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SUMMER 2010

LREI NEWS

Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School

A Leader In Progressive Education Since 1921 T H E N E W YO R K T I M E S M A G A Z I N E / A U G U S T 16 , 2 0 0 9

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SUMMER 2010

LREI NEWS

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A GRAND OPENING A spring celebration of Charlton Street expansion

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DIVERSITY MATTERS Diversity training starts in the Lower School

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HELPING HAITI How the Middle School responded to January’s earthquake

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GRADUATION 2010 Overheard at commencement

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KINDERGARTEN TO COLLEGE How this year’s college list embodies LREI’s mission

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MY LIFE AT LREI Jimmy Rogers-Gahan’s 14-year LREI experience

GROW AND TELL Afterschool gets greener with rooftop gardening boxes A MAJOR STEP FOR THE ARTS Students request—and receive!—a new Performing Arts Elective

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NEW & NOTEWORTHY Adult (r)Ed, Stir the Pot, Faculty Wins and Sing for Hope’s street piano project

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MEET OUR NEW TRUSTEES AND ADMINISTRATORS

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REUNION 2010

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CLASS NEWS

LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR At this point in the summer, each of you has spent time with your children celebrating their successes and reviewing all that they achieved during the past school year. Amazing, isn’t it? In June, as I watched the students leave on the last day, they were barely the same people they were when they arrived in September. We are so proud of each and every one of them. In these pages you will find articles on some of our collective successes this year, including the addition of the 42 Charlton Street townhouse to the high school building, the inspiring Haiti relief efforts initiated by our middle schoolers and a unique diversity training program in the Lower School. But just as spring turned to summer and school turned to Summers at LREI, we have begun to turn our attention from the school year that was to the one that is to come. In August we will continue our ongoing renovation and greening of the Sixth Avenue campus. This work will include remodeling the Second Grade classrooms, replacing the floor in the cafeteria and installing a new retractable wall in the auditorium. In addition to improvements to our facilities, more than 20 faculty members have received summer grants to create, refine and renew the curriculum. These grants are a longstanding tradition at LREI and represent work in all three divisions and a variety of content areas. We are proud of the focused attention that the faculty brings to our progressive program each year. Enjoy LREI News and enjoy the rest of your summer. Best,

Phil Kassen


FIELD DAY

COVER PHOTO: RICHARD CLEVES. THIS PAGE: PHOTOS BY CELESTE DORSEY AND STEVE NEIMAN.

2010

Knights of every grade rush the field at Pier 40 on May 28, after the ribbon cutting at 40 Charlton Street.

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A GRAND Opening G R O W T H A N D E X PA N S I O N

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he ribbon cutting celebrated not only our expanding facility, but also the increased interest in progressive secondary education.” PHIL KASSEN, DIRECTOR

The entire community came together on May 28 to celebrate our newly expanded campus at 40 Charlton Street. Children, parents, alumni, faculty, neighbors and friends gathered together on the street as we closed down the whole block to mark this special occasion. “The ribbon cutting celebrated not only our expanding facility, but also the increased interest in progressive secondary education,” said Director Phil Kassen. The expansion project began in 2004 when, in order to accommodate our growing student body and program, LREI’s Board of Trustees purchased the townhouse next door to the high school, owned by Anne Murphy and Arthur Bence (parents of Charlotte Bence ‘02). Representing all three divisions, Willy Staso, Samantha Maison and Noelle Raffo joined Board Chair Michael Patrick, ’71, to cut the ribbon—together. Watch us cut the ribbon at lrei.org/ribbon 2

Left: The staircase in the new upper lobby. Below: Day one at the Harkness table.


WHAT’S NEW BASEMENT PHOTOS BY STEVE NEIMAN AND BRIANA E. HEARD

• The newly enlarged and revamped cafeteria

• A new music suite with three practice rooms and a main classroom • A skylit student lounge with plenty of room to work or relax with classmates

FIRST FLOOR

• A sophisticated lobby with seating and a window into the theater • A light-filled, upper lobby leading to the courtyard • The college guidance office, a restored 1840’s parlor with period details

Top and above: The new skylit student lounge.

SECOND FLOOR

and Smartboard for humanities electives

GROUND FLOOR

• The high school admissions office • A faculty office

• An additional classroom for math and foreign language

THIRD FLOOR

• A faculty workroom

• A seminar room with Harkness table

• A faculty office

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Cut paper self-portraits, part of ‘‘I Am From’’project. Center: Sandra Chapman.

L OW E R S C H O O L

DIVERSITY MATTERS At LREI, we do not pretend that society is free of bias. “We encourage kids to notice the differences, to celebrate their unique selves, and to speak out against bias of any form,” says Sandra (Chap) Chapman, Director of Diversity and Community. That’s why Chap is working to develop a social justice and anti-bias program for Lower School students. This spring Third Grade students dis-

cussed their multiple identities: age, gender, family structure, religion, race, ability and ethnicity. In conjunction with their poetry unit, students wrote “I Am From” poems to describe their identities creatively and poetically (e.g., I Am From… swirls of chocolate; I Am From…the sweet sounding steel pans). “They were so excited to talk about the skin color, food, religion and other aspects of who they are. They discovered beauty in their uniqueness,” says Chap, who plans to expand the introductory program to Second Grade classrooms in 2010-2011.

AFTERSCHOOL

GROW AND TELL LREI’s Afterschool program got a little greener last year with the start of something new: gardening boxes. Built in 2009 by Summers at LREI staffers, the eight raised beds on Sixth Avenue’s rooftop have become a staple of Afterschool’s science core curriculum. Students of all ages—from the 4s through Sixth Grade—grow mint, thyme, basil and rosemary, as well as vegetables like green beans and cucumbers. One box with tomatoes, basil and oregano is lovingly dubbed the Pizza Box. “It’s cool for city kids to have the opportunity to dig in the dirt,” says Hannah Watkins Gilfillan, Associate Director of Afterschool and Summers at LREI Program Coordinator. “We give them time to just weed and dig—and there’s something really satisfying about that.” Hey, soil sister: Planting the herb box this spring.

Another yummy plus: Kids get to taste what they grow, which could help expand picky eaters’ palates, says Hannah. “Kids are more likely to try new foods when they’ve been a part of the growing process. Sometimes when they take a brave taste, they find a new food they like.” To learn more about Afterschool at LREI, contact Clara Campos, Associate Director of Afterschool at 212-4775316 ext. 239, or Cari Kosins, Director of Afterschool and Summer Programs at ext. 207.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL

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HELPING HAITI

ver Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend the Middle School led a community-wide donation drive to aid earthquake survivors in Haiti. Students, families and faculty members collected and boxed supplies for charity: water, a nonprofit that distributed goods where they were needed most. “It was inspiring to see so many students and families involved,” said Middle School Principal Mark Silberberg. “When tragedies happen in other parts of the world, relief efforts that focus on fundraising can often feel abstract. In this instance, sorting, counting and organizing all of the material created a direct connection for students.” Thank you to Ella Crivello ’08, who connected LREI with charity: water. (charitywater.org) A MAJOR STEP

FOR THE ARTS In our school, ask (nicely) and you shall receive. Case in point: The new Performing Arts Elective program for seventh and eighth graders. Students requested it and now it’s part of the progressive curriculum.

PHOTOS BY STEVE NEIMAN AND SARA FEIGIN (FAR RIGHT)

This year’s course offerings included jazz band, digital music, vocal ensemble, drama and dance. Students enrolled in one year-long major course that met twice a week and two semester-long minor courses

that met once a week. Over the course of two years, students are required to take classes in all of the performing arts areas through the combination of their major and minor courses. “When students choose what they want to do, they come to class with motivation and enthusiasm,” says Joanne Magee, Middle School Drama Teacher and Play and Musical Director. Students shared that enthusiasm with the community. In April, major classes showImpromptu peer review cased their work at LREI’s first annual at the Middle School Art Show. Performing Arts Festival, in conjunction with the Middle School Art Show. The evening event was a resounding success as the entire Sixth Avenue building was alive with the arts. “Watching the vocal majors and minors gain confidence in their abilities to perform choral music, participate in poetry slams, create raps, produce music videos and sing solos made me incredibly proud,” Lower and Middle School Chorus Director Ledell Mullvaney said. “They all took artistic leaps and learned so much about themselves as performers as well as how to support one another.” L R E I N E W S | S U M M E R 2 010

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GRADUATION 2010 QU OT E S F RO M C O M M E N C E M E N T

“Here, today, we have 43 reasons to dream. Forty-three reasons to hope. Forty-three reasons to believe that inquiries will be conducted, that new ideas and solutions will be pursued, and that creativity, freedom and independence will flourish.” –Michael Patrick, ’71, Chair of the Board of Trustees

“BEFORE WE START, I WOULD JUST LIKE TO LET YOU KNOW THAT YOU ALL LOOK VERY GOOD IN YOUR UNDERWEAR.” –Kevin Schneck, ‘10

“When you walk across this stage and to your parents and to your families after this ceremony, it is only a matter of time—tomorrow, four weeks from now, at the end of the summer when the light in the sky grows short—before you will walk away to make your way.” –Ruth Jurgensen, High School Principal

“One of the things that’s so special about LREI is our willingness to encourage failure. Each of you here on this stage has failed, and failed mightily, at some point in the past four years—and you are each better because of it.” –Peter Bonfanti, High School Math Teacher “THERE’S SOMETHING PARTICULAR ABOUT THIS CLASS. THERE THEY SIT BESIDE ME AND I STILL CAN’T PUT MY FINGER ON IT.” –Diana Festa, ‘10

“We hope that the lessons of community, diversity, decency and caring stay with you. That you continue to live with, learn from and be allies to those who are different from you. If you do this, you will, unfortunately, be in the minority. But you will be an example to all, a beacon to many and a challenge to those who stand in your way.” –Phil Kassen, Director

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“Let yourself smile. Let your heart soar. Let your mind wander a little to what this day means to you, to what has brought us together.” PHIL KASSEN, DIRECTOR

LREI honored the Class of 2010 at NYU’s Skirball Center on June 11.

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COLLEGE LIST Class of 2010 K I N D E RGA RT E N TO C O L L E G E MATRICULATION LIST Amherst College Bard College Barnard College Bennington College Berklee College of Music Boston College Brown University (2) Carleton College Clark University Colgate University Connecticut College Gap Year Georgetown University Hampshire College Ithaca College (2) Johnson and Whales University Kenyon College Lynn University McDaniel College New York University Oberlin College Pitzer College Quinnipiac University (2) St. John’s University Sarah Lawrence College (2) School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2) School of Visual Arts Smith College State University of NY, New Paltz Syracuse University Trinity College Dublin Tulane University University of Delaware University of Mississippi University of Montana, Missoula University of Rochester Vassar College Washington University in St. Louis Wesleyan University

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By Phil Kassen

REI is not a school where the primary objective of each day is to move students ever closer to college acceptance. Instead, we believe that today’s learning is important for what it offers today, as well as what it will bring tomorrow. It is clear, however, that even a student’s early experiences exert significant influence on their later goals. With that in mind, I invite you to consider our college list. Interestingly, this list is very similar to our Kindergarten classrooms—and I believe this reveals our dedication to LREI’s mission. Our Kindergarteners display a diverse range of interests and abilities, family structures, beliefs, as well as the other, more familiar definitions of diversity (racial, ethnic, socio-economic). You’ll see this same diversity in our college list. Rather than all seniors being drawn to the same group of very similar schools, our students apply to a broad range of prestigious institutions based on their interests, needs and dreams. Liberal arts colleges, larger universities, technical schools, public, private, Ivy League, art schools—you will see all of these and more on our list. We are proud of the seniors—of those who are the first in their families to go to college and those who are attending the universities attended by family members before them. We are proud of those who have received generous scholarships and those for whom finances are not a deciding factor. We are proud of the art students and of the athletes, of the scientists and the historians—and of those students who are a little bit of all.


For her senior project, Kelly Otterness ‘10 shot portraits of each of her classmates— in their New York City element.

MY LIFE At LREI J I M M Y RO G E R S - GA H A N ‘ 1 0

Years at LREI: 14 Extracurriculars: Student Body President 2009-2010, Community Service Round Table, Varsity Soccer, Varsity Basketball Siblings: Stella Rose ‘17 Favorite Lunch: Taco Day College Plan: University of Delaware, Political Science What do you think makes LREI’s approach so special? Learning outside the classroom. There’s a huge difference between learning something from a textbook and actually going out and seeing it. I remember walking over to John’s Pizzeria on Bleecker to learn about landmarks in Second Grade. What’s unique about the high school experience? One of the great things is that every class has a core curriculum, but then you get to choose your own focus. In Global War on Terror, my group decided to study the Iraq War. Other groups focused on other parts of the world, and for our final project, we had to create a policy brief together. I remember going in with a very liberal mindset. And I left with—well, still a liberal mindset—but understanding it from different perspectives. What’s the school like socially? It’s very inclusive. No one is going to say, ‘Oh, you can’t hang out with us.’ No one’s going to say, ‘You can’t sit at our lunch table.’ If someone went and bullied someone, it would be looked at as weird and out of place here.

PHOTOS BY KELLY OTTERNESS ‘10

Do you remember looking up to the high schoolers when you were in Lower School? I thought they were giants, and they seemed so cool. But now, I think, “You know, I don’t remember people being this short!” Will you stay in touch with people from LREI? Definitely. We’re a very tight-knit class, so I’m sure we’ll keep in touch with each other. And I’m sure I’m going to keep in contact with the teachers and come visit and all that. It’s more than a school. It’s like a second family. Jimmy on his first (top) and last (above) days at LREI. L R E I N E W S | S U M M E R 2 010

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NEW & N O T E WO R T H Y

By Julia Heaton

REI parents love to hear about the learning that happens in their children’s classrooms. We often hear parents say things like, “I love LREI so much – I wish I could be a student here!” or “If only I could have been a fly on the wall during that lesson…” In response to this overwhelming parent interest, and in keeping with our mission to foster lifelong experiential learning, LREI launched a new adult education program this year entitled Adult (r)Ed. Current LREI parents, faculty and staff were invited to enroll in a series of evening courses taught by members of our outstanding faculty.

On five consecutive Tuesday evenings, students gathered in seminar-style classes, completed assigned readings, and, in some cases, wrote personal or analytical essays. The faculty were thrilled to be able to share their passions with the adult community at LREI, and the parent participants loved the opportunity to experience our exciting progressive curriculum first-hand. In fact, the response to Adult (r)Ed has been so positive that we are expanding the program this year to run three sessions in Fall, Winter and Spring, with a wide range of courses across all disciplines. Stay tuned for more information about Adult (r)Ed in September!

This year’s roster of courses featured abridged versions of four popular high school electives: Dangerous Language, taught by Julia Heaton Global War on Terror: American Foreign Policy Since 9/11, by Tom Murphy Twentieth Century American Cultural History, by Mark Bledstein Writing Memoir, Finding Voice, by Ileana Jimenez

Above: Wayne Hartley Cupcakes hit a sweet note with Stir guests. Right: Aerial view of the festivities.

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A TASTE OF DOWNTOWN LREI celebrated spring with Stir the Pot, a tasting party at 40 Charlton Street on Thursday, May 13. Guests brought nonperishable food items to benefit St. John’s Pantry and sampled food from downtown hotspots (and LREI families!) including ‘ino, Minetta Tavern, Otto and Pepe Rosso. Dozens of palate-pleasing prizes were raffled off, too, including a tour of the Jacques Torres Chocolate Factory and dinner at Gemma with an overnight stay at The Bowery Hotel.

PHOTOS BY AMY ANGELO (SING FOR HOPE) AND SARA FEIGIN (STIR THE POT)

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HIGHER ED


PLAYTIME Little Red Square is always abuzz. There are kids on scooters, parents on iPhones, dogs on (long) leashes—and that’s just during morning drop-off. But for a couple weeks this summer, the buzz turned to music, thanks to a painted piano and passionate passersby. Sing for Hope (singforhope.org), a nonprofit comprised of more than 600 professional artists, stationed 60 pianos on sidewalks across the city for Play Me, I’m Yours, a public art project that brought music to the masses. LREI Lower and Middle School classrooms got in on the action by decorating our street piano. “Even in the arts mecca of New York City, there are communities who don’t have access to art. Our year-round programs work to address that,” explains Camille Zamora, Sing for Hope’s co-founding director. Camille is also an opera singer and LREI parent of rising Kindergartener Landon. “LREI’s tradition of arts activism—using art as a catalyst for positive social change—is what initially attracted us to the school,” she said, adding that it just seemed “logical” to include LREI in Play Me, I’m Yours. All summer 2010 pianos, including LREI’s, will be donated to underserved schools and hospitals in the metropolitan area.

Summers at LREI campers take an itsy-bitsy break to enjoy our Sing for Hope piano.

FACULTY WINS Stacy Dillon, Lower School Librarian, has been selected to be a member of the Newbery 2012 committee. The Newbery Medal—named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery—is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. High School English Teacher Ileana Jiménez has been awarded the Distinguished Fulbright in Teaching Award. She will spend six months in Mexico conducting research at a major university, providing professional development to local teachers, and completing a capstone project on gender and education. For a complete list of faculty grants, visit lrei.org/facultynews. L R E I N E W S | S U M M E R 2 010

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MEET OUR

NEW TRUSTEES

MEGHAN FARLEY ASTRACHAN, artist, educator, painter, playwright, director, designer, actor, acting coach, clown, wife and mom, has worked at LREI as the Director of Drama for the past 12 years. She is also currently the Chair of the Performing Arts Department and the coordinator of the Joint Advisory Council. Meghan received a B.F.A. in sculpture, painting and design from Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Indiana, and received her Masters from NYU in Educational Theatre. After studying and performing in New York, England and Ireland, Meghan received a teaching fellowship from NYU and completed her Ph.D. (ABD). In 2006 and 2008, Meghan brought LREI’s High School productions to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival receiving Sell-Out Show Awards. Last summer, as part of the New York Fringe Festival, she received four stars from Time Out New York for her production of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew (starring several LREI alumni) which she directed and co-produced with her company Reaching Andromeda Theatre.

ANNETTE RAPHEL is currently Head of School at The School at Columbia, an independent K-8 school started by Columbia University seven years ago. She joined the school four years ago after having worked an astonishing 19 years at Milton Academy in Massachusetts as Curriculum Coordinator, Middle School Math Teacher and Lower School Principal. She is a Presidential Math Awardee and the author of Math Homework That Counts. In the late 60s, she attended pretty much every dance, play and event at our high school with her best friend, Tina Asher, and that’s the official beginning of her appreciation for the school.

JEFF BROOKS has spent 20 years in the world of marketing and advertising, at marquis agencies including Grey, Ogilvy, BBDO, and most recently, Euro RSCG New York, where he serves as CEO and Chief Digital Officer. During his career, Jeff has had the privilege of working with some of the most influential brands in the world, including American Express, Volvo, Target and HBO. Jeff is a graduate of Hamilton College, where he received his BA in Philosophy and graduated with academic distinction. He lives in Greenwich Village with his wife, two daughters, two cats and two fish.

DAVE OLSEN is a proud father of three Lower School students at LREI, and has lived in lower Manhattan since 1994. Dave spent his early years growing up first in Montana and later in suburban Chicago, watching his parents navigate their careers as educators in the public school system. After meeting his wife-to-be at Kenyon College, Dave moved to NYC to work for J.P. Morgan where he is now a Managing Director and runs a group responsible for moving derivatives into central clearinghouses. He’s passionate about LREI’s mission and ensuring it continues to be a beacon for excellent progressive education and social justice.

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MEET OUR

NEW ADMINISTRATORS

JULIA NAKANO HEATON Director of Admissions Julia has been a member of the LREI faculty since September 2004, teaching high school English and serving as Eleventh Grade Dean, Academic Dean and Acting High School Principal. She is thrilled to be moving into the role of Director of Admissions and looks forward to contributing to LREI in new ways. Julia received a BA in American Studies from Yale University and a Masters in Educational Leadership and Policy from Columbia University Teachers College. Prior to LREI, Julia taught in a one-room schoolhouse in rural Kenya, then at Manhattan Country School, The Chapin School and Prep for Prep. This year, Julia takes on another new role as an LREI parent – her older daughter Hanna will be starting in the 4’s-K in September!

CAREY SOCOL Director of College Guidance Carey comes to LREI after completing 10 years as a guidance counselor and College Advisor at Hunter College High School. She earned an undergraduate degree in sociology and communication from Hunter College, and later a graduate degree from New York University with a concentration in Counseling. Prior to her work at Hunter College High School, Carey did her training at Stuyvesant High School. Carey also had a career in the music industry, where she spent five years working in marketing and promotion. Over the years, Carey has been involved with a breadth of professional development activities including the Cornell College Selection Institute and the Harvard Summer Institute for College Admissions. She is a member of several key college counseling associations include CANNY and NACAC. Carey also is an avid sports enthusiast—having coached the Girls Varsity HCHS tennis team for four years and personally participating in 13 marathons and counting.

Welcome the new kids on the block! L R E I N E W S | S U M M E R 2 010

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REUNION 2010 W E L C O M E BAC K TO S C H O O L

Class Unity: Friends from the Class of ‘60, in the Charlton Street campus at their 50-year reunion.

The 2010 Alumni Reunion brought back the Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin alumni from classes ranging from 1950 to 2005. Congratulations to this year’s Distinguished Alumnus, Jean Carey Bond ’55, writer, editor and political activist. Jean’s articles, essays, arts criticism, commentaries, children’s books and poetry have appeared in a variety of media. She was co-editor of Freedomways Magazine, a leading journal of African American and progressive opinion. Before the reunion, alums and community members celebrated former faculty member Grace Cohen with “Amazing Grace,” a vocal performance and video presentation with clips from students, colleagues and families touched by her LREI legacy. “For many of us, Grace Cohen was one of our favorite teachers. For me, she was my favorite of all time,” said Andrea Cooper Andrews ’70, who organized the surprise for Grace, 86. “I wanted to pay tribute to her in a way that would make her happy and give everyone a chance to tell her individually how we feel about her.” Next year’s reunion will be on Saturday, June 4, honoring classes ending in 1 and 6. If you are interested in helping organize your class’s reunion, please contact Liza Sacks at lsacks@lrei.org or (212) 477-5316 ext. 291. Grace Cohen among the stars of her famed planetarium. Grace taught the 8’s (now called Third Grade). 14


Marie’s knowledge of the school community was as insightful as it was encyclopedic.

MARIE WEISS 1920-2010

I

By Grace Cohen

n June, LREI lost Marie Weiss, a near constant presence in the community for over 50 years. Marie wore a number of hats during her 46 years working here, and her legacy will undoubtedly live on. Marie was mother to Andrea Weiss ’65 and LREI's middle and high school psychologist Andrew Weiss ‘68, as well as beloved mother-in-law and grandmother to their families. The following reflection comes from Grace Cohen, Marie's longtime friend and colleague.

What did Marie do? She was the Executive Secretary, comptroller, accountant, nurse, confidant, guardian of the budget, keeper of the keys, keeper of the petty cash (always to the penny), friend/protector to us all.

With Marie Weiss’s passing, our glue has come apart! She was the glue that held family, friends and school together.

To have known Marie was to love her. She was the eyes, the ears, the heart of the school. What a loss, but what a model. We celebrate her life!

In her quiet, modest, unassuming manner, she was a tower of strength. She had high ethical standards and lived up to them in every way. Marie retired from LREI more than 10 years ago, but she never really left. Her devotion was boundless.

IN MEMORIAM Jerry Davidoff ‘40, organizer of the splendid 50th anniversary of the LREI class of 1940, died on November 7, 2009. In life he played significant roles as an attorney and a member of the Westport, Connecticut Board of Education, where he advanced many of Elizabeth Irwin’s ideas and ideals. He also was a very important

moving force nationally in the Unitarian Church. He remained a friend to all members of the LRSH class of 1940. Mary Travers ‘55 died on September 16, 2009. She was an inspiration to the LREI community and to the world. While at Elisabeth Irwin High School, she joined the Song Swappers, which sang backup for Mr. Seeger when

There was no one who wasn’t touched by Marie’s warmth, her interest, her help if and when needed. Marie knew every child, every parent, no matter how far back.

There will be a memorial service for Marie Weiss on Saturday, October 2 at 3:00 p.m., 272 Sixth Avenue

the Folkways label reissued a collection of union songs under the title “Talking Union” in 1955. The Song Swappers made three more albums for Folkways that year, all featuring Mr. Seeger to some degree. -nyt

who made a difference. She will be sorely missed.

Eileen Contes, an inspirational teacher from 1967-1980, died on March 11, 2010. She was a caring, devoted friend and extraordinary person

Linda Kiss died on July 13. She was an active member in the LREI community while her children Barbra ‘84 and Andy ‘85 were here.

Ana Heim ‘99 died in an automobile accident on April 9. Ana lived in Deerfield Beach, Florida with her brother Carlos ‘01.

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CLASS NOTES 2010 W H AT O U R A L U M S A R E U P T O

Alexander “Sandy” Elwyn ‘45 writes, “After a career in physics and health physics, I’m living with my wife in Chicago in a retirement home with a great view of Lake Michigan. Good luck to LREI. My years there were most great!” Lyn Campbell Macfarlane ‘46 is on the board of Edmonds-South Snohomish County Historical Society and the governing board of the Lake Washington Garden Club and will be President of the board in 2010. “Enjoying 10 grandchildren with my husband Alan,” she writes. “Pretty good for turning 80 this past October!”

Paul Golden ‘62’s third grandson, Malachi Jay Grimmett, was born November 12, 2008.

Jessica Bard ‘84 and husband Callum Benepe will celebrate daughter Grace Tyler Bard Benepe’s first birthday in August.

Louise Nayer ‘67’s book “Burned: A Memoir” was published by Atlas and Company in April. It was featured in the Reading Room Section of the April 2010 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine. Visit louisenayer.com for more.

Victoria Shestack Aronoff ‘84 emails, “I have two kids: Solomon who is 2 and Dalia who is 5 and a half. We live in South Orange, NJ. I am currently a stay-at-home mom.”

Linda Spector ‘68 writes, “Just spent four months living in Switzerland where I reconnected with classmate, Meera Davies (Torres). I have two almost all grown up kids: My daughter graduates from Yale in June 2011.

Saideh Page-Browne ‘89 and her company Impact Speakers Bureau (impactspeakersbureau.org) were profiled in Family Circle Magazine’s “5 Successful Entrepreneur Moms,” a feature in the May 2010 issue.

Nancy Schaines Merjos ‘49 and her husband Constance welcomed their fifth grandchild, Thomas Leroy Merjos, child of their son Stavros ‘77 and his wife Honor Fraser. In April, Simon & Schuster published Linda Gravenson ‘56’s new book “In The Fullness of Time: 32 Women on Life After 50,” a collection of essays, poems, interviews and photographs about the experience of aging. Contributors include Erica Jong, Carolyn See, Gail Godwin, Abigail Thomas, Dr. Christiane Northrup, actresses Jane Alexander and Claire Bloom. Learn more at lindagravenson.com.

Alicia Sands ‘89 and her husband Rob Fioretti welcomed twins Malena and Delilah last June. Big brothers: Matthew, 5, and Daniel, 3. Lynn True ‘95’s movie “Summer Pasture” premiered during IFC’s 14th Annual DocuWeeks, July 30 to Aug. 5 in New York City, and is showing in Los Angeles at the Arc Light Hollywood from Aug. 6 to 12. Learn more at summerpasturefilm.com.

Double take: Alicia Sands ‘89’s twins, Malena and Delilah.

Matthew Cipriano ‘96 started to work on his doctorate in Higher Education this year. As Alumni Council President, he encourages all LREI alums to stay connected via Facebook’s LREI Alumni group.

“Facebook brings our class together.” Ruth Nagashima Braunstein ‘57 writes, “I just returned from a very LINDA SPECOR, ‘68 happy family reunion and 70th In August, Sarah Schur, MD ‘96 birthday celebration with my children and two grandchildren in Portland, OR. My son is working toward a Doctorate of Phi- will marry Ethan McCarty on a farm in the They have returned from living in Tokyo; it’s losophy at Oxford. I’m semi- retired as in be- Catskills. She is a third year psychiatry resitween jobs! And my husband continues at dent at NYPH/Cornell and he works for IBM. good to have them back in the US!” University of Michigan. Facebook brings our They just moved to Brooklyn. Diana Furst Nelson ‘61 is now a grandmother class together!” Analisa Cipriano ‘05 is now the Assistant to of two: Margaret and Robert. “I see them 4-7 days per week. What a blessing,” she writes. Tony Sparber ‘74 recently appeared on Dr. Director of College Guidance at LREI. “Having retired from the Mayo Clinic, I am now Phil, Good Morning America and MTV feamentoring a woman prisoner through the Big turing his New Image Weight Loss Camp, Former faculty member Beth Marcotte posts Brothers Big Sisters Amachi Program. I am Camp Pocono Trails, for kids and teens ages via Facebook, “Heading to Puerto Rico with my family. I am taking them to the caves, coffee helping lead a class at the maximum security seven to 19. bean plantation and Old San Juan. We will prison. Mentors can decrease the return-to-prison rate from 70 percent to 15 percent and simi- Jed Share ‘74 shares via Facebook, “I had an take a kayak trip at night to see the glowing larly decrease the chances of a child of a prisoner exhibition of photographic portraits in Seattle. waters. Great memories from the two trips going to prison. If you want to do something that You can armchair travel via my website (jed- Luis took us on Spring Break in ’91-’92 (I think those were the years!). is ever so rewarding, get involved in mentoring.” share.com), fully updated with new work.” 16


LREI CALENDAR 2010-2011 S AV E T H E DAT E !

SEPTEMBER 9/23 First Alumni Council Meeting, 6:30 p.m. OCTOBER 10/2 Marie Weiss Memorial 3:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 11/10 Alumni Council Meeting 6:30 p.m. DECEMBER 12/7 Literary Evening Charlton Street JANUARY 1/6 Alumni College Panel 6:30 p.m. 1/7 Homecoming Alumni Basketball Game and Party 6:30 p.m. 1/26 Alumni Council Meeting 6:30 p.m. MARCH 3/17 Alumni Council Meeting 6:30 p.m. APRIL 4/7 Big Auction Former and current knights hoop it up over the holidays.

HOMECOMING A LU M N I BAS K E T BA L L GA M E A N D H O L I DAY PA R T Y

On January 8, alumni spanning over 20 years reunited for some hoops and some hoopla. Current LREI varsity players faced alumni players in the Thompson Street Gym, and everyone reminisced over a fine spread downstairs. Thanks to all for a fantastic turnout!

MAY TBD Alumni Council Meeting 6:30 p.m. JUNE 6/3, 6/4 Alumni Reunion Weekend 6/10 Graduation *All LREI alumni are welcome at Alumni Council Meetings

Visit lrei.org for upcoming events throughout the year.

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LREI News 2010  

Summer 2010 edition

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