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GRAMMAR AND WRITING

I N

E N G L I S H

teacher edition


Question Words OBJECTIVES • To recognize question words • To use question words appropriately

MATERIALS • Day 1: story to share with the class • Day 2: Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 1 (pages 12–13), 2–3-inch wide strips of paper, crayons, markers, tape • Day 3: Question Words blackline master (page 107), safety scissors, crayons or markers • Day 4: painter’s tape or butcher paper, marker, one die

DAY

1 Warm-Up

Ask students to listen carefully as you read aloud a brief story. Then write the following words on the board: Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. Remind students that an asking sentence is called a question. SAY: Let’s think about the story we just read. ASK: What kinds of questions could we ask about it? Invite students to call out questions that begin with the words on the board—for example, Who wrote the story? What is it about? Why did [character] do [action]? How did the story end? SAY: Some words help us ask questions. They are called question words. Keep the question words on the board for Days 2 and 3.

• Day 5: Assessment options (pages 148–154)

Question Words

DAY

We use a question word to ask a question. Here are some question words.

2 Teach

Turn to pages 12–13 in the Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 1. SAY: Let’s learn more about question words. Read aloud the title and the explanation. Then read aloud the six question words, pointing out that all of them except for one begin with the letter w. Encourage volunteers to explain what is shown in each image and how it connects to one or more question words. Then invite students to make up a question about each image that begins with a question word.

Who?

What? When?

How?

Where?

12

SHARED WRITING  Have students make Question Word Bracelets to remind them about words they can use when writing asking sentences. Call attention to the question words on the board. Pass out a strip of paper to each student. Share the marker with each student and together write the question words on the strip. After writing, encourage students to color their bracelets, and then help them tape the ends together.

12  •  Part 1

Why?

13

Whenever students engage in writing, have them point out question words. Help each student recognize asking sentences and question marks.


LESSON

1.6 3 Practice

LESSON

1.6

Name

Question Words

Distribute the Question Words blackline master, page 107. SAY: Now we’re going to make Question Catchers. First, have students find the four large question marks in the corners and color each a different color. Then show them where to cut along the dotted lines, reminding them to be careful not to cut on the solid lines, which are the fold marks. Help students fold their Question Catchers using these steps:

is your name?

Why Where

Where

Who

When

is your school?

catcher facedown. Fold each corner point to touch the center.

old are you?

is blue?

is your birthday?

What

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade K

What

How

2. Open up the paper, making sure the creases show. Then turn the

do birds have wings?

do you live?

1. Fold paper in half from top to bottom. Then fold in half sideways.

Make a Question Catcher. Color the question marks with different colors. Then use the catcher to play a game.

is your best friend?

DAY

www.voyagesinenglish.com

Grade K

Lesson 1.6

3. Turn over the paper so the question words show. Then fold in half

from top to bottom. 4. Unfold and then fold in half sideways. Unfold again. 5. Fold each point toward the center. 6. With the questions facing you, insert thumbs and middle

fingers under question mark flaps on the other side. With a student as your partner, show the rest of the class how to manipulate the Question Catcher. Select a question and complete it using the question word shown under the flap. Have partners take turns playing the game.

How

(Note: Visit www.voyagesinenglish.com for visual directions for making the Question Catcher. Consider making your own Question Catcher before assigning the activity to students. This will help you become familiar with the required steps and will give you a better sense of how long the activity will take.)

Why

When

DAY

4 Apply What

Using painter’s tape or butcher paper, create a game of hopscotch on the floor in an open area. Make six boxes. In each one, show a different question word plus its accompanying number. Have students take turns rolling a die and hopping to the number they rolled. Then have students use the word on which they land in a question posed to classmates. Invite volunteers to take turns answering the questions.

DAY

Where

5 Assess

Who

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

Choose an assessment option from pages 148–154. Place students’ work samples in their portfolios.

CCSS.ELA.L.K.1d CCSS.ELA.SL.K.2 CCSS.ELA.SL.K.3

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Question Words  •  13


Being Verbs Was and Were OBJECTIVES • To recognize the past tense being verbs was and were • To use being verbs correctly

MATERIALS • Day 1: family photos students have brought from home • Day 2: Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 1 (pages 32–33), paper, marker, crayons • Day 3: two large sheets of paper, strips of paper, tape • Day 4: Was and Were blackline master (page 117), crayons

DAY

1 Warm-Up

Ask students to bring in photos from home. Collect the photos. Then have students sit in a circle around you, where all can see. Hold up the photos one at a time. For the first one, model how to say a caption for the photo using was or were, for example: Grace was on a trip./Max and his sister were small. Ask students to suggest captions for the other photos as they are shown. SAY: We just used the verbs was and were to tell about our photos.

• Day 5: Assessment options (pages 148–154)

Being Verbs Was and Were

DAY

2 Teach

This morning, the waffles were delicious.

These being verbs show what happened before.

Yesterday, the train was late.

Remind students that -ed is added to many action verbs to tell about the past. SAY: Being verbs can also tell about the past. Turn to pages 32–33 of the Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Last week, was Volume 1. Read aloud the title and the on a boat ride. explanation. Point to the being verbs in the example sentences. Read aloud 32 each sentence, emphasizing when each event described took place. SAY: We use the word was if the noun names one person or one thing. We use the word were if the noun names more than one person or thing. SHARED WRITING  Arrange to have students bring in information about their weight and length when they were born. Then have students make “All About Me” booklets. Distribute a sheet of paper to each student. Model how to fold it into a booklet. Sharing the marker with students, help them write these sentences, one on each page:

Last spring, the tulips were beautiful.

33

When I w as a baby . . .

When I was a baby . . . I was    pounds. I was    inches long. Mom and Dad were so    . Then help students complete the sentences. Have them draw a picture on each page and underline each being verb. 32  •  Part 1

Whenever students engage in writing, have them point out the being verbs was and were. Make sure the verbs are used correctly to explain events in the past.


LESSON

1.16 DAY

3 Practice

Play a variation of the game from Lesson 1.15, in which students walk to the corner that displays the correct being verb. This time, tape up the being verbs was and were in opposite corners. Include time words and phrases in the sentences on the sentence strips, such as yesterday, last night, and this morning, to indicate past tense. For an added challenge after the game is played once, combine the previous lesson’s game with this one to see if students can tell the difference between present and past tense sentences. Now, tell students that they are going to make up a story using the words was and were. To start off, SAY: Once upon a time, there was a bear who lived in the forest. Invite students one at a time to add a sentence. As necessary, help guide the development of the story by adding more of your own sentences. Make sure students remember to include a few sentences with plural nouns that require the verb were.

DAY

wa s

H e    hungry this morning.

4 Apply

LESSON

Distribute copies of the Was and Were blackline master, page 117. Read the directions. Then read aloud each sentence, pausing at the verb choices. Guide students to circle the correct being verb. Remind them to use the word was if the noun names one person or thing and the word were if the noun names more than one person or thing. Go over the correct answers, reading aloud the completed sentences. Then, on the back, have students draw a picture to go with one of the sentences.

DAY

Was and Were Circle the correct verb in each sentence. 1. I (was were) excited to stay up late. 2. Three fireflies (was were) in my yard. 3. The owl (was were) nearby. 4. Jack (was were) tired. 5. We (was were) tired too. © Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade K

Next, write this sentence on the board: I was up late one night. Invite students to take turns telling about a time when they stayed up late. ASK: Why did you stay up late? What did you do? Encourage them to describe the people and the situation using the being verbs was and were.

1.16

Name

www.voyagesinenglish.com

Grade K

Lesson 1.16

5 Assess

Choose an assessment option from pages 148–154. Place students’ work samples in their portfolios.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.K.1b CCSS.ELA.SL.K.4 CCSS.ELA.SL.K.5 www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Being Verbs Was and Were  •  33


Size and Shape Words OBJECTIVES • To recognize that size and shape words describe nouns • To use size and shape words in writing and speaking

MATERIALS • Day 1: a paper bag; a variety of objects that fit in the bag, such as a block, coin, and playing card • Day 2: colored paper shapes, glue sticks, black construction paper • Day 3: Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 2 (pages 46–47)

DAY

1 Warm-Up

Invite students to take turns putting a hand inside a paper bag that contains an object with a distinct size or shape, such as a block, a coin, or a playing card. Ask students to handle the object and describe how it feels using words that tell about its size or shape—for example, big, small, round, square, and flat. Repeat the process with other objects. Then as a class, review the different words that students used. Write the words on the board in two columns, one for size words and the other for shape words.

Size

Shape

• Day 4: modeling clay in various colors, blackline master Size and Shape Words (page 124) • Day 5: Assessment options (pages 148–154)

DAY

2 Teach

SAY: We’ve learned about color words and number words that describe

nouns. Now let’s learn about size and shape words. They also describe nouns. Invite students to play a guessing game. Explain that you will describe objects in the classroom using size and shape words. Have students try to identify the object you are describing. Use words such as large and square for a window, small and round for a button, and so on. After playing a few times, allow volunteers to take over for you, describing other classroom objects while the rest of the class guesses. Next, distribute precut paper squares and circles, in large and small sizes and in a variety of colors. Give each student a sheet of black construction paper. Have students make a Shape Monster by gluing the shapes to the black construction paper. When students have finished, have volunteers take turns using size and shape words to describe their monsters.

Whenever students engage in writing, encourage them to use size and shape words as needed. Talk about how these words help give more information about nouns.

46  •  Part 1


LESSON

1.23 DAY

3 Practice

Turn to pages 46–47 in the Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 2. Read aloud the title and the explanation. Have students look at the first pair of words, big and small. Point out how they relate to the corresponding pictures, and say the phrases the big ship, the small boat. Continue with the other word pairs and pictures. Then invite volunteers to offer additional examples of contrasting size and shape word pairs, such as tiny/huge, thin/wide, flat/puffy, and so on. Reiterate that size and shape words tell more about nouns.

DAY

square

Size and Shape Words Size words tell the size of things. Shape words tell the shape of things.

big small

tall short

46

47

4 Apply

LESSON

1.23

Name

Size and Shape Words

On the board, write the sentence frame The silliest animal I ever saw was a/an    . Read the sentence to the class. Give students modeling clay and have them make a new animal or a real animal but with a fun shape one wouldn’t expect, such as a square ladybug or a round bird. Ask students to talk about the animals they made. Make sure they begin with the sentence frame on the board and include at least one size or shape word.

Read each sentence. Write each size or shape word in the correct column. 1. Look at the tiny bug! 2. The gift came in a square box. 3. Can you climb the tall tree? 4. The truck has round wheels. Size

Shape

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade K

Distribute copies of the blackline master Size and Shape Words, page 124. Read aloud the directions. Then, as you say each sentence, have students point to the boldfaced size or shape word. Challenge students to write the word in either the Size or Shape column. Provide writing assistance as needed.

DAY

round

www.voyagesinenglish.com

Grade K

Lesson 1.23

5 Assess

Choose an assessment option from pages 148–154. Place students’ work samples in their portfolios.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.K.1f CCSS.ELA.SL.K.4 CCSS.ELA.SL.K.5 www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Size and Shape Words  •  47


Synonyms OBJECTIVES • To demonstrate an understanding of synonyms • To identify synonyms

MATERIALS • Day 1: sticky notes • Day 2: Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 2 (pages 58–59), drawing and writing materials

DAY

SAY: Remember the matching game we played last week? Now I’m going

to play a different kind of matching game, and I want you to watch me. On the wall, display six sticky notes with the following words written on them: ill, fast, big, sick, huge, quick. Read aloud the words and have the class repeat after you. Then reposition the notes as paired synonyms. SAY: Why did I match these words? Help guide the class to realize that the words in each pair mean the same thing. Mix up the sticky notes again and have volunteers rearrange the words into synonym pairs.

• Day 3: paper strips, invisible tape, different-colored markers, Synonyms blackline master (page 130)

fast

• Day 4: (none) • Day 5: Assessment options (pages 148–154)

DAY

2 Teach

Turn to pages 58–59 in the Voyages in English Grammar Big Book, Volume 2. SAY: Let’s learn more about words that mean the same thing. Read aloud the title and the explanation. Point to the synonym pairs and read them aloud. Explain that both words in each pair relate to the accompanying image. Then say a sentence about the first image, using one of the words— for example, The bug is so small! Ask a volunteer to repeat the sentence using its synonym: The bug is so tiny! Do the same for the other images and word pairs. SHARED WRITING  Have each student draw a picture of a favorite animal. Share the marker and together write a complete sentence about that animal that includes a descriptive word about its size or how fast it moves. Then help the student rewrite the sentence, replacing the descriptive word with a synonym.

58  •  Part 1

1 Warm-Up

quick

Synonyms

friend pal

Some words mean the same thing. We call these words synonyms.

small tiny

smile grin

58

The horse is quick. The horse is fast.

59

Whenever students engage in writing, challenge them to find a word they have written that could be replaced with a synonym.


LESSON

1.29 3 Practice

LESSON

Synonyms

In advance, write synonym pairs (glad/happy, big/huge, mad/angry, and so on) on large strips of paper, using a different-colored marker for each pair. Cut the synonym pairs in half, mix up the strips, and give each half to a different student. Invite students to find the other student with the synonym for their word. Once they have found each other, have the student pairs tape the strips together.

On the board, write the following question-and-answer sets that contain synonyms. Ask volunteers to come up to the board and circle the synonyms.

big

cut

kind

slic e

fast

nic e

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade K

qu ick

cry

t

4 Apply

Write each word in the correct sock to make a matching pair.

fas

Next, distribute copies of the Synonyms blackline master, page 130. Read aloud the directions. Explain to students that they should decide which word from the box would make a good match for each word written on a sock. Allow time for students to trace the first word and to write the other words to complete the pairs. Have them share their work.

DAY

1.29

Name

so b

DAY

www.voyagesinenglish.com

Grade K

Lesson 1.29

hu g e

glad

happy

What will you pick for a snack? I will choose an apple. Do the twins look alike? Yes, they do look the same. Why did you have to rush? We had to hurry and catch the bus.

DAY

5 Assess

Choose an assessment option from pages 148–154. Place students’ work samples in their portfolios.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.K.4 CCSS.ELA.SL.K.4 www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Synonyms  •  59

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