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High School Course Selection Guide 2013-2014

Inspiring Students Through Innovative Education

Please visit the Forney ISD website at www.forneyisd.net for the most up-to-date information regarding the student handbook. The following information is based on current state adopted policy and is subject to change based on new adoptions.

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Table of Contents General Information How to Use the Course Selection Guide .................................... 4 Grade Level Classification .......................................................... 5 Procedures for Dropping a Course or Changing Classes ............ 5 Class of 2014 Graduation Requirements ................................... 6 Class of 2015 and Thereafter Graduation Requirements .......... 7 Advanced High School Program................................................. 8 Weighted Courses...................................................................... 8 Advanced Placement Program. ................................................. 9 Dual Credit. .............................................................................. 10 Preparing to be “College/Career Ready”. ............................... 11 Four Year Plans ........................................................................ 14 Course Offerings and Course Descriptions English–Language Arts ............................................................. 17 Mathematics ............................................................................ 20 Science ..................................................................................... 24 Social Studies and Economics .................................................. 29 Languages Other than English ................................................. 33 Physical Education, Health, and Athletics ................................ 36 Speech ..................................................................................... 39 Fine Arts ................................................................................... 40 General Elective Courses. ........................................................ 45 Special Education .................................................................... 48 CTE Course Offerings and Course Descriptions Career/Workplace Preparation................ ..................... 52 Certification and License Options .................................. 52 FISD Agriculture Academy ............................................. 53 FISD Culinary Arts Academy .......................................... 56 FISD Education and Training Academy .......................... 58 FISD Engineering Academy ............................................ 60 FISD Global Business and Finance Academy .................. 62 FISD Law and Public Safety Academy ............................ 64 FISD Media and Communications Academy .................. 66 FISD Medical Science Academy ..................................... 70

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General Information

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Introduction: How to Use the Course Selection Guide The Forney Independent School District (FISD) High School Course Selection Guide is designed to provide important information for students on how they can be successful planning and selecting courses during their high school course program. The Guide has two sections: The General Information Section which contains FISD regulations that apply to secondary school students and the Course Offerings and Course Description Section which describes detailed information about course offerings. There are several ways to use this guide. First, you may identify topics that interest you from the Table of Contents and go directly to them. Second, you may want to read The General Information Section all the way through. Third, you will need to refer to the Course Offerings and Course Description as you select your schedule for the next academic year. Please note that all of the courses listed in this guide will not necessarily be offered each semester. Course offerings will be dependent on a sufficient number of students being enrolled in each course to warrant scheduling. Limited numbers of student space may be available in some courses. If there are more students than space available, preference is given to graduating students and class levels beginning at the senior level.

Planning Your High School Program As students, you have the opportunity to make some decisions that will influence your future. The planning of your education, in particular, your high school courses is an important goal in your life. This process should not be overwhelming, but needs serious consideration. Keep in mind, the decisions made in high school concerning your course selections, will affect graduation, career path, and college selection. It is important to take time to develop a plan that meets your needs and that prepares you for all your potential careers rather than just enrolling in courses that will allow you to graduate. In Forney ISD, a wide variety of courses are offered in all areas of the curriculum in order to meet the needs and interests of students, and prepare students for post-high school experiences including: two and four year colleges and universities, business or technical school, military services, fine arts, immediate employment, and many others. This Guide offers a description of the courses to help you personalize your plan toward graduation and career choice. In addition to the explanation of the course, other important information including grade placement, prerequisites, and fees are provided. Be sure to read all the information about the course. Several classes have prerequisite courses that you must take in your freshman and sophomore years in order to take the higher level courses in your junior and senior years, so plan ahead! Careful planning is essential for wise and responsible decisions regarding course selections which provide the educational preparation needed for the attainment of future goals. High School students are encouraged to meet with parents, their counselor, and teachers for assistance in selecting courses that will meet personal needs for the future and graduation requirements. For 4


further information, please do not hesitate to contact your counselor or check high school graduation requirements in the High School Student Handbook.

Grade Level Classification Grade level classification will be assigned based upon the number of documented credits earned. Students transferring from another school will be classified upon entering at the grade level consistent with our school’s classification schedule. Students must adhere to their grade level classification to participate in class activities or events. It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of the graduation and classification requirements and make sure that required courses are completed in a timely manner to meet graduation requirements. For students entering 9th grade 2009-2010 or after grade level classifications require the following earned credits at the beginning of the school year: Grade 9th 10th 11th 12th

Classification Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior

Credits 0–5 5.5 – 11.5 12 – 18.5 19

Procedures for Dropping a Course or Changing Classes Students should take extra care in selecting their courses with the approval of their parents and with their counselor’s guidance. Changes may be made to course selections prior to a date chosen by the principal. After this advertised date, schedule changes will only be made based on the following reasons: class loads, scheduling conflicts, scheduling errors, or improper placement of a student. Changes based solely on teacher preference will not be considered. Dropping courses or changing schedule after the beginning of the school year is handled according to the following criteria: 1. Students who attend class regularly, turn in all required work, and attend tutorials as needed, will increase their likelihood of achieving academic success. If a student experiences serious academic difficulties and/or have failing grades, a parent/student/teacher conference is recommended. 2. Students who follow these steps yet continue to experience consistent academic failure may submit a written request form for a schedule change. All requests must have a parent signature. 5


Class of 2014 Graduation Requirements Required Courses English Language Arts Mathematics Social Studies Science Languages Other Than English Fine Arts Academic Elective Speech Physical Education Technology Health Electives TOTAL Advanced Measures Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills

Recommended Program 4 Credits (English I, English II, English III, English IV) 4 Credits (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and one additional credit)1 4 Credits (World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government ½, Economics ½) 4 Credits (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and one additional credit)2 2 Credits (in the same language) 1 Credit None ½ Credit 1 Credit3 1 Credit ½ Credit 4 Credits 26 Credits --------TAKS Exam - Exit Level · English Language Arts and Reading · Mathematics · Science · Social Studies

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Advanced High School Program 4 Credits (English I, English II, English III, English IV) 4 Credits (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and one additional credit) 4 Credits (World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government ½, Economics ½) 4 Credits (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and one additional credit) 3 Credits (in the same language) 1 Credit None ½ Credit 1 Credit3 1 Credit ½ Credit 3 Credits 26 Credits Any combination of 4 advanced measures TAKS Exam - Exit Level · English Language Arts and Reading · Mathematics · Science · Social Studies

Mathematical Models with Applications may count for 1 of the 4 required credits, if completed successfully prior to enrolling in Algebra 2. 2 Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) may count for 1 of the 4 required credits, if completed successfully prior to enrolling in Chemistry or Physics. 3 Students may earn additional elective credits in physical education up to a maximum of 4 credits.

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Class of 2015 and Thereafter Graduation Requirements For Students Entering 9th Grade in 2011- 2012 & Thereafter

Required Courses English Language Arts Mathematics Social Studies Science Languages Other Than English Fine Arts Academic Elective Speech Physical Education Technology Health Electives TOTAL Advanced Measures State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) Mastery

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Recommended Program 4 Credits (English I, English II, English III, English IV) 4 Credits (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and one additional credit)1 4 Credits (World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government ½, Economics ½) 4 Credits (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and one additional credit) 2 2 Credits (in the same language)

Advanced High School Program 4 Credits (English I, English II, English III, English IV) 4 Credits (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and one additional credit)

1 Credit None ½ Credit 1 Credit3 1 Credit ½ Credit 4 Credits 26 Credits ---------

1 Credit None ½ Credit 1 Credit3 1 Credit ½ Credit 3 Credits 26 Credits Any combination of 4 advanced measures End-of-Course Exams · English I Reading and Writing, English II Reading and Writing, English III Reading and Writing 4 · Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 4 · Biology, Chemistry, Physics · World Geography, World History, and U. S. History

End-of-Course Exams · English I Reading and Writing, English II Reading and Writing, English III Reading and Writing5 · Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 25 · Biology, Chemistry, Physics · World Geography, World History, and U. S. History

4 Credits (World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government ½, Economics ½) 4 Credits (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and one additional credit) 3 Credits (in the same language)

Mathematical Models with Applications may count for 1 of the 4 required credits, if completed successfully prior to enrolling in Algebra 2. 2 Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) may count for 1 of the 4 required credits, if completed successfully prior to enrolling in Chemistry or Physics. 3 Students may earn additional elective credits in physical education up to a maximum of 4 credits. 4 Level III Advanced Academic Performance on STAAR/EOC 5 Level II Advanced Academic Performance on STAAR/EOC.

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Advanced High School Program The Advanced High School Program recognizes students who demonstrate levels of performance equivalent to college students or work done by professionals in the arts, sciences, business, industry, or in community service. Students must successfully complete three years of the same foreign language and must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures:

Four advanced measures may include all or any combinations of the following: Test Data • A score of three or above on The College Board Advanced Placement examination o Note: If a student takes more than one AP exam, each exam receiving a three or above will count as one advanced measure.

A score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) that qualifies a student for recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of The College Board; or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The PSAT score may count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student.

College Courses •

A grade of 3.0 (B) or higher on courses that count for college credit Note: If a student takes more than one college course, each course in which the student earns a grade of 3.0 or higher will count as one advanced measure.

STAAR Requirement In addition to the cumulative score requirements, a student must meet or exceed the Level III: Advanced Academic Performance standards for the STAAR English III reading, English III writing, and Algebra II assessments. To pursue the Advanced High School Program, students must notify their counselor no later than the beginning of the semester in which they plan to graduate. Students are responsible for providing their counselor with documentation of completion of the four advanced measures, even if this documentation is received after graduation (in the case of AP scores).

Weighted Courses All courses designated Pre-AP, Advanced Placement, or on-campus dual credit shall be weighted. Class rank is determined by the student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA) in courses eligible for state credit taken during the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. Please see the High School Student Handbook for how courses are weighted for students. 8


Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Board enables students to complete college-level studies as well as prepare for AP exams that give students the opportunity to receive college credit or placement for qualifying exam scores. AP courses encourage critical and creative thought, fine-tune analytical skills, enhance reasoning abilities, and serve as an “academic bridge” to help smooth the transition for students from high school to college. When evaluating a student’s high school transcript, universities place a great deal of importance on the rigor and success of an applicant’s academic program in high school, particularly in the junior and senior years. The AP program in Forney ISD is an inclusive program. A student may enroll in an AP class as long as the prerequisite courses (i.e., English II before English III) have been successfully completed, and the student is willing to accept the time and learning requirements of a college-level class. Each student signs a course contract when enrolling in an AP course. The contract and course description for each class outline in detail the requirements of the class. Successful completion of each AP course requires a significant amount of individual study time per week. Upon completion of an AP course, students are required to take the AP exam or a comprehensive final examination.

AP Exams The examinations are structured to measure depth of knowledge, completeness of thought, and synthesis of ideas. Approximately 1200 institutions of higher learning award credit based on a student’s AP examination scores. Exams are graded on a five-point scale with college credit usually given for scores of 3 or higher. The score requirement and number of college credit hours or placement credit awarded varies among universities and colleges and can be accessed at www.collegeboard.com/apcentral. In March of the academic year, the AP student is expected to sign up to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. For a fee, the student will take the examination. Students should check with individual colleges for their AP credit policies.

Pre-AP Program Many of the core courses in the major academic disciplines offer advanced courses referred to as Pre-AP. These courses lay the foundation for success not only in the AP program, but ultimately in college coursework. Pre-AP courses emphasize the same types of thinking skills and student expectations as the AP courses, although the course content is at the appropriate grade level. The Pre-AP program in Forney ISD is an inclusive program. A student may enroll in a Pre-AP class as long as the prerequisite courses (i.e., English II before English III) have been successfully completed, and the student is willing to accept the time and learning requirements of an advanced class. Each student signs a course contract when enrolling in a Pre-AP course. The contract and course description for each class outline in detail the requirements of the class.

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Concurrent Enrollment for College and High School Credit (Dual Credit) Students in the 11th or 12th grade may wish to take courses on the college level at Eastfield College or Trinity Valley Community College that would also receive high school credit. Each student must have prior permission from his/her high school counselor before enrolling in a course for dual credit. Dual enrollment provides the opportunity for high school seniors to remain in high school and take college courses at the same time. In most cases, these hours are transferable to other colleges; however, you should check with the college of your choice for its policy. Students must pay for tuition, books, and/or fees that are required for dual credit course(s). In addition, students must meet and comply with the colleges’ rules, regulations, and requirements. High school students must either be exempt from the THEA or take the THEA prior to enrollment in a Texas public college or university. Forney ISD will accept the following college courses for dual credit toward high school graduation requirement. (NOTE: courses available and prerequisites may vary by semester) College Course Government Macro/Micro Economics Psychology Sociology English 1301 English 1302 British Lit Part 1 British Lit Part 2 History 1301 History 1302 Speech College Algebra College Statistics Art Appreciation

High School Course U. S. Government ½ credit Economics ½ credit Psychology ½ credit Sociology ½ credit English III (1st semester) ½ credit English III (2nd semester) ½ credit English IV (1st semester) ½ credit English IV (2nd semester) ½ credit U. S. History (1st semester) ½ credit U. S. History (2nd semester) ½ credit Communications Applications ½ credit Independent Study in Math ½ credit Independent Study in Math ½ credit Art III History ½ credit

***Additional courses may be approved on an individual basis by the principal and/or counselor.

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Preparing to be “College/Career Ready” Eighth Grade-Spring • Analyze courses in the High School Course Selection Guide • Think about all the options: Advance Placement courses for college credit, and dual credit • Begin creating your four-year plan for graduation from high school and for admission to the college/work and/or technical training institute of your choice by using the High School Student Handbook and the High School Course Selection Guide • Attend all course selection meetings and high school orientation for incoming freshmen • Consult with your grade level counselor • Access information related to your college/career choices by viewing websites Freshman Year-Fall • Begin to develop a student resume portfolio which lists courses taken, report cards, test scores, activities, projects, awards, honors, community service, and work experience • Become familiar with course offerings that relate to your abilities and interests; and register for these classes at the most challenging level you can handle • Become involved in extracurricular activities sponsored by your campus and/or community • Be responsible for your education and make sure your course grades reflect your true ability and effort • Become familiar with the college and career resources available on your campus • Know NCAA Eligibility Center or NAIA requirements if you want to play sports in college • Consider taking the PSAT (Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test) in October • Get to know your counselor and visit the counseling office Freshman Year-Spring • Evaluate your course selections for your sophomore year and adjust your four-year plan, if necessary Sophomore Year-Fall • Continue to focus on the importance of high school, make good decisions, and take care of grades • Do your best on the PSAT in October • Get involved in campus/community organizations and work toward leadership positions in activities you like the best • Continue to visit with your counselor and attend college and career meetings Sophomore Year-Spring • Continue to monitor and modify four year plan • Analyze all careers and colleges of interest • Investigate scholarship and financial aid options with your counselor • Consult with your counselor concerning the Texas Higher Education Assessment Test (THEA) and EOC STAAR tests 11


Junior Year-Fall • Attend the College Day, on your high school campus and talk to college personnel • Do your best on the PSAT in October. This is the qualifying test for National Merit Semifinalists • Begin to visit college/technical institute campuses of interest to you. (Check the District policy on absences related to these visits) • Narrow down the features that are important to you in a post-secondary institution • Continue to explore career interests • Collect information about college application procedures, entrance requirements, tuition and fees, room and board costs, student activities, course offerings, faculty composition, accreditation, and financial assistance Junior Year-Spring • Attend Financial Aid Night on your high school campus • Continue to conference with your counselor about your future and to make sure you are on track for graduation • Take the SAT and/or ACT and any other achievement tests • Review your four-year plan and course work. Make adjustments, if necessary • Check your class rank • Continue to add and update your student resume portfolio • Develop, write, and perfect college essays • Continue to visit college/technical institute campuses of interest to you and fill out applications Senior Year-Fall • Take SAT and/or ACT again, if necessary • Narrow your choices for college/universities or technical institutes. Keep in mind cost, admissions requirements and academic offerings • Adhere to deadlines for admissions, housing, and financial aid o Texas offers a common application for all public universities. This application may be obtained online at www.applytexas.org • Ask your counselor and teachers for letters of recommendation early in the year • Turn in all college applications at least two weeks prior to the stated deadline • Apply for any scholarships for which you may qualify Senior Year-Spring • Order and send transcripts by deadline • Continue adding to your portfolio • Send the Free Application for Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA) in January o You may apply on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov • Continue to apply for any scholarships for which you may qualify o One of the best resources for scholarship information is directly from the financial aid office at the college(s) you wish to attend o Most scholarship opportunities are now posted online, allowing students the opportunity to do local and national scholarship searches on their own 12


Technology Courses The following courses will meet the local requirement for a technology credit towards graduation. Each course listed is described in another section of this book. AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGY COURSES

Description Page

Introduction to Engineering Principles of Engineering Aerospace Engineering Engineering Design and Development Business Information Management I Principles of Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Graphic Design and Illustration Audio/Video Production Advanced Graphic Design and Illustration Advanced Audio/Video Production Practicum in Graphic Design and Illustration Practicum in Audio/Video Production

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60 61 61 61 62 66 67 67 68 68 69 69


Four Year Plan Upon entering High School, each student should develop a 4-6 year plan for graduation and attainment of goals immediately following graduation as outlined by the Texas Education Agency, the following criteria applies: 1. 2. 3.

4.

Each student plan has a required agenda and number of courses necessary to graduate. The student must attain the required number of credits specified by his graduation plan. The student must earn credit in all required courses specified by his/her graduation plan. In addition to the cumulative score requirements, a student on the Recommended Program must meet or exceed the Level II: Satisfactory Performance standards for the STAAR English III reading, English III writing, and Algebra II assessments. In addition to the cumulative score requirements, a student on the Advanced High School Program must meet or exceed the Level III: Advanced Academic Performance standards for the STAAR English III reading, English III writing, and Algebra II assessments.

A graduation plan is used as a guide to organize a course of study, which will provide the educational preparation needed for the attainment of future goals. The plan will assist students in meeting graduation requirements while planning post-secondary education and/or work. Students are advised to consult college catalogs to determine post-secondary requirements. The student and parents should choose the classes to be included in the graduation plan. Then the student and parents should evaluate the student’s graduation plan carefully and insure that the student successfully completes the plan. School counselors will assist students and parents with the development of their plan. Students should review their plan each year and make revisions as needed. The following pages are designed to help you pick four year plans they are just samples that can be customized to meet the needs of each and every students. The important thing would be to pick a pathway that is in the student’s area of interest, and then visit with a teacher, counselor, or principal to decide how it can be customized.

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Four Year Plan Student: ___________________________________ Career Pathway:__________________________________ Graduation Plan: Discipline

9th Grade

Recommended* or Advanced* 10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English

English I

English II

English III

English IV

Math

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

4th Math

Science

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

4th Science

US History

Government / Economics

Social Studies

W. Geography

W. History

Electives Electives Electives Electives 8th Grade Courses for HS credit

*The Recommended Program graduation plan requires scoring Level II on English III, and Algebra II on STAAR/EOC. *The Advanced High School Program graduation plan requires an additional foreign language plus 4 advanced measures. As well as, scoring Level III on English III, and Algebra II on STAAR EOC. Pre-AP or AP levels will be determined during course registration. State testing scores may change the course selection.

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Course Offerings and Descriptions

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ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS

English I

Grade Level: 9 1 credit Prerequisite: 8th grade English English I is the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres. In preparation for the English I End of Course exam, emphasis is placed on various domains of writing, the use of written and oral conventions of language, critical and analytical reading comprehension skills in the study of literature, and vocabulary enrichment.

Pre-AP English I

Grade Level: 9 1 credit Prerequisite: 8th grade English Pre-AP English I is the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres. In preparation for the English I End of Course exam and Advanced Placement courses, emphasis is placed on literary analysis and higher level critical thinking skills, extensive writing and independent research projects, the use of written and oral conventions of language, and vocabulary enrichment.

English II

Grade Level: 10 1 credit Prerequisite: English I English II builds on the foundation of English I with the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres. In preparation for the English II End of Course exam, emphasis is placed on various domains of writing, the use of written and oral conventions of language, critical and analytical reading comprehension skills in the study of literature, and vocabulary enrichment.

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Pre-AP English II

Grade Level: 10 1 credit Prerequisite: English I Pre-AP English II builds on the foundation of Pre-AP English I with the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres. In preparation for the English II End of Course exam and Advanced Placement courses, emphasis is placed on literary analysis and higher level critical thinking skills, extensive writing and independent research projects, the use of written and oral conventions of language, and vocabulary enrichment.

English III

Grade Level: 11 1 credit Prerequisite: English II English III builds on the skills developed in English II with the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres with an emphasis on American Literature. In preparation for the English IIII End of Course exam, emphasis is placed on various domains of writing, the use of written and oral conventions of language, critical and analytical reading comprehension skills in the study of literature, and vocabulary enrichment.

AP English Language and Composition

Grade Level: 11 1 credit Prerequisite: English II Advanced Placement Language and Composition is designed to prepare students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement test in Language and Composition. Students will read extensively in American literature and respond through analytical composition. Summer reading is required. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

English IV

Grade Level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: English III English IV is the study of skills and concepts in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and write extensively in multiple literary and informational genres with an emphasis on British Literature.

AP English Literature and Composition

Grade Level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: English III Advanced Placement Literature is designed to prepare students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement test in Literature and Composition. Students will read extensively in British literature and respond through analytical composition. Summer reading is required. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

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Dual Credit English III-- English 1301 English Composition and Rhetoric

Grade Level: 11 .5 credit for High School / 3 college hours Prerequisite: English II credit and student must meet dual credit requirements *** Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** English 1301, the first half of freshman college English, aims to help the student produce effective writing which observes the conventions of Edited American English – i.e., writing which is acceptable in the academic and professional world. The student will be encouraged to find and improve his or her own writing style while being guided through the composition process. In preparation for the required English III End of Course exam, emphasis will be placed on critical analytical skills in reading with a focus on analytical writing.

Dual Credit English III-- English 1302 English Composition and Literature

Grade Level: 11 .5 credit for High School / 3 college hours Prerequisite: English 1301 ***Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** English 1302 is a continuation of English 1301 with emphasis on the study and critical evaluation of modern literature, primarily from American writers of fiction, poetry, and drama. Extensive writing assignments are required. In preparation for the required English III End of Course exam, emphasis will be placed on critical analytical skills in reading with a focus on analytical writing.

Dual Credit English IV-- British Literature I

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit for High School / 3 college hours Prerequisite: English 1302 credit and student must meet dual credit requirements ***Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** This college English class is a study of British Literature from the Middle Ages through the Restoration and the 18th Century with selections from but not limited to Malory, Marlowe, Chaucer, and Shakespeare. A fully documented research paper is required as part of the course work.

Dual Credit English IV-- British Literature II

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit for High School / 3 college hours Prerequisite: British Literature I credit and student must meet dual credit requirements ***Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** Beginning with the Romantics, this course continues the study of British masterworks through the 19th and 20th centuries to the present. A fully documented research paper or a critical analysis of selected literary works will be required.

English for Speakers of Other Languages – ESOL I & ESOL II

Grade Level: 9-10 1 credit Prerequisite: Home Language Survey indicating that a language other than English is spoken in the home English for Speakers of Other Languages is a class for other language speakers. This course is designed to reinforce the learning of the English language and to help students acquire listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Support is offered to help students in their other classes as well. 19


MATHEMATICS

Algebra I

Grade level: 9–12 1 credit This course continues to build on the basic mathematical understandings developed in grades K8. Students will use symbols in a variety of ways to study relationships among quantities, particularly relationships in which there exists a systematic dependence of one quantity on another. These functional relationships will provide situations for students to set up and solve equations. The focus in Algebra I will be on problem solving and linear functions, but quadratic and other nonlinear functions will also be explored. Preparation for Algebra 1 EOC test will be an integral part of Algebra I.

Geometry

Grade level: 9–12 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra I Geometry is a course designed to develop critical thinking skills, problem solving, and application of algebraic skills to geometric situations. Students use coordinate, transformational and axiomatic approaches as well as spatial reasoning to develop an understanding of a variety of geometric concepts. Preparation for Geometry EOC will be an integral part of Geometry.

Pre-AP Geometry

Grade level: 9–10 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra I with a suggested year-end minimum average of 90 or Advanced/College Ready score on Algebra I EOC. In Pre-AP Geometry, students develop reasoning skills through the justification of geometrical proofs. Using the practical side of geometry, students find applications in everyday situations and projects throughout the course. A greater emphasis will be placed on area, volume and problemsolving techniques. The Pre-AP Geometry student is expected to use higher level thinking skills to prepare for other challenging Pre-AP and AP Math courses. Preparation for Geometry EOC will be an integral part of Pre-AP Geometry.

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Mathematical Models with Applications

Grade level: 11–2 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra I, COUNSELOR OR ADMINISTRATIVE PLACEMENT This course must be taken prior to Algebra II and can be taken concurrently with Geometry. Mathematical Models with Applications provides students with opportunities to use algebraic, graphical and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structures. Students will model information and solve real life applied problems related to finance, data analysis, probability, art and architecture and scientific growth and decay. Students use algebra, geometry, probability, statistics and will make connections among these to solve problems from a wide variety of applications. Students use concrete, numerical, algorithmic and graphical representations and technology to solve applied problems. There is not an EOC for Mathematical Models with Applications.

Algebra II

Grade level: 10–12 1 credit Algebra II extends the fundamental concepts of algebra beginning with equations and inequalities. It includes the study of functions, graphs, matrices, systems, transformations of parent functions, sequences and series, and the complex number system. Algebra II provides an opportunity for students to make connections between Algebra and Geometry. Preparation for Algebra II EOC test will be an integral part of Algebra II.

Pre-AP Algebra II

Grade level: 9–10 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra I with a year-end minimum suggested average of 90 or Advanced/College Ready score on Algebra I EOC or Geometry EOC. The curriculum of this course follows that of Algebra II, but includes the additional studies of polynomial functions, sequences and series. It also follows a more in-depth study of rational functions, logarithms and their applications. A focus will be placed on algebraic representations of problem situations from the physical world. Preparation for Algebra II EOC test will be an integral part of Algebra II.

Advanced Quantitative Reasoning

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra II AQR is an engaging and rigorous course that prepares students for a range of future options in non-mathematics-intensive college majors or for entering workforce training programs; it may also be an appealing elective for students pursuing pre-calculus and calculus. It follows Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II and is designed as a 12th-grade alternative to pre-calculus or as an elective to accompany or follow pre-calculus. The course emphasizes statistics and financial applications, and it prepares students to use algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and discrete mathematics to model a range of situations and solve problems. AQR builds on, reinforces, and extends what students have learned and covers a range of mathematics topics that are not part of most high school mathematics programs. The course offers student activities in a range of applied contexts and helps students develop college and career readiness skills.

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Pre-Calculus

Grade level: 11–12 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry Students build on their mathematical foundations, expanding their understanding to prepare for college. The student defines functions, describes characteristics of functions and translates among verbal, numerical, graphical and symbolic representations of a variety of functions. The student will also use trigonometric functions, sequences and series, conic sections and vectors to represent, analyze and solve real world problems. The student is introduced to Calculus in the study of limits and continuity.

Pre-AP Pre-Calculus

Grade level: 10–12 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Pre-AP Algebra II (Preferred) Pre-AP Pre-calculus is designed to prepare students for AP Calculus. Students continue to build on their mathematical foundations, expanding their understanding to prepare for college. Broad concepts are emphasized with a more intense program of critical thinking and problem solving. Students should have a willingness and ability to accept the more strenuous work involved. The student defines functions, describes characteristics of functions and translates among verbal, numerical, graphical and symbolic representations of a variety of functions. The student will also use trigonometric functions, sequences and series, conic sections and vectors to represent, analyze and solve real world problems. The student is introduced to calculus in the study of limits and continuity.

AP Calculus

Grade level: 11–12 1 credit Prerequisite: Pre-calculus Students preparing for college study calculus as a coherent body of knowledge. Students will work with functions represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students will study the meaning of the derivative in terms of rate of change and local linear approximation and will use derivatives to solve a variety of problems. Students will study the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of a rate of change. Students will study the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will model a written description of a physical situation with a function, a differential equation, or an integral. Students will use technology to help solve problems, experiments, interpret results, verify conclusions and determine the reasonableness of solutions. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

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College Algebra (Fall semester only)

Grade level: 11-12 .5 High School Credits/3 college hours Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and a THEA score of 270 or higher on the mathematics portion, or a THEA exemption based on TAKS, SAT, or ACT scores. ***Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** This course will begin with a rapid review of factoring, exponents, radicals, complex numbers, linear and quadratic equations with applications. It continues with functions and graphs, higher degree equations, absolute value equations, radical equations, logarithm and exponential functions, rational functions, polynomial and rational inequalities, systems of equations with matrices. Conics, binomial theorem, and other topics will be presented as time permits.

Statistics (Spring semester only)

Grade level: 11-12 .5 High School Credits/3 college hours Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and a THEA score of 270 or higher on the mathematics portion, or a THEA exemption based on TAKS, SAT, or ACT scores. ***Fee required for Dual Credit through TVCC*** Statistics is a course designed to meet the needs of business, education, and behavioral science students. Descriptive statistics, probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and linear regression are the topics that will be covered.

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SCIENCE

Students graduating on the Recommended and Advanced High School Graduation plans will be required to complete four years of science. It is suggested that students and parents consider future career choices when determining the sequence of science course selected. NOTE ABOUT PRE-AP AND AP SCIENCE COURSES: Students and parents are strongly encouraged to consider the recommended prerequisites when making decisions regarding Pre-AP/AP courses. Pre-AP/AP courses are college prep or college-level courses requiring a significant time commitment outside of class. Students and parents should consider class loads and extracurricular involvement before signing up for Pre-AP/AP classes.

Integrated Physics and Chemistry

Grad Level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Counselor or Administrative Placement IPC is a lab-based study of the basic concepts of physics and chemistry, making extensive use of algebra skills. IPC will no longer satisfy the science requirements in the Advanced High School Graduation Plan.

Biology

Grade Level: 9 1 credit Required Science Course This is a lab and field oriented course that surveys the living world. Students will study cells, plant and animal processes, genetics and ecology, along with proper scientific investigation skills and equipment. Students in Biology will take a state End of Course exam as part of this course.

Pre-AP Biology

Grade Level: 9 1 credit Advanced Science Course Pre-AP Biology is an advanced level laboratory-oriented course which exceeds the content and depth of Biology I. Students who desire the academic challenge of a stronger science curriculum are encouraged to select this course. Students in Pre-AP Biology will take a state End of Course exam as part of this course.

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Chemistry

Grade Level: 10-11 1 credit Prerequisites: Algebra I and Biology Chemistry is a lab-based study of matter and energy. The course includes the study of atomic structure, phases of matter, chemical periodicity, bonding, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Many of the concepts in this course require mathematical reasoning and application. Critical thinking and problem solving skills will be emphasized. Students in Chemistry will take a state End of Course exam as part of this course.

Pre-AP Chemistry

Grade Level: 10-11 1 credit Prerequisites: Algebra I, Biology or Pre-AP Biology Advanced Science Course Pre-AP chemistry is an advanced level, laboratory-oriented course which exceeds the content and depth of Chemistry I. Students who desire the academic challenge of a stronger science curriculum are encouraged to select this course. Strong math skills are required. Students in PreAP Chemistry will take a state End of Course exam as part of this course.

Principles of Technology I

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit CTE Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I, and Geometry, and counselor or administrative placement Principles of Technology I is an applied physics course designed to provide a study of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, and power as applied to mechanical, fluid, thermal and electrical energy systems. It is a lab-based course which is designed to present physics concepts in the context of real-world applications. All labs have significant mathematical applications and analysis. Principles of Technology I will no longer satisfy the science requirements in the Advanced High School Graduation Plan.

Physics

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra II or concurrent enrollment Physics is the study of the interaction of matter and energy. Physics includes knowledge of Newtonian laws and their effect, momentum laws and their applications, concepts of work, power and energy, and conversions of energy. Physics also includes a strong laboratory component.

Pre-AP Physics

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and recommended Pre-Calculus or concurrent enrollment Advanced Science Course Pre-AP Physics is an advanced level, laboratory-oriented course which exceeds the content and depth of Physics. This course will take a strong mathematical approach to the content. Students who desire the academic challenge of a stronger science curriculum are encouraged to select this course. Students will be expected to complete self-directed, independent projects.

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AP Biology

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics recommended AP Biology is equivalent to a college freshman biology class. The curriculum is based on national standards set by The College Board. The course is designed for students who want a greater depth of understanding of biological concepts and who want more extensive laboratory experience. Extensive lab work and individual readings will be required. The class will also complete 8-13 required College Board labs. Topics to be covered include molecules and cells, genetics and evolution, and organisms and populations. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

AP Chemistry

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Pre-Calculus or Calculus. AP Chemistry is equivalent to a college-level chemistry course. The curriculum is based on national standards set by The College Board. The course is designed for students who want a greater depth of understanding of chemical concepts and who want more extensive laboratory experience. AP Chemistry will prepare students for the AP Chemistry exam. It will involve a detailed look into the field of chemistry with a concentration on higher levels of critical thinking and problem solving. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

AP Physics B

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Pre-Calculus or concurrent enrollment AP Physics B will prepare the student for the AP Physics B exam. The curriculum is based on national standards set by The College Board. The course is designed for students who want a greater depth of understanding of physics concepts and who want more extensive laboratory experience. This college-level physics course will cover Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, sound, optics, electricity, magnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and relativity. Students will gain both a deeper appreciation of the concepts of Physics and additional problemsolving skills. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

AP Environmental Science

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics recommended This course is a college-level, laboratory-oriented course. Concepts include: interdependence of Earth’s systems, human interactions, and effects on the environment. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

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Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems

Grade Level: 11-12 1 Credit CTE Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics recommended Anatomy and Physiology is a two-semester course offering students general exploratory and advanced activities in the structure and functions of the components of the human body. Students will practice the methods and techniques used by professional scientists in medical investigations, build a mature understanding of the relationship of the structure and function of human body components, and acquire a realization of the interrelationship of the body systems. This course is particularly recommended for students who expect to work in the health field.

Scientific Research and Design

Grade Level: 12 1 or .5 credit CTE Prerequisite: Counselor or administrative placement This course gives students the opportunity to be in a science class with a curriculum that utilizes the laboratory investigations and scientific problem solving. Investigations will be used to assist the students in developing the necessary critical thinking skills required for success on the Exit Level Science TAKS Test.

Astronomy

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics recommended Astronomy is a one-year course in which students will study topics including information about the universe, scientific theories of the evolution of the universe, characteristics and the life cycle of stars, exploration of the universe, the role of the sun in our solar system, the planets and the orientation, and placement of the earth. This course will include several night labs during the year when conditions are optimal for planetary observations.

Aquatic Science

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics recommended This course is a lab-oriented study of freshwater and marine environments. Studies include water ecosystems, mapping, tides, water properties, technology, water issues, and pollution.

Advanced Animal Science

Grade level: 12 1 credit CTE Prerequisites: Veterinary Medical Application, Biology, Chemistry, Physics recommended, and instructor approval Fee Required This course will prepare for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. NOTE: Can be used as a 4th Science. 27


Forensic Science

Grade level: 11–12 1 credit CTE Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Law Enforcement I and instructor approval Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science. NOTE: Can be used as a 4th Science.

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SOCIAL STUDIES and ECONOMICS

World Geography

Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit The course is designed to give students unique perspectives about their own culture and physical environment in relationship to other places, cultures, and societies. These fundamental insights prepare students for daily interaction in a broad range of economics, political, and social issues. The primary goals of the course are to reinforce and refine basic geographic concepts and skills, help students think critically, form independent judgments, and develop competencies essential for effective citizenship in a global world.

Pre-AP World Geography

Grade Level: 9 1 credit Students will engage in active, high-level learning to develop skills and concepts needed to succeed at more rigorous academic levels of study in world cultures. The student will research and develop products that encourage deeper understanding of other cultures and environments.

AP Human Geography

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also will use and think about maps, understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places, define regions and evaluate the regionalization process, characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense. 9TH graders will be in an exclusively 9th grade class.

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World History

Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit This survey course is a study of the history of a variety of world cultures, their values, beliefs, political ideas, institutions, and innovations, as well as cultural diffusion and the links that connect different societies. Emphasis will be on political revolutions, industrial and technological revolutions, and the growth and mobility of the world’s population. There will be a historical perspective on contemporary trends, issues, and problems and will emphasize the need for global cooperation to solve world problems.

AP World History

Grade level: 10 1 credit The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. Focused primarily on the past thousand years of the global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage prior to 1000 A.D. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

United States History

Grade Level: 11 1 credit This is a study of the geographic, political, social and economic development of the United States from the Reconstruction era through this decade. Emphasis is placed on leaders, issues, events, and U.S. policies. The study traces the emergence of the United States as a world power and its position as leader of democratic nations. With this background, a study of contemporary U.S. and world affairs becomes an essential element for the course.

AP United States History

Grade Level: 11 1 credit This course is designed as a college level study of American History that provides students with opportunities to demonstrate high ability achievements while acquiring a background that enables them to earn college credit in higher-level history through examination. Supplementary readings in the form of documents, essays, and primary sources provide both a chronological and thematic study of America’s development from the first colonial settlements to present. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

United States Government

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit U.S. Government is the study of principles and concepts of American democracy; U.S. and state constitutions; civil liberties and legal rights; economic systems; branches of the national government; and an introduction to state and local government. Emphasis is placed on political participation, decision making, and the rights and responsibilities of American citizens.

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AP United States Government

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit Prerequisites: World Geography, World History, and U.S. History This course is a college-level study of American government and politics that helps student’s interpretative and analytical skills and acquires a background that enables them to earn college credit in government. The study requires a student to learn facts and concepts, understand the political processes, and use information critically to evaluate general propositions about politics and government. They learn to present data relevant to government and politics in written arguments and become aware of institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas of U.S. politics. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

Economics/Free Enterprise Systems

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit This course is designed to give students economic literacy as consumers in the economic system. It is a study of basic principles and theories with emphasis on helping develop competencies in the application of economic knowledge to daily functions and decision-making. Essentials and benefits of the free enterprise system will be studied.

AP Macroeconomics

Grade Level: 12 .5 credit Prerequisites: US Government Advanced Placement Macroeconomics is a course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the economic system as a whole. Such course places emphasis on the study of national income, price determination, and also develops familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

Sociology

Grade Level: 10-12 .5 credit This course examines the structure, attitudes, and behavior of social groups. Included in the course is a study of individual and societal values, an overview of social institutions (family, school, church, government, economic) and an investigation of society’s effect on individuals. Also included are contemporary social problems: crime, prejudice, aging, death, and overpopulation.

Psychology

Grade Level: 11-12 .5 credit This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior with an emphasis on heredity, environment, learning, personality dynamics, group processes, and individual differences. It provides for the study of individual and group psychology and how the knowledge, methods, and theories of psychologists are applied to the explanation of human behavior. Study in this field enables the student to better understand self and others as well as gain an insight into human nature. 31


Pre-AP Psychology

Grade Level: 11-12 .5 credit This course serves as an introduction into AP Psychology, in which students will learn individual and group psychology. Students learn how the knowledge, methods and theories of psychologists are applied to analyzing human behavior. Study in this field enables the student to better understand human development, perceptions and consciousness, learning and thinking, personality, abnormal behavior and treatment methods.

AP Psychology

Grade Level: 11-12 .5 credit Students will be introduced to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and the phenomena associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science practice. Enrollment in this class will prepare students to be successful on the AP Examination for psychology. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

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Languages Other Than English

Spanish I

Grade level: 8-11 1 credit Spanish I is designed to develop the student's ability to read, write, and speak Spanish. Conversational expressions and basic grammar will be stressed. The course will also include a basic study of composition, reading, and Hispanic cultures.

Spanish II

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Spanish I credit Spanish II is a continuation of the language skills introduced in Spanish I. Basic grammar and additional vocabulary are added to the fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing a second language.

Pre-AP Spanish II

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: A grade of at least an 85 in Spanish I and teacher approval This course exceeds the traditional survey course of Spanish II by including a more in-depth study of the Spanish culture, grammar, and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on oral proficiency. The course is designed to begin preparing college-bound students to take the AP Spanish exam.

Pre-AP Spanish III

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Spanish I & II; must have an 85 average in Spanish II and teacher approval The third year of the study of Spanish will continue to emphasize vocabulary expansion, grammatical concepts, oral proficiency, reading comprehension, and written expression. Students will also acquire cultural data, insights, and an appreciation of Hispanic history and art. Completion of Spanish III fulfills the foreign language requirement for the Advanced High School Program.

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AP Spanish Language (Spanish IV)

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Spanish III; must have an 85 average in Spanish III and teacher approval AP Spanish Language is a continuation of developing language skills with extensive use of audio and video materials. More emphasis will be placed on writing and reading Spanish literature. This course is conducted in Spanish. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

AP Spanish Literature (Spanish V)

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: AP Spanish IV This course covers selected authors and works from literature of Spanish and Latin America. It centers on the analysis and understanding of literary texts. Students will read and analyze literature orally and in writing in Spanish. AP Spanish Literature will prepare students to understand lectures in Spanish, to participate actively in discussions in Spanish on literary topics, to do a close reading of literary texts of all genres in Spanish, and to analyze critically the form and content of literary works. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

German I

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit German I is designed to develop the student’s ability to read, write, and speak German Conversational expressions and basic grammar will be stressed. The course will also include a basic study of composition, reading, and the German culture.

German II

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: German I German II is a more complex continuation of the oral and written skills learned in German I. Emphasis is placed on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing as well as focus on the German culture.

Pre-AP German III

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: German I & II; must have an 85 average in German II and teacher approval The third year of the study of German will continue to emphasize vocabulary expansion, grammatical concepts, oral and written skills, a degree of fluency in silent reading, and expression in oral reading. Students will also acquire cultural data, insights, and an appreciation of Germanic history and art. Completion of German III fulfills the foreign language requirement for the Advanced High School Program.

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AP German IV

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisites: German I, II, & III; must have an 85 average in German III and teacher approval Students in level four continue the study of German literature beginning with 1750 and extending through contemporary literature. Students continue to enact German works and prepare to take the advanced placement exam. The course provides a full academic year of advanced study with increased emphasis on thinking and speaking in German. All students are assessed for oral proficiency. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

American Sign Language III

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: American Sign Language II Students will apply their knowledge of ASL in a variety of interactive situations both receptively and expressively. Cultural connotations of common signs and phrases will be emphasized. All students will be assessed for receptive and expressive proficiency in ASL. Completion of ASL III fulfills the foreign language requirement for the Advanced High School Program.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH, and ATHLETICS

Health Education

Grade level: 9-12 .5 credit This one-semester course explores a variety of health issues which influence the well-being of an individual throughout the life cycle. Students will be given an opportunity to develop a personal philosophy of wellness and self-responsibility for health through self-assessment, investigation of factors affecting one’s health and the examination of behavior modification strategies. In addition, this course provides practical instruction in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR/AVD ) and first aid. Health issues relevant to students included are basic human anatomy and physiology, mental health, use and abuse of drugs, tobacco, alcohol, human sexuality, communicable diseases, environmental and consumer health. In compliance with House Bill 2176, the state mandated Paternity and Parent Awareness curriculum is implemented in this course.

Foundations, Individual, and Team Sports (F.I.T.S.) I

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Dressing Out Required* This purpose of this course is to help students of all fitness levels develop a solid foundation of training principles and guidelines for flexibility, fitness and wellness components, misconceptions, nutrition, weight control, stress management, and contemporary health issues. Upon the completion of the course students will have developed a working knowledge of the benefits of exercise and a physically active lifestyle, and developed physical activity behaviors associated with a lifetime of personal fitness and wellness.

Foundations, Individual, and Team Sports (F.I.T.S.) II

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Dressing Out Required* The purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for lifetime fitness with an emphasis on individual sports skills, leisure time activities, and positive social interaction during activities. Students will be required to actively participate as they learn fundamental skills, basic strategies, knowledge of rules, and sportsmanship of a variety of individual sports that help promote lifetime fitness and enjoyment.

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Foundations, Individual, and Team Sports (F.I.T.S.) III

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Dressing Out Required* In this course, students will participate in a variety of team sports that will help develop and maintain an optimal level of fitness including weight training and cardio-respiratory workouts.

Foundations, Individual, and Team Sports (F.I.T.S.) IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Dressing Out Required* In this classroom/lab/activity course, students will be introduced to a range of knowledge and skills that will enable them to understand the importance of proper nutrition and maintaining an active lifestyle. Students will design appropriate and effective personal fitness programs using the scientific principles of overload, specificity, and progression, as well as the health related components of fitness including cardio-respiratory, endurance, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, and flexibility. In addition, students will actively participate in a variety of movement labs and workouts where they will monitor their improvement and learn to assess their changes in personal fitness. *Dressing Out Requirement Dressing out is a requirement of Physical Education at Middle School to enhance motor skill development and for the purposes of hygiene and safety. Students are to wear the FISD physical education uniform or approved apparel by their teacher. Student’s black shorts must fall between the bottom of the knee and no more than 3 inches above the knee in front and back. For the safety and comfort of your students, please have them wear OR bring athletic shoes with a rubber sole, closed toe, and full support around the heel. These athletic shoes must have either Velcro straps or shoelaces. The safety of your student and their classmates is a #1 priority.

Drill Team

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Selection as a member of the school drill team. Fee required Drill Team is a dance course for students selected as a member of the school’s drill team that performs at many athletic and civic events. The students learn different dance techniques and precision. After school practices are required for participation in this group. A student must participate in the spring tryouts and be chosen by a panel of judges prior to enrollment in this class. If a student is interested in a manger position, the director, prior to enrollment, must interview the student. This class is equivalent to the physical education credit requirement and local elective credit. UIL guidelines prohibit a student from being enrolled in more than one of the following classes: cheerleading, athletics, or drill team. NOTE: More than 2 credits earned in four years of high school become local credit.

Aerobic Activity (Dance I)

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Fall Semester only is 1 state credit for physical education. Aerobic Activity is a course designed to cover four basic strands: perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of 37


themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy. NOTE: More than 2 credits earned in four years of high school become local credit.

Cheerleading

Grade level: 9-12 .5 credit Prerequisite: Selection as a cheerleader Students who are selected as cheerleaders, including the mascot, are expected to enroll in the cheerleading class for the fall semester of the year they serve as cheerleader if the class is offered. This class can be counted as a semester (1/2 credit) of physical education during the fall semester only. UIL guidelines prohibit a student from being enrolled in more than one of the following classes: cheerleading, athletics, or drill team.

Boys or Girls Athletics

Grade level: 9-12 .5- 1.0 credit Prerequisites: Coach’s approval and pass a physical examination Athletics provides a series of competitive games scheduled during the year. The sports offered for boys are football, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, track, soccer, and cross country. The sports offered for girls are volleyball, basketball, softball, golf, tennis, track, soccer, and cross country. UIL guidelines prohibit a student from being enrolled in more than one of the following classes: cheerleading, athletics, or drill team.

Tennis

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Coach’s approval and previous tennis experience Competitive sport which may require practice during the school day and after school. Students who choose tennis should have had previous experience with the sport or be able to show evidence of talent.

Golf

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Coach’s approval and previous golf experience High school golf is a competitive sport and may require regular practice sessions during the day and after school. Students interested should contact the golf coach.

Swimming

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Coach’s approval and previous swimming experience High school swimming is a competitive sport and may require regular practice sessions before or after school. Students interested should contact the swimming coach.

Athletic Training I

Grade level: 10-12 .5-1 credit (Fall and/or Spring) Prerequisites: Application and instructor approval This course is the second of the series of four and will serve as an introduction for students who have an interest in athletic training, sports medicine, or physical therapy. Some of the topics covered will be an overview of the profession of athletic training, basic anatomy and basic 38


exercise physiology, injury recognition and rehabilitation, and protective taping and bracing. NOTE: Athletic Training will coincide with the practical application sports medicine setting of working with athletics during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside the regular school day.

Introduction to Sports Medicine II Grade level: 11-12 1 credit

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Sports Medicine I, Athletic Training I; application and Instructor approval This course is the third in the series of courses that provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components of sports medicine. This course will build on the leadership and performance skills that students acquired in Sports Medicine I and Athletic Training I. Students will continue to improve administrative duties in sports medicine, prevention of athletic injuries, recognition, evaluation and immediate care of athletic injuries, rehabilitation and management skills, taping and wrapping techniques, emergency procedures, sports psychology, human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise. Note: Sports Medicine will coincide primarily in a classroom/lab setting during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside the regular school day.

Athletic Training II

Grade level: 12 .5-1 credit (Fall and/or Spring) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Sports Medicine I, Athletic Training I; application and Instructor approval This course will conclude the series of four courses. It will provide practical application that will require additional time in the sports medicine setting as scheduled before and/or after normal school hours allowing the students opportunities to apply and expand upon the taught skill components of sports medicine. Note: Athletic Training will coincide with the practical application sports medicine setting of working with athletics during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside the regular school day.

Professional Communications

SPEECH

Grade level: 9 – 12 .5 credit CTE Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research.

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FINE ARTS

Art I – Introduction to Art

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required Students will learn to appreciate art and practice artistic skills throughout the year. Students will be exposed to terminology that will enhance their ability to discuss artistic form. During the course, problem-solving skills will be developed in the resolution of art projects. Some of the areas of skill will include study of design, drawing, painting and sculpture. Students will gain valuable insight and experience in the world of art!

Art II

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Art I Fee required Artists will continue to study elements and principles of good design. Focus on observational skills will be stressed and developed through different types of 2D and 3D design problems. Various media and visual formats will be experienced. Artists will begin building an electronic portfolio of best works. Participation in art contests is encouraged.

Art III

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Art I and Art II Fee required This third level studio art class is offered to those students wishing to pursue their study of Art, but may not want the rigor of an AP class. Emphasis will be placed on personal development of design, technique skill and creativity. Artists will continue building an electronic portfolio of their best work. Participation in art contests is expected.

Art IV

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Art I, Art II, and Art III Fee required This fourth level studio art class is offered to those students who would like to continue their study of Art, but may not interested in pursuing an Art degree in college. Artists will focus on skill

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building and personal expression in various media and design problems. Best works will be added to their electronic portfolio. Participation in art contests in expected.

Pre-AP Art

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Art I and instructor approval This is an intense class filled with higher-level painting, drawing and color theory projects. Artists will be expected to submit an electronic portfolio at the end of this year from the artwork created during this class. Artists will also be able to verbally defend their artwork with art history examples. They will be required to enter two works of art in the Visual Art Scholastic Event (VASE) and will be encouraged to enter at least two other art contests. It is assumed students applying for this course have a serious interest in Art and are considering art related career opportunities.

AP Art

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Art II or Pre-AP Art, and instructor approval This is a rigorous course requiring commitment from the student. Artists will be expected to create complex visual solutions using personal themes for their artwork and assess the work against AP standards. They will produce an electronic portfolio of their artwork to be submitted for evaluation by the AP College Board in early May. In addition, artists will be required to enter at least three art contests, one being the Visual Art Scholastic Event. Students must supply own art materials and supplies. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

Band I, II, III, IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Audition and/or middle school instrumental music recommended Fee required Instrumental music includes marching band, concert band, solos, and small ensembles.

Stage Band I, II, III, IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Students must also be enrolled in Band I, II, III, or IV, and must audition STAGE BAND is provided to supplement the traditional marching and concert band curriculum and to afford the opportunity for study in the music idioms of jazz, big band, and rock music.

Applied Music I, II, III, IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in Band I, II, III, or IV. Applied Music is designed for students who want an advanced course of instrumental study. The class emphasizes the improvement of instrumental musicianship through the preparation of advanced etudes, solos, and ensembles. Members of the class are encouraged to audition for AllRegion and compete at UIL solo and ensemble contests.

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Music Theory I

Grade Level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Enrolled in a performing ensemble, and instructor approval Music Theory I is an entry level theory course that is designed for students who are interested in learning the basics of music notation, melody, harmony, chord structure, sight singing and part writing. Once students have an understanding of the written component, the majority of the class will be focused on ear training; interval recognition, harmonic and melodic dictation, and sight singing. This course is a prerequisite for the AP Music Theory Course, which picks up right where this course ends.

AP Music Theory

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Music Theory I and instructor approval AP Music Theory is a course designed for students who are interested in learning the theories of writing, comprehending, and performing music. Students must be able to read basic musical notation and must have experience playing a musical instrument or singing. The class is taught from a college-level textbook and is approached as a college course. The course is fast-paced and requires independent learning. Each student will develop skills ranging from independent singing, musical form analysis, and music composition. Students may earn college credit for the class by passing the AP Music Theory exam given in May of each year. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the AP exam. Fees will be at the student’s expense.

Chorale Women I, II, III, IV

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Audition Fee required Course Requirements Encourage Students to: • Study the fundamentals of vocal production, music theory, and sight-reading techniques • Study unison, two, three, and four part singing • Participate in region tryouts, fall concert and winter holiday performances in the first semester as required • Participate in solo and ensemble contests, spring concerts, and a music festival trip (second semester); attend after school rehearsals

Chorale Men I, II, III, IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Audition Fee required Course Requirements Encourage Students to: • Study the fundamentals of vocal production, music theory, and sight-reading techniques • Study unison, two, three, and four part singing • Participate in region tryouts, fall concert and winter holiday performances in the first semester as required • Participate in solo and ensemble contests, spring concerts, and a music festival trip (second semester); attend after school rehearsals 42


Concert Women’s Choir I, II, III, IV

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Previous choral training or audition Fee required Course Requirements Encourage Students to: • Study the fundamentals of vocal production, music theory, and sight-reading techniques • Study unison, two, and three part singing • Participate in fall concert and winter holiday performances in the first semester as required • Participate in solo and ensemble contests, spring concerts, and a music festival trip (second semester); attend after school rehearsals (as needed)

Intermediate Women’s Choir I, II, III, IV

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required Prerequisite: Audition and instructor approval Course Requirements Encourage Students to: • Continuation of beginning theory, ear training, and sight-reading • Participate in choral ensembles and concert performances with an emphasis on secular and sacred literature as prescribed • Participate in campus concerts, spring festivals and UIL Concert/Sight Reading Contest • Attend as required after-school rehearsals and performances

Chamber Choir/Show Choir I, II, III, IV

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required Prerequisite: Audition and concurrent enrollment in Chorale Women or Chorale Men Course Requirements Encourage Students to: • Study advanced theory, ear training, and sight-reading • Participate in small ensembles and concert performances with an emphasis on popular and current musical selections (Choreography may be included) • Participate in festivals, musicals, community, school, and district performances and competitions • Attend as required after-school rehearsals and performances

Theatre Arts I

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required Students will be provided opportunities to improvise, understand dramatic structure, explore technical theater, and develop an appreciation of the theater. Students will be provided opportunities to try-out for school plays as well as in class productions.

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Theatre Arts II, III, IV

Grades level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Theatre Arts I and teacher approval Fee required Students will learn advanced characterization skills, explore classical production styles and contemporary styles of production. Activities will include mime, theater for children, puppetry, and live productions for the community.

Theatre Production I, II, III

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Audition and instructor approval Students will focus on theater production. Students will perform both on stage and back stage roles in various productions. Students in this course will comprise the cast and crew of the U.I.L. One Act Play. Enrollment in this course will be required for participation in One Act Play.

Technical Theatre I, II

Grades level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Theatre Arts I and instructor approval Technical Theatre is for students who have completed the Theatre Arts I course and are interested in developing skills, knowledge and understanding of the technical aspects of theatre design. Students will focus on the construction and design of sets and scenery with “hands-on� applications in class and production work. Students will be required to participate in the crew work with out of class productions.

Dance I

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Dance I is a course designed to cover four basic strands: perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy.

Dance II, III, IV

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Dance I and instructor approval Dance II-IV is a course that will continue to emphasize the four basic strands, but will incorporate more advanced technique and combinations. Students should be proficient in leaps, turns and be able to quickly learn more advanced choreography. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own style through their own choreography and performance experiences. They will be exposed to a variety of dance techniques and styles.

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GENERAL ELECTIVE COURSES

Any of the courses listed in the above sections that are relating to the Essential Knowledge and Skills may be used as an elective if they are not used to meet another graduation requirement.

Debate I, II, III

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit This course provides students with the knowledge and skills in argumentation and debate. Students will analyze controversial issues, debate propositions of value and policy, apply critical thinking and logic, utilize research and proof, apply the mechanics of refutation, create cases, and use effective communication skills. Students enrolled will be required to complete a major project portfolio or compete at one regional debate competition.

Concepts of Engineering & Technology - Introduction to Robotics

Grade level: 9-10 1 credit Concepts of Engineering and Technology provides an overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Upon completing this course, students will have an understanding of the various fields and will be able to make informed decisions regarding a coherent sequence of subsequent courses. Further, students will have worked on a design team to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments

Robotics and Automation

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Concepts of Engineering & Technology - Intro to Robotics Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for the robotic and automation industry. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will build prototypes or use simulation software to test their designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the robotic and automation industry.

Partners PE

Grade Level: 11-12 .5 credit (Fall or Spring) Prerequisite: Instructor approval Students will work with partners who may need assistance with regular physical activities. This course follows the same format as other PE courses, but emphasizes individual and group activities. Students will receive a local elective credit for this course not a PE credit.

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Principles of Health Science - Introduction to Sports Medicine I

Grade level: 9-10 1 credit Introduction to Sports Medicine & Athletic Training is for individuals interested in athletics and the medical needs of athletes. Introduction to Sports Medicine - Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, and support services including anatomy and physiology surrounding sports medicine and athletic training. To pursue a career in the Sports Medicine and Athletic Training, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The Sports Medicine and Health Science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology and safety requirements of each system. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. Introduction to Sports Medicine/Principles of HST will coincide primarily in a classroom/lab setting during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside of the regular school day.

Introduction to Sports Medicine II

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Successful completion of Sports Medicine I and Athletic Training I This course is the third in the series of courses that provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components of sports medicine. This course will build on the leadership and performance skills that students acquired in Sports Medicine I and Athletic Training I. Students will continue to improve administrative duties in sports medicine, prevention of athletic injuries, recognition, evaluation and immediate care of athletic injuries, rehabilitation and management skills, taping and wrapping techniques, emergency procedures, sports psychology, human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise. NOTE: Sports Medicine will coincide primarily in a classroom/lab setting during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside the regular school day.

AFJROTC I

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Fee required: $25 This course is an introductory course for students interested in Air Force Junior ROTC. Students will be introduced to AFJROTC’s mission and organization. First year cadets will learn important teamwork, leadership, and citizenship skills through various activities. This course is student led with citizenship building a major goal. Students will learn skills that will be valuable throughout the rest of their lives. Cadets can participate in numerous co-curricular and extra-curricular activities including field trips to military installations, space and science outings, an annual military ball and awards program, drill team, saber team, color guard, rocket and orienteering clubs. Optional ROPES courses, paintball outings, and orienteering are also offered. Academic training will include A Journey into Aviation History, leadership, citizenship, and twenty percent 46


physical fitness training with emphasis on a healthy lifestyle. Students enrolled in this class may receive a Physical Education substitution of 1 credit or an elective 1 credit.

AFJROTC II

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: AFJROTC I Fee required: $25 This course continues to emphasize leadership, teamwork, and citizenship skills. Cadets will participate in the same activities as Aerospace Science I cadets and are given the opportunity to become the leaders and planners of these activities. Academic training can include leadership, Science of Flight, Exploration of Space, Global and Cultural Studies, Introduction to Astronomy and other subjects including twenty percent physical fitness training with emphasis on a healthy lifestyle. Cadets are preparing to be the leaders of the AFJROTC Corps of Cadets. Students enrolled in this class may receive a Physical Education substitution credit of .5 or an elective 1 credit.

AFJROTC III

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: AFJROTC II Fee required: $25 This course continues to emphasize leadership, teamwork, and citizenship skills. Cadets will participate in the same activities as Aerospace Science I and II cadets and are given the opportunity to become leaders and planners of these activities. Academic training can include leadership, Science of Flight, Exploration of Space, Global and Cultural Studies, Introduction to Astronomy, and other subjects including twenty percent physical fitness training with emphasis on a healthy lifestyle. Cadets should be taking an active role as leaders of the AFJROTC Corps of Cadets. Students enrolled in this class will receive 1 elective credit.

AFJROTC IV

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: AFJROTC III Fee required: $25 This course continues to emphasize leadership, teamwork, and citizenship skills. Cadets will participate in the same activities as Aerospace Science I, II, III cadets and are given the opportunity to become the leaders and planners of these activities. Academic training can include leadership, citizenship, Science of Flight, Exploration of Space, Global and Cultural Studies, Introduction to Astronomy, and other subjects including twenty percent physical fitness training with emphasis on a healthy lifestyle. Cadets should be taking a senior leadership role within the AFJROTC Corps of Cadets. Students enrolled in this class will receive 1 elective credit.

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special education services shall be provided to eligible students in accordance with all applicable federal law and regulations, state statutes, rules of the State Board of Education (SBOE) and commissioner of education, and the State Plan under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Placement in any Special Education class is dependent on eligibility and the decision of the Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. Placement and course selections are reviewed, at a minimum, on an annual basis. The following is a list of the courses with modified Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) which are taught by special education teachers. Goals and objectives are developed for each class based on individual student needs. All Special Education courses are taken for credit as are General Education courses. Functional Classes Defined Functional classes at the secondary level are classes designed for students with moderate to severe disabilities. These disabilities pose significant difficulties in mastering the core curriculum. While the classes are based on the core academic areas including math, language arts, science, and social studies, the planned student outcomes are “functional” or applicable to general life skills. Students in functional classes will deal with concepts at the prerequisite level. Functional classes will focus on tangible, real-life simplified applications to the extent the district does not consider these “core area subjects”. Specific objectives will be drafted for individual students based on their individual needs. Within functional classes, transition planning will be incorporated to allow for maximization of job readiness skills. ENGLISH Basic English (1-4) Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Basic English courses use modified, general education curriculum designed to expose students to a variety of literature including different genre and themes. Students will read a variety of literary and informational texts and compose a variety of written texts. The development and reinforcement of study skills is a part of these courses.

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Functional English (1-4) Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Functional English is a basic course of study in concentrated areas of literature and communication skills including reading, grammar, spelling, and writing/composition. An emphasis is placed on school to vocational skills and daily living skills. MATH Basic Algebra I Grade Level: 9 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Basic Algebra I is a course that focuses on transitioning the student from the areas of basic arithmetic to the foundational concepts for high school mathematics. It includes the study of prealgebra and algebra, scale reading, charts and graphs, and problem solving. Basic Geometry Grade Level: 10 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Basic Geometry is a course designed to provide students with an introduction to geometry. It includes the opportunity to study and understand geometric concepts and to develop deductive, inductive, and creative thinking skills. Basic Math Models I & II Grade Level: 11 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Basic Math Models is a course that focuses on the consumer and economic applications of mathematics. Problem solving and decision-making using real world data are emphasized. Concepts relating to money including math operations, taxes, interest rate, banking, credit and consumer awareness, business practices related to money, and managing household finances and budgets are covered. Functional Algebra I, Geometry, Math III & IV Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Functional Math is a basic course of study designed to address the fundamental operational skills of math as applied to daily life and vocational skills. Business related skills, time measurement, scheduling, money, banking skills, purchasing goods and services, general money management, time cards, work schedules, and problem solving strategies are stressed. SCIENCE Functional Biology, Functional Science II & III Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Functional Science is a basic course of study designed to address fundamental concepts of science and will use activity based learning to address science skills necessary for employment, community experiences, independent living, and safety. 49


Personal Health Grade Level: 9-12 .5 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee This course is a study in health awareness. Attention is given to growth and development, exercise, diet and nutrition, leisure activities, personal development and strategies to use in addressing personal health and hygiene issues, and social skills development. SOCIAL STUDIES Functional World Geography, Functional World History, Functional US History, Functional Government/Economics Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Functional Social Studies is a basic course of study designed for exposure to geography, significant events in world history and American history, basic principles of American government and economics. It will also focus on understanding the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of students within their school, community, and employment settings. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Functional PE Grade Level: 9-12 .5 credit per semester Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee This course follows the same format as other PE courses, but emphasizes individual and group activities and provides an opportunity for students to work with a peer partner for assistance. TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Basic Technology Applications 1 Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Basic Technology Application will enable students to gain knowledge and skills in the use of a variety of technological equipment that may be applied to personal/workplace situations. Basic use and operation of computers and various office machines will be covered. SPEECH Personal Communication Applications Grade Level: 9-12 .5 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Personal Communication Applications is designed to help students develop and strengthen effective communication skills. Topics covered will include using information to make value judgments, handling conflict and making decisions in a variety of settings.

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ELECTIVES Daily Living Skills (1-4) Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Credit: 1 unit Daily Living Skills is designed to help students develop skills related to independent living. Activities involve instruction in the areas of nutrition, cooking skills, personal hygiene, and other domestic skills. VOCATIONAL Employment Skills (1-2) Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Employment Skills prepares students to enter the job market through investigating the areas of job skills and interests. A study of employment issues including: the application and interview process; understanding the job experience; quality employment skills; job performance evaluations; job training; employment policies; procedures; rights and responsibilities; positive productive work experiences; work ethic and job attitudes; co-worker, supervisor, and customer relationships; safety; self-initiative, follow-through, and best efforts are skills applied in the process for a positive work experience. Vocational Training (1-2) Grade Level: 11-12 .5 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Vocational Training is designed for the student to gain an awareness of the community and work environment by taking regularly scheduled trips, to learn vocational skills by participating in campus directed programs and experience actual training at pre-determined community businesses. Functional Fine Arts (1-4) Grade Level: 9-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Placement by ARD Committee Through activity based learning students will gain an appreciation of music and art. This course will offer students the opportunity for creative growth and expression through areas of study and exploration of career interests in art and music.

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Career/Workplace Preparation Career & Technical Education (CTE)

Career and Technical Education (CTE) is committed to providing quality programs for the students in the Forney Independent School District. Students at the high school level pursue a rigorous academics integrated with the technical courses that better prepare them for education and career options. A coherent sequence of courses is an educational plan made of developmentally appropriate courses suited for a given career objective. This plan is built upon the academic core components and includes campus-based and work-based learning experiences leading to both academic and occupational competencies.

Certification and License Options Students may wish to pursue certificates and/or licenses based upon skills/knowledge attained while enrolled in a CTE course. Completion of the CTE course does not guarantee success on certification exams. The following chart identifies various credential options. Students are responsible for fess associated with certification /licenses.

Academy

Medical Science

Global Business & Finance Culinary Arts

Certification

Adult, child, infant CPR/AED/First Aid Work towards Pharmacy Tech MOS (Microsoft Office Specialist) up to 5 tests Food Handlers Permit

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Preparation Course

Health Science

Practicum in Health Science BIM

Cost $27

$250 $50 per test $10


AGRICULTURE ACADEMY

TH

9

p Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

TH

TH

TH

11

10

Livestock Production/Small Animal Management

Veterinary Medical Applications

Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies

Agriculture Power Systems

12

Advanced Animal Science th

(4 year Science) Agriculture Facilities Design & Fabrication

Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

Grade level: 9 – 10 1 credit Fee required To be prepared for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge in agriculture. This course allows students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, personal development, globalization, industry standards, details, practices, and expectations. To prepare for success, students need to have opportunities to learn, reinforce, experience, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

Livestock Production (Fall Semester)

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Fee required To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Animal species to be addressed in this course may include, but are not limited to, beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and poultry.

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Small Animal Management (Spring Semester)

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Fee required To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested small animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, avian, dogs, and cats.

Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Fee required To be prepared for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge; acquire technical knowledge and skills related to power, structural, and technical agricultural systems and the industry; and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of agricultural mechanics as it relates to safety and skills in tool operation, electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, fencing, concrete, and metal working techniques.

Veterinary Medical Applications

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 credit Prerequisites: Livestock Production and Small Animal Management Fee required To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, veterinary practices as they relate to both large and small animal species.

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Agricultural Power Systems

Grade level: 11–12 1 credit Prerequisites: Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies Fee required To be prepared for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students should attain academic skills and knowledge; acquire technical knowledge and skills related to power, structural, and technical agricultural systems and the work place; and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students should have opportunities, to learn, to reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and technical skills in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of power and control systems as related to energy sources small and large power systems and agricultural machinery.

Advanced Animal Science

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisites: Veterinary Medical Application, Biology, Chemistry, Physics recommended, and instructor approval Fee required To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. NOTE: Can be used as a 4th Science.

Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication

Grade level: 12 2 credits Prerequisites: Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies Fee required To be prepared for careers in mechanized agriculture and technical systems, students attain knowledge and skills related to agricultural facilities design and fabrication. Students explore career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and technical skills in a variety of settings.

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CULINARY ARTS ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Principles of Hospitality & Tourism/Restaurant Management

Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness

Culinary Arts

Practicum in Culinary Arts

Principles of Hospitality and Tourism (Fall Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 credit The hospitality and tourism industry encompasses lodging; travel and tourism; recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts; and restaurants and food beverage service. The hospitality and tourism industry maintains the largest national employment base in the private sector. Students use knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

Restaurant Management (Spring Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 credit This course will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. The course will provide insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit This laboratory course allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, education and training, human services, and health sciences. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

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Culinary Arts

Grade level: 11 – 12 2 credits Prerequisite: Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness and instructor approval Culinary Arts begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of cooking and the science of baking and includes management and production skills and techniques. Students can pursue a national sanitation certification, a Texas culinary specialist certification, or any other appropriate industry certification. This course may be offered as a laboratory-based or internship course. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

Practicum in Culinary Arts

Grade level: 12 2 credits Prerequisite: Culinary Arts and instructor approval This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Practicum in Culinary Arts integrates academic and career and technical education; provides more interdisciplinary instruction; and supports strong partnerships among schools, businesses, and community institutions with the goal of preparing students with a variety of skills in a fast-changing workplace. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training plan, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio development. Practicum in Culinary Arts is relevant and rigorous, supports student application of academic standards, and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

.

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EDUCATION and TRAINING ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Principles of Education & Training/Principles of Human Services

Human Growth & Development

Instructional Practices in Education & Training

Practicum in Education & Training

Principles of Education and Training (Fall Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 – 1 credit Principles of Education and Training is designed to introduce learners to the various careers available within the education and training career cluster. Students use self-knowledge and educational and career information to analyze various careers within the education and training career cluster. Students will also gain an understanding of the basic knowledge and skills essential to careers within the education and training career cluster. Students will develop a graduation plan that leads to a specific career choice in the student's interest area.

Principles of Human Services (Spring Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 – 1 credit This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers.

Human Growth and Development

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Human Growth and Development is an examination of human development across the lifespan with emphasis upon research, theoretical perspectives, and common physical, cognitive, emotional, and social developmental milestones. The course covers material that is generally taught in a postsecondary, one-semester introductory course in developmental psychology or human development.

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Instructional Practices in Education and Training

Grade level: 11 – 12 2 credit Prerequisite: Human Growth and Development Instructional Practices in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students with background knowledge of child and adolescent development as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators or trainers in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, develop materials for educational environments, assist with record keeping, and complete other responsibilities of teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel.

Practicum in Education and Training

Grade level: 12 2 – 3 credits Prerequisites: Instructional Practices in Education and Training; and instructor approval Practicum in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of child and adolescent development principles as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students in the course work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel.

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ENGINEERING ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Introduction to Engineering Design

Principles of Engineering

Aerospace Engineering

Engineering Design & Development

Concepts of Engineering & Technology Introduction to Robotics

Robotics & Automation

v

Introduction to Engineering Design

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit This is the first course in the Project Lead The Way high school program. This course teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of product solutions are created analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software.

Concepts of Engineering and Technology - Introduction to Robotics

Grade level: 9-10 1 credit Concepts of Engineering and Technology provides an overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Upon completing this course, students will have an understanding of the various fields and will be able to make informed decisions regarding a coherent sequence of subsequent courses. Further, students will have worked on a design team to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments

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Principles of Engineering

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisites: Recommended Introduction to Engineering Design This is the first or second course in the Project Lead The Way high school program. This overview course introduces students to the concepts and practices that underlie careers in engineering and engineering technology. The course integrates technology, mathematics, and science into preengineering activities. Students learn basic requirements for technical drawings and transferring drawings to “real world� construction projects.

Aerospace Engineering

Grade level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering Through hands-on engineering projects developed with NASA, students learn about aerodynamics, flight planning, navigation, astronautics, space-life sciences, materials, structures and systems engineering (which includes the study of intelligent vehicles like the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity).

Robotics and Automation

Grade level: 10-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Concepts of Engineering and Technology - Intro to Robotics Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for the robotic and automation industry. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will build prototypes or use simulation software to test their designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the robotic and automation industry.

Engineering Design and Development

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisites: Chemistry, Physics, Algebra II, Geometry, and Intro to Engineering Design In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel

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GLOBAL BUSINESS and FINANCE ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Business Information Management I

Entrepreneurship/ Retailing & E-tailing

Money Matters/ Banking & Finance

Practicum in Business Management & Finance

Business Information Management I

Grade level: 9 – 12 1 credit Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software.

Entrepreneurship

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Prerequisite: None Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit.

Retailing and E-tailing

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Students will have the opportunity to develop skills that involve electronic media techniques necessary for a business to compete in a global economy. Students will coordinate online and offline marketing. Students will demonstrate critical-thinking skills using decision-making models, case studies, various technologies, and business scenarios.

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Money Matters (Fall Semester)

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Students will investigate global economics with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its impact on consumers and businesses. Students apply critical-thinking skills to analyze financial options based on current and projected economic factors. Students will gain knowledge and skills necessary to set long-term financial goals based on those options. Students will determine methods of achieving long-term financial goals through investment, tax planning, asset allocation, risk management, retirement planning, and estate planning.

Banking and Financial Services (Spring Semester)

Grade level: 10 – 12 .5 credit Students develop knowledge and skills in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of banking to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the operations, sales, and management of banking institutions to gain a complete understanding of how banks function within society.

Practicum in Business Management

Grade level: 12 2 credits Prerequisites: Money Matters, Banking and Financial Services or Entrepreneurship/Retailing-etailing; and instructor approval The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions.

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LAW and PUBLIC SAFETY ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Principles of Law, Public Corrections, & vSafety,Security

Law Enforcement I

Court Systems & Practices

Practicum In Law & Public Safety

Law Enforcement II

Law Enforcement I and Court Systems & Practices are offered every other year Forensic Science (4th year Science)

Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 – 1 credit Fee Required Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security introduces students to professions in law enforcement, security, corrections, and fire and emergency management services. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of police, courts, corrections, private security, and protective agencies of fire and emergency services. The course provides students with an overview of the skills necessary for careers in law enforcement, fire service, security, and corrections.

Law Enforcement I

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Fee Required Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. This course includes the role of constitutional law, the United States legal system, criminal law, law enforcement terminology, and the classification and elements of crime. 64


Court Systems and Practices

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Fee Required Court Systems and Practices is an overview of the federal and state court systems. The course identifies the roles of judicial officers and the trial processes from pretrial to sentencing and examines the types and rules of evidence. Emphasis is placed on constitutional laws for criminal procedures such as search and seizure, stop and frisk, and interrogation.

Law Enforcement II

Grade level: 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I Fee Required Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. This course includes the ethical and legal responsibilities, operation of police and emergency telecommunication equipment, and courtroom testimony.

Practicum in Law & Public Safety

Grade level: 12 2 – 3 credits Prerequisites: Court Systems and Practices, or Law Enforcement I; and instructor approval Fee Required The Practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience.

Forensic Science

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 Science credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Law Enforcement I and instructor approval Fee Required Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science. NOTE: Can be used as a 4th Science.

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MEDIA and COMMUNICATIONS ACADEMY

9TH Principles of Audio/Video Technology, & Communication

10TH Graphic Design & Illustration

11TH Advanced Graphic Design & Illustration

Advanced Audio/Video Production

Audio/Video Production

Digital & Interactive Media for-Journalism

Graphic Design & Illustration for Newspaper or Yearbook

12TH Practicum in Graphic Design & Illustration

Practicum Audio/Video Production

Web Technologies for Newspaper or Yearbook

Newspaper III or Yearbook III

Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 – 1 credit Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster require, in addition to creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and educational requirements for those opportunities.

Digital and Interactive Media for Journalism

Grade level: 9 – 12 1 credit Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. DIM is and entry-level course designed to give students interested in newspaper and/or yearbook and overview of the different types of journalistic writing and knowledge of publications 66


production. Students in this course will not work on the yearbook or newspaper, but they will learn skills that will prepare them for these important activities the following year.

Graphic Design and Illustration

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design.

Audio/Video Production

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities.

Graphic Design and Illustration for Newspaper (Newspaper I)

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Instructor approval Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. This course is recommended for the student who loves to write and likes responsibility. The student will learn journalistic style of writing and layout design on computers. Students in this class are responsible for producing the school newspaper. Some outside class time is required. This class is limited to 20 students.

Graphic Design and Illustration for Yearbook (Yearbook I)

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Instructor approval Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. This course offers practical experience in public relations, advertising, layout design, photography, writing copy, and other basic journalistic techniques required in yearbook production. Students will produce the school yearbook.

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Advanced Graphic Design and Illustration

Grade level: 11 – 12 2 credits Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on mastery of content knowledge and skills.

Advanced Audio/Video Production

Grade level: 11 – 12 2 credits Prerequisite: Audio/Video Production Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production activities. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio format or an advanced format, including both audio and video.

Web Technologies for Newspaper (Newspaper II)

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration Through the study of web technologies and design, students learn to make informed decisions and apply the decisions to the field of information technology. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. This course is recommended for the student who loves to write and likes responsibility. The student will learn journalistic style of writing and layout design on computers. Students in this class are responsible for producing the school newspaper. Some outside class time is required. This class is limited to 20 students.

Web Technologies for Yearbook (Yearbook II)

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 credit Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration Through the study of web technologies and design, students learn to make informed decisions and apply the decisions to the field of information technology. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. This course offers practical experience in public relations, advertising, layout design, photography, writing copy, and other basic journalistic techniques required in yearbook production. Students will produce the school yearbook. 68


Practicum in Graphic Design and Illustration

Grade level: 12 2-3-credits Prerequisites: Advanced Graphic Design and Illustration and instructor approval Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop a technical understanding of the industry with a focus on skill proficiency. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities.

Practicum in Audio/Video Production

Grade level: 12 2 – 3 credits Prerequisites: Advanced Audio/Video Production and instructor approval Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and postproduction audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through labbased classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities.

Newspaper Production III

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Instructor approval This course is recommended for the student who loves to write and likes responsibility. The student will learn journalistic style of writing and layout design on computers. Students in this class are responsible for producing the school newspaper. Some outside class time is required. . This class is limited to 20 students.

Yearbook Production III

Grade Level: 11-12 1 credit Prerequisite: Instructor approval This course offers practical experience in public relations, advertising, layout design, photography, writing copy, and other basic journalistic techniques required in yearbook production. Students will produce the school yearbook.

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MEDICAL SCIENCE ACADEMY

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

Principles of Health Science/Medical Nutrition & Wellness

Medical Terminology

Health Science

Practicum in Health Science

Principles of Health Science - Sports Medicine I

Anatomy & Physiology (4th year Science)

Principles of Health Science (Fall Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 credit Fee required The Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the health care industry. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions.

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Medical Nutrition & Wellness (Spring Semester)

Grade level: 9 – 10 .5 credit This laboratory course allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, education and training, human services, and health sciences. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

Principles of Health Science - Introduction to Sports Medicine I

Grade level: 9-12 1 credit Introduction to Sports Medicine & Athletic Training is for individuals interested in athletics and the medical needs of athletes. Introduction to Sports Medicine - Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, and support services including anatomy and physiology surrounding sports medicine and athletic training. To pursue a career in the Sports Medicine and Athletic Training, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The Sports Medicine and Health Science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology and safety requirements of each system. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. Introduction to Sports Medicine/Principles of HST will coincide primarily in a classroom/lab setting during the regular hours of the school day. However, there will be several scheduled practical lab settings outside of the regular school day.

Medical Terminology

Grade level: 10 – 12 1 credit This course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, and singular and plural forms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. To pursue a career in health science, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should understand that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to learn the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions.

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Health Science

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology and Medical Terminology Fee required The Health Science course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will have hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. The course may be taught by different methodologies such as clinical rotation and career preparation learning. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should recognize, learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities, recognize limitations, and understand the implications of their actions. NOTE: Health Science may substitute for Health Education.

Practicum in Health Science

Grade level: 12 2 – 3 credits Prerequisites: Health Science and instructor approval Fee required: $20-$30 for Scrubs, $7.50 for rotation patch, $5 for clinical rotation The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions.

Anatomy and Physiology

Grade level: 11 – 12 1 Science Credit Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry In Anatomy and Physiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis. NOTE: Can be used as a 4th Science. 72


Public Notice of Nondiscrimination in Career and Technology Education Programs Forney ISD offers career and technology education programs in Agriculture Food and Natural Resources; Architecture and Construction; Business Management and Administration; Education and Training; Health Science Technology Education; Human Services; Information Technology; Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security; and Vocational Adjustment. Admission to these programs is based on the student’s abilities and educational needs. It is the policy of Forney ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap in its vocational programs, services, or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. It is the policy of Forney ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, handicap, or age in its employment practices as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Forney ISD will take steps to assure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Title IX Coordinator, and/or the Section 504 Coordinator, at 600 S. Bois D’Arc, Forney, TX 75126, (972) 564-4055. Noticia Pública de no Discriminación De los Programas de Educación de Carreras y Tecnología Forney ISD ofrece programas de Carreras y Tecnología en Agricultura, Comida y Recursos Naturales; Supervisión y Administración de Negocios; Educación y Entrenamiento; Ciencias de Salud; Servicios Humanos; Leyes, Seguridad Publica, Correcciones y Seguridad; Ciencias, Tecnología, Ingeniería y Matemáticas; y Ajuste Vocacional. Admisión a estos programas se basa en las habilidades y necesidades educacionales de los estudiantes. Es la norma de Forney ISD de no discriminar en base a la raza, color, origen nacional, sexo, discapacidad en sus programas vocacionales, en los servicios, ni en las actividades como lo requiere la enmienda de Título VI del Acta Civil de Derechos de 1964; el Título IX de las Enmiendas de la Educación de 1972; y la Sección 504 del Acta de Rehabilitación de 1973. Es la norma de Forney ISD de no discriminar en base a la raza, color, origen nacional, sexo, discapacidad, y edad en sus practicas de empleos como lo raequiere la enmienda del Título VI del Acta Civil de Derechos de 1964, el Título IX de las Enmiendas de la Educación de 1972; el Acta de la Discriminación de la Edad de 1975, y la enmienda de Sección 504 del Acta de Rehabilitación de 1973. Forney ISD tomará los pasos necesarios para asegurar que la falta de habilidades en el idioma inglés no será una barrera para la admisión y participación total en los programas educativos y vocacionales. Para información acerca de los procedimientos de sus derechos o queja, avise al Coordinadora del Título IX y/o la Coordinadora de la Sección 504 en 600 S. Bois D’ Arc, Forney, TX 75126, (972) 564-4055.

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Forney High Schools Course Selection Guide  

Forney High Schools Course Selection Guide

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