Page 1

GRAMMAR AND WRITING

I N

E N G L I S H


Contents PART

1

SECTION 1

GRAMMAR Sentences

The Sentence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Exclaiming Sentences . . . . . . . . .

Capital Letters and End Marks . . . . . . 4

The Naming Part of a Sentence . . . . . 19

Words Working Together . . . . . . . . . 5

The Action Part of a Sentence . . . . .

Telling Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Commanding Sentences . . . . . . . . . 9

Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24

Asking Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Sentence Challenge . . . . . . . . . .

26

SECTION 2

Nouns

Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1 15

20

29 30

Irregular Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . .

46

Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Collective Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

The Days of the Week . . . . . . . . . . 35

Nouns in a Series . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

The Months of the Year . . . . . . . . . 37

Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Writing Dates Using Commas . . . . . . 39

Singular Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . 53

Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . .

Initials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41

Compound Words . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Common Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

Noun Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . .

Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . .

44

54

60

Contents  •  iii


Contents

Verbs

63

Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Ate and Eaten, Gave and Given . . . . . 78

Verbs in the Present Tense . . . . . . . 66

Went and Gone, Did and Done . . . . .

79

Has and Have . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Am and Is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

80

Verbs in the Past Tense . . . . . . . . . 68

Are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Was and Were . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Verbs That Tell What Is Happening Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Verbs That Tell What Will Happen . . . . 85

Verbs Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Saw and Seen . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SECTION 4

77

82

Using Vivid Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

89

Verb Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Pronouns and Adjectives

93

Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . .116

The Pronouns I and Me . . . . . . . . . 98

A, An, and The . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

Using I in Sentences . . . . . . . . . . 100

This and That . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Possessive Adjectives and Pronouns . . 102

These and Those . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Indefinite Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . 105

Choosing the Right Adjective . . . . . 121

Reflexive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . 107

Adjectives Review . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Pronouns Review . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Adjective or Adverb . . . . . . . . . . 126

Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Adjectives in Poems . . . . . . . . . . 127

Sensory Words . . . . . . . . . . . . .114

Pronoun and Adjective Challenge . . . 128

iv  •  Contents

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

SECTION 3


Contents SECTION 5

131

Contractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Contractions with Have . . . . . . . . 143

Contractions Review . . . . . . . . . . 133

Contractions with Has . . . . . . . . . 144

Contractions with Not . . . . . . . . . 134

Contractions Review . . . . . . . . . . 146

Contractions with Am and Is . . . . . . 140

Contractions with Had . . . . . . . . . 148

Contractions with Are . . . . . . . . . .141

Contraction Challenge . . . . . . . . . 150

SECTION 6

Word Study

153

Synonyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154

Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

Synonyms Review . . . . . . . . . . . 159

Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173

Antonyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

Root Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Synonyms and Antonyms Review . . . 165

Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

Word Categories . . . . . . . . . . . 166

Homophones Review . . . . . . . . . 183

Context Clues . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

Word Study Challenge . . . . . . . . . 184

SECTION 7 © Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Contractions

Study Skills

187

Alphabetical Order . . . . . . . . . . 188

Fiction and Nonfiction . . . . . . . . . 196

Dictionary Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . 191

Using the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . 199

Parts of a Book . . . . . . . . . . . . 195

Study Skills Challenge . . . . . . . . . 200

Contents  •  v


Contents PART

2

WRITING CHAPTER 1

Personal Narratives

204

Get Ready to Write: Personal Narrative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

CHAPTER 2

Friendly Letters

216

Get Ready to Write: Friendly Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222

CHAPTER 3

How-to Articles

228

Get Ready to Write: How-to Article . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234

CHAPTER 4

Descriptions

240

Get Ready to Write: Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

Book Reports

252

Get Ready to Write: Book Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258

CHAPTER 6

Research Reports

264

Get Ready to Write: Research Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272

Proofreading Marks Chart����������������������������������������� Inside Back Cover

vi  •  Contents

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

CHAPTER 5


PART

GRAMMAR SE

1

CTION

1 Sentences The Sentence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Capital Letters and End Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Words Working Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Telling Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Commanding Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Asking Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Exclaiming Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Naming Part of a Sentence . . . . . . . . . . . .

19

The Action Part of a Sentence . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

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Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Sentence Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

1


Name The Sentence A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. This is not a complete sentence.

The bear This group of words is not a sentence because it does not tell anything about the bear. A period is not placed after these words. This is a complete sentence.

The bear ate the honey. This group of words is a sentence because it tells what the bear did. A sentence always ends with an end mark. A period ( ) is a kind of end mark.

.

Write an S next to each group of words that is a sentence. Put a period at the end of each sentence. 1. I made a cake 2. A kite

4. Run and hide, Bill 5. My desk 6. I rode my bike 7. The dog 8. At home 9. We made our beds 10. This is a holiday 2  •  Section 1

A little black dot that you can see. Period is my name. A telling sentence ends with me, I play a telling game.

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3. Jill gave the ball to Jenny


Name More About Sentences A sentence begins with a capital letter. It ends with an end mark. Write these sentences correctly. Begin each sentence with a capital letter. Put a period at the end of each sentence. 1. the dog eats its dinner

2. i love to go fishing

3. amal kicks the ball

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4. we walk to school

5. brandon sweeps the floor

Sentences  •  3


Name Capital Letters and End Marks Unscramble each group of words to make a sentence. Remember to add capital letters and periods. 1. sing to she likes

2. sit sofa the on we

3. book the reads he

4. eats cookies jesse the

6. runs dog the fast

7. pretty pony that is a

8. flowers they fresh bring

4  •  Section 1

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5. dog i give bath the a


Name Words Working Together Words work together to build a sentence. Remember, a sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. A

Color the check mark next to each complete sentence. 1. Aki goes to school. 2. gets rabbits 3. Kylie sings with the radio. 4. Mario watches the movie. 5. eats an apple 6. Andy stops the

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B

Match the words in the first list with the words in the second list to build a complete sentence. 1. The kids

rises.

2. My mom

plays hockey.

3. The moon

fly.

4. Birds

go to the park.

5. Kenji

has a green bag.

Sentences  •  5


Name More Words Working Together Match the words in the first list with the words in the second list to build a sentence. Put the correct letter on the line. The first one is done for you.

d

1. The happy children

B

a. crashed against the rocks.

2. The baseball player

b. howled through the treetops.

3. A bitter cold wind

c. blazed in the fireplace.

4. Two large pine logs

d. clapped their hands.

5. The big white waves

e. hit a home run.

Match the words in the first list with the words in the second list to build a sentence. 1. Three baby robins

chased the little mouse.

2. The big red truck

sped across the sky.

3. My playful kitten

hung in the closet.

4. Jeff’s winter coat

slept in a nest.

5. A shiny silver plane

rumbled down the street.

6  •  Section 1

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A


Name Telling Sentences A telling sentence tells about something. A period ( ) is placed at the end of a telling sentence.

.

The honey is in the jar. The honey is sticky. Underline the complete telling sentence in each pair. Put a period at the end of each telling sentence.

1. Bob likes to fish

Does Bob like 2. Parks his blue car

Dad parks his car

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3. Sings in the morning

My pet bird sings 4. Beth holds the cat

The furry cat

5. Down the busy street

Joe runs down the street 6. The bunny is soft

The soft little bunny 7. Leslie talks on the phone

On the phone 8. Type on

I type on the computer

Writer’s Corner Write a telling sentence about something you did this morning. Sentences  •  7


Name Making Telling Sentences Use the words on the right to make telling sentences. Put a period at the end of each sentence.

writing

1. We go to the

Puppets

tire flowers

2. They feed the

skateboard

cards

3. Kira will not

rain

park

4. Jason dries the 5. Mae rides her

help shoes

in the park

birds

6. Erin and Shawn play

is fun

8. Grandma plants

9.

10. Your

in her garden scare my sister look new

11. Today it will 12. This 8  •  Section 1

would make a good swing

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7. Marco thinks

plates


Name Commanding Sentences A commanding sentence tells people what to do. A commanding sentence begins with a capital letter. A period ( ) is usually placed at the end.

.

Stop at the red light.    Wait for me. A

Color each sign that has a commanding sentence on it.

Turn right.

Watch your step.

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B

Obey the rules.

Did you go?

The dog barked.

Step up.

Put a period at the end of each commanding sentence. Underline the capital letter in the first word of each sentence. 1. Turn off the light

5. Ride your bike

2. Open the door, please

6. Blow the whistle

3. Work quietly

7. Water the flowers

4. Swim across the pool

8. Write the answer on the line

Writer’s Corner Write a commanding sentence that you might say to someone crossing the street. Sentences  •  9


Name More Commanding Sentences A

Underline the commanding sentence in each pair. 1. The dog is named Bear.

3. Give Shen the cookie.

Walk the dog. The cookie tastes good. 2. Help your little brother.

4. These bags are heavy.

Your little brother plays baseball. Carry these bags. B

Choose the word from the word bank that best completes each commanding sentence. Remember that a sentence begins with a capital letter.

1.

to the kitchen.

4.

the orange.

2.

on your shoes.

5.

banging the drum.

3.

the lawn.

6.

pet the tiger.

Commanding Sentence is my name. Giving directions is my aim. I help you know the things to do at home, at play, and in school too!

10  •  Section 1

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go   put   stop   don’t   mow   eat


Name Sentences Review A telling sentence tells about something. A commanding sentence tells people what to do. Write t beside each telling sentence. Write c beside each commanding sentence. 1. The team is ready.  2. Play ball. 

t

c

3. The boats are moving.  4. Turn off the light.  5. My house is on King Street.  6. My brother works at night. 

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7. Please sit down.  8. Nan likes to draw.  9. I read that book.  10. Listen to the story.  11. Your desk is neat.  12. Color the picture. 

Sentences  •  11


Name More Sentences Review A

Write t next to each telling sentence. Write c next to each commanding sentence. 1. Give Molly your hand.

c

2. She can help you cross the street.

t

3. Josh likes to read. 4. Take him to the library. 5. Let Josh pick a book. 6. Josh loves books about dinosaurs. 7. Don’t let him get a scary book. 8. Josh also likes movies. 9. Josh can get one movie.

B

Write your own telling sentence.

C

Write your own commanding sentence.

12  •  Section 1

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10. Be home by five o’clock.


Name Asking Sentences An asking sentence asks a question. Some asking sentences begin with question words. An asking sentence ends with a question mark (?). Complete each sentence with a question word from the word bank. You may use some words more than once.

How   What   Who

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Why   When   Where

1.

are you doing?

2.

old are you?

3.

did Mary laugh?

4.

is the picnic?

5.

is Pete?

6.

gave Ren that daisy?

7.

do we leave for the park?

8.

do you feed your parrot?

?

?

? ?

?

?

I am a squiggle on your page with a little dot below. At the end of each asking sentence, please place me just so.

Sentences  •  13


Name More Asking Sentences A

Complete each sentence with one of the question words on the right. Use each word one time. 1.

you going to the circus?

2.

Jonah popped his balloon?

3.

you like popcorn?

4.

you see the clown?

Do Has Have Are Is

B

5.

the elephants done any tricks?

6.

there enough popcorn for everyone?

Did

Write the letter that tells what each sentence is. Put the correct end mark at the end of each sentence.

1. Will you go with me 2. All fish need water 3. Today is cold 4. Does John know the way 5. Jump over the fence

14  •  Section 1

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t = telling   c = commanding   a = asking


Name Exclaiming Sentences An exclaiming sentence shows surprise or excitement. An exclamation point (!) is placed at the end of an exclaiming sentence.

What a hot day it is!    The sun is coming out! Underline the capital letter at the beginning of each sentence. Then put an exclamation point at the end. 1. Watch your step 2. I am so excited 3. He can hardly wait

!

! ! ! !

My name is Exclamation Point. Now if you are very wise, you will put me at the end of each sentence of surprise.

!

4. What a surprise 5. Watch out for the ball

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6. The storm is coming 7. Today is my birthday 8. Look at her run 9. The bus is coming 10. This tastes delicious

Sentences  •  15


Name More Exclaiming Sentences Write your own exclaiming sentence for each picture. Remember to use an exclamation point (!).

1.

2.

3.

5.

Writer’s Corner Write an exclaiming sentence that you might say during a thunderstorm. 16  •  Section 1

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4.


Name Asking and Exclaiming Sentences Read the sentences. Put a question mark at the end of each asking sentence. Put an exclamation point at the end of each exclaiming sentence. 1. How old are you 2. Can you see the clowns 3. It is so hot today 4. That is a funny mask 5. Where is my hat 6. Hurry, Paige 7. Where is the squirrel

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8. Watch out 9. I had the best birthday 10. Did you read the story

Sentences  •  17


Name More Asking and Exclaiming Sentences Read the sentences below. Put an X in the Exclaiming box for each exclaiming sentence. Put an X in the Asking box for each asking sentence. Add the correct end mark to each sentence. The first one is done for you.

Exclaiming Asking

1. Where is your house ?

2. Mary did well on her test

3. I love my dog

4. How are you

5. It is really hot

6. This game is fun

7. Is it raining

8. Do you have a scooter

9. Who brought the kittens

10. When are you going home

18  •  Section 1

X

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Name The Naming Part of a Sentence A sentence has two parts. The naming part of a sentence tells who or what the sentence is about.

Sari likes to sing. In this sentence the naming part is Sari because the sentence is about Sari.

The stars are very bright. In this sentence the naming part is The stars because the sentence is about the stars. Underline the naming part of each sentence. 1. We play in the snow. 2. Talia has red mittens. 3. I have a fast sled. 4. Kim makes a snow angel.

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5. They make a snowman. 6. Our neighbors come over. 7. Chad makes snowballs. 8. The puppy eats snow. 9. We get cold. 10. Aunt Debbie gives us hot cocoa.

Sentences  •  19


Name The Action Part of a Sentence The action part of a sentence tells what a person or a thing does.

Gina ran home. In this sentence the action part is ran home because it tells what Gina did.

Jake cleaned his room. In this sentence the action part is cleaned his room because it tells what Jake did. Underline the action part of each sentence. 1. The sisters play piano. 2. Miss Burke opens the book. 3. Emil washes the dishes. 4. They play hopscotch.

6. Kathy answers the phone. 7. Brian plays a game. 8. Marc runs to second base. 9. Ally helps wash the car. 10. We water the plants.

20  •  Section 1

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5. Mr. Smith sells ice cream.


Name Naming Parts and Action Parts Remember that a sentence has two parts. Together, the naming part and action part form a complete sentence. A

B

Match the naming part to the action part. The first one is done for you. Then say each complete sentence. 1. She

built a fort.

2. The kids

make a sandcastle.

3. The baby

sleeps in his stroller.

4. I

goes to the store.

Draw a line under the naming part. Draw a circle around the action part. 1. We go to the beach. 2. My father brings a picnic.

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3. I bring a pail and a shovel. 4. Grandma brings a blanket. 5. Leo makes a sandcastle. 6. Taylor and Paul go swimming. 7. My mother teaches Carly how to surf. 8. We go home after sunset.

Sentences  •  21


Name The Conjunctions And, But, Or A conjunction is a word that joins together words in a sentence. And, but, and or are conjunctions. These sentences have conjunctions.

Soccer and basketball are sports. Kelly plays soccer but likes basketball too. Do you throw with your right or your left arm? Underline the conjunction in each sentence. 1. Ming loves soccer and plays football, too. 2. Basketballs are large but easy to throw. 3. You can play basketball inside or outside.

5. Baseball and soccer are team sports. 6. We throw and catch the baseball. 7. Trey is a good batter but a slow runner. 8. Jenna likes pitching or catching.

22  •  Section 1

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4. Children play sports for fun and exercise.


Name The Conjunctions So, Because Conjunctions join together words or groups of words. Because and so are conjunctions. Because gives a reason. It tells why. So gives the result.

School was closed today because there was a lot of snow. There was a lot of snow, so school was closed today. Use because or so to complete each sentence. 1. Daniel ran fastest, Daniel won the race

2. Rayna ate lunch early Rayna was hungry,

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3. Dad packed lunch,

he won the race. he ran fastest.

she was hungry. she ate lunch early.

we ate in the car.

We ate in the car

Dad packed lunch.

4. Nestor was tired,

he took a nap.

Nestor took a nap

he was tired.

5. We moved closer, We could see better

we could see better. we moved closer.

Sentences  •  23


Name The Prepositions To, From The words to and from are used in sentences to show movement and action.

When Jarret came home from school, he wrote an e-mail to his friend Ben. Ben was happy to get an e-mail from Jarret. He wrote back to Jarret right away. Jarret was happy to get an e-mail from Ben. Use to or from to complete each sentence.

2. Some students walk

3. We walked from the bus

4. Veronica got a present

5. Alma sent an e-mail

6. Max got his test back

7. Carlos bought fruit

8. Javier gave soup

24  •  Section 1

my window. school. the store. her brother. her teacher. Ms. Ramos. the farmers market. the food drive.

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1. I can see the street


Name The Prepositions Before, After Before and after are used in sentences to tell when something happens.

Marcus makes his bed before school. This sentence tells when Marcus makes his bed—before school.

Beth plays the piano after dinner. This sentence tells when Beth plays the piano—after dinner.

Circle the word that best completes each sentence. 1. (Before  After) dinner we cleared the dishes from the table. 2. James put on his socks (before  after) his boots. 3. It gets dark (before  after) the sun goes down.

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4. Puddles form (before  after) it rains. 5. Kevin warmed up (before  after) the race. 6. Leon packs his book bag (before  after) leaving for school. 7. Ariana only liked picture books (before  after) she could read. 8. We shovel the sidewalk (before  after) it snows.

Sentences  •  25


Name Sentence Challenge Put the correct end mark at the end of each sentence. Then write the letter telling what kind of sentence it is.

t = telling a = asking

t

c = commanding e = exclaiming

1. Some fish swim in the ocean . 2. Will you go with me 3. It is so cold 4. Does Tim know how to swim 5. Write your name in the book 6. The green frog hopped across the pond

8. That was a great game 9. Do you know your teacher’s name 10. Don’t step in that puddle

26  •  Section 1

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7. Plant the seed in the ground


Name Sentence Challenge A

Read the sentences below. Underline the naming part. Circle the action part. 1. I like peanut butter. 2. Jamal and Nico eat lunch. 3. They know where we are going. 4. Lucy and Avril pet the puppies.

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5. He sees a huge spider.

B

Write a telling sentence.

C

Write a commanding sentence.

D

Write an asking sentence.

E

Write an exclaiming sentence.

Sentences  •  27


Name Sentence Challenge A

Use and, but, or, because, or so to complete each sentence. 1. We went to dance class

it was Tuesday.

2. Is her shirt blue 3. Pears

red? grapes are healthy snacks.

4. The rocks were slippery, 5. Ariana was tired

B

she tripped. did not quit.

Circle the right word to complete each sentence. 1. I sent a package (to  from) my aunt. 2. I got a message (to  from) my friend. 3. Sometimes I go (to  from) Kelly’s house to play.

C

Use before or after to complete each sentence. 1. It was dark 2. Lara cleaned up 3. Juan ate the sandwich 4. Felix put a helmet on

28  •  Section 1

she turned the light on. the spill. he made it. his bike ride.

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4. She got a book (to  from) the library.


PART

WRITING

2

Personal Narratives . . . . . . . . . . . 204

CHAPTER 2

Friendly Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216

CHAPTER 3

How-to Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228

CHAPTER 4

Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240

CHAPTER 5

Book Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252

CHAPTER 6

Research Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . 264

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

CHAPTER 1

203


CHAPTER

1

Personal Narratives

Quotation Station Even the best writer has to erase.

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—Spanish Proverb

204


© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Stormy Night It was a loud and rainy night. Scary shadows were everywhere. My chair looked like it had a monster in it! So I turned on the light. Then I laughed. It was just my fuzzy bear. It is funny to be scared of a little fuzzy bear.

Personal Narratives  •  205


What Is a Personal Narrative? A personal narrative is a story about you. A personal narrative has a beginning, a middle, and an ending. A personal narrative uses the words I, me, and my.

The Beginning The beginning is the first sentence or sentences in a story. The beginning tells what the story is about. beginning

The wind played a trick on me today. A brisk breeze took my hat and tossed it across the ground. I chased my hat and grabbed it. Would you like to have the wind treat your favorite hat this way? a. This morning

I had my first skating lesson. b. I had fun

yesterday with a cardboard box. c. Last week I was

riding my bike.

 Dad said it was time to take off my training wheels. I got scared. I started slowly. I pedaled once. I pedaled twice. I couldn’t believe it. I was riding all by myself!  As soon as I moved onto the ice, my feet slid out from under me! My coach helped me up and we started over. I wonder if penguins have this much trouble.  I made it into a sled. I zoomed down a hill on my simple sled. What an exciting ride!

206  •  Chapter 1

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Match each beginning to its story. Write the letter on the line.


The Middle The middle tells what happens in the story. A story usually has more than one middle sentence. middle

It was my very first balloon ride. The giant balloon began to float. People waved to me from the ground. The balloon went higher and higher. Someday I’d like to go around the world in a balloon. Read the beginning and ending sentences below. Write your own middle sentences. Use the word bank for help.

splash   sun   turtle   fish   swim   boat

My Day at the Lake

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

I had a great day at the lake.

I had so much fun that I can’t wait to go back again. Personal Narratives  •  207


The Ending The ending is the last sentence or sentences in a story. The ending finishes the story. It may tell the last thing that happens, ask a question, or tell about a special feeling the writer has.

My brother and I were making cookies. He challenged me to an egg-cracking contest. He neatly cracked an egg with one hand. Then it was my turn. The whole egg, shell and all, plopped into the cookie dough. I lost the contest, but the cookies were still delicious! ending

Choose the correct ending for each story. Write the letter on the line.

I learned a lot about camping last summer. Owls were hooting all night. Chirping birds woke me up in the morning. Today was my first time on a subway train. We moved so fast that I could barely stand. I had to hold on tight. In the tunnel it got dark. 208  •  Chapter 1

a. I cannot wait to ride

again! b. I learned that the

forest is a noisy place to sleep! c. I think I will add

more sugar next time!

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Nothing tastes better than lemonade on a warm day. My brother and I decided to make some. He cut up the lemons. I squeezed them into a jar. Then I added sugar and water. Dad tasted it and made a funny face.


Write a Story A personal narrative is a story about you. You are the star in your story. Remember to use the words I, me, and my to show that the story is about you. Write a story about a day you remember well. Remember to include • a beginning that tells what the story is about. • a middle that tells what happened in the story. • an ending that tells the last thing that happened, asks a question, or tells about a special feeling.

Beginning

I remember the day I

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Middle

Ending

It was the

day ever.

Personal Narratives  •  209


Writer’s Workshop PREWRITING Pick a Topic A personal narrative is a story about you. The topic can be anything that happened to you. Raj needs to pick a topic for a personal narrative. Look at his notes.

rida

a y of d t s r i f my sc h o o l

ight n y r a c s my very won I e m i t th e test th e c o n

Write a personal narrative about you. It should be a real story that happened to you. Jot down ideas in your notebook. Think about a time that • you were happy. • you were really surprised. • something funny happened. • you were scared by something silly.

210  •  Chapter 1

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

to Flo p i r t y m

Your Turn Write as many ideas as you can. Then circle the idea you like best. This will be your topic.


Personal Narratives

PREWRITING Plan Your Story Now Raj must plan his personal narrative. He draws pictures to help him plan his story. He draws pictures of the beginning, the middle, and the ending of his story.

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Beginning

Middle

Ending

Your Turn What pictures come to mind when you think about your story? In your notebook, draw pictures of the beginning, the middle, and the ending. Write beginning next to the beginning pictures. Write middle next to the middle pictures. Write ending next to the ending pictures. Personal Narratives  •  211


Writer’s Workshop DRAFTING When you first write your story, you are making a draft. This is Raj’s draft.

Your Turn Look at the pictures you drew to help you plan your story. Put them in the right order. Draw more pictures if you need to. Write a sentence to go with each picture. Write your draft in your notebook. Use your pictures and sentences to help you. You can also use the words in the word bank if you need help. Remember to write a beginning, a middle, and an ending. surprise   happy   loud   shiny scary   warm   fuzzy   laugh

212  •  Chapter 1

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

had a My chair looked like it t. h g li e th n o I o S ! it n o monster st my ju s a w It . d e h g u la I n e Th ed r a c s e b to y n n fu is It fuzzy bear. of a little fuzzy bear.


Personal Narratives I don’t have a beginning to my story.

EDITING

When you check your draft, you are editing. Raj uses this Editing Checklist to review his draft.

t Editing Checklis Do I have a beginning? e? Do I have a middl

ng? Do I have an endi me? Is my story about r?

Is my story in orde

It was a loud and rain y night. Scary shadows were e verywhere. My chair looked like it had a monster in it! So I on th e light.

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Look at the mistake Raj finds. How does he fix it? Your Turn Look at your draft. Then use the Editing Checklist. If you spot a mistake, fix it. You might ask another person to read your story. Other readers can point out ways you can improve your draft.

REVISING Raj copies his draft. He makes changes that improve the draft. Your Turn Copy your story. Add any changes that will make it better. Fix any mistakes that you find. Make your story the best it can be. Personal Narratives  •  213


Writer’s Workshop PROOFREADING When you carefully check your words and sentences, you are proofreading. Raj uses this Proofreading Checklist to review his draft.

It was a loud and rainy night. Scary shadows we re everywhere. My chair looked li ke it had a monster on it! Soturned I on the light.

ecklist Proofreading Ch

spelled Are all the words correctly? tters? Did I use capital le end Did I use the right marks? Are the sentences complete?

Look at the mistake that Raj finds. How does he fix it?

Proofreading Marks Symbol

214  •  Chapter 1

Meaning

Example read

add

We books.

take out

the the park

add period

She is smart

capital letter

carl jones

lowercase letter

He likes Soccer.

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Your Turn Use the checklist to review your draft. Put an X next to the questions you can answer yes to. Use these proofreading marks to mark your changes.


Personal Narratives

PUBLISHING Publishing your work means sharing it. It is exciting to share your very best work with an audience. How will Raj publish his personal narrative? Are you ready to publish your work? Copy your story onto a sheet of paper. Print as neatly as you can. Be sure to include all the improvements in your final copy. Leave room to draw a picture. You can publish your story in many ways. How will you publish yours?

I want to read my story to my mom!

Make a bo ok.

Give it to my parents.

© Loyola Press. Voyages in English Grade 2

Put it on the bulletin board. Make it into a skit.

Read it to a friend.

Frame it.

Your Turn Decide with your class how to share your story. Think of new and fun ways.

Personal Narratives  •  215

Voyages in English 2018, Student Edition, Grade 2  

The Voyages in English Student Edition engages students with varied learning styles and allows teachers to adapt lessons to help meet all st...

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