not disqualify a record catch. “At first blush, it’s no different than radar or sonar,” he said. “It’s just an additional way to determine where the fish are.” Aerial drones are already used for fishing, doing everything from carrying fishing line out from the surf to scouting for fish. They’ve generated little controversy — although the six-figure-stakes Florida Keys Dolphin Championship and Final

Sail tournaments banned aerial drones, a spokesman stating that they give users a competitive advantage. As far as the permissibility of using underwater drones in Texas, a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department official said the subject hasn’t come up. He checked with the agency’s legal department, however, which gave him a yes and no response. Scouting for fish with an underwater drone would be OK. However, using the PowerRay’s attachment to present bait to a fish would be illegal. “It would be illegal in Texas because it’s not an eligible gear,” said Mark Lingo, coastal fisheries science and policy branch chief. “You can use a hook and line for some species, for example, and spearfish for others. But using a drone to fish isn’t in there. Therefore, it would be illegal means.

You may come up with some new magic to catch fish, but it’s illegal until we address it.” In a bit of a switch, using an underwater drone for fishing would probably be allowable in federal waters. Scouting with the drone wouldn’t be a problem. And, in most circumstances, neither would using it to present bait, said Sean Meehan, southeast recreational fishing coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “As long as you’re using a legal rod and reel, which is what the bait is attached to, it would be allowable,” said Meehan, who checked with NOAA’s legal department. “You’re just using a motorized robot to haul it around.” An avid fisherman — he fished in the 66th Annual Hemingway Fishing Tourna-

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ment in Cuba — Meehan said he would like to try out an underwater drone. “It would be cool to see how a lure swims underwater,” he said. “It might make me a better fisherman. Can I change the presentation of the jig? What can I do to make it more effective?” Meehan, however, thinks anglers will be far more likely to use an underwater drone for scouting than fishing. “I don’t know if it would cover enough water to be effective for fishing,” he said. The biggest limitation to using an underwater drone for fishing could end up being its cost. A spokesman for PowerVision told the website Tom’s Guide the price would be in the $2,000-$3,000 range.

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February 10, 2017

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TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Last

New

First

Full

Feb. 18

Feb. 26

Mar. 5

Mar. 12

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13 Mon 14 Tue 15 Wed 16 Thu 17 Fri 18 Sat 19 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 Wed 23 Thu 24 Fri

10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13 Mon 14 Tue 15 Wed 16 Thu

4:31 5:24 6:17 7:09 8:01 8:51 9:40

17 Fri 18 Sat 19 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 Wed 23 Thu 24 Fri

4:25 10:38 5:18 11:31 6:11 ----7:04 12:52 7:55 1:44 8:45 2:34 9:34 3:23 10:21 4:10 11:07 4:56 11:52 5:41 12:13 6:25 12:57 7:09 1:41 7:53 2:25 8:38 3:11 9:24

4:52 11:05 5:44 ----6:35 12:23 7:27 1:15 8:18 2:06 9:07 2:56 9:56 3:45 10:43 4:32 11:30 5:19 ----- 6:04 12:37 6:49 1:21 7:34 2:06 8:18 2:51 9:03 3:37 9:50

07:04 07:03 07:03 07:02 07:01 07:00 06:59 06:58 06:57 06:56 06:55 06:55 06:54 06:53 06:52

06:05 06:06 06:07 06:08 06:08 06:09 06:10 06:11 06:12 06:12 06:13 06:14 06:15 06:15 06:16

6:04p 6:43a 7:05p 7:27a 8:03p 8:07a 9:00p 8:45a 9:54p 9:21a 10:48p 9:55a 11:40p 10:30a NoMoon 11:06a 12:33a 11:44a 1:24a 12:24p 2:15a 1:07p 3:06a 1:55p 3:55a 2:46p 4:42a 3:41p 5:28a 4:38p

10:44 11:37 12:05 12:58 1:50 2:40 3:29

4:58 11:11 5:50 ----6:41 12:29 7:33 1:21 8:23 2:12 9:13 3:02 10:02 3:51

07:14 07:13 07:12 07:11 07:10 07:09 07:08

10:27 4:16

10:49

4:38

07:07 06:13 NoMoon 11:08a

11:13 11:58 12:19 1:03 1:47 2:31 3:17

11:36 ----12:43 1:27 2:12 2:57 3:43

5:24 6:10 6:55 7:39 8:24 9:09 9:55

07:06 07:05 07:04 07:03 07:02 07:01 07:00

5:02 5:47 6:31 7:15 7:59 8:44 9:30

06:07 06:08 06:09 06:10 06:11 06:11 06:12 06:14 06:15 06:16 06:17 06:18 06:18 06:19

6:06p 7:08p 8:08p 9:05p 10:01p 10:56p 11:50p 12:43a 1:35a 2:27a 3:17a 4:06a 4:53a 5:38a

6:53a 7:36a 8:15a 8:52a 9:26a 10:00a 10:34a 11:45a 12:25p 1:08p 1:55p 2:46p 3:42p 4:40p

San Antonio 2017 Feb.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13 Mon 14 Tue 15 Wed 16 Thu 17 Fri 18 Sat 19 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 Wed 23 Thu 24 Fri

4:37 10:51 5:30 11:43 6:24 12:11 7:16 1:04 8:07 1:56 8:58 2:47 9:46 3:35 10:34 4:23 11:20 5:09 ----- 5:53 12:26 6:38 1:09 7:22 1:53 8:06 2:38 8:51 3:24 9:36

5:04 5:56 6:48 7:39 8:30 9:20 10:08 10:56 11:42 12:05 12:49 1:34 2:18 3:03 3:49

11:18 ----12:36 1:28 2:19 3:09 3:57 4:45 5:31 6:16 7:01 7:46 8:31 9:16 10:02

07:16 07:15 07:14 07:14 07:13 07:12 07:11 07:10 07:09 07:08 07:07 07:07 07:06 07:05 07:04

06:18 06:19 06:20 06:21 06:21 06:22 06:23 06:24 06:25 06:25 06:26 06:27 06:28 06:28 06:29

6:18p 6:55a 7:18p 7:39a 8:16p 8:20a 9:13p 8:58a 10:07p 9:34a 11:00p 10:08a 11:53p 10:43a NoMoon 11:19a 12:45a 11:57a 1:36a 12:38p 2:27a 1:21p 3:18a 2:09p 4:07a 3:00p 4:54a 3:55p 5:40a 4:52p

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Feb. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13 Mon 14 Tue 15 Wed 16 Thu 17 Fri 18 Sat 19 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 Wed 23 Thu 24 Fri

4:51 11:04 5:44 11:57 6:37 12:25 7:30 1:18 8:21 2:10 9:11 3:00 10:00 3:49 10:47 4:36 11:33 5:22 ----- 6:07 12:39 6:51 1:23 7:35 2:07 8:19 2:51 9:04 3:37 9:50

5:18 6:10 7:01 7:53 8:43 9:33 10:22 11:09 11:56 12:18 1:03 1:47 2:32 3:17 4:03

11:31 ----12:49 1:41 2:32 3:22 4:11 4:58 5:44 6:30 7:15 7:59 8:44 9:29 10:16

07:38 07:37 07:36 07:35 07:34 07:33 07:32 07:31 07:29 07:28 07:27 07:26 07:25 07:24 07:22

06:23 06:24 06:25 06:26 06:27 06:28 06:29 06:30 06:31 06:32 06:33 06:34 06:35 06:36 06:37

6:24p 7:17a 7:27p 8:00a 8:27p 8:38a 9:26p 9:13a 10:23p 9:47a 11:19p 10:19a NoMoon 10:52a 12:13a 11:26a 1:07a 12:02p 2:01a 12:41p 2:53a 1:24p 3:43a 2:11p 4:32a 3:02p 5:19a 3:58p 6:03a 4:57p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Time 1:41 AM 2:34 AM 3:27 AM 4:22 AM 5:21 AM 12:21 AM 1:14 AM 2:11 AM 3:08 AM 4:05 AM 4:59 AM 5:48 AM 6:33 AM 12:02 AM 12:46 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.2H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.3L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L 1.1H 1.2H

Time 8:48 AM 9:33 AM 10:16 AM 10:58 AM 11:39 AM 6:31 AM 7:58 AM 9:47 AM 11:34 AM 12:51 PM 1:40 PM 2:14 PM 2:41 PM 7:16 AM 7:56 AM

Height -0.8L -0.6L -0.4L -0.2L 0.1L 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H -0.4L -0.4L

Time 4:19 PM 4:54 PM 5:28 PM 6:00 PM 6:31 PM 12:21 PM 1:06 PM 2:01 PM 3:29 PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.9L

Time 9:19 PM 10:01 PM 10:45 PM 11:32 PM

Height 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L

7:01 7:30 7:58 8:28

1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

7:46 7:32 7:36 3:06 3:30

0.9L 1.0L 0.9L 1.3H 1.3H

10:22 PM 11:15 PM

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7:54 PM 8:21 PM

0.9L 0.8L

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Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 1:42 AM 2:43 AM 3:40 AM 4:32 AM 5:27 AM 12:27 AM 1:19 AM 2:15 AM 3:11 AM 4:10 AM 5:09 AM 5:59 AM 6:41 AM 7:20 AM 12:24 AM

Height 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.5L 1.0H

Time 9:02 AM 9:51 AM 10:34 AM 11:12 AM 11:49 AM 6:42 AM 8:22 AM 9:50 AM 11:41 AM 1:11 PM 2:07 PM 2:48 PM 3:18 PM 3:42 PM 8:00 AM

Height -0.8L -0.7L -0.5L -0.3L 0.0L 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H -0.5L

Time 4:43 PM 5:13 PM 5:42 PM 6:11 PM 6:39 PM 12:27 PM 1:14 PM 2:33 PM 5:18 PM

Height 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.2L 0.4L 0.6L 0.8L

Time 10:16 PM 10:44 PM 11:12 PM 11:46 PM

Height 0.7L 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L

7:05 7:25 7:42 8:01

0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

8:43 PM 9:13 PM 4:03 PM

0.9L 0.9L 1.2H

11:06 PM

0.9H

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0.8L

Height 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L 0.6H

Time 9:57 AM 10:45 AM 11:29 AM 5:00 AM 5:58 AM 7:17 AM 8:52 AM 6:23 PM 3:49 PM 4:17 PM 4:32 PM 3:48 PM 4:10 PM 4:32 PM 8:59 AM

Height -0.6L -0.5L -0.4L 0.6H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H -0.4L

Time 5:38 PM 5:57 PM 6:12 PM 12:09 PM 12:49 PM 1:26 PM 1:08 PM

Height 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H -0.2L 0.0L 0.2L 0.3L

Time 11:12 PM 11:43 PM

Height 0.4L 0.3L

6:30 6:53 7:16 7:32

0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H

10:21 PM 4:49 PM

0.6L 0.8H

Height 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L 1.1H -0.2L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L

Time 8:34 AM 9:24 AM 10:13 AM 10:57 AM 5:10 AM 6:16 AM 7:53 AM 9:38 AM 11:15 AM

Height -0.7L -0.6L -0.4L -0.2L 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H

Time 4:37 PM 5:04 PM 5:27 PM 5:47 PM 11:37 AM 12:18 PM 1:13 PM 3:00 PM 3:34 AM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L -0.1L

1:31 PM 2:12 PM 2:47 PM 3:17 PM 3:42 PM

1.2H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H

10:04 PM

0.8L

Height 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L 0.2L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.7L

Time 4:07 AM 5:10 AM 6:14 AM 7:18 AM 8:26 AM 9:44 AM 11:43 AM 10:34 PM 11:06 PM 11:48 PM 7:53 PM 10:07 AM 10:50 AM 11:32 AM 3:30 AM

Height 0.8H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.4H 0.3H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H -0.3L -0.4L -0.5L 0.8H

Time 1:00 PM 1:47 PM 2:32 PM 3:12 PM 3:44 PM 3:45 PM 2:06 PM

Height -0.7L -0.6L -0.4L -0.2L 0.0L 0.2L 0.3L

10:22 PM 8:12 PM 8:28 PM 8:38 PM 12:12 PM

0.7L 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H -0.5L

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Time 1:48 AM 3:00 AM 4:04 AM 12:16 AM 12:56 AM 1:42 AM 2:30 AM 3:20 AM 4:18 AM 5:21 AM 6:13 AM 6:56 AM 7:35 AM 8:15 AM 12:21 AM

PM PM PM PM

10:37 PM

0.5L

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6:04 6:19 6:30 6:33

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Freeport Harbor Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Time 1:01 AM 2:03 AM 3:05 AM 4:09 AM 12:02 AM 12:30 AM 1:08 AM 1:55 AM 2:44 AM 12:40 PM 4:27 AM 5:25 AM 6:16 AM 6:58 AM 7:36 AM

Time 1:23 AM 2:04 AM 2:47 AM 3:33 AM 4:22 AM 5:13 AM 6:05 AM 6:57 AM 7:47 AM 8:36 AM 9:22 AM 12:40 AM 1:37 AM 2:34 AM 12:32 AM

Time 2:07 AM 3:06 AM 4:06 AM 5:12 AM 6:33 AM 2:20 AM 3:57 AM 5:08 AM 6:09 AM 7:05 AM 8:01 AM 8:56 AM 12:01 AM 12:47 AM 1:33 AM

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12:10 PM 12:46 PM 1:15 PM 5:39 AM 7:21 AM 7:37 PM 7:05 PM 7:09 PM 7:26 PM 7:53 PM 8:35 PM 9:36 PM 10:53 PM

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Height -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H -0.2H -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L 0.0H 0.0H 0.0H

Time 12:23 PM 1:04 PM 1:38 PM 2:03 PM 2:18 PM 8:19 AM 10:45 AM 9:15 PM 9:47 PM 10:28 PM 11:14 PM

Height -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2H -0.2H -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H

9:48 AM 10:37 AM 11:22 AM

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Height 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L

Time 8:47 AM 9:33 AM 10:13 AM 10:45 AM 10:51 AM 5:25 AM 6:39 AM 6:26 PM 6:46 PM 3:13 PM 3:41 PM 4:07 PM 3:38 PM 4:02 PM 4:27 PM

Height -0.2L 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H

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10:21 PM 1:39 PM 2:02 PM

Height

Time

Height

0.0H -0.3L -0.2L

8:57 PM 8:04 PM

-0.1H 0.0H

Time

Height

Time

Height

9:04 PM 2:20 PM 1:55 PM

-0.2H -0.2L -0.2L

8:49 PM 8:55 PM

-0.2H -0.1H

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Time 12:18 AM 1:19 AM 2:18 AM 3:18 AM 4:19 AM 12:15 AM 1:07 AM 2:04 AM 3:01 AM 3:57 AM 4:51 AM 5:43 AM 6:31 AM 7:15 AM 7:55 AM

Height -0.5L -0.4L -0.2L 0.0L 0.1L 0.5H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

Time 5:03 PM 5:26 PM 5:20 PM 5:03 PM 5:17 PM 10:51 AM 11:07 AM

Height 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.5H 0.6H 0.2L 0.4L

Time 9:35 PM 10:11 PM 10:48 PM 11:29 PM

Height 0.6L 0.5L 0.4L 0.3L

5:39 PM 6:03 PM

0.6H 0.6H

8:38 PM 8:59 PM

0.7L 0.7L

11:16 PM

0.8H

Time 5:28 PM 9:31 AM 10:17 AM 11:00 AM 11:41 AM 6:11 AM 7:46 AM 5:48 PM 2:08 PM 2:45 PM 3:22 PM 3:57 PM 4:29 PM 4:54 PM 5:00 PM

Height 1.4H 0.0L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H

Time 10:10 PM 5:42 PM 5:52 PM 6:02 PM 6:10 PM 12:21 PM 12:59 PM

Height 1.2L 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 1.1H 0.7L 0.9L

Time 10:36 AM 11:07 AM 11:48 AM 1:30 PM 5:52 AM 7:16 AM 11:57 AM 8:26 PM 4:28 PM 4:44 PM 4:58 PM 5:15 PM 7:47 PM 9:36 AM 10:02 AM

Height 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.3H 0.0L 0.0L

South Padre Island

PM PM PM PM

Rollover Pass Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Height -0.7L 0.2H 0.1H 0.0H -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.5L -0.4L

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Rockport

Time 11:27 AM 1:05 AM 2:24 AM 3:55 AM 1:25 AM 2:22 AM 3:12 AM 3:59 AM 4:48 AM 5:41 AM 6:40 AM 7:42 AM 8:43 AM 9:38 AM 10:26 AM

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Time 8:42 AM 12:38 AM 2:04 AM 3:25 AM 4:46 AM 12:27 AM 1:10 AM 1:55 AM 2:44 AM 3:37 AM 4:31 AM 5:24 AM 6:15 AM 7:04 AM 7:49 AM

Time

Height

10:37 PM 11:10 PM 11:47 PM

1.1L 1.0L 0.8L

6:11 PM 6:02 PM

1.1H 1.1H

East Matagorda Time 9:45 PM 9:58 PM 10:04 PM 10:02 PM 9:56 PM 9:58 PM 10:11 PM

Height 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.6H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H

11:14 PM 11:56 PM

0.7L 0.7L

8:46 PM

0.8H

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Time 1:46 AM 3:07 AM 4:05 AM 4:54 AM 2:09 AM 2:36 AM 3:03 AM 4:59 AM 5:57 AM 6:38 AM 7:20 AM 8:12 AM 9:01 AM 12:27 AM 01:04 AM

Time 8:05 7:26 2:08 2:27 2:29

PM PM PM PM PM

9:11 PM 9:41 PM 10:02 PM 1:04 AM

Height

Time

Height

0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.2L 0.2L

10:27 PM

0.3L

7:13 PM 7:33 PM 7:59 PM

0.3H 0.3H 0.3H

0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.4H

11:12 PM 11:53 PM

0.3H 0.4H

10:02 AM

0.0L

Texas Coast Tides

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24

Date Feb 10 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb 13 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 18 Feb 19 Feb 20 Feb 21 Feb 22 Feb 23 Feb 24


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 10, 2017

Page 17

Fashion in the field: McKenna Quinn rethinks hunting shirts for women By Jillian Mock

For Lone Star Outdoor News McKenna Quinn, a new Texas-based, women-owned business, is hoping to use fashion to inspire more women to hunt. “If you could have a pretty shirt that you could shoot in, move around in, and don’t feel underdressed in your camo at lunch, that would be perfect,” said the clothing line’s cofounder Amber Haynes. Amber and her friend-turned-business partner Carly Green are both from Boerne, and dreamed up the idea for their company, McKenna Quinn, while watching their daughters ride horses after school. As they waited for the girls, Carly mentioned her desire to design and manufacture something of her own, but she wasn’t exactly sure what, yet. Amber chimed in, saying that if she were to design anything it would be women’s hunting clothes, because good shirts were so hard to find. A few months later, as Amber remembered it, Carly called her and asked: “How serious are you on this?” After that, the two women went to their savings accounts, selected a name — McKenna for Carly’s middle name and Quinn for Amber’s favorite middle name — and set to work building a business from scratch. Amber and Carly designed each shirt themselves, combining Amber’s hunting expertise with Carly’s fashion instincts. Amber has been a lifelong hunter and grew up bird hunting with her father. Carly is newer to the sport but has a passion and background in fashion; she used to own a clothing store in San Antonio and worked in public relations for Saks Fifth Avenue. “I bring, like she said, the fashion background and perspective and she brings the hunting, the functional perspective,” Carly said. “So you know, I think we combined to make a couple great shirts that are actu-

ally fashionable, yet really functional and fit well, and you can shoot in.” To turn design into reality, Amber and Carly wanted to manufacture their shirts in the United States. “For me, as a consumer, I’m always looking for things you can buy in the U.S., and it’s so hard to find,” Amber said. “I want to promote the country that I love, and I’m from, and encourage job growth here.” Ultimately, they had to source global fabrics — “there’s a very limited market on fabric that’s actually produced in the U.S.,” explained Carly — but the garments are made and assembled by a manufacturer in Brooklyn. For Amber and Carly, McKenna Quinn is not just a passion project. It’s also part of a larger mission to encourage and foster women in hunting. According to Amber, McKenna Quinn hopes to help women be “excellent shots and excellent hunters” without having to compromise their femininity. The business owners also hope McKenna Quinn sets an example for their young daughters. Amber has two daughters, ages 6 and 8, and Carly’s daughter is 7. “My whole goal to be able to have a women-owned company that kind of shows our daughters too, you know, that you can have an idea and a dream and really bring it to fruition if you work hard enough,” Carly said. McKenna Quinn launched earlier this month. The initial clothing line includes six unique shirt designs, with plans to expand into all types of women’s hunting clothes. The shirts can currently be bought presale on the company’s website (shopmckennaquinn.com) and will be available in the Joshua Creek Pro Shop in Boerne in March. FIRST SHOT: McKenna Quinn, a new clothing retailer based in Boerne, is beginning with six shirts designed for the woman hunter. Photos from McKenna Quinn.

New book celebrates North American game birds By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Regular readers of magazines such as Ducks Unlimited and Shooting Sportsman are familiar with Gary Kramer’s photographic work, as thousands of his photos have been published. The former biologist and refuge manager with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service undertook a monumental task in writing and photographing the 256-page coffee-table book entitled: Game Birds: A Celebration of North American Upland Birds. “It took more than three years to photograph all of the birds,” Kramer said. “The Himalayan snowcock (only found in a remote, mountainous part of Ne- MUST READ: Author Gary Kramer spent nearly four years photographvada) was the toughest. I made three trips ing game birds, including much time spent in harsh conditions, to produce his coffee table book that covers all of the game birds of the and finally got a few shots.” The book highlights photos of com- U.S. and Canada. Photo by Gary Kramer. monly known game birds like the bob“I have driven, walked and hiked in the thin white quail, ring-necked pheasant and wild turair at 14,000 feet, torrential downpours, blizzards key. Lesser-known birds include the Gunnison and blowing dust storms; and spent hundreds of sage grouse, the sooty grouse and the heath hen. hours sitting in cramped blinds as the temperaSeveral pages of eye-popping images accomtures ranged from below zero to more than 100 pany each of the chapters focusing on a species, degrees,” he wrote in his preface. “I was driven along with a chapter on the game birds of Haby my desire to showcase the magnificence of waii. But the book contains much more than the these birds in their native habitats.” 384 images, and is a must for students, hunters After viewing Game Birds: A Celebration of North and bird enthusiasts, with descriptions of the American Upland Birds, readers will be grateful for birds, their habitat and range (including a map Kramer’s effort and persistence, and will gain a of North America showing the bird’s range), benew awareness for game birds and the need to havior and reproduction, diet and foraging, morconserve them. tality and predation and conservation and status. Game Birds: A Celebration of North American Kramer is likely the only person to have photoUpland Birds may be purchased for $65 postpaid graphed all 34 game birds found in the U.S. and through Lone Star Outdoor News. To order, call Canada. (214) 361-2276.

Kayak theft ring busted Lone Star Outdoor News Stolen kayaks and other fishing equipment, taken from Galveston to Rockport, have been recovered after a recent arrest in Rockport. The theft ring was thwarted after two men were arrested while attempting to store stolen items at a storage facility. On Jan. 19, Rockport police were called to a storage facility by a convenience store clerk who reported a vehicle at the facility at 4 a.m. When officers arrived, they found two men in possession of numerous kayaks, as well as fishing gear and other equipment, but did not make an arrest. Later, Rockport police received a report of a theft and residential burglary. Investigators linked that report to the men who had been contacted earlier in the day. Police obtained a search warrant and returned to the storage locker they were at earlier in the morning. Police reported finding eight kayaks, 17 fishing rod and reels, fish finders and other gear in the storage locker. Joseph Howe, 27, of Texas City and Joshua Gorley, 28, of Mineral Wells, were arrested and charged

with theft. Another property room, full of kayaks, paddleboards and fishing gear was discovered in Galveston on Feb. 2. Police in Galveston and Jamaica Beach had recovered more than a dozen kayaks and other stolen items as a result of the arrest. According to Internet posts, the two men had been selling the kayaks online, even providing receipts for purchases. Galveston police reported the thieves would stake out targets while posing as fishermen on the beach, and would return at night to steal the equipment. The two men and an unnamed third person of interest have not been charged in relation to the Galveston County incidents, although police officials said felony charges are likely. Investigators said information was received about possible locations where stolen goods were stashed. Investigators identified locations in Galveston, Texas City and Jamaica Beach. The men reportedly admitted they were selling the items online and out of a warehouse in Austin.


Page 18

February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

Solution on on Page Solution Page22 22 1

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New VP at Weatherby

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Weatherby hired Charles Calvin as vice president of manufacturing. .

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Gerber sales director

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Across 4. 9. 12. 13. 15. 16. 17. 19. 23. 25. 26. 28. 30. 31. 33. 35. 36. 38. 39. 41. 42.

TheACROSS shotgun's recoil Harmful fungi in corn recoil 4. The shotgun’s Site of March's Classic Type9. of Harmful minnow fungi in corn The12. gobbler Site of March’s Classic The13. Texas hunting, fishing agency Type of minnow The small pistol 15. The gobbler Lesser-known river with good speckled trout fishing 16. The Texas hunting, fishing agency Texas/Louisiana border lake 17. The small pistol Georgetown, San ____ River that flows through Texas Association director 19.Wildlife Lesser-known river with good speckled The Barbary sheep trout fishing A lure manufacturer 23. Texas/Louisiana border33 lake Manufacturer of the Patriarch Texas directorGeorgetown, 25.Deer RiverAssociation that flows through State fish of Illinois A fish finSan ____ 26. Texas Association director A favorite foodWildlife for deer Texas walleye 28.lake The stocked Barbary with sheep A favorite offshore target 30. species A lure manufacturer A quail 31. Manufacturer of the Patriarch 33 33. Texas Deer Association director 35. State fish of Illinois 36. A fish fin 38. A favorite food for deer 39. Texas lake stocked with walleye 41. A favorite offshore target 42. A quail species

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Down

1.DOWN Writes the outdoor ticket 2. 1. A favorite winter bassticket lure Writes the outdoor 3. Texas/Oklahoma border lake A favorite winter bass lure 5. 2. The fastest mammal 6. 3. A type of fishing line Texas/Oklahoma border lake 7. 5. Good plains game hunting nation The fastest mammal 8. A turkey's chest hair A type fishing line Waco 10. 6. River thatofflows through 11. 7. Hunting for these in Quebec banned in 2018 Good plains game hunting nation 12. Good elk-hunting state A turkey’s chest the hairrifle fire 14. 8. Squeeze to make 18.10. State fish of flows Texas, _____Waco bass River that through 20.11. Favorite dove hunters Huntingdestination for these inforQuebec banned in 2018 21. A group of pheasants 12. Good elk-hunting state 22. State bird of South Dakota 24.14. Artificial shrimp manufacturer Squeeze to make the rifle fire 25. The male goose State fish of in Texas, _____ bass 27.18. Invasive plant Texas lakes Favorite for dove hunters 29.20. The youngdestination turkey 32.21. AnAAfrican antelope group of pheasants 34. A turkey sound 22. State bird of South Dakota 37. Bullets or arrows 24. Artificial shrimp manufacturer 25. The male goose 27. Invasive plant in Texas lakes 29. The young turkey 32. An African antelope 34. A turkey sound 37. Bullets or arrows 40. The female bighorn

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

TriStar’s top distributor

Gerber promoted Marty Carlson to director of sales, sporting goods.

Suppressor board member

New execs at Buck Knives

Travis Glover of Orchid Advisors was reelected to serve on the Board of Directors at the American Suppressor Association.

Trent Malone has joined Buck Knives as chief financial officer and Joe Piedmont has been promoted to chief operations officer.

New CEO at EdgeWater

Delta Waterfowl names development team

EdgeWater Power Boats named Jennifer Butera president and CEO.

Jarnigan joins Gun Talk Gun Talk Media added Kevin Jarnagin of Norman, Oklahoma as content manager.

Caraccioli promoted at OSG Outdoor Sportsman Group promoted Tom Caraccioli to vice president of communications.

Delta Waterfowl promoted Jeffrey Howell to vice president of development – individual and major gifts, and hired John Davis as vice president of development – corporations and foundations.

GunVault adds execs Mike Sullinger was named director of sales at GunVault, Inc., Margarita Stamper was named operations manager and Cody Keyser was promoted to national sales manager.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Pecan-crusted crappie 3/4 cup chopped pecans 1 tbsp. sesame seeds 1 1/2 pounds of crappie (4 servings) 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tbsps. butter, melted Salt and pepper

Nature’s Calling

Gary Witherspoon received Benelli USA’s Super Black Eagle Award, Chase Spurgin and Jeff Woods received the USA Sales Representative of the Year award and Owen J. Brown & Associates was the Agency of the Year.

TriStar Arms named Sports South, LLC its Distributor of the Year for 2016.

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Lapointe enters NMMA Benelli USA names HOF sales reps of the year The National Marine Manufacturers Association inducted Denys Lapointe of BRP’s Design and Innovation Centre into the NMMA Hall of Fame.

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LSONews.com

Stir together the pecans and sesame seeds and set aside. Arrange fish on a baking dish or baking sheet. Add garlic to melted butter and brush on the fish. Cover fish with nut mixture. Salt and pepper to

taste. Chill or let stand for 30 minutes. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Heat a small amount of olive oil in the bottom of a skillet and sauté the fish, pecan side down for about 5 minutes. Transfer to an oiled baking sheet. When all fish are sautéd, bake with pecan side up until meat flakes. —Missouri Department of Conservation

French dip with elk roast 3-pound of elk top or bottom round roast 4 cloves garlic, cut into slivers 4 cups beef or elk stock 4 tsps. beef bouillon granules 1/2 tsp. pepper 10-12 hoagie buns, split Pierce roast several times with tip of sharp knife. Insert garlic slivers into holes made by knife. Place roast in 6-quart Dutch oven. Add stock, bouillon and pepper. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low. Cover. Simmer for 1-1.5 hours, or until meat is tender, turn-

ing meat occasionally. Remove roast from pan; let stand for 10 minutes. Cut meat into very thin slices. Strain liquid in pan through fine-mesh sieve. Return liquid to pan; add sliced meat to liquid. Heat meat mixture over medium-low for 10-12 minutes, or until hot. Using slotted spoon, spoon meat evenly into hoagie buns. Serve with small dish of cooking liquid for dipping. —South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 10, 2017

Page 19

PRODUCTS FIELD SPRAY: Scent Kapture’s Field Spray targets human odor — as well as odors caused by mold, mildew, smoke, fire damage and more. Outdoorsmen can just spray on clothes or gear before heading out to the field. The spray, part of a product line that also includes laundry detergent, hair and body wash, and hand scrub, utilizes a special encapsulation ingredient that attaches itself to odor-causing bacteria, encapsulating them and then eliminating them. The bundle of products costs $32.48 while the field spray costs $8.99 for the small (8.5 ounces) or $18.99 for the large (33.8 ounces). “I tried this product line during a recent bow hunt where the winds weren’t exactly in my favor,” said Lone Star Outdoor News’ Operations Manager Mike Hughs. “I saw firsthand the advantage Scent Kapture gave me and took an axis deer during that weekend hunt.”

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THE DRY FLY BOX: This 7-inch by 3.5inch by 1.125-inch box is made for storing flies. The Tacky Fly Fishing box has a 3-D mat with a tacky blue silicone anchoring system that cradles up to 199 flies without hurting their hackles or tails. The box has a magnetic closure. It costs about $30.

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(801) 610-9928 tackyflyfishing.com

(469) 601-4081 scentkapture.com

>> F25 OUTBOARD MOTOR: Yamaha describes its all-new F25 outboard, which weighs less than 126 pounds, as the perfect power solution for 14- to 16-foot aluminum boats as well as many other craft. The outboard features a no-battery-required Electronic Fuel Injection, two-cylinder powerheads, a pull start through the cowling, and a variable trolling rpm switch. It also features built-in handles to provide greater portability and easier handling while the updated tiller handle features new ergonomics and a new shifter position. An electric starting kit, sold separately, is available as a field upgrade.

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Grandma’s elk Continued from page 1

Ranch near Glen Rose. Bagging an elk was on Glenda’s bucket list, but with two hip replacements making a trip up in the mountains wasn’t an option. So in January, her family took her on a local elk hunt instead. The hunting party set up behind a tree in a pickup truck. It didn’t take long for them to spot the elk coming out of the trees. “Oh, my goodness girl, he was huge!” Glenda said. “I couldn‘t believe it. It was a shock. I had no idea an elk was that big.” Glen said his mom aimed her Parker crossbow, which has a CO2 cartridge that allows it to cock automatically, and took the shot at about 35 yards off. She hit the 1,000-pounder in the upper lung area with one shot. Glenda said the elk stumbled and didn’t go far before collapsing. They loaded the half-ton trophy onto a flatbed trailer, much to Glenda’s relief. “I said, ‘How in the world are we going to get him on this pickup?’” she recalled. The elk is her biggest success with a crossbow, but there have been others since she took up hunting at age 77. Glen calls her “my unsinkable Molly Brown mom” for good reason. She grew up on a farm and liked the outdoors but had never hunted. He decided to get her a crossbow to see if she would like it because he was afraid the recoil of a rifle might give her scope-eye.

She was a natural. After her third time shooting the crossbow, she hit the bull’s-eye. The only problem was he needed to cock it for her, so he found one that cocked on its own. She progressed from target practice on to hunting and eventually used a rifle as well. Besides elk, she has hunted turkey, fallow deer, and a corsican ram with her crossbow. Glenda admits she gets frustrated sometimes because the game animals run when shot. When hunting turkey about four years ago, she came up with a plan to put a stop to it. “I told my grandson before I left the house, ‘I’m tired of those turkeys running off. I’m going to hit them in the neck. So I did,’” Glenda said. Glenda said hunting keeps her active, and its much more interesting than the senior citizen events she sometimes attends. “Yes, I would recommend it,” she said of hunting. “They invite me to these senior things. They’re sitting around twiddling their thumbs feeling sorry for themselves.” But not Glenda. She’d much rather be canning, cooking or hunting. Her son said he has as much fun watching his mom as she has hunting. She told him hunting gives her something to look forward to every year now. “The whole family — it’s like, ‘Go, go granny,’” he said.

More bass for Ray Roberts Continued from page 8

will only make the recovery all the sweeter. “The lake’s full now. We’re actually getting more fish in there,” Walling said. Everett Reynolds, another longtime guide who runs Reynolds Guide Service, said it was high time Ray Roberts got some attention. “They’ve never supplied Ray Roberts like the others,” Reynolds said. He chalks the lack of stockings up to politics or not enough push from local towns. Reynolds said the lake could be a fisherman’s dream with more help. However, Bennett said the lake isn’t taking a back seat in his district, and he put in a request last year for the reservoir to be stocked this spring. “Ray Roberts is one of the better bass lakes and has been heavily managed,” Bennett said. “I put it as a No. 1 priority.” The state produces a limited number of fingerlings in its hatcheries, so it must prioritize where the fish go, Bennett said. Conditions must be conducive for their survival at targeted lakes. It also helps that Ray Roberts has shown a history of producing at least six 13-pounders. Its proximity to the Dallas-Fort Worth area makes it an important resource for anglers as

well. Because stocking is done to enhance the genetic potential, reservoirs with the proven ability to produce trophy fish receive priority for available fingerlings, according to Bennett. Ray Robert’s rebound from the drought also makes it a good candidate for stocking. When Ray Roberts was at its lowest in late 2014, the aquatic vegetation suffered, which reduced the cover and nutrients for fish. The catch rate decreased for bass during that time. But thanks to the rise in rainfall, the vegetation that grew up around the banks of Ray Roberts while it was low now provides aquatic cover for fish. That kind of habitat makes the lake a suitable candidate for stocking, Bennett said. “Although about 70 percent of the bass in Ray Roberts possess Florida genetics, I do believe we can improve upon that and the proportion of Florida alleles in individual fish through strategic stocking,” Bennett said. This year state hatcheries will begin working to develop broodstock directly from Sharelunkers, so that all Florida bass fingerlings stocked around the state will be direct descendants of a 13-pound or larger fish, he said.

Father, son win on Travis Joe and Brandon Bray of Marble Falls won the Bass Champs first Central Region event on Lake Travis with 28.45 pounds, earning $20,000. “We went to spawning coves and threw top-water lures and flukes, then switched to Carolina-rigged brush hogs off of main lake points.” Joe Bray said.  Bryan Richards of Round Rock and Matt Kevil of Manor finished second with 20.81 pounds, using a Texas-rigged trick worm to win $3,500. They were followed by Jason Buchanan and Terry Kircus, both of Burnet, with 18.96 pounds to earn $2,500. The biggest bass of the day was landed by Craig Urofsky, of Burnet, at 8.81 pounds. —Bass Champs


Page 20

February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL Tagged shark swims 13,000 miles

Hunters taking older deer

Hell’s Bay, a male mako shark, shattered records by traveling the equivalent of halfway around the globe over the course of 600 days. The shark swam more than 13,000 miles in the longest recorded journey through the Atlantic Ocean by a mako shark tagged by researchers, according to the experts tracking him at Nova Southeastern University. The shark was tagged by researchers off the coast of Ocean City, Maryland, in May 2015, and in the shark’s first year of travel after that, he swam north along the U.S. East Coast. This past year, he stayed near the coast of Maryland before heading north to Nova Scotia, then down just south of Bermuda, before coming back to Ocean City. —Nova Southeastern University

Semi-autos for hunting approved in Pa.

—QDMA

The Pennsylvania Game Commission board unanimously approved allowing the use of semiautomatic rifles for hunting, including deer and bear, during its quarterly meeting. The move comes two months after Gov. Tom Wolf signed legislation that gives the agency the ability to implement the use of semi-automatic rifles.

ALEXANDRIA SIMPSON, 18, OF SAN A NTONIO, SHOT THIS 1 0-POINTER AT THE BACK PORCH RANCH IN SA BINAL, SCORING 153 7/8 GROSS. SIMP SON SHOT HER BUCK W ITH HER FATHER’S 30 .06 AT 125 YARDS A FTER A THREE-HOUR WAIT IN THE BLIND.

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U.S. whitetail hunters took more mature bucks than yearling bucks for the second consecutive year, according to data compiled by the Quality Deer Management Association. In the 2015-16 hunting season, the percentage of 3 1/2-year-old and older bucks climbed to 35 percent of the nation’s buck harvest, the highest harvest rate in modern history. That exceeds the rate of harvest for yearling bucks (34 percent) and the harvest of 2 1/2-year-old bucks as well, which was 31 percent. Of the 28 whitetail states that collect age data on bucks, the top state in harvest of mature bucks for the 2015-16 season was, again, Mississippi, where 77 percent of bucks killed were 31/2 years old or older. Rounding out the Top-5 were Texas at 75 percent, Arkansas at 74 percent, Louisiana at 67 percent, and Oklahoma at 60 percent.

—Staff report

Governor to chair sportsmen group Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has been named the Honorary Chairman of Sportsmen Organized for Law Enforcement, an initiative spearheaded by Mossy Oak. The goal of Sportsmen Organized for Law Enforcement is to raise awareness and funds that will be divided equally among three existing 501(c)(3) organizations that already know where help is needed. Those organizations are Below 100, Spirit of Blue Foundation and Concerns of Police Survivors. —Mossy Oak

GSC names new leaders The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation announced Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana and Gov. Tom Wolf of Pennsylvania as the new Democratic Co-Chair and Vice-Chair, respectively, of the Sportsmen’s Caucus. Bullock and Wolf join Gov. Phil Bryant (Mississippi) and Gov. Matt Mead (Wyoming), the respective Republican co-chair and vice chair of the GSC. “As a hunter, angler, and someone who enjoys the nearly 30 million acres of public land in Montana, I’m honored to co-chair the Governor’s Sportsmen’s Caucus,” Bullock said. “Protecting public lands and access to them is an issue that transcends party politics. It isn’t about Democrats, Republicans or Independents — it’s about doing what’s right for everyone who enjoys the outdoors.” —CSF

Namibia, DSC enter agreement

MDF helping feed snowbound wildlife The Mule Deer Foundation is working closely with western states to support mule deer management efforts during the severe winter conditions affecting much of the region. MDF has provided $30,000 and significant volunteer labor to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources during its emergency mule deer feeding operation. Greg Sheehan, director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources stated, “For over 100 years, our sportsmen have always been the first to come help our wildlife in need. In the case of the decision to feed deer in northern Utah this year, we once again had sportsmen pour in with equipment, funding, and countless volunteer time to save our iconic deer herd.” Portions of almost every western state are facing higher than normal snowfall impacting high elevations as well as critical winter range. —MDF

Workers save hatchery fish, eggs after floods Following recent heavy rains, workers at California’s Nimbus and American River hatcheries worked around the clock to prevent massive debris loads from clogging the main water supply below Nimbus Dam. Their intense efforts to clean intake structures and adjust water flows during battering winds and rains saved millions of eggs and young fish over the 11-day ordeal. After a winter deluge from Jan. 7-18, the two hatcheries’ main water source experienced clogging that affected the water distribution system, putting more than 5.5 million trout and salmon eggs and 3 million young trout, steelhead and salmon in peril. In a joint cooperative effort, technicians from the Bureau of Reclamation devised a simple but effective way to quickly remove the debris clogging the main intake screen. They also bypassed systems that limited the time between cleaning cycles on the machinery, thereby allowing CDFW personnel to monitor the process 24 hours a day and keep water flowing to the hatcheries. —California Department of Fish and Game

During its 2017 Dallas Safari Club convention, members of DSC and DSC Foundation met with government officials from Namibia to sign a Memorandum of Understanding. The agreement formalizes the existing relationship between the parties. Both share a common concern for the future of Namibian wildlife as well as the desire for cooperation in the field of wildlife conservation. DSC Executive Director Ben Carter and DSCF President Richard Cheatham met with Minister Pohamba Shifeta and three representatives from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism of the Republic of Namibia. Each party will seek to promote Namibia’s conservation hunting program, antipoaching activities in national and state lands, to visit and exchange research and nonproprietary information and to collaborate with continuing education and other training programs. —DSCF

Striper advocate dies James “Jim” Price, an advocate for striped bass and menhaden, died on Dec. 18. He was 73. In the early 1980s, Price founded the Chesapeake Bay Ecological Foundation to study what he believed was a severe decline in the populations and relative health of striped bass, also known as rockfish or stripers, many of which spawn in the bay, then migrate to coastal waters. Price’s effort to raise concern about rockfish helped to push for Maryland’s catch moratorium, which lasted from 1985 to 1990. The fiveyear hiatus is credited with helping the species rebound. —Staff report


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 10, 2017

Page 21

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February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK FEBRUARY 9-12

San Antonio Boat & Travel Trailer Show Alamodome sanantonioboatshow.com

FEBRUARY 9-26

San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo Wildlife Expo sarodeo.com

FEBRUARY 10-11

Central Texas Wildlife Legacy Hunting Convention and Gala Crowne Plaza Hotel (512) 773-5674 centraltexaswildlifelegacy.org Texas Deer Association Sportsman’s Roundup & Deer Auction La Cantera Resort & Spa, San Antonio texasdeerassociation.com

FEBRUARY 11

National Wild Turkey Federation Hunting Heritage Banquet Houston Distributing Co. Inc. (832) 492-1400 nwtf.org Ducks Unlimited Volunteer Leadership Meeting Historic Milltown’s River Venue (806) 598-9400 ducks.org/texas

FEBRUARY 16

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Royal Oaks Country Club, Dallas (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

FEBRUARY 16-19

Austin RV Expo Austin Convention Center (512) 366-7135 austinrvexpo.com

FEBRUARY 17-19

Guadalupe River Trout Unlimited Lazy L&L Campgrounds, New Braunfels grtu.org/troutfest/ All Valley Boat Show McAllen Convention Center (866) 639-8940 allvalleyboatshow.com

FEBRUARY 17-26

Coastal Conservation Association Annual Crab Trap Cleanup Fort Anahuac Park ccatexas.org/events-directory/

FEBRUARY 18-19

Texas Gun and Knife Association Gun Show Fredericksburg Fair Grounds texasgunandknifeshows.com

FEBRUARY 23

Texas Dove Hunters Association Bag Limit Banquet Noah’s Event Venue, Sugar Land (281) 491-0300 texasdovehunters.com

FEBRUARY 24

Coastal Conservation Association San Bernard Chapter Banquet Riverside Hall, East Bernard (281) 330-0135 ccatexas.org/events-directory/

Lubbock Sportsman’s Club, DSC Chapter Hunter’s Banquet & Auction Lubbock Memorial Civic Center (806) 789-2441 Lubbocksportsman.com

Texas Gun and Knife Association Gun Show Kerrville Event Center texasgunandknifeshows.com

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 22

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4. The shotgun's recoil [KICK] 9. Harmful fungi in corn [AFLATOXIN] 12. Site of March's Classic [CONROE] 13. Type of minnow [SHINER] 15. The gobbler [TOM] 16. The Texas hunting, fishing agency [TPWD] 17. The small pistol [DERRINGER] 19. Lesser-known river with good speckled trout fishing [LAVACA] 23. Texas/Louisiana border lake [CADDO] 25. River that flows through Georgetown, San ____ [GABRIEL] 26. Texas Wildlife Association director [YEATES] 28. The Barbary sheep [AOUDAD] 30. A lure manufacturer [RAPALA] 31. Manufacturer of the Patriarch 33 [NOSLER] 33. Texas Deer Association director [TARLTON] 35. State fish of Illinois [BLUEGILL] 36. A fish fin [PECTORAL] 38. A favorite food for deer [ACORNS] 39. Texas lake stocked with walleye [MEREDITH] 41. A favorite offshore target [AMBERJACK]

THE GUN RANGE FOR THE SERIOUS SHOOTER

Great East Texas Outdoor Fest Sabine County Rodeo Arena (936) 275-8223 getof.net

FEBRUARY 25-26

Across

20 CONCRETE BENCHES 100, 200 AND 300 YARD TARGETS

Texas Dove Hunters Association 4th Annual Shooting for Scholarships National Shooting Complex, San Antonio (210) 764-1189 texasdovehunters.com

Mule Deer Foundation Parker County Chapter Banquet Weatherford (817) 475-9702 muledeer.org

T A R L T O N

AFFORDABLE, COMFORTABLE AND SECLUDED

MARCH 4

North Texas Chapter Safari Club International 22nd Annual Dinner, Banquet & Auction Worthington Renaissance Hotel, Fort Worth (817) 271-9858 scinorthtexas.com

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Coastal Conservation Association Trinity Valley Chapter Banquet Dayton Community Center (936) 334-2528 ccatexas.org/events-directory/

Park Cities Quail 11th Annual Dinner and Auction Flight Museum, Dallas (214) 632-7460 parkcitiesquail.org

FEBRUARY 25

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National Wild Turkey Federation Hunting Heritage Banquet Richard M. Borchard Regional Fairgrounds (361) 980-1194 nwtf.org

MARCH 2

National Wild Turkey Federation Hunting Heritage Banquet, Pioneer Chapter McKenzie Memorial United Methodist (903) 219-2692 nwtf.org

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1. Writes the outdoor ticket [WARDEN] 2. A favorite winter bass lure [JIG] 3. Texas/Oklahoma border lake [TEXOMA] 5. The fastest mammal [CHEETAH] 6. A type of fishing line [BRAID] 7. Good plains game hunting nation [NAMIBIA] 8. A turkey's chest hair [BEARD] 10. River that flows through Waco [BOSQUE] 11. Hunting for these in Quebec banned in 2018 [CARIBOU] 12. Good elk-hunting state [COLORADO] 14. Squeeze to make the rifle fire [TRIGGER] 18. State fish of Texas, _____ bass [GUADALUPE] 20. Favorite destination for dove hunters [ARGENTINA] 21. A group of pheasants [NIDE] 22. State bird of South Dakota [PHEASANT] 24. Artificial shrimp manufacturer [DOA] 25. The male goose [GANDER] 27. Invasive plant in Texas lakes [SALVINIA] 29. The young turkey [POULT] 32. An African antelope [SABLE]

Puzzle solution from Page 18


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

February 10, 2017

Page 23


Page 24

February 10, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

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February 10, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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