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January 13, 2017

Volume 13, Issue 10

Change your tactics for last-minute dove By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News The late dove season closed in the Central Zone on January 8, but hunters that stayed home missed out on some good action. Hunting near Clyde with Circle E Outfitters, hunters shot limits on both sides of the Christmas holiday, but not at what some consider the usual times. Before Christmas, the birds hit the croton and native sunflower field around noon, while the next week they headed to the field at 9 a.m. and were gone by 3 p.m. In the South Zone, open until Jan. 23, good hunts were reported in the Kenedy, George West and D’Hanis areas, according to the Texas Dove Hunters Association. Sesame fields also were bringing in good numbers of birds. Near Pearsall, Craig Wilson of Wilson Whitetail Ranch said his hunts have been better than expected and his hunters are happy. “We’re hunting cut milo fields, but the mornings have been much better than the afternoons,” Wilson said. Late-season birds tend to be in larger groups, often flustering hunters when they buzz over, making picking a single bird to target more difficult. And they often don’t show up in mid to late afternoon as they do in September. Heading to the field with a few hours of daylight may leave you thinking the birds aren’t there, when in reality they have come and gone. Officials say the response to the extended season has been positive. “Overall, we’ve had good support,” said Shaun Oldenburger, dove program leader for Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “We see

CONTENTS

that putting more days at the back end shows a spike in hunters and harvest.” Some hunters noticed smaller body size in the mourning dove, but Oldenburger said that is natural. “They lose weight in migration, and in midwinter, they get to their lowest weight,” he said. “If they weigh less, they need less.” At Paloma Pachanga in Hondo, all of the hunts through the end of the season are scheduled for mornings, according to the large outfitter’s Facebook page. Morning dove hunts can have benefits, though. You can duck hunt for a half-hour or so before switching to dove, and head to the deer blind in the afternoon. BRINGING THEM IN: Dakota, the Lone Star Outdoor News’ newsroom dog, made many retrieves during his first two dove hunts in Callahan County in December. Top photo by David J. Sams, bottom photo by Lili Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Drownings highlight need for safety

Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 14 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 15 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 20

Jig for Fork lunkers

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

By Mark England

A recent string of apparent accidental deaths involving waterfowlers and fishermen has officials cautioning outdoorsmen to stay vigilant around the water and take precautions. Water-related incidents claimed five waterfowlers’ lives in January and at least three anglers’ lives in December. The most recent deaths occurred Jan. 6 near Carancahua Bay, between Port Lavaca and Palacios, when three young duck hunters and at least one of their dogs died. On Jan. 2, a young boy and his father duck UNENVIABLE TASKS: Texas game wardens participate in search-and-rescue efforts after being notified of drownhunting on Lake Tawakoni drowned. ings, including both hunters and fishermen. December was also deadly with at least three fishing-related deaths. On Dec. 29, a 54-year-old angler bank-fishing was found parently drowned. Earlier in December, a dead in Lake Brazos in Waco, and on Dec. 30-year-old teacher apparently drowned in 26, a 61-year-old man gigging for flounder Christmas Bay while wade-fishing alone. near Mustang Island, Corpus Christi, ap-

Winter has found Texas’ famed Lake Fork, which has ruled largemouth bass fishing statewide to an almost ridiculous extent. More than 60 percent of the Texas Top 50 (and the current state record) largemouth bass were caught there. However, the weather recently has been hot and cold and over the first long weekend in January turned freezing. That doesn’t mean that largemouth bass fishing is on hiatus until spring, but it does mean that anglers must make adjustments. Guide Brooks Rogers told LSON that if you’re all about hot-and-heavy fishing, you probably need to be looking elsewhere, like a power-plant lake. “When January comes, you’re not going to wear them out,” Rogers said. “You’re not going to catch large numbers over 5 pounds. They don’t have a lot of grass to relate to this time of year. They scatter, which makes it harder to pinpoint them.”

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INSIDE

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 22

HUNTING

A makeover for land

First buck

East Texas landowner retools ranch for wildlife. Page 4

Husband guides wife on whitetail hunt. Page 4

FISHING

Please turn to page 11

Drum ribs?

Colorful stringers

Baffin Bay delicacy. Page 13

Boerne man builds popular stringers at his home. Page 8


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January 13, 2017

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January 13, 2017

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HUNTING

Creating something from nothing East Texas landowner revamps property for deer, ducks and bass By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News

A WORTHY EFFORT: Steve Favre overlooks a portion of Riverview Farms, a property he purchased in 2002 and spent years developing for wildlife, including deer and ducks. Photo by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News.

When Steve Favre bought what he named Riverview Farms in 2002, he had a vision. The vision is now reality. “This was row crop land,” he said of the 1,450-acre, low-fenced property along the Sulphur River on the Delta/Lamar County border in Northeast Texas. After buying the ranch, he got to work. For the deer, the work involve a lot of prescribed burning, developing food plots and getting rid of Johnson grass. “We also did multiple disking,

spraying and planted 11 native species,” Favre said. “And then there were the cedars — most of them were reduced by burning — it’s fun watching them explode into flames. Then we planted 220,000 hardwood trees, including oaks and persimmons.” Riverview Farms became part of the Managed Lands Deer Program, and the deer population and numbers were addressed. “There were fair numbers of deer when I bought the place,” Favre said. “But the quality of bucks was really bad — it was hard to find anything that would score 100 inches.” Favre quickly learned he had

10 does for every buck, and with help from biologists, permits were obtained, the doe population was reduced, and the quality of animals increased tenfold. “We shot more than 20 does each year for four years, and no bucks,” he said. “Now, the ratio is 1.5 does for every buck, and the average buck ranges from the high 140s to 160. East Texas isn’t known for big bucks, but the genetics are here if you give them the right environment.” The ranch isn’t a commercial operation, and the available hunts are reserved for family, friends and hunts donated to charities. Two years ago, the deer manPlease turn to page 6

Worthwhile wait First buck finally bagged By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Her first shot at a buck a few years ago didn’t work out. But on the last weekend of deer season, Jana Potts connected on her first buck. “She’s been hunting awhile,” said her husband, Chad Potts, who is the president of the BassChamps fishing circuit. “A few years ago, we found a good 8-pointer and she hit it, but we never found it. It tore her up.” The couple headed to their lease near Seymour for the final weekend of the general rifle season. “We had seen a good deer on the trail camera and decided to hunt for it the next morning,” Chad said. “That evening, we planned to find a pig or call in some coyotes.” The plans changed. “The deer were moving well when we tried to call in some coyotes,” Chad said. “Then, about 45 minutes before dark, a deer came in that we hadn’t seen. He was an 8-pointer, very wide and old.” Jana, an assistant principal at Chisolm Trail High School in the Eagle Mountain – Saginaw Independent School District, took a look at the deer through the binoculars. A GOOD START: Jana “It was huge,” she said. “I told him I Potts bagged this wide 8-pointer while huntwished I could shoot it. Then Chad said, ing with her husband, ‘This is him.’” Chad. It was her first It took awhile for Jana to get off the shot buck. Photo by Chad with her .270. Potts.

Please turn to page 6

Study shows benefits, consequences of supplemental feed use By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

This time of year, many hunters and managers start thinking about supplemental nutrition. But according to experts, management needs may increase when supplemental feed is used. Studies show that supplemental feed is important in antler growth and fawn production in whitetails, but it can also cause overpopulation issues and negatively impact feeding for some deer. In a “Wildlife for Lunch Webinar

Series” hosted by Texas Wildlife Association and Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service last month, researchers reported on the impact of supplemental feeding based on the Comanche-Faith Research Project near Carrizo Springs. Twelve 200-acre enclosures were used to test the impact of feed on deer at the Comanche and Faith ranches. Feed was provided on six enclosures, but not on the other six. Emily Belser, a researcher who presented Patterns of Supplemental Feed Consumption in White-tailed Deer,

said the study showed fawn production increased with better nutrition. Thirty-one percent of females with access to feed became pregnant compared to 12.5 percent with no feed. So more feed equals more babies. Fawns and yearlings also grew more with supplemental feed than those without. Antlers size benefited from extra nutrition, she said. Based on the Comanche-Faith project, when supplemental feed was lacking, the percentage of spikes was much higher in the yearling population and no yearling produced Please turn to page 21

ENJOYING A SNACK: Supplemental feed has shown to improve antler growth and fawn production. Landowners and managers know that with increased deer numbers, more management will be required. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.


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Hunters relishing quail season By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Quail hunters in the rolling plains of Texas say the quail hunting is exactly the way it was predicted to be: fantastic. The recent cold snap has been a happy occurrence for many quail hunters and their dogs. Eric Glass, who hunts near Big Spring, said he saw about three coveys Jan. 9 in less than two hours and his dogs made some good points. “I shot a couple of birds,” he said. For Glass, who guides fly-anglers out of South Padre Island, covering some ground instead of water for some action was a nice change. “I love quail. I love my dogs,” Glass said. He was happy to report that the area he hunts went from having almost no birds four years ago to “Biblical” numbers the past two years. Also out west, Roy Washburn reported that hunting has been good for the past three days in A BIRD IN THE HAND: Quail hunters find paradise on the Rolling Runnels and Concho counties Plains. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News. near Ballinger. He saw 13 coveys Jan. 8-9. But the weather went from cold to a snow near Childress Jan. 8. balmy 69 degrees Monday, meaning Wash“Probably moved 40 coveys,” he wrote. burn couldn’t hunt with dogs. “My young lemon male turned the corner, “We didn’t have any dew this morning. pointed and held several coveys and sinWe couldn’t run the dogs,” he said. The gles. Found lots of dead birds.” last weekend of December saw about 14 Others eagerly awaited word on the focoveys, he added. rum, with one photo showing more than Washburn also received reports from a 30 birds bagged. friend hunting in Haskell of 28 coveys. “Looks like memories were made. ConOn the Texas Hunting Forum, pharmvet grats!” added bobcat1. posted photos of quail hunting in a patchy

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Gulf Coast project adds new habitat for waterfowl Waterfowl and whooping crane stand to benefit from improved habitat this winter on the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge in Anahuac near Houston. The Gulf Coast Initiative provides better habitat for waterfowl and other wetland-dependent wildlife and improves outdoor recreation opportunities for people. The project focused on the 300-acre Middleton Unit. Working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ducks Unlimited and corporate partner Axalta Coating Systems added water control infrastructure to facilitate better habitat management and promote waterfowl use on this publicaccess refuge, which is open to public waterfowl hunting. “The Gulf Coast is one of the most important areas for waterfowl on the continent, and its habitats are in jeopardy from coastal land loss, saltwater intrusion, and land use changes,” said DU CEO Dale Hall. Populations of northern pintail and mottled ducks are declining or below long-term averages. Gulf Coast habitats like those found on Anahuac NWR are critical for both species and the endangered whooping crane. Some of the Middleton project features will promote nesting and brood rearing by mottled ducks. The work is part of Ducks Unlimited’s Rescue Our Wetlands campaign. It is a continental, seven-year, $2 billion conservation effort. It focuses on the habitats most important to waterfowl, including the coastal prairies and marshes of Texas and Louisiana. —Ducks Unlimited

Coyotes prove costly for airport Coyotes are apparently causing trouble for the Arlington Municipal Airport. Officials want $1.2 million in federal funds to build a chain-link fence to help keep coyotes from roaming onto its runways, according to local news reports. The airport is located in what was once an undeveloped area. The airport now has about 250 takeoffs and landings daily. Officials said the coyotes roam Fish Creek, which winds through trees and brush on the south end of the 500acre airport. Airport crews must currently honk truck horns to chase the varmints away. The federal grant would cover about 90 percent of the cost to fence the creek area and replace an older barrier on the airport perimeter.

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First whitetail Continued from page 4

“Every time I would get the gun up, he would move,” she said. Chad said he had to have his wife back off the shot several times. “He kept quartering toward us,” he said. “We went through that four times.” When the broadside shot presented, Jana made it count. “I saw him fall over but she couldn’t see him,” Chad said. “She was real nervous — I told her we had to wait 30 minutes to go and try to find him, but I could see his antlers on the ground the whole time — but I didn’t tell her.”

Jana wasn’t so patient. “I used my assistant principal skills and negotiated him down to 15 minutes,” she said. “Then I set the timer on my phone. I thought I had seen the deer fall, but as the time went by, I started worrying.” Chad finally relented. “She was looking at the timer every two minutes,” he said. “Then she started looking at stuff on her phone to pass the time, so I said it was time to look. I told her to walk to the area where the deer was to let her walk up to it. A few seconds later she was freaking out and jumping.”

Jana didn’t apologize for her celebration. “It was such an exciting experience,” she said. “I was super pumped — I might have done a really corny dance.” The word of her hunt spread quickly around the school. “People didn’t believe it,” she said. “I’m usually in heels. I can’t wait for the shoulder mount to get back; we already have a place in the house picked out for him.”

Property facelift for wildlife Continued from page 4

agement effort paid off. “I shot a 25-inch wide buck that scored 165,” Favre said. “The fact that I squeezed the trigger on this deer was the easiest part; it’s creating the environment where they can thrive and exist that was the most rewarding.” Sharing his information with the neighbors also has paid off. “The people all around are starting to do the same thing, so we are all on the same page,” Favre said. “Some contacted me, and I contacted others.” Favre’s favorite hunting, though, involves ducks, and even though the Sulphur River was there, there was little duck habitat or food on the property. “I needed water for ducks,” he said. “A series of levees stretching 4.5 miles was designed by Ducks Unlimited. They target a 16- to 18-inch average depth, and we pushed up some islands.” Dakota, the Lone Star Outdoor News’ newsroom dog,

went on his first real duck hunt at Riverview Farms, where three hunters saw waves of green-winged teal, and good numbers of gadwall, wigeon and mallards. Dakota retrieved 16 of the 18 ducks brought in. Favre didn’t ignore fishing opportunities, either, and created a fishing lake on the property. “The largest bass caught was 9.5 pounds,” he said. “We have to do fish shocking to reduce the total number of bass each year.” Favre’s efforts at Riverview Farms haven’t gone unrecognized. He received the Delta County Outstanding Wildlife Conservationist award from the Soil and Water Conservation District and the Region IV Texas Conservation award in 2015. “I’m extremely proud of creating something from almost nothing,” Favre said, noting the efforts have been at considerable cost. “All of the money is outgoing.”

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TAHC proposes rules for movement of exotics Lone Star Outdoor News Rules proposed on the movement of elk, red deer, and sika within Texas will likely be less taxing than those for whitetail and mule deer. On Dec. 13, the Texas Animal Health Commission adopted the new rules which will undergo a 30-day public com- EXOTIC RULES: A red deer buck follows several doe. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News. ment period. Charly Seale, executive director of the • Three elk, red deer, or sika morExotic Wildlife Association, said in a press talities each year shall be tested for release the newly proposed rule is simple CWD. (This can be from hunter and easy to understand — unlike the rule harvest, natural mortality, slaughter for the movement of whitetail deer. surveillance, etc.) According to EWA, the basics of the new• A mortality log supplied by the Texly proposed regulations in order to move as Animal Health Commission shall within the State, are as follows: be kept at each premise listing the RFID numbers of any elk, red deer, • The originating premise must have or sika mortality and the results of a premise ID number issued by the the CWD test. Texas Animal Health Commission as Seale said the association’s representawell as a premise ID number issued tives wanted to ensure that no healthy to the receiving premise. animal would have to be euthanized for • Any elk, red deer or sika leaving a testing in order to be movement qualified. premise alive must have a visible Only those elk, red deer and sika that die USDA RFID tag approved by the in the course of normal business have to Texas Animal Health Commission. be tested. • Before leaving the originating premThe rules come on the heels of a freeise, a transfer paper shall be acti- range elk that was harvested in Dallam vated with the Texas Animal Health County by a hunter in December and testCommission. This transfer paper ed positive for CWD. It is the first known must list the identification of the elk in Texas to test positive for the disease. elk, red deer, or sika being trans- CWD has been found in free-ranging elk in ferred and must also list the premise New Mexico and Colorado. Dallam CounID of the receiving premise. ty borders New Mexico and Oklahoma.

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FISHING

Deep-water trout come to life with hard cold fronts By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News

COLDER MEANS BIGGER: Winter fishing brings a chance for bigger, and even trophy speckled trout, and some simple changes in tactics can improve the chance for success. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

The cold front that rolled across Texas on Jan. 6 brought us morning low temperatures in the 30s and set the stage for some excellent deep-water trout fishing in the bays and rivers along the coast. This is the time of year when the Colorado River, above Matagorda, becomes one of the most popular places to fish during the winter months. On the upper Texas coast, fishermen on Sabine Lake are looking to hook up with solid trout while drifting on the lower lake reef. And at Port O’Connor, there is the Army Hole that gives up some excellent catches of trout on the coldest days of the year. “Our fishing on the Colorado River is good now and is only going to get better with more cold weather,” said Matagordabased guide Charlie Paradoski. “The river starts holding trout in September when the water is in the low 70s. But as of Jan. 1, the water temperature was right at 65 degrees. It’s gone down a few degrees since the front we got on Jan. 6.” Paradoski says that one of the best ways to fish the river is to work both banks just like you would while bass fishing with a Texas-rigged worm.

“I like to work the bank in 3 to 5 feet of water with 5-inch Bass Assassins rigged on 1⁄4- to 3/8-ounce jig heads,” he says. “I’ll use the heavier jigs when I’m fishing the middle of the river on very cold days. My best colors are chartreuse, pink, chicken on a chain and black shad. I’ll usually start out with a saltwater shad Assassin. But there are days when a paddle tail is best.” Sabine Lake guide Jerry Norris says the colder the weather gets the better the trout fishing will be on the lower end of Sabine Lake. He’s talking about the water from the causeway bridge and on up to Blue Buck Point. This is one huge oyster reef in water from 5 to 25 feet deep. It’s the perfect place for trout to hold during the chill of winter. “The fishing is easy on the reef and when it’s on, it’s tough to beat,” says Norris. “The best way to fish is to drift while bumping jigs on bottom. I’ll usually start out fishing in 10 to 12 feet of water early. As the sun warms things up, I’ll move shallow and fish from 5 to 8 feet deep. But on the really cold and windy days, I’ll bump jigs along the deeper areas of the reefs. My go to jig is an Assassin Saltwater Shad in red/shad, fire tiger or chartreuse. A 1/4-ounce jig head is best. You don’t want the jig head to be too heavy, otherwise you’ll be snagging Please turn to page 13

“Stinky” business ends Old nemesis lurking in Lake Fork not seen as up smelling sweet threat to bass By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

HOME GROWN: Those seeing wade-fishermen along the Texas coast notice a colorful stringer dangling behind nearly every angler. The stringers are made by Jason Paul in his garage. Photo from Jason Paul.

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News If you fish on the Texas coast, odds are you’ve seen Jason Paul’s handiwork — slick stringers that come in 10 electric colors. If you don’t already know his product’s name, odds are you’ll never guess it. It’s a tribute of sorts to his son, Wyatt: Stinky Pants Fishing Stringers. Paul started the company almost 10 years ago. When he wasn’t teaching at a San Antonio middle school, or changing diapers, he made stringers. “You might hate the name or you might love it,” said Paul, who lives in Boerne, “but you’ll remember it. I’ve

had a lot of fun with the name over the years.” At first, Paul only intended to make a better premium stringer. “When you pay more, you expect more,” he said. “The ones I bought didn’t last, so I started making my own stringers.” Paul made his stringers with galvanized wire (he now uses stainless steel) topped by a vinyl coating. The stringer ran through the float. There was nothing to connect or fall off. Soon, his friends sought their own. And the demand grew from there. “They were coming back and telling me their friends wanted them,” Paul said. “I thought, ‘Maybe I ought to just start making and selling them.’” Please turn to page 14

The results of a Lake Fork fish survey in November found signs of a virus once problematic for largemouth bass but no new pathogens or diseases of concern. Testing found signs of the largemouth bass virus (LMBV) at Lake Fork that once plagued lakes in the 1990s. The good news is that fish develop resistance to the virus, so it is no longer seen as a threat. Kevin Storey, district manager of Tyler North District Inland Fisheries, said the virus was worrisome in the past because of the large fish kills it created. “It seems that once there’s been a fish kill — there’s no reoccurrence,” he said. “It seems to be the same pattern throughout the country.” LMBV was the causative agent of large fish kills experienced on Sam Rayburn Reservoir in 1998 and on Lake Fork between June and August 1999. LMBV was confirmed in 26 bass fisheries in Texas and, in many cases, the virus resulted in mortalities, especially larger fish. As recently as in 2011, LMBV was detected in samples from Lake Fork. Jason Woodland, a fish biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Dexter, New Mexico, which initiated the study at Lake Fork, said the idea of the wild fish survey is to test for pathogens to help fishery managers across the United States deal with potential problems. Woodland said that there is no known treatment for LMBV, but agreed with Storey in that it would be rare for the virus to strike the same reservoir twice. Tissue samples were taken from the kidney, spleen, and swim bladder from a sample of 60 largemouth bass. The tissues were pooled in 12 groups of five fish, and two of these groups

BILL OF HEALTH: A fish survey at Lake Fork did not discover diseases of concern, although largemouth bass virus was discovered, but the bass have developed resistance to the disease. Photo by TPWD.

tested positive for LMBV. Storey said the USFWS had some extra funding that made the sampling possible. State staff assisted in determining if there were any unknown threats to fish health. Samples were taken at Lake Fork from largemouth bass, redear sunfish, bluegill, longear sunfish, channel catfish, gizzard shad, bowfin, freshwater drum and black crappie. The sampling also helps determine if pathogens are occurring in both the wild and hatcheries. One example would be to determine if whirling disease and the Asian tapeworm are showing up in wild fish populations.


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TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear; 48 degrees; 1.77’ low. Black bass are slow on deep-diving crankbaits, swimbaits and jerkbaits. Crappie and bass are slow. Catfish are good on punch bait up the river. AMISTAD: Water murky; 66– 70 degrees; 16.27’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits, jerkbaits and soft plastics. Striped bass are good on slabs, spoons, and jigs in 30–65 feet. White bass are good on slabs, spoons, and jigs in 30–65 feet. Catfish are good on shrimp, chicken livers, nightcrawlers and cheese bait. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 49–56 degrees; 0.8’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 50–53 degrees; 0.18’ low. Black bass are fair on suspending jerkbaits and bladed jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad. BASTROP: Water stained; 62–66 degrees. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, spinnerbaits and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on stink bait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow. BELTON: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.62’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 51–54 degrees; 1.16’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws, bladed jigs and spinner baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 49–52 degrees; 2.97’ low. Black bass are slow on crankbaits, jigs and Texasrigged soft plastics. Crappie are good on brush piles with jigs and jigs. Catfish are good on cut bait. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are good on spinner baits, dark soft plastic worms, and minnows in the reeds and near the dam. Striped bass are good on spoons in deeper water. Redfish are fair on perch, shad and silver spoons. Channel and blue catfish are good on liver, shrimp, perch and shad. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 49–53 degrees: 0.09’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Catfish are slow. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 0.16’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse/black jigs, small crankbaits, and watermelon red worms over brush piles in 10– 20 feet. Hybrid striper are fair on green striper jigs. White bass are fair under lighted docks at night. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows over brush piles in 10–20 feet. Channel catfish are fair on stink bait, minnows and shrimp. BUCHANAN: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 2.00’ low. Black bass are good on water-

melon red grubs on jigheads and Texas-rigged blue flake worms. Striped bass are good drifting live shad, and jigging swim baits in 25–40 feet. White bass are fair on crappie jigs along main lake points and creek bluffs in 15–25 feet. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CADDO: Water stained; 50–54 degrees; 0.75’ high. Black bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms, live minnows and crankbaits around reeds and near the dam. Striped bass are good on shad near the dam in 15–20 feet. Redfish are fair on live perch, shad, tilapia and crawfish. Channel catfish are good on liver, shrimp and minnows. Blue catfish are good on liver and nightcrawlers. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 0.27’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon red Brush Hogs, Texas-rigged drop-shot worms, and tubes on jigheads in the stickups and along bluffs in 15–20 feet. Striped bass are fair trolling Shad Raps in the lower end of the lake over humps. White bass are fair on blade baits along main lake bluffs. Smallmouth bass are good on white grubs, watermelon tubes and smoke drop-shot worms along main lake points and bluff ledges. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 49–53 degrees; 1.75’ low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, lipless crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 19.67’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits, heavy jigs and large soft plastic lizards in the grass. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on punch bait. COLEMAN: Water stained; 64–68 degrees; 1.30’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon lipless crankbaits and crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. COLETO CREEK: Water murky; 77 degrees at the hot water discharge, 67 degrees in main lake; 2.52’ low. Black bass are fair on green pumpkin soft plastics and crankbaits in 8–10 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. CONROE: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 0.20’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon red spinner baits and lipless crankbaits in 15–30 feet. Striped bass are good on chartreuse striper jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on stink bait and frozen shrimp.

FALCON: Water murky; 65–69 degrees; 28.53’ low. Black bass are fair slow-rolling spinner baits and on large worms in 12–18 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on frozen shrimp and stink bait. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on spinner baits and crankbaits over grass, and on watermelon Carolina-rigged worms. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stink bait and minnows over baited holes. FORK: Water lightly stained; 49–53 degrees; 2.84’ low. Black bass are good on squarebilled crankbaits, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. White and yellow bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait and stink bait. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 50–56 degrees; 0.5’ low. Black bass are fair on shaky heads, chatterbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on watermelon red spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp and liver. GRANBURY: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse/blue flake soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on small spinner baits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp, stink bait and liver. GRANGER: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 0.57’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on shad in the main lake and upriver. Crappie are slow. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits, and on juglines baited with cut bait, shad and Zote soap. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 49–52 degrees; 0.28’ high. Black bass are fair on suspending jerkbaits, shakyhead worms and spinner baits. White bass and hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait. GREENBELT: 31.27’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and finesse jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 0.21’ high. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and clear/metal flake creature baits off piers. Crappie are fair on minnows. Bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. HUBBARD CREEK: Water off-color; 51–55 degrees; 0.57’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and spinner baits. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 48–52 degrees; 0.5’ low. Black bass are good on finesse jigs, bladed jigs and medium crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are

fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water lightly stained; 49–52 degrees: 0.05’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, bladed jigs and flipping jigs. White bass are fair on slabs and crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 50–53 degrees: 3.45’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. LBJ: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 1.65’ low. Black bass are fair on jigs, pumpkin drop-shot worms, and green pumpkin tubes off docks. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on shad swimbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are fair on minnows and nightcrawlers. Yellow and blue catfish are slow. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 48–51 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.33’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse crankbaits, spinner baits, and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with shad. MACKENZIE: 73.67’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 84–88 degrees; 1.74’ low. Black bass are good on spinner baits, square-billed crankbaits and Texas-rigged craws. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. MEREDITH: 60.91’ low. Reports of black bass are rare. No reports of smallmouth bass. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 84–88 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are good on Texasrigged creature baits, flipping jigs and swim jigs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. NASWORTHY: 49–55 degrees; 1.28’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs and chatterbaits. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 0.11’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on spinner baits and crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows in 9–15 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 49–56 degrees; 34.04’ low. Black bass are fair on pearl crankbaits, Texas rigs and swim jigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained;

48–56 degrees; 9.38’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, crankbaits and shaky heads. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on chartreuse nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 49–52 degrees; 1.35’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged worms, bladed jigs and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. White bass are fair on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 48–55 degrees; 0.09’ low. Black bass are fair to good on swim jigs, Texas rigs and medium-running crankbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.52’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and soft plastics. Striped bass are fair on green striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shad and shrimp. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 48–52 degrees; 1.25’ low. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, umbrella rigs and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines and prepared bait. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 48–51 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are good on bladed jigs, soft plastic jerkbaits and Carolina-rigged creature baits. White bass are fair on slabs and crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 48–51 degrees; 1.54’ low. Black bass are slow. White bass are fair on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 3.07’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics, crankbaits, and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on live minnows and silver spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Bream are fair on worms. Catfish are good on stink bait, frozen shrimp and liver. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 63–67 degrees; 0.22’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse crankbaits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and green/black tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are good on blood bait. STAMFORD: 0.3’ low. Black bass and crappie are fair to good, but mostly undersized. White bass are fair to good on minnows and bladed jigs. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait.

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 14

STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 60–64 degrees; 0.35’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits, soft plastics and lipless crankbaits. White bass are fair on pet spoons. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. TAWAKONI: Water stained; 49–53 degrees; 2.62’ low. Black bass are fair on bladed jigs, Texas-rigged creature baits and flipping jigs. White bass are good on slabs and crankbaits. Hybrid bass are fair on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water stained; 47–51 degrees; 0.76’ high. Black bass are fair on suspending jerkbaits, umbrella rigs and shaky-head worms. Crappie are good on minnows and white jigs. Striped bass are good on slabs. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 3.80’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastics, spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs over brush piles. Bream are fair on worms. Channel and blue catfish are good on nightcrawlers, shrimp and stink bait. TRAVIS: Water stained; 62–66 degrees; 1.14’ high. Black bass are good on green shad crankbaits, electric blue worms and smoke grubs in 10–25 feet. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and spoons in 30–45 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait in 25–40 feet. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are slow. WHITE RIVER: Water stained; 45–52 degrees; 19.47’ low. Black bass are very slow. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. WHITNEY: Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 3.24’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon red spinner baits and crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are good on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on frozen shrimp, minnows and stink bait.

—TPWD


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Trout, fun and food with Capt. Javi Castillo By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Capt. Javi Castillo has always loved to fish, but for years never had enough time to do it. The Bishop resident worked in oil-related businesses, where he liked the pay but grew weary of the 100-hour weeks away from home and off of the water. “I finally said it was enough, and it was time to do what I love,” he said. Now, he guides out of Corpus Christi and Baffin Bay. “My favorite is to pursue trophy trout,” he said. “In the fall, I’m in Corpus Christi Bay and I move to Baffin Bay in the winter when the trout move in.” His favorite method is wade-fishing, and he’s currently throwing Homewrecker, Down South Lures and Corkies over the famous rocks, and occasionally the mud, of Baffin Bay. “Baffin Bay doesn’t have shell, so the rocks and the mud are where the fish seek warmer water,” he said. The loss of lures is always a risk when casting over the rocks, as they seem to reach out and grab a hook when the lure is fished a little too slowly. “My wife, Alicia, probably has thousands of dollars of lures in those rocks,” he said while making another cast. Castillo grew up in Corpus Christi and attended a school where bullying, fighting and bad behavior were common. “I started to hang out at the golf course and get jobs,” he said. “The people there were like parents to me. It kept me out of trouble.” He also practiced and became quite proficient at the game, landing a college scholarship and playing in a few mini tours. His other great interest, gourmet cooking, was developed while in college. “I took a culinary class in college and really took to it,” Castillo said. The description of your sandwich won’t be “Here’s your turkey sandwich;” more likely, it will be: “You’re having turkey on multi-grain bread with fresh lettuce, tomatoes and an aioli mayonnaise.” Two recent dinner descriptions were: “Fresh crispy skin-on trout from today, lobster tail, colossal shrimp, grilled asparagus marinated in fresh ginger and garlic with

BIG TROUT GUIDE: Capt. Javi Castillo guides customers to trophy trout, and last year, customers landed 37 trout measuring more than 28 inches. Photo by Craig Nyhus, Lone Star Outdoor News.

a splash of white wine; and homemade Pho with colossal Argentinian shrimp and stone crab purchased at HEB in Kingsville.” His cooking prowess has his customers wanting more. “They always want me to cook,” Castillo said, “I’m planning on expanding at home to provide lodging for a few people so I’ll have a place for them to stay where I can cook.” Castillo posts recipes and videos of cooking methods on his Facebook and Instagram pages. A cookbook including his recipes is being developed. And Alicia is the beneficiary. “I’ve gained weight since being with him,” she said. “He won’t let me cook, he’s always changing everything.” But at the end of the day, it’s all about the trout. Javi’s personal best trout measured 32.5 inches and weighed 10.3 pounds. Alicia’s best is 31 inches and weighed 9.4 pounds. Last trout season, Javi’s customers landed 37 trout between 28 and 32 inches. Capt. Javier “Javi” Castillo (361) 815-4865

Lake Fork bass Continued from page 1

If you don’t mind working for a catch, though, and, frankly, have the skill to tangle with fish in the cold, you might just catch yourself a big ’un — as in trophy size. No joke. Lake Fork’s record largemouth bass (18.18 pounds) was caught in January 1992. While crappie fishing, angler Barry St. Clair used a minnow in 42 feet of water to bring in the 25.5-incher. That was during what many call Lake Fork’s “prime,” only 12 years after its impoundment. It’s tougher to fish there in winter these days, guides told LSON. You need to be proficient using jigs, which doesn’t come easily to novices, said guide David Ozio. “If you don’t know how to throw a jig, how to pitch it accurately, it’s going to be a terrible day for you at Lake Fork,” Ozio said. “For that reason, I don’t expose a lot of my clients (beginners) to that venue during the winter.” Besides technique, experience plays a big role in handling a jig when weather turns colder, said guide Jason Hoffman. “It’s kinda hard for an inexperienced fisherman to get the hang of,” Hoffman said. “He’s not going to get a ton of bites and the ones he gets are going to be light. You really have to be focused on what you’re doing.” Anglers have two options when fishing at Lake Fork in the winter, according to Hoffman. “You can fish really slow or you can fish

really fast and try to get a reaction strike,” he said. “Fish slow with a jig or a jerkbait. Fish fast with a jiggerbait or a crank, cover a lot of water and hope you get it close enough to make them react.” Rogers said if he was going out with the water still cold that he’d start out in 6-10 feet of water and hit the main lake points with a jerkbait “and, maybe, a square-billed crankbait in main lake pockets if there’s any sun.” Go slow with a jerkbait, Hoffman instructed. “Try to give long pauses between jerks,” he said. “Give the bass a chance to move over there and eat it.” However, for many guides the go-to lure when it turns cold is a jig. For two reasons. It matches winter forage (crawfish) that move at a snail’s pace, which suits the bass’ slower metabolism just fine. Also, a jig can be fished at all depths: down deep to get the bass feeding or up higher where they live in the winter. Hoffman and a jig put one of his clients on ShareLunker 346 at Lake Fork in 2003. “It was a 13.51 largemouth on a black and blue jig in 50-degree water,” he said. “It’s a proven big fish bait. It’s hard not to have one in your hand this time of year — if you’re experienced enough to throw it.” Brooks Rogers, (903) 405-1272 David Ozio, (409) 782-4269 Jason Hoffman, (903) 456-3691

January 13, 2017

Page 11


Page 12

January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER BUCK IN THE TRUNK A 911 call to the Pecos County Sheriff’s Office claimed someone had discharged a firearm from a car stopped in the road. Deputies on patrol located the suspect vehicle with two people inside. The deputies discovered a 12-gauge shotgun in the backseat and a dead mule deer buck stuffed into the trunk. State game wardens were called to the scene. The driver had a valid hunting license and hunter safety certification, while his buddy had no identification at all. Both men were cited for hunting at night and hunting from the road, along with possession of a mule deer in a closed season and booked into the Pecos County jail. CITATION FOR SIZE VIOLATION A hunter contacted game wardens in Houston County claiming to have witnessed a person on the neighboring property shoot two bucks. Wardens responded and attempted to locate the individual. After searching neighboring properties for about two hours, the wardens noticed a light and some movement in a barn. Wardens walked onto the property and found two deer that had been tagged by two different people. After a short interview, one man confessed to killing both deer and tagging the second with another man’s hunting license. Citations were issued and the second deer was seized. Violations included exceeding the bag limit for whitetail, harvesting an illegal buck having less than a 13-inch spread, hunting under the license of another and allowing another to hunt under license. Cases and civil restitution are pending.

SECOND SHOT OVER THE LINE A Wharton County game warden was patrolling for deer hunting activity when he noticed two hunters in trucks parked just inside of a gate. As he waited for the hunters to return, he heard a single rifle shot that did not hit its target. A short time later he then heard a second shot with a pronounced thump, indicating a hit. The warden looked through his binoculars and saw a man with a rifle walking past a deer feeder and crossing the fence line. He next saw the man come back across the fence and go into his stand. Another hunter came up to the man, and they both rode back to their trucks on an ATV. The warden made contact and when he asked if they had seen anything that morning, the hunter that shot stated he shot once at a buck but

NOT EASILY DISTRACTED While on patrol opening weekend of deer season, a Shelby County game warden approached a house after dark and saw movement from behind the house. After backing up his patrol vehicle and pulling in the driveway, the warden was met by a hunter who claimed someone was trespassing on his property and had fired a shot. The man provided directions to a location where the warden should go patrol, but before leaving, the warden checked behind the house where he discovered a buck strapped to the back of an ATV. The buck’s antlers measured 12 inches wide, which did not meet the minimum restrictions for the county and also was untagged. The man claimed he’d left his hunting license inside and while he excused himself to go retrieve it, the warden did a quick search on his mobile app and found the man did not have a hunting license.

missed. The warden then told the hunter he had been listening as well as watching him for some time and that he knew he had shot twice. The man then confessed to shooting at the deer twice, taking a second shot after the deer crossed the fence line. The man stated he looked for blood and hair, but could not find any. The warden searched and found where the deer had crossed a county road leaving a small blood trail and hoof prints with a drag mark where it was dragging a leg. The warden located the shot white-tailed buck. It was determined that the deer had been shot in the right hindquarter as it was traveling away from the hunter. The hunter was accused of hunting without landowner consent. Cases and restitution are pending.

The man returned and handed the warden proof of a hunting license purchased online three minutes earlier. The illegal buck and firearm used were both seized. The warden also noticed a nearby ice chest and inquired about the venison inside, to which the man replied that his son had shot a nice buck and given the meat to his mother. Because a wildlife resource document is required to transfer harvested game, the warden contacted the son, who verified he had killed a deer on opening day, Saturday, Nov. 5. On a hunch, the warden followed up on and discovered the son did have a hunting license, but it had been purchased at a local store on Sunday, Nov. 6, the day after he admitted harvesting a deer. Multiple citations and civil restitution filed on both hunters and the investigation is ongoing.

RAILROADED DEER A Harrison County game warden received a call from a landowner that someone had been hunting deer without consent on property owned by a railroad company and had witnessed the suspect dragging a dead deer down the middle of the railroad tracks bordering the property. The warden was able to pick up the blood trail on the tracks and followed it to a house where he found the deer and the suspect. The suspect admitted to hunting on railroad property. Multiple charges are pending. IT’S ALL DOWNSTREAM A Travis County game warden received a call about an individual keeping undersized largemouth bass and exceeding the daily bag limit on the upper end of Lake Austin at a popular fishing spot. Upon the warden’s arrival, a fisherman matching the description of the

suspected violator indicated he was leaving, and it was not necessary to check him for compliance. The suspect did possess a fishing license. The warden discovered a stringer of fish downstream and was able to revive and release them alive. Cases pending. UNPLUGGED PROBLEM While on patrol for duck hunting violations in Aransas County, wardens came across a group of three hunters, including one they recognized from a check the week prior who had been given several warnings for violations. One of the hunters had his shotgun taken apart, the second one said he was not hunting but handed over his license and the third one produced his license and shotgun for inspection. As the first hunter was reassembling his shotgun, the warden noticed he was in possession of lead shot, which is prohibited for waterfowl hunting. The warden then noticed an object in the water under the bench of the second hunter. After repeated requests to hand over the item, the hunter finally picked up his shotgun from under the water. The shotgun was in violation of waterfowl rules limiting to three the number of shotshells it can hold (unplugged). By this time, the first hunter had finished putting his shotgun together and handed it to the warden. It was also unplugged. Four citations were issued.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL (800) 792-4263


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LoneOStar Outdoor News

Drum ribs a Baffin Bay hit

Continued from page 8

Lone Star Outdoor News After a cool, windy day of wade-fishing in Baffin Bay, angler Gil Esquivel of Bishop made a suggestion for lunch. “Let’s go get some drum ribs,” he said. He received a puzzled look and a question from his fishing companion. NEW DELICACY: At “What are drum Baffin Bay Seafood ribs?” Co., customers It turns out black drum ribs are the spe- jump at the chance to try the black cialty at Baffin Bay drum ribs. The Seafood Co., owned by drum are caught loCraig Alexander, that cally by commercial sits by the water with a fishermen. Photos large patio and view of by Craig Alexander. the bay. “They got famous down here at the Baffin Bay Café,” Alex- and supplied three times per week. “When I opened, all I would get was ander said. Alexander purchased the business af- the drum fillets, but everyone asked for ter the café’s owner, Bruce Kraatz, died the fish ribs,” Alexander said. “There’s in 2013, and reopened it as Baffin Bay a bunch of commercial fishermen here, and I get the drum from Baffin FisherSeafood Co. in November of 2015. “As far as I know, Kraatz started selling men in Riviera, a fish market that purdrum ribs in 2000 when he opened the chases drum from the commercial guys. restaurant,” Alexander said. “My origi- They fillet the drum and send me the full nal menu did not include drum ribs, but fillet with the ribs. I cut them out and I soon found out I wouldn’t survive out sell them separately.” On Fridays, the fish ribs are the spehere without them. I had requests for cial; all you can eat for $9.99. them on the first day we opened.” “We sell out of them first,” Alexander The black drum served at the restaurant, all caught locally, are super fresh said. “That’s why they are on the menu Please turn to page 17

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a lot of oysters.” Norris points out that when you catch a trout, it’s best to put out a marker or mark the spot on your depth finder. Where you find one fish there are usually more in the area. The Army Hole at Port O’Connor is famous for holding trout on the coldest days of winter. It’s located along Matagorda Island just north of Pringle Lake. The key to catching trout here is to fish jigs along the edge of the ledge in 5 to 12 feet of water. Or you can fish live shrimp under a slip float. For the best results rig the shrimp to fish about 6 feet deep in 10 feet of water.

REEF TROUT: Phil Brannon shows his Sabine Lake trout caught over an oyster reef. Photo by Robert Sloan, for Lone Star Outdoor News.


Page 14

January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Redfish are fair to good at the discharge canal on peeled shrimp. Black drum are fair around rock groins. Sand trout are good in the deep holes on shrimp. SOUTH SABINE: Bull redfish are good at the jetty on crabs. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. BOLIVAR: Sand trout are fair to good in the ICW on shrimp. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. TRINITY BAY: Redfish are fair to good in the bayous for waders tossing plastics. Redfish are good at the spillway on crabs and mullet. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair over deep mud and structures on MirrOlures. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are fair for waders in the mud and shell on MirrOlures and Corkies. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. TEXAS CITY: Sheepshead are good around the rocks on shrimp. Trout are fair on shrimp over shell. FREEPORT: Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs. Redfish are good in Cold Pass and San Luis pass on cracked blue crabs. EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Redfish are fair on the south shoreline in the guts and bayous. Sheepshead

LSONews.com

Colorful stringers Continued from page 8

are fair around piers and rocks on shrimp. PORT O’CONNOR: Redfish are fair on Corkies over soft mud and drop–offs near reefs on plastics. Redfish are fair at the mouths of drains on soft plastics and gold spoons. ROCKPORT: Redfish are fair to good at California Hole on shrimp. Trout are fair on the edge of the ICW on glow DOA Shrimp. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Estes Flats on mullet and shrimp. PORT ARANSAS: Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the channel on scented plastics and mullet. Sand trout are good on shrimp in the channel. CORPUS CHRISTI: Redfish are fair to good in the Humble Channel and around Emmords Hole on crabs and shrimp. Trout are best on the edge of the flats on live shrimp and DOA Shrimp.

BAFFIN BAY: Trout are fair to good in mud and rocks on Corkies and Soft–Dines. Redfish are fair on the edge of the Land Cut on plastics tipped with shrimp. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are fair to good on DOA Shrimp around grass holes. Trout and redfish are fair on muddy shorelines and on the edge of the ICW on Corkies and soft plastics worked slowly. SOUTH PADRE: Trout and redfish are fair on the edge of the Intracoastal on DOA Shrimp and scented plastics. Redfish, black drum and mangrove snapper are fair to good in the channel on shrimp. PORT ISABEL: Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on soft plastics and imitation shrimp. Redfish are fair in the deep holes and along the edge of the channel on gold spoons and jigs tipped with shrimp. —TPWD

Paul makes most of his stringers during the summer when school’s out and over the Thanksgiving and Christmas breaks. His father, Greg, helps with the assembly; his mom, Patty, with packaging; and Wyatt with organizing the materials. Stinky Pants’ craftsmanship has caught the attention of people along the Gulf and elsewhere, including Tony Hart, editor-in-chief of Yak Outlaws, a Florida website devoted to kayaking and paddleboard angling. Hart discovered Stinky Pants after entering a Corpus Christi fishing tournament. “I’ve used the nylon stringers, even the chain-link style fish stringers, and neither have lasted the test of time on the water,” Hart said. “The nylon stringers typically last as long as one use, whereas the metal chain-link style are loud, clank, and tend to rust after several trips in the saltwater marshes and flats we typically fish here in northeast Florida. I still have the original stringer that I got from SP. It’s held up to hauling tons of redfish, trout, flounder, black drum, and sheepshead over the years.” Fans of Paul’s product exhort friends and others to “get their stank on.” Many of them frequent the 2CoolFishing.com website. “High grade material and has the simplest/easiest way to remove the float and dump fish,” esc wrote. “Won’t ever twist and is durable as heck,” southpaw noted. In case you’re wondering, these guys don’t like everything. One regular warned readers off a competitor’s stringer: “Do not buy this unless you are a catch-and-release guy, because that is exactly what will happen.”

Paul sells his stringers at 23 stores “up and down” the coast, including Rockport Tackle Town. “It does pretty good,” said manager Mike Schwenn. “It’s a slick instead of being rope. It’s a piece of coated wire, and the fish come on and off easily. It doesn’t get tangled. If you’re wading and catch some redfish, they’ll pretty much stay in line.” Paul doesn’t really advertise his product, unless you count his “pro team,” friends whom he supplies with gear. Besides stringers, Stinky Pants sells such things as floats, waterproof tackle boxes, T-shirts and caps. With limited resources, customer service is paramount to Paul’s business strategy. On 2CoolFishing.com, coryki wrote that his brother had a Stinky Pants stringer croak after several years and called Paul. While there’s no lifetime guarantee, Paul listened patiently to his brother. “A few days later, he had a new stringer shipped to his house, no questions asked,” coryki stated. “Awesome.” “Awesome” is also the word Paul uses to describe how he’d feel if his hobby became a full-time business. It’s clear, however, that he’s not consumed by dreams of riches. For one thing, Paul’s hesitant about having larger stores sell his products. “If everything was made in China, and I was just shipping it in and shipping it out, the big box stores would be important to me,” he said. “But I make everything myself. Honestly, I’d have a hard time letting go of it being a handson product and making sure it’s the way it’s meant to be.”


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

January 13, 2017

Page 15

PRODUCTS 337 WICKED BOX CALL: Zink’s newest call is a versatile, traditional-style box call handcrafted from poplar and dense blood wood. The turkey call, which transitions from a nasal front end to a raspy low end, creates superior low tones for soft calling and long-range locating. The multiple tones of its double-sided design emulate multiple hens. It costs about $100.

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TRAVELER TUMBLER: Pelican’s new tumbler – with its double-wall vacuum insulation and copper-plated inner wall — will keep an angler’s or hunter’s hot drinks hot and cold drinks cold. Featuring a high polished steel base and rim accents, the tumbler has a threaded spill-resistant slide lid and an ergonomic design for a comfortable grip. Available in three colors: black, green (shown) and stainless steel, the tumbler comes in a 22-ounce size (about $30) or a 32-ounce size (about $40).

GOLDEN SHINER SWIMBAIT: This lure from Live Target is for use in shallow water fisheries where monster bass will chase this baitfish among the pencil reeds and eelgrass. The freshwater swimbait offers a medium-slow sink rate and is available in two sizes (5.5-inch-long and 6.5-inch-long models) and two colors (silver/blue and gold/black). The lure costs about $12 to $14.

(800) 473-5422 pelican.com

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(888) 231-4448 livetargetlures.com

UA GORE-TEX PRO JACKET AND PRO PANTS: These hunting pants and jacket by Under Armour are waterproof and windproof for use in extreme conditions. The shell of each garment is engineered from a three-layer rugged, breathable fabric that repels water. The Ridge Reaper Camo jacket and pants offer a fuller cut for a comfortable, loose fit and are available in sizes small to 3XL. The jacket (about $500) has secure, pack-accessible hand pockets plus an interior mesh pocket for stashing extra gear while the pants (about $470) have a secure back pocket plus 23-inch-long leg zippers. Lone Star Outdoor News’ CEO David J. Sams wore the pants and jacket on a recent hunt in British Columbia. “The weather socked in with snow and subzero temperatures. I used the pants and jacket as my top layer. It blocked the wind totally, keeping my core warm and the snow melted without me feeling any moisture. The breathable fabric performed as advertised. The fit was a real plus since I had on two other layers and was on horseback most of the time. I wore the pants without a belt and they never slipped down when tromping through the knee-high snow. They are not loud but not totally quiet either when stalking. But when I sat waiting for two hours on a bull moose to show, I was glad my butt was covered and not getting frozen to the ground.” (888) 727-6687 underarmour.com

ASQUITH FLY ROD: Combining the best of Shimano technology and G. Loomis expertise, this line includes fly rods to target trout, bass, salmon and steelhead trout. These rods excel in situations where developing high line speed and making precise casts means success, said G. Loomis chief rod designer Steve Rajeff. The rods, which are designed for demanding conditions and technical fishing environments, offer exceptional casting distance, pinpoint accuracy, a lighter-than-expected blank, and reduced blank twist. The increased rod rigidity that reduces twist without adding weight is achieved through a patented construction process utilizing “Spiral X” technology: The rod blank begins with a Shimano carbon fiber Infinity Tape core layer. Then, a longitudinal middle layer of “musclecarbon” is added to form a base structure to improve performance. And, finally, it is finished with a reverse-axis Infinity Taper outer layer. Depending on the model, features may include custom bamboo and aluminum reel seats or saltwater-friendly aluminum reel seats plus Titanium SIC Sea Guide strippers with REC Recoil snake guides. The line offers 14 models (nine “all-water” and five spey rods) that range in length from 9 to 15 feet and in weight from 4 to 12. They range in price from $1,000 to $1,700. (800) 456-6647 gloomis.com

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The Patriarch 33 from Nosler is your big-game choice Patriarch: the head of a family or line. That’s what Nosler decided to call the latest and most powerful member of the Nosler Cartridge family, the 33 Nosler. The 33 Nosler brings a new level of power and performance to the standard length action. Capable of firing a 225-grain AccuBond bullet at 3,025 feet per second from one of our Nosler rifles, the 33 is an excellent choice for hunting just about any big game in the world. When you travel halfway around the world to hunt for species with extremely limited licenses, you have to know that your rifle and ammunition possess the power necessary to take animals quickly and cleanly. While the ability of trackers in Africa to follow game is nothing short of amazing, I prefer not to have to rely on their skills when a once-ina-lifetime trophy is on the line. When I shoot an animal, I want it to drop on the spot and that requires an equal measure of power and precision. Fortunately, both abound in the 33 Nosler cartridge. I consider it the greatest big game cartridge ever created, which is why I chose it for my rifle to take on safari this year in Tanzania. From roan and sable down to smaller game like lesser kudu and Thompson’s gazelle, the 33 Nosler in my Liberty rifle handled everything with authority. Between the rugged simplicity and dependability of the Model 48 Nosler Rifle and the raw power and accuracy of the 33 Nosler cartridge, I had complete confidence that when a trophy was in my crosshairs, all I had to do was break the shot clean and the rest would take care of itself. I was able to take a total of eight plains game species on that trip, and my PH and I were simply astounded at how quickly animals went down when shot with the 33, no matter how big or far away they were. One thing is for sure, the 33 is definitely “enough gun.” If you are booking a dream hunt his year, consider taking a new 33, and giving the trackers a break. —John R. Nosler

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Walk where no other topwater has walked before! Compact and durable, the PT-7’s sleek aerodynamic body casts like a bullet and skips into tight places where others can’t. 3 inches in length and 1/2 oz., this soft plastic minesweeper detonates explosive strikes like no other topwater. Snook, redfish, and seatrout, to lunker largemouth bass find its “walk-the-dog” action simply irresistible. Pre-rigged with a single premium 6/0 EWG hook, it keeps the big fish on where standard trebles fail. Available in 4 realistic colors with several more on the way.

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Page 16

January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Brock Scherber shot this 12-point buck with his dad, Doug, at their family lease in Rocksprings.

Howard Sparkman caught this 46.5-inch redfish in Venice, Louisiana, on 12-pound tippet.

Jason DeNunzio Jr., 12, of Angleton, took this first deer — an axis spike — on a low-fenced ranch in Kerr County.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@ lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Carson McKinney Coward, 9, got his first deer hunting at Bonehill Hunting Club in Center.

Jenna Maler, 12, of West, took this 8-pointer with a Browning .30-06 at 110 yards. She was with her dad, David, near Clifton.

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Tasty drum Continued from page 13

as ‘when available.’” The recipe is nothing fancy, as the restaurant uses the same breading and seasoning as in its other fried offerings. But there is something about them that keeps the customers coming back. “They are kind of a pain to eat,” Alexander said as his customers picked meat from the bones. “But people like them.” Alexander wasn’t surprised his new customer had never heard of drum ribs. “As far as I know, there isn’t anyone else on the coast that sells them,” he said.

OTF hires executive director The Outdoors Tomorrow Foundation, formerly known as the Dallas Ecological Foundation, announced the hiring of Sean McLelland as its executive director, effective Jan. 3. Prior to coming onboard with OTF, McLelland served as the national youth director for the Youth Target Foundation, the director of development for the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation and he is an advisory council member for the National Sporting Clays Association. McLelland represented the United States of America 17 times in international competition as a shotgun athlete and competed in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in marketing from Lindenwood University. “Sean brings the right mixture of talents to the job as the organization rebrands and strives to increase its presence as the industry leader in youth outdoor education through our nationally acclaimed Outdoor Adventures program, and through our commitment to conservation efforts worldwide,” said OTF Chairman David Price. —OTF

LoneOStar Outdoor News

January 13, 2017

Page 17

Rash of drownings spur precautions Continued from page 1

Steve Hall, Hunter Education manager for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, said hunters and anglers need to take steps to stay safe. “Duck hunters in boats – it’s always been about drowning,” Hall said. Duck hunting entails a unique set of risks involving guns, water and oftentimes boats. Small boats are loaded down with decoys and equipment, and duck hunters frequently set out in cold, rainy conditions that could contribute to hypothermia. Hall said lifejackets should always be part of a hunters safety plan if he or she is going to be in a boat or in the water. Lifejackets are required for those under 13 who are on a boat, but everyone should wear one, he said. “The bottom line is anyone would be foolish not to wear one,” Hall said. Authorities recovered the bodies of 26-year-old Corey Saunders and his 5-year-old son, Nathan, from Lake Tawakoni this month. They are still investigating the circumstances, but said both bodies were recovered without lifejackets. “We preach lifejackets. We enforce lifejacket rules. It’s because of tragedies like this,” said Texas Game Warden Capt. Steve Stapleton, who helped conduct the search for the pair. Stapleton said the man, his son and their Labrador took a boat onto the lake from Caddo Landing in the area of Farmto-Market Road 2101 near Boles Home at about 5 a.m. The boy’s mother reported them missing when they didn’t return from their trip. Authorities said it was the father’s first time using the small boat that was filled with hunting equipment. A strong storm

blew through the area that morning, and their capsized boat was found near a stump in the water. The dog survived the incident and searchers used the dog’s position on the bank, as reported by a neighbor, to help locate the child’s body in the water. The father’s body was recovered hours later in the same general area. But lifejackets didn’t save the three waterfowlers on the coast. Starett Burke, Spencer Hall and Chris Ruckman, all between the ages of 18 and 25, were pulled from the water wearing their lifejackets according to Capt. Jasson Bussey at TPWD’s Victoria office. Like the Lake Tawakani incident, weather apparently played a role in their deaths. Karl Alejandre, a spokesman with the U.S. Coast Guard in Corpus Christi, said it was windy and a small-craft advisory was in effect when the trio went hunting. Searchers found their 17-foot boat capsized. The body of one of their two hunting dogs was also recovered. The other dog remains missing. Bussey said the water temperature was reported to be about 49 degrees at the time the three went hunting. Their bodies were found about 15 miles from where they put in. Authorities are awaiting autopsy results, but hypothermia may have claimed their lives. The deaths of the three young men were unusual because they were wearing lifejackets, Bussey said. Their deaths underline the need for thinking through different situations. “I would say, first be smart. You’ve got to look at conditions. Is it worth the risk of life?” Bussey said. People need to run through different scenarios and how to handle them, he said. For example, one

technique people can use if their boat capsizes is to climb on top of it. Besides lifejackets, authorities say people should leave a detailed itinerary of their trip with someone that includes locations and time they expect to return. Another important precaution is to avoid hunting or fishing alone. If a medical emergency takes place, a partner can call for help. In the case of the possible Waco drowning, Sgt. Patrick Swanton said Gregory Landers, 54, appeared to be taking safety precautions by fishing with a buddy. When the friend stepped away for a few minutes and returned, the victim had disappeared. Swanton pointed out that most people bank-fishing don’t wear life vests because they don’t think they’re going in the water. “The reality is any time you’re around the water, you could have a slip or fall. Things can turn deadly very quickly,” Swanton said. As for wade-fishing, Hall said some bottoms are muddy and anglers can get stuck. One technique for getting free is to drop to your knees in the water to free your feet and then crawl backward, away from the hole. But that’s only if an angler finds himself in about a foot of water. If anglers are fishing in 2 or 3 feet of water, then using a wade stick and fishing with a buddy are the safest bet. Hall said people often lose their lives because they become complacent about safety and don’t think it can happen to them. “You’ve got to be extra careful,” Hall said.


Page 18

January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

Last

New

First

Full

Jan. 19

Jan. 27

Feb. 3

Feb. 10

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jan. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jan. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

13 Fri 14 Sat 15 Sun 16 Mon 17 Tue 18 Wed 19 Thu 20 Fri 21 Sat 22 Sun 23 Mon 24 Tue 25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri

13 Fri 14 Sat 15 Sun 16 Mon 17 Tue 18 Wed 19 Thu

5:50 ----6:49 12:36 7:47 1:34 8:42 2:30 9:33 3:22 10:22 4:11 11:07 4:56

6:18 12:04 7:16 1:02 8:12 1:59 9:05 2:53 9:56 3:45 10:44 4:33 11:29 5:18

07:29 07:29 07:29 07:29 07:28 07:28 07:28

20 Fri

11:50 5:39

-----

07:27 05:46 1:06a 12:35p

21 Sat 22 Sun 23 Mon 24 Tue 25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri

12:10 6:21 12:51 7:02 1:31 7:43 2:13 8:25 2:57 9:09 3:43 9:55 4:31 10:43

12:32 6:43 1:13 7:25 1:55 8:06 2:37 8:49 3:22 9:34 4:08 10:20 4:56 11:09

5:44 11:58 6:43 12:30 7:41 1:28 8:36 2:24 9:28 3:16 10:16 4:05 11:01 4:51 11:44 5:34 12:04 6:15 12:45 6:56 1:26 7:37 2:07 8:19 2:51 9:03 3:37 9:49 4:25 10:38

6:12 ----7:10 12:56 8:06 1:53 9:00 2:48 9:50 3:39 10:38 4:27 11:23 5:12 ----- 5:55 12:26 6:37 1:07 7:19 1:49 8:01 2:32 8:44 3:16 9:28 4:02 10:15 4:50 11:03

07:17 07:17 07:17 07:16 07:16 07:16 07:16 07:16 07:15 07:15 07:15 07:14 07:14 07:13 07:13

05:41 05:42 05:42 05:43 05:44 05:45 05:46 05:47 05:48 05:48 05:49 05:50 05:51 05:52 05:53

7:20p 8:05a 8:22p 8:52a 9:21p 9:34a 10:18p 10:13a 11:12p 10:49a NoMoon 11:24a 12:06a 11:58a 12:58a 12:33p 1:50a 1:09p 2:42a 1:48p 3:33a 2:29p 4:24a 3:15p 5:14a 4:04p 6:03a 4:57p 6:49a 5:53p

6:01

07:27 07:27 07:26 07:26 07:25 07:25 07:24

05:40 05:41 05:42 05:43 05:44 05:45 05:46 05:47 05:48 05:49 05:50 05:51 05:52 05:53

7:22p 8:16a 8:24p 9:02a 9:25p 9:43a 10:23p 10:20a 11:19p 10:55a NoMoon 11:29a 12:13a 12:02p 1:59a 2:52a 3:44a 4:36a 5:26a 6:14a 7:00a

1:11p 1:49p 2:30p 3:15p 4:05p 4:58p 5:54p

San Antonio 2017 Jan.

A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

13 Fri 14 Sat 15 Sun 16 Mon 17 Tue 18 Wed 19 Thu 20 Fri 21 Sat 22 Sun 23 Mon 24 Tue 25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri

5:56 ----6:56 12:42 7:53 1:41 8:48 2:36 9:40 3:29 10:28 4:17 11:14 5:03 11:57 5:46 12:17 6:28 12:57 7:09 1:38 7:50 2:20 8:32 3:03 9:16 3:49 10:02 4:37 10:50

6:25 12:10 7:22 1:09 8:18 2:06 9:12 3:00 10:03 3:51 10:50 4:39 11:35 5:25 ----- 6:08 12:39 6:50 1:20 7:31 2:01 8:13 2:44 8:56 3:28 9:41 4:14 10:27 5:03 11:15

07:28 07:28 07:28 07:28 07:28 07:28 07:27 07:27 07:27 07:27 07:26 07:26 07:25 07:25 07:25

05:54 05:55 05:56 05:57 05:57 05:58 05:59 06:00 06:01 06:02 06:03 06:04 06:04 06:05 06:06

7:34p 8:17a 8:35p 9:04a 9:34p 9:47a 10:31p 10:25a 11:25p 11:02a NoMoon 11:37a 12:18a 12:11p 1:10a 12:46p 2:02a 1:22p 2:54a 2:01p 3:45a 2:43p 4:36a 3:29p 5:26a 4:18p 6:15a 5:11p 7:01a 6:07p

Amarillo

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jan. Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

13 Fri 14 Sat 15 Sun 16 Mon 17 Tue 18 Wed 19 Thu 20 Fri 21 Sat 22 Sun 23 Mon 24 Tue 25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri

6:10 12:00 7:09 12:56 8:07 1:54 9:02 2:50 9:54 3:42 10:42 4:31 11:27 5:16 ----- 6:00 12:30 6:41 1:11 7:22 1:51 8:03 2:33 8:45 3:17 9:29 4:03 10:15 4:51 11:04

6:38 7:36 8:32 9:25 10:16 11:04 11:49 12:10 12:52 1:33 2:15 2:57 3:42 4:28 5:16

12:24 1:22 2:19 3:14 4:05 4:53 5:38 6:21 7:03 7:45 8:27 9:10 9:54 10:40 11:29

07:55 07:55 07:55 07:54 07:54 07:54 07:53 07:53 07:52 07:52 07:51 07:51 07:50 07:50 07:49

05:54 05:55 05:56 05:57 05:58 05:59 06:00 06:01 06:02 06:03 06:04 06:05 06:06 06:07 06:09

7:39p 8:41a 8:43p 9:26a 9:44p 10:06a 10:43p 10:42a 11:40p 11:16a NoMoon 11:49a 12:35a 12:21p 1:30a 12:53p 2:23a 1:28p 3:17a 2:05p 4:10a 2:46p 5:02a 3:31p 5:52a 4:20p 6:40a 5:14p 7:26a 6:11p

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 2:19 AM 3:10 AM 4:04 AM 12:20 AM 1:26 AM 2:34 AM 3:36 AM 4:27 AM 5:10 AM 5:50 AM 6:28 AM 7:05 AM 12:13 AM 12:43 AM 1:16 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.6L 0.4L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L -0.5L -0.6L 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 9:46 AM 10:33 AM 11:19 AM 5:09 AM 6:36 AM 8:31 AM 10:30 AM 12:08 PM 1:17 PM 2:06 PM 2:43 PM 3:14 PM 7:42 AM 8:18 AM 8:55 AM

Time 5:28 PM 6:12 PM 6:56 PM 12:06 PM 12:54 PM 1:47 PM 2:53 PM 4:20 PM 5:59 PM 7:08 PM 7:42 PM 8:02 PM 3:42 PM 4:09 PM 4:37 PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H -0.3L 0.0L 0.2L 0.5L 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L 0.8L 0.8L 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H

Time 10:26 PM 11:19 PM

Height 0.7L 0.7L

7:39 PM 8:21 PM 9:02 PM 9:40 PM 10:15 PM 10:47 PM 11:17 PM 11:45 PM

1.0H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H 0.9H

8:23 PM 8:49 PM 9:21 PM

0.8L 0.8L 0.8L

Time 11:25 PM

Height 0.9L

7:13 7:54 8:30 8:58 9:19 9:29 9:36 9:53

1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H 0.9H

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 2:23 AM 3:19 AM 12:01 AM 12:51 AM 1:53 AM 2:53 AM 3:50 AM 4:43 AM 5:28 AM 6:06 AM 6:40 AM 7:14 AM 7:48 AM 12:26 AM 1:15 AM

Height 1.2H 1.1H 0.8L 0.6L 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L -0.7L 0.9H 0.9H

Time 9:56 AM 10:41 AM 4:12 AM 5:07 AM 6:29 AM 8:34 AM 10:17 AM 12:11 PM 1:32 PM 2:32 PM 3:17 PM 3:51 PM 4:19 PM 8:24 AM 9:01 AM

Height -0.9L -0.7L 1.0H 0.9H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.2H -0.7L -0.7L

Time 5:48 PM 6:30 PM 11:23 AM 12:05 PM 12:50 PM 1:44 PM 2:58 PM 5:17 PM 6:36 PM 7:31 PM

Height 1.4H 1.3H -0.5L -0.3L 0.0L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L 0.7L 0.8L

10:07 PM 4:44 PM 5:07 PM

0.9L 1.2H 1.2H

Height 0.6H 0.4L 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.4L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L -0.6L -0.6L -0.6L

Time 10:47 AM 3:36 AM 4:41 AM 5:46 AM 7:21 AM 9:04 AM 11:49 AM 4:11 PM 4:44 PM 5:09 PM 4:48 PM 4:52 PM 5:13 PM 5:36 PM 5:57 PM

Height -0.8L 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H

Time 6:56 PM 11:33 AM 12:19 PM 1:08 PM 2:01 PM 2:49 PM 2:19 PM 6:28 PM

Height 0.8H -0.6L -0.5L -0.3L -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.4L

Height -0.8L 0.8L 0.7L 0.6L 0.5L 0.3L 0.1L 0.0L -0.2L -0.3L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L -0.6L -0.6L

Time 5:42 PM 2:40 AM 3:47 AM 4:54 AM 6:06 AM 8:02 AM 10:03 AM 12:01 PM 1:15 PM 2:03 PM 2:46 PM 3:25 PM 4:00 PM 4:29 PM 4:54 PM

Height 1.5H 0.9H 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H

Height -0.7L -0.6L -0.5L -0.3L 0.6H 0.1L -0.1L -0.2L 0.6H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7L -0.7L -0.7L

Time 11:20 PM 11:45 PM 11:58 PM

Height 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H

6:40 AM 11:27 AM 11:58 PM

0.3L 0.2H 0.6H

9:25 AM 10:01 AM 10:37 AM 11:13 AM 2:32 AM 10:41 PM 11:01 PM

-0.3L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L 0.7H 0.8H 0.7H

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

10:32 PM 10:52 PM

0.8L 0.8L

Time 2:16 AM 12:39 AM 1:24 AM 2:10 AM 2:55 AM 3:42 AM 4:35 AM 5:28 AM 6:13 AM 6:51 AM 7:26 AM 8:02 AM 8:39 AM 9:19 AM 9:58 AM

Time 7:36 8:08 8:31 8:49 9:06 9:22 9:18

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.5H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Freeport Harbor Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 9:25 AM 12:21 AM 12:55 AM 1:34 AM 2:14 AM 2:53 AM 3:31 AM 4:10 AM 4:52 AM 5:36 AM 6:15 AM 6:50 AM 7:23 AM 7:55 AM 8:29 AM

Time 1:52 PM 2:43 PM 3:32 PM 4:17 PM 12:01 AM 7:25 AM 8:07 AM 8:47 AM 12:15 AM 12:41 AM 1:14 AM 1:51 AM 12:26 AM 12:26 PM 1:04 PM

Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Height 0.H 0.3H 0.2H -0.5L -0.4L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.5L -0.6L -0.6L -0.7L -0.7L -0.7L

Time 12:17 PM 1:03 PM 1:43 PM 11:56 PM 11:45 PM 10:09 PM 9:46 PM 9:13 PM 8:55 PM 9:07 PM 9:32 PM 10:08 PM 10:56 PM 11:52 PM

Height -0.7L -0.7L -0.6L 0.0H 0.0H 0.0H 0.0H 0.0H 0.0H 0.1H 0.1H 0.1H 0.2H 0.2H

Time 2:48 AM 3:43 AM 4:36 AM 5:31 AM 6:35 AM 4:33 AM 6:11 AM 7:11 AM 8:01 AM 8:49 AM 9:36 AM 12:21 AM 1:01 AM 1:41 AM 2:20 AM

Height 0.0H 0.0H -0.1H -0.1H -0.2H -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H

Time 1:26 PM 2:08 PM 2:41 PM 3:06 PM 3:20 PM 8:13 AM 10:57 AM 10:50 PM 11:13 PM 11:44 PM

Height -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.3L -0.2H -0.3H -0.1H -0.1H -0.1H

10:22 11:08 11:52 12:33

AM AM AM PM

-0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L

Height 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.4L 0.3L 0.2L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.4L -0.4L -0.4L -0.5L 0.6H

Time 9:38 AM 10:23 AM 11:04 AM 3:55 AM 5:09 AM 6:35 AM 7:37 PM 8:04 PM 8:33 PM 4:17 PM 4:41 PM 4:02 PM 4:29 PM 5:04 PM 8:43 AM

Height -0.6L -0.5L -0.4L 0.5H 0.4H 0.3H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H 0.6H -0.5L

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Time 6:45 PM 7:13 PM 7:32 PM 7:46 PM 5:06 AM 7:29 AM 7:49 PM 7:20 PM 3:23 PM 3:58 PM 4:33 PM 5:08 PM 5:39 PM 6:05 PM 6:16 PM

Height 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 0.9H 0.8H 1.0H 1.0H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H 1.4H

Height 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3L 0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 11:20 AM 12:29 PM 1:36 PM 2:54 AM 7:03 AM 8:18 AM 12:34 PM 4:45 PM 4:53 PM 5:08 PM 7:21 PM 9:26 AM 9:54 AM 0:16 AM 10:37 AM

Height -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.3L 0.3H 0.2H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

Time 11:57 PM

Time

Height

Time

Height

Time

Height

0.1H

Height

11:08 PM 3:19 PM 2:47 PM

-0.2H -0.3L -0.3L

Time 6:19 PM 6:56 PM 7:20 PM 11:33 AM 11:37 AM 11:44 AM

10:40 PM 10:37 PM

-0.2H -0.2H

Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 12:57 AM 1:53 AM 2:51 AM 12:41 AM 1:40 AM 2:38 AM 3:31 AM 4:18 AM 5:00 AM 5:41 AM 6:21 AM 6:59 AM 7:37 AM 8:12 AM 12:01 AM

Height 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H -0.2L 0.0L 0.1L

Time 10:58 PM 11:46 PM

Height 0.6L 0.5L

6:51 PM 6:53 PM 7:12 PM

0.5H 0.4H 0.5H

6:51 PM

0.5L

9:07 PM

0.5H

9:11 PM 9:46 PM 5:38 PM

0.6L 0.6L 0.6H

11:17 PM

0.6H

10:16 PM

0.6L

South Padre Island Time 10:15 AM 11:01 AM 11:44 AM 12:25 PM 1:16 PM 2:37 PM 5:38 PM

Height -0.7L -0.4L -0.2L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7L

Time 6:17 6:51 7:22 7:50 8:12 8:27 8:38

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height 1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.8H

Rollover Pass Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Rockport

Time 12:39 AM 1:37 AM 2:28 AM 2:16 PM 2:42 PM 2:59 PM 7:32 AM 6:51 AM 7:10 AM 7:43 AM 8:24 AM 9:09 AM 9:55 AM 10:41 AM 11:25 AM

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 9:35 AM 10:24 AM 11:11 AM 11:57 AM 2:01 AM 2:44 AM 3:27 AM 4:09 AM 4:50 AM 5:30 AM 6:09 AM 6:48 AM 7:27 AM 8:05 AM 8:44 AM

Time

12:40 PM 1:19 PM

Height

0.4L 0.6L

Time

7:56 PM 8:00 PM

Height

1.1H 1.0H

East Matagorda Time

Height

Time

Height

9:22 AM 5:10 PM

0.3H 0.1L

4:57 PM 11:53 PM

-0.1L 0.6H

9:15 PM 9:44 PM 11:49 AM

0.7H 0.7H -0.6L

11:26 PM

0.6L

10:13 PM

0.7H

Date Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15 Jan 16 Jan 17 Jan 18 Jan 19 Jan 20 Jan 21 Jan 22 Jan 23 Jan 24 Jan 25 Jan 26 Jan 27

Time 2:54 AM 3:56 AM 4:43 AM 12:12 AM 3:43 AM 5:17 AM 6:02 AM 6:39 AM 7:17 AM 8:02 AM 8:49 AM 12:10 AM 12:36 AM 12:59 AM 12:22 AM

Time

5:37 2:29 2:42 5:53 6:51 8:07 9:19 9:56 8:05

AM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height

0.3H 0.1L 0.2L 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.4H

Time

Height

2:09 PM 8:50 PM 9:04 PM 9:35 PM 10:23 PM 11:09 PM 11:42 PM

0.1L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H

10:23 PM

0.4L

Texas Coast Tides

Height -1.0L -0.8L -0.6L 0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.7H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.1H 1.1H -0.7L -0.7L -0.7L


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

January 13, 2017

Page 19

NATIONAL Bighorn poached in N.M. A bighorn sheep was poached on Dec. 22 in Comales County, New Mexico. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is requesting the public’s help in identifying suspects involved in the poaching of a bighorn sheep off N.M. 518. The sheep was killed in the morning on a hillside off the highway. Investigating officers are seeking information about any vehicles or people on foot in the area at the time. A reward is being offered.

ment. In addition to drafting and sponsoring pro-gun legislation, members of the Second Amendment Caucus will invite firearm experts, constitutional scholars, and pro-gun groups to speak to the caucus. —Second Amendment Caucus

ASA to participate in 60 in 60 campaign

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council voted to approve a new plan to allow guided recreational halibut anglers to buy up commercial quota through a system called an RQE — a recreational quota entity. The RQE can hold, over time, up to 10-12 percent of the total commercial quota in different regions of the state.

The American Sportfishing Association, the sportfishing industry’s trade association, announced personnel changes and additions, intended to position the organization to help effectively meet its members’ needs and its commitment to growing the recreational fishing industry. Liz Ogilvie will take on the newly created position of chief marketing officer. She will oversee the industry’s role in the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation’s “60 in 60” initiative, which aims to increase annual recreational angler participation from 46 million to 60 million by 2020. She will also oversee the Keep America Fishing advocacy program. RBFF announced its initiative at its annual State Marketing Workshop held in December 2016.

—NPFMC

—ASA

—NMGF

NPFMC Recreational Quota Entity passes

Scout Media hit with forced bankruptcy Scout Media, an operator of network websites, including college sports, hunting and fishing, was hit with an involuntary Chapter 11 petition in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. Leading the group of petitioning creditors is print services company LSC Communications, which holds a $671,651 claim on a judgment in its favor after it sued Scout in New York State Supreme Court. Craig Amazeen, Scout Media’s president, said the websites would continue to operate. —Staff report

Cuomo vetoes N.Y. knife bill New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo vetoed Knife Rights’ Gravity Knife and Switchblade Reform Bill, after New York’s legislature overwhelmingly passed the bill. “In vetoing this bill, he (Cuomo) has potentially doomed thousands more to arrest and prosecution for carrying common pocket knives that won’t get someone arrested virtually anywhere except in New York City,” Knife Rights said in a release. —Knife Rights Foundation

QB buys shotguns for linemen Philadelphia Eagles rookie quarterback Carson Wentz gave a unique gift to each of the offensive linemen who protected him during the football season — Beretta over-and-under shotguns, each customized with the lineman’s number on the stock. Wentz, from Bismarck, North Dakota, is an avid hunter.

Bud Lilly, famed fly-fisherman, dies Bud Lilly, the previous owner of the famous Bud Lilly’s Trout Shop in Bozeman, Montana, and a conservationist who helped bring about changes to the sport of fishing and trout conservation, died at the age of 91. —Staff report

Recreational red snapper season to open in Louisiana The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission announced the 2017 recreational red snapper fishing season in state waters will begin on Feb. 1, and remain open until further notice. The season will run seven days a week in state waters with a daily bag and possession limit of two fish per person at a 16-inch minimum total length. A Recreational Offshore Landing Permit is required in order to possess certain species, including red snapper. —LWFC

Bass Pro awards conservation partners Bass Pro Shops presented a series of awards for noted conservation partners including Bass Anglers Sportsman Society founder Ray Scott; legendary angler Bill Dance; and country music recording artist John Anderson. Bass Pro Shops Founder Johnny Morris announced the awards during a special holiday ceremony  at the company’s headquarters in Springfield, Missouri. Scott and Dance received the Fisherman’s Best Friend awards, and Anderson received the Conservation Partner of the Year award.

—Staff report

Republican Congressmen Form Second Amendment Caucus A group of U.S. Representatives, led by Kentucky congressman Thomas Massie, launched the Congressional Second Amendment Caucus. Brian Babin (R-TX), of Port Arthur, is among the founding members of the caucus. Caucus members will lead efforts in the House of Representatives to pass meaningful firearms legislation and protect Americans against infringements of the Second Amend-

—Bass Pro Shops

INTERNATIONAL

China to ban ivory trade China announced it was banning all commerce in ivory by the end of 2017, potentially shutting down the world’s largest ivory market. —Staff report

JUDGE WORS WICK, 9, OF SAN ANTO NIO, SHOT THIS 13-POIN T BUCK THAT SCORED 196 AT DRY CREEK R ANCH ON 11-11-16. HE USED A 6.5 CREEDMO OR AT 100 YARDS.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Nagel’s Gun Shop

6201 San Pedro Ave. San Antonio, TX 78216 (210) 342-5420 nagelsguns.net


Page 20

January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER 4

Gibbs named sales manager

Capsule Feeders acquired

8

Centurion and Supreme Boats appointed industry veteran Mark Gibbs national sales manager.

Outdoor Product Innovations Inc. has acquired Capsule Feeders as part of their product offerings.

Awards for Sellmark

C’mere Deer hires agency

Solution on on Page Solution Page23 23

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TheACROSS king of ducks Happens near Christmas 1. The king of ducks in South Texas A waterfowl organization Happens near Christmas inthe South Many5.quail hunters wait until after firstTexas _____ 8. A waterfowl organization Vice President elect 9. Many quail hunters wait until after the A favorite duck food firstcaught _____ at Lake Tawakoni Fish often Shooting a deer while trespassing is this type of 10. Vice president-elect crime 12. A of favorite duck food in camp Sections deer processed One17. of the sheep Fishgrand oftenslam caught at Lake Tawakoni Good planta lake redfish 18.power Shooting deer for while trespassing is Ducks that nest in trees this type of crime Short-haired pointers came from this country A quail 19. species Sections of deer processed in camp Gun company nearing 500 years old 22. of the grand slam sheep A shark One species 24.itsGood power-plant lake for redfish Holds convention in mid-January A salmon species 25. Ducks that nest in trees River that feeds Lake Livingston 26. Short-haired pointers came from this A binocular manufacturer 28. 29. 30. 31. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37.

country A quail species Gun company nearing 500 years old A shark species Holds its convention in mid-January A salmon species River that feeds Lake Livingston A binocular manufacturer A trout species A Texas/Mexico border reservoir

Sellmark Corporation was recently ranked among the county’s top five women-owned companies and was recognized as a finalist for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce 2017 Small Business of the Year Award.

Real estate group expanding Mossy Oak Properties of Texas opened a new division in the Bryan/ College Station area.

30 31

LSONews.com

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37

Down

2.DOWN A turkey organization 3. 2. A diving duck A turkey organization 4. 3. Often wornduck by duck hunters A diving 6. A favorite way to eat tuna Often worn by duck hunters 7. 4. A snapper species 11. 6. AnAAfrican favoriteantelope way to eat tuna 13. A sunfish species A snapper 14. 7. Deer huntersspecies take good care of this African manufacturer antelope 15.11. AnAn outboard 16.13. Not for flounder fishing in November A allowed sunfish species 20. Largest lake completely in Texas, Sam ______ Deer hunters takedriving good care of thiskill ____ 21.14. Always wear when the boat, 22.15. A manufacturer of artificial shrimp An outboard manufacturer 23.16. Some deer hunters eat this organ Not allowed for flounder fishing in November 24. Another name for the aoudad Largest lakethrough completely in Texas, Sam 26.20. River running Georgetown, San _____ 27. Digs holes in pond dams ______ 32. The white goose 21. 22. 23. 24. 26.

Always wear when driving the boat, kill ____ A manufacturer of artificial shrimp Some deer hunters eat this organ Another name for the aoudad River running through Georgetown, San _____ 27. Digs holes in pond dams 32. The white goose

The parent companies of C’mere Deer and Swhacker have named Bast-Durbin Advertising as their agency of record for 2017.

Tecomate names VP Tecomate Holdings, LLC has named industry veteran Mike Walston as its senior vice president of sales.

French hired at Job openings at Big Rock Winchester Safes Big Rock Sports has an immediate need for three sales representatives on the East Coast.

New DU Southern Region director Ducks Unlimited has named Jerry Holden as the director of operations for the 13-state Southern Region. Holden replaces Tom Moorman, who will move into the organization’s chief scientist position.

Weatherby leadership passed down Ed Weatherby passed the dayto-day leadership baton to his son, Adam, at Weatherby Inc. Since 1983, Ed Weatherby has been president and CEO.

Winchester Safes hired Kim French as vice president of sales and marketing.

RMEF seeks software developer Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is seeking a software developer at its Missoula, Montana headquarters.

New director at BRP BRP, maker of Evinrude motors, has appointed Olivier Pierini director of global marketing and strategic planning for the Marine Propulsion Systems division.

New hires at Pradco Shaun McPhail and Brian Malone have joined Pradco Outdoor Brands as vice president of sales, hunting division and VP of regional sales, respectively.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Pheasant with wild rice casserole

Nature’s Calling

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced or 4-ounce can mushrooms butter 1 onion, finely chopped 1 cup finely chopped parsley 1/2 cup chopped celery 1 (10 3/4-ounce) can cream of mushroom soup 1/2 soup can milk 1 cup grated cheddar cheese 2 cups cooked wild rice 2 pheasants, cut into pieces flour Few shakes of paprika

add onions, parsley and celery; cook until onions are tender and golden. Heat mushroom soup and milk. Add cheese. Add to cooked wild rice, mushrooms, onions, parsley and celery. Roll pheasant in flour and brown in shortening. Pour rice mixture into greased casserole. Top with pheasant. Sprinkle with paprika. Cover and bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour. Four servings. —NSSF.org

Cook mushrooms in butter for 5 minutes. Remove mushrooms;

Crappie francaise 8-12 crappie, filleted 2 cups flour 4 eggs 1 tbsp. chopped parsley 1-2 lemons 1 tbsp. chopped oregano 1 stick butter 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1 tsp. garlic salt 2 cups fresh morels or button mushrooms, sliced 1 cup white wine Mix herbs and spices with

flour, and roll fillets with herbed flour in a plastic bag until coated. Dip coated fillets in beaten eggs. Lightly fry fish in hot oil in large pan or skillet. Turn once. Reduce heat and add butter, wine, mushrooms, and juice of 1/2 lemon. Cover and simmer 10-15 minutes until mushrooms are soft. Garnish with lemon slices. Serves 3-4. —Missouri Department of Conservation


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

January 13, 2017

Page 21

White bass moving Effects of supplemental feed down south Continued from page 4

Lone Star Outdoor News The white bass are showing signs of beginning their run at the Nueces River, much to the excitement of white bass enthusiasts. Fishing forums have been abuzz with news of white bass, or sand bass as they are sometimes called, making their way into rivers and lakes. In most places in Texas that happens in late winter. “It has begun! The white bass are thick in the Nueces River,” wrote southtxangler22 on the Texas Fishing Forum, who posted a picture with a stringer full of fish. “I think we might have an early run this year,” said Greg Binion, supervisor at TPWD Inland Fisheries District Office — Corpus Christi. “We get the white bass first.” Binion said anglers have been doing well catching mostly males south of the Highway 59 Bridge for about 12 miles to La Para Creek. They have been trolling using lipless crankbaits and crankbaits in 6-10 feet of water. He attributes the run to a

more than 4 antler points. With supplemental feed, the number of spikes in the yearling population was lower and there was a more even distribution of yearlings with 3-4 points and several with more than 4 points. The supplemental feed also impacted the overall survival rate. “The deer that had access to feed, the population was steadily increasing,” Belser added. “It could take up to 10 years to see large effects.” There is a another side to supplemental feed. For one thing, an increase in population means managers must spend more time reducing the doe population. Supplemental feed could also

warmer than normal winter. And if an informal fish survey is any indication, this year’s run should be first-rate. In October, a survey of Lake Corpus Christi turned up a lot of white bass. “Hopefully that will translate into a good season,” Binion added. Alex Cruz, with Affordable Guide Service, said clients are limiting now, with mostly males being caught. He estimates it will be two to four more weeks before females make their way up the river from the lake.

alter the distribution of deer on a ranch. More deer could spend time near feeders and competition for food could impact behavior. As the population increases, antagonistic behavior can happen between deer to determine hierarchy. This might keep some deer away from feeders and cause avoidance in others. Bucks are ranked higher than does in the social order, which impacts does at the feeder as well. The options for does are to wait outside the feed site, attempt to feed with bucks present or avoid the feed site altogether. “Bucks are going to be eating more feed than yearling bucks,

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Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

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who eat more feed than does, who eat more feed than fawns,” Belser said. On ranches where the deer population is increasing, some deer that want to eat will be run off by other deer. Studies show that point is reached when the deer density is about 45.4 deer per 200 acres. This can happens in fall when fawn start to take feed, she said. “Supplemental feed doesn’t take care of the population,” she said. “We still need to have good native forages.”

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January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 SPANISH IBEX CAPE Full body Southeastern Spanish ibex cape for sale. Replace your old mount with a rare, hard to find, perfect condition cape. Call Gary at Rhodes Brothers Taxidermy (830) 896-6996

ALASKA GRIZZLY HUNT 12-Day, Guided 1 x1, July 25-August 5, 2017 $10,500   High Success Dave  (719) 963-4479

TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189

ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does. Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

HUNTING LAND FOR SALE 210 acres Crabtree, AR (501) 412-6621”

SEEKING HUNTING PROPERTY Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation is looking for hunting property to continue its mission of creating hunters for a lifetime by providing hunting experiences for those that have the passion but lack the opportunity. All hunting rights sought, house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276

KENT CREEK RANCH Guided hunts for Axis, Blackbuck, Fallow, Sika, Whitetail, and more. Hunt@kentcreekranch.com www.kentcreekranch.com Contact John (830) 232-4927

SOUTH TEXAS TROPHY HUNTS Management hunts also. Maverick County. Native, mature herd. Quality, comfortable lodging. Txdiamondcranch.com Call for end of season SPECIALS! (713) 516-2954

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

GUIDED WATERFOWL  Day Hunts Parris, TX.  www.RedLegOutfitters.com (903) 517-5889

HUNTING FOR TRUCKS? New Ford and used trucks below. 2014 Ford F-150 STX SuperCrew Cab 4x2 5.0L V8 Automatic, Running Boards Ingot Silver Metallic 14,768 Miles Stock # EKF18577 2013 Ford F-150 Lariat SuperCrew Cab 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost Automatic Leather Ingot Silver Metallic 18,493 Miles Stock #DKF93180 2014 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew Cab 4x4 3.5L V6 Ecoboost 4X4 Automatic Leather Color, Ingot Silver Metallic Interior, steel gray 20,795 Miles Stock #EKD03236

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LoneOStar Outdoor News

January 13, 2017

Page 23

DATEBOOK JANUARY 19-21

Wild Sheep Foundation The Sheep Show convention and expo Reno-Sparks Convention Center (406) 404-8750 wildsheepfoundation.org

JANUARY 19-22

Austin Boat Show Austin Convention Center (512) 494-1128 austinboatshow.com

JANUARY 20

USA Archery 3rd Annual Texas Cup Indoor Plano (972) 768-4622 webpoint.usarchery.org

JANUARY 20-21

Deer Breeders Corp New Year’s Auction Horseshoe Bay Resort (972) 389-3100 dbcdeer.com

JANUARY 21

National Wild Turkey Federation Hunting Heritage Banquet Bryan College Station Best Western (281) 639-9185 nwtf.org Alamo Chapter Safari Club International Hunter’s Heritage banquet Oblate School of Theology alamosci.org

JANUARY 22

Rat-L-Trap Open Sam Rayburn Reservoir (214) 850-6581 rat-l-trap.com

JANUARY 28

National Wild Turkey Federation Hunting Heritage Banquet Nacogdoches Civic Center (936) 552-1942 nwtf.org Texas Hill Country Safari Club International Annual Fundraiser Dinner/Gala Hill Country Shooting Sports Center texashillcountrysci.org

FEBRUARY 3-12

DFW Boat Expo Market Hall, Dallas dallasboatexpo.com

FEBRUARY 9-12

San Antonio Boat & Travel Trailer Show Alamodome sanantonioboatshow.com

FEBRUARY 9-26

San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo Wildlife Expo sarodeo.com

FEBRUARY 18-19

MARCH 7-11

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Ranching & Wildlife NRG Center, East End rodeohouston.com

FEBRUARY 25

North Texas Chapter Safari Club International 22nd Annual Dinner, Banquet & Auction Worthington Renaissance Hotel, Fort Worth (817) 271-9858 scinorthtexas.com

MARCH 11-12

Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival Plano Center, Plano (703) 402-8338 txflyfishingfestival.org

MARCH 2

Park Cities Quail 11th Annual Dinner and Auction Flight Museum, Dallas

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 23

1

5

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1. The king of ducks [CANVASBACK] 5. Happens near Christmas in South Texas [RUT] 8. A waterfowl organization [DELTA] 9. Many quail hunters wait until after the first _____ [FREEZE] 10. Vice President elect [PENCE] 12. A favorite duck food [RICE] 17. Fish often caught at Lake Tawakoni [CATFISH] 18. Shooting a deer while trespassing is this type of crime [FELONY] 19. Sections of deer processed in camp [QUARTERS] 22. One of the grand slam sheep [DALL] 24. Good power plant lake for redfish [BRAUNIG] 25. Ducks that nest in trees [WOODIES] 26. Short-haired pointers came from this country [GERMANY] 28. A quail species [BOBWHITE] 29. Gun company nearing 500 years old [BERETTA]

T R

I 37

N

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R

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F A L C O N

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O

30. A shark species [BLACKTIP] 31. Holds its convention in mid-January [HSC]

13 15

Y

18

B R O W N

Across

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P E N C E

FEBRUARY 17-19

Guadalupe River Trout Unlimited Lazy L&L Campgrounds, New Braunfels (210) 669-5763 www.grtu.org/troutfest/

Texas Dove Hunters Association 4th Annual Shooting for Scholarships National Shooting Complex, San Antonio (210) 764-1189 texasdovehunters.com

Texas Dove Hunters Association Bag Limit Banquet Noah’s Event Venue, Sugar Land (281) 491-0300 texasdovehunters.com

FEBRUARY 16

Dallas Safari Club Monthly Meeting Royal Oaks Country Club, Dallas (972) 980-9800 biggame.org

MARCH 4

FEBRUARY 23

FEBRUARY 10-11

Central Texas Wildlife Legacy Austin Hunting Convention Crowne Plaza Hotel (512) 773-5674 centraltexaswildlifelegacy.org

(214) 632-7460 parkcitiesquail.org

Texas Gun and Knife Association Gun Show Fredericksburg Fair Grounds texasgunandknifeshows.com

35

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Puzzle solution from Page 20

Down

2. A turkey organization [NWTF] 3. A diving duck [BUFFLEHEAD] 4. Often worn by duck hunters [WADERS] 6. A favorite way to eat tuna [SUSHI] 7. A snapper species [RED] 11. An African antelope [NYALA] AFFORDABLE, COMFORTABLE 13. A sunfish species [GREEN] 14. Deer hunters take good care of this [RIFLE] AND SECLUDED 15. An outboard manufacturer [YAMAHA] 16. Not allowed for flounder fishing in November [GIGGING] 20 CONCRETE BENCHES 20. Largest lake completely in Texas, Sam ______ [RAYBURN] 100, 200 AND 300 YARD TARGETS 21. Always wear when driving the boat, kill ____ [SWITCH] RIFLE AND 22. A manufacturer of artificial shrimp [DOA] HANDGUN SHOOTING 23. Some deer hunters eat this organ [LIVER] ONE HOUR 24. Another name for the aoudad [BARBARY] EAST OF DALLAS ANNUAL 26. River running through Georgetown, San _____MEMBERSHIPS [GABRIEL] 27. Digs holes in pond dams [NUTRIA] 214.728.5309 32. The white goose [SNOW]

THE GUN RANGE FOR THE SERIOUS SHOOTER

W W W. S M A L L G R O U P S R I F L E R A N G E . C O M


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January 13, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

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1800GUNSANDAMMO.COM (800) 486-7497 MARBURGERS SPORTING GOODS 1400 Bayport Blvd. Seabrook (281) 474-3229

BURDETT AND SON 1055 Texas Ave. So., Ste. 104 College Station (979) 695-2807 burdettandson.com

UNITED AG GENERAL STORE 907 S. Wharton St. El Campo (979) 543-7756 unitedaggeneralstore.com

THE SHARP SHOOTER 5515 S. Staples Corpus Christi  (361) 980-1190 thesharpshooter.com


January 13, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting